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Alzheimer's May Be Caused by Cell Phones, Scientists Say
Turns out our cell phones may have something to do with Alzheimer's, according to a new study published in the journal Current Alzheimer Research . According to a press release on the research , most scientists agree that Alzheimer's is caused by excess calcium buildup in the brain. And pulsed electronically generated electromagnetic fields (EMFs) emitted from cell phones, the study says, may be
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Man Married to Hologram Can't Talk to Wife Due to Software Glitch
A 38-year-old man named Akihiko Kondo, who married a holographic representation of nerd-popular virtual star Hatsune Miku back in 2018, has been separated from his virtual partner due to a software glitch. The Japanese newspaper The Mainichi first reported on the marital troubles back in January, with the New York Times providing further details this week. The issue is that the startup that devel
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'Potentially devastating': Climate crisis may fuel future pandemics
'Zoonotic spillovers' expected to rise with at least 15,000 instances of viruses leaping between species over next 50 years There will be at least 15,000 instances of viruses leaping between species over the next 50 years, with the climate crisis helping fuel a "potentially devastating" spread of disease that will imperil animals and people and risk further pandemics, researchers have warned. As
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Shocker: Elon Musk's Twitter Deal May Already Be Falling Apart
With all the hubbub about SpaceX and Tesla CEO Elon Musk being approved to buy Twitter, there remains a giant elephant in the room — and it means the deal may not go through at all. As Reuters noted in a scathing editorial , there's ample reason to believe that Musk may get cold feet, or that market factors beyond his control could still sink the controversial $44 billion deal. At first glance, e
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NASA Scientists Thrilled to Spot Wreckage From Mars Helicopter
Ultimate Scout NASA's Mars Ingenuity helicopter has gone far and beyond its original task of completing five flights on the surface of the Red Planet. During the flight, which took place last week, the four pound helicopter spotted the parachute and backshell that protected it and the Perseverance rover during their treacherous reentry in February 2021. "Perseverance had the best-documented Mars
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Scientists Say We May Be Extremely Wrong About the Universe
Not to alarm anyone, but several scientists are saying we need to revamp our entire understanding of the universe. Instead of a uniformly expanding cosmos that looks more or less the same anywhere you go, some experts are now positing that the whole universe is actually skewed, with profound implications for our understanding of the natural world. Subir Sarkar, a professor at the University of Ox
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Seven hours' sleep is ideal amount in middle to old age, study finds
Too much and too little sleep linked with worse cognitive performance and mental health Seven hours of sleep each night is the ideal amount in middle to old age, research suggests. The study of nearly 500,000 adults aged between 38 and 73 found that both too much and too little sleep were linked with worse cognitive performance and mental health, including anxiety and depression. A consistent amo
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The World Is Running Out of Sand, Scientists Lament
Sand Crisis The United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) is warning that the world is facing a "sand crisis." The global demand for sand, the precursor for popular materials including glass and concrete, has surged over time thanks to increased urbanization and growing populations. In fact, according to a new report by the UNEP, we could build a wall that's 88 feet wide and tall around the entir
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Secrets of the Moon's Permanent Shadows Are Coming to Light
On October 9, 2009, a two-ton rocket smashed into the moon traveling at 9,000 kilometers per hour. As it exploded in a shower of dust and heated the lunar surface to hundreds of degrees, the jet-black crater into which it plummeted, called Cabeus, briefly filled with light for the first time in billions of years. The crash was no accident. NASA's Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite…
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Hibernating bats have similar metabolism to that of hibernating bears
A trio of researchers, two with Universidad Austral de Chile, and one with Universidad Católica de Chile, has found that a gram of hibernating bat has a similar metabolism to a gram of hibernating bear. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Roberto Nespolo, Carlos Mejias and Francisco Bozinovic describe their work in scaling energy expenditures of multiple mammals to lear
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Elephant Skulls and Hyena Packs! | Naked and Afraid
Stream Naked and Afraid on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/naked-and-afraid #NakedAndAfraid #Discovery #Survival Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discover
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Harnessing the powers of light to operate computers
It is said that light is the source of life, and in the near future, it will possibly form the basis of our everyday personal computing needs too. Recently, researchers from the University of Tsukuba have harnessed specific energies of light from a "packet" of light by creating a nanocavity, which may help in the development of future all-optical computers.
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Humans Can't Quit a Basic Myth About Dog Breeds
After four decades of training and studying dogs, Marjie Alonso has lost track of the number of pets she's seen because their humans felt they weren't acting as they "should." There were the golden retrievers who weren't " friendly " or "good enough with kids," and the German shepherds who were more timid scaredy-cats than vigilant guard dogs . There was the Newfoundland (who later turned out not
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The Atlantic Daily: Republicans Could Just Call Trump a Loser
Over the past several days, newly public reporting has revealed that Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy harshly criticized Donald Trump after the January 6 attacks on the U.S. Capitol. "The Democrats are going to take care of the son of a bitch for us," McConnell, then majority leader, told advisers. McCarthy was caught on tape saying that he would pus
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Beautiful Video Shows Dragon Capsule Making Final Approach to Space Station
Close Encounters SpaceX has released a stunning new video of its Crew Dragon spacecraft firing its thrusters to dock with the International Space Station — and it looks like something straight out of the classic Steven Spielberg epic "Close Encounters of the Third Kind." The resplendent clip shows a number of the spacecraft's 16 Draco thrusters firing to adjust the capsule's attitude. The capsule
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Shadowbanning Is Big Tech's Big Problem
Sometimes, it feels like everyone on the internet thinks they've been shadowbanned. Republican politicians have been accusing Twitter of shadowbanning—that is, quietly suppressing their activity on the site—since at least 2018, when for a brief period, the service stopped autofilling the usernames of Representatives Jim Jordan, Mark Meadows, and Matt Gaetz, as well as other prominent Republicans,
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Viewing a microcosm through a physics lens
"What can physics offer biology?" This was how Alison Patteson, assistant professor in the College of Arts and Sciences' physics department and also a faculty member in the BioInspired Institute, began the explanation of why her physics lab was studying bacteria.
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The restorative power of medical tattoos | Becky Barker
Tattoos can transform and empower people, with some seeking them out to reconnect with their bodies due to scarring, physical abnormalities or the aftermath of a procedure or illness. Paramedical tattooist Becky Barker shares the art and craft of medical tattooing, explaining how this expansive field helps improve the quality of life for breast cancer survivors — and anyone looking to renew thems
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Evanescent scattering microscopy: A sharper image for proteins
Proteins may be the most important and varied biomolecules within living systems. These strings of amino acids, assuming complex 3-dimensional forms, are essential for the growth and maintenance of tissue, the initiation of thousands of biochemical reactions, and the protection of the body from pathogens through the immune system. They play a central role in health and disease and are primary targ
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The Download: Police used social media to surveil Black people, and India's worsening heat waves
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. Minneapolis police used fake social media profiles to surveil Black people The Minneapolis Police Department violated civil rights law through a pattern of racist policing practices, according to a damning report published today by the Minnesota Department of
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A molecular glue for turning on human cell pluripotency
There are cells in the body known as pluripotent stem cells that are yet to specialize in a particular biological function. These cells maintain the potential to become any of the possible cell types in an organism. Pluripotent stem cells have shown great promise in fields such as regenerative and transplant medicine for their properties, including unlimited self-renewal. The protein NANOG is the
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Best 60 Percent Keyboards in 2022
Despite their weird name, the best 60 percent keyboards may be just what you need for your current game or work station. It doesn't matter if we're talking Manhattan real estate or spare room on your desktop: space is precious. And for many, a full-blown keyboard just isn't necessary. Scaling down a necessary part of any computer setup is an easy way to streamline things just a little bit. These
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Menu design key to increased wine sales and customer satisfaction
Ever since America's oldest restaurant, the White Horse Tavern in Rhode Island, opened its doors in 1673, restaurateurs have been trying to keep their customers happy while increasing profits. Wine has always been a solid source of revenue for restaurants. But new research from the University of Houston finds the wine menu may be more important to the bottom line than the libation itself.
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Humans run at the most energy-efficient speed, regardless of distance
As race season approaches, many runners have the same goal: go faster. But researchers now show that speeding up might require defying our natural biology. By combining data from runners monitored in a lab along with 37,000 runs recorded on wearable fitness trackers, scientists have found that humans' natural tendency is to run at a speed that conserves caloric loss — something that racers seekin
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First leaf fossil study of Borneo's rainforest reveals current ecosystem is ancient
The first study of leaf fossils conducted in the nation of Brunei on the island of Borneo has revealed that the current dominant tree group, the dipterocarps, has dominated the rainforests for at least 4 million years, according to an international research team led by Penn State in partnership with Universiti Brunei Darussalam. The findings, published in the journal PeerJ, suggest that the curren
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New study could help reduce agricultural greenhouse gas emissions
A team of researchers led by the University of Minnesota has significantly improved the performance of numerical predictions for agricultural nitrous oxide emissions. The first-of-its-kind knowledge-guided machine learning model is 1,000 times faster than current systems and could significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture.
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How are the physical characteristics of the coal-fluid system reflected in ultrasound?
Around the beginning of the 21st century, the world economy entered a new development cycle, and the demand for oil and natural gas resources around the world has skyrocketed. In the face of this huge energy demand, people are beginning to pay more attention to unconventional oil and natural gas resources. Coalbed methane (CBM) is a gas resource associated and symbiotic with coal. CBM is mainly hy
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Developing inorganic lead-free perovskite for broadband emission
Artificial lighting accounts for one-fifth of global electricity consumption, and developing efficient and stable luminescence materials is critical to avoid unnecessary waste of electric energy. The single emitters with broadband emission, such as lead halide perovskites, have recently triggered tremendous attention for artificial illumination and display applications. To develop lead-free and st
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'Polaroids' help scientists detect hazardous ice on airplane plating
Researchers from Skoltech, MIPT, Russia's State Research Institute of Civil Aviation, the University of North Texas, and York University have simplified and automated the lab procedure used to test anti-icing fluids that ensure safe aircraft takeoff. The findings of the study, which was supported by the Russian Science Foundation, are reported in the journal Cold Regions Science and Technology.
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'Lensless' imaging through advanced machine learning for next generation image sensing solutions
A camera usually requires a lens system to capture a focused image, and the lensed camera has been the dominant imaging solution for centuries. A lensed camera requires a complex lens system to achieve high-quality, bright, and aberration-free imaging. Recent decades have seen a surge in the demand for smaller, lighter, and cheaper cameras. There is a clear need for next-generation cameras with hi
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Researchers create self-assembled logic circuits from proteins
In a proof-of-concept study, researchers have created self-assembled, protein-based circuits that can perform simple logic functions. The work demonstrates that it is possible to create stable digital circuits that take advantage of an electron's properties at quantum scales.
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Discrepancy between childhood IQ score and teenage IQ score
When I was in second grade I took the RIAS and scored 101 verbal, 111 nonverbal. Now, at age 16, I consistently score 130+ nonverbal 120+ Verbal on leaked pro-tests, tests with high correlations to pro-tests, etc. Why might this be? are my new scores invalid? some information: Present scores= 130+ Nonverbal, 120+ verbal, 117PSI, 110+ WMI psychologist noted that I was well behaved and respectful s
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Import tariffs: An alternative to a European energy embargo against Russia
Tariffs on Russian energy imports could provide the EU with a lever to reduce Russia's financial gains from its oil and gas exports and allow it to flexibly react to Moscow's actions in Ukraine, a team of economists from the European think tank Bruegel, Harvard, and the University of Cologne propose in a letter to Science and in a working paper. Among the authors is the University of Cologne's ene
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A sharper image for proteins
Scientists describe a new technique that promises to revolutionize the imaging of proteins and other vital biomolecules, allowing these tiny entities to be visualized with unprecedented clarity and by simpler means than existing methods.
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CAR-T therapy effective in Black and Hispanic patients
CAR-T therapy, a form of immunotherapy that revs up T-cells to recognize and destroy cancer cells, has revolutionized the treatment of blood cancers, including certain leukemias, lymphomas, and most recently, multiple myeloma. However, Black and Hispanic people were largely absent from the major clinical trials that led to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval of CAR-T cell therapies.
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Chemistry paper retracted from Science
Science has retracted a 2020 paper which hinted at the future of eco-friendly pharmaceuticals after concluding that the data had been manipulated. The article, "Asymmetric remote C–H borylation of aliphatic amides and esters with a modular iridium catalyst," came from a team anchored by Masaya Sawamura, of Hokkaido University, in Sapporo. Funding for the study … Continue reading
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Selection bias may lead to underestimation of risk of CTE in former football players
Researchers have been studying chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) and while much has been learned, diagnosing the disease still needs to be done post-mortem on autopsied brains donated to a brain bank. One criticism of the research is that brain bank study results have a selection bias because they are based on a subset of players most affected by CTE, and therefore not representative of the p
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Queensland students' excitement skyrockets working on satellite project
More than 50 high school students working with university and industry experts to design, build and launch a CubeSat Get our free news app ; get our morning email briefing Students in south-east Queensland will be shooting for the stars as they prepare to work with space industry experts to launch a satellite into space. More than 50 high school students will take part in the Stem Program About S
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Time‑correlated single‑photon counting technique to visualize weak pulse electroluminescence
Time‑correlated single‑photon counting (TCSPC) technique is a powerful way to measure the weak light signals. The basic principle behind TCSPC is the photoelectric effect in which an electrical charge is released by absorbing a photon. Compared to the traditional strategy of detecting analog photogenerated voltage, the TCSPC technique counts the single electron pulse created by single photons, whi
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New method can predict summer rainfall in the Southwest months in advance
As reservoir levels dwindle in the arid southwestern United States, scientists have developed a method to estimate summer rainfall in the region months in advance. Such seasonal predictions can help state and local officials make key reservoir storage and water allocation decisions earlier in the season and support more efficient water management.
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Why do mood swings precede Alzheimer's memory loss?
Researchers are studying why neuropsychiatric symptoms, such as apathy and irritability, appear in most Alzheimer's disease patients before the onset of memory loss. The study, led by Yao-Ying Ma, assistant professor of pharmacology and toxicology at Indiana University School of Medicine, appears in the journal Molecular Psychiatry . The team of researchers identified a receptor in the brain that
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Unravelling the origins of the human spine
Scientists have recapitulated in the laboratory how the cellular structures that give rise to our spinal column form sequentially. They have created a 3D in vitro model that mimics how the precursor structures that give rise to the spinal column form during human embryonic development.
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A switch in neuronal dynamics that helps to initiate movement
Nature, Published online: 28 April 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01079-2 Experiments on the mouse brain reveal that neuronal signals from the midbrain to the cortex act as a switch that transforms the dynamics of cortical neuronal activity and, in turn, initiates movement.
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New study reveals how human embryo develops the precursor to blood-forming stem cells
Blood-forming stem cells found in bone marrow are the life-saving component used in bone marrow transplants. However, suitable donors cannot be found in many cases. A new study reveals how the human embryo develops the precursor to blood-forming stem cells, which researchers say can be used in the novel method they developed to generate blood-forming stem cells from cells in a tissue culture.
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The Tragedy of the Congress
Mitch McConnell isn't known for his joyousness, but the dour Senate Republican leader was able to find delight even in the bleak aftermath of the January 6 insurrection: This, at long last, was the end of Donald Trump. "I feel exhilarated by the fact that this fellow finally, totally discredited himself," McConnell told the New York Times reporter Jonathan Martin late that night, according to Mar
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Unraveling the origins of the human spine
The spinal column is the central supporting structure of the skeleton in all vertebrates. Not only does it provide a place for muscles to attach, it also protects the spinal cord and nerve roots. Defects in its development are known to cause rare hereditary diseases. Researchers from the Ebisuya Group at EMBL Barcelona have now created a 3D in vitro model that mimics how the precursor structures t
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New earthquake assessments strengthen preparedness in Europe
During the 20th century, earthquakes in Europe accounted for more than 200,000 deaths and over 250 billion Euros in losses. Comprehensive earthquake hazard and risk assessments are crucial to reducing the effects of catastrophic earthquakes because earthquakes cannot be prevented nor precisely predicted.
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Discovery of 30 exocomets in a young planetary system
For the past 30 years, the star β Pictoris has fascinated astronomers because it enables them to observe a planetary system in the process of formation. It is made up of at least two young planets, and also contains comets, which were detected as early as 1987. These were the first comets ever observed around a star other than the sun.
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Skyrmions on the rise: New 2D material advances low-power computing
Two-dimensional magnetic materials have been hailed as building blocks for the next generation of small, fast electronic devices. These materials, made of layers of crystalline sheets just a few atoms thick, gain their unique magnetic properties from the intrinsic compass-needle-like spins of their electrons. The sheets' atomic-scale thinness means that these spins can be manipulated on the finest
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New theory explains mystery behind fast magnetic reconnection
When magnetic field lines of opposite directions merge, they create explosions that can release massive amounts of energy. On the sun, the merging of opposing field lines causes solar flares and coronal mass ejections, giant bursts of energy that can travel to Earth within a day.
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Loneliness leads to higher risk of future unemployment
A new study found that people who reported 'feeling lonely often' were significantly more likely to encounter unemployment later. The analysis also confirmed previous findings that the reverse is true — people who were unemployed were more likely to experience loneliness later.
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Modern data management, the hidden brain of AI
Artificial intelligence (AI) is the darling of businesses and governments because it not only promises to add tens of trillions to the gross domestic product (GDP), but it comes with all the excitement of action-packed movies or dopamine-drenched gaming. We are mesmerized by computer vision, natural language processing, and the uncanny predictions of recommendation engines. It protects us from fr
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Springy device jumps 100 feet up to break record
A new mechanical jumper has achieved the tallest height—roughly 100 feet (30 meters)—of any jumper to date, engineered or biological. The feat represents a fresh approach to the design of jumping devices and advances the understanding of jumping as a form of locomotion. "The motivation came from a scientific question," says Elliot Hawkes, engineering professor at the University of California, San
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A prehistoric forest grows in Brunei
A new study of leaf fossils conducted in the nation of Brunei on the island of Borneo has revealed that the current dominant tree group, the dipterocarps, has dominated the rainforests for at least four million years. The findings suggest that the current landscape is similar to what was present during the Pliocene Epoch, 5.3 to 2.6 million years ago, and may provide additional justification for c
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Giant marine reptiles at 2,800 meters above sea level
More than 30 years ago, researchers discovered vertebrae, ribs and a tooth in the High Alps of eastern Switzerland. The typical shape indicated that they had to originate from large marine reptiles known as ichthyosaurs, but there was a lack of corresponding comparative material. A new study has now allowed a more precise classification. According to the findings, they belong to three different ic
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Best Photo Editing Software in 2022
The best photo editing software will give your pictures the final pop that they need before you share them. Whether you are a casual smartphone shooter, enthusiastic amateur or a professional photographer, a photo editing program will help you keep your images organized and optimize them to look their absolute best. Although smartphones typically come with basic photo editing tools, a dedicated p
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SARS-CoV-2 can infect and damage kidney cells
SARS-CoV-2 can infect kidney cells via multiple binding sites and hijack the cell's machinery to replicate, causing injury and COVID-19-associated kidney disease, according to a new study. The discovery helps explain why acute kidney injury is one of the main complications observed in patients with severe COVID-19, the researchers report. When COVID-19 began spreading across the globe in early 20
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New proton capture rate of arsenic-65 changes periodic thermonuclear X-ray bursts
A research team at the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), together with international collaborators at Monash University and the Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, has computed a significantly revised proton capture reaction rate of arsenic-65 for the extreme astrophysical environments of accreting neutron stars, permitting astrophysicists to probe t
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Runners prefer the same pace, regardless of distance
Stanford University scientists have found that when recreational runners are left to their own devices and outfitted with a wearable fitness tracker, they prefer to run at the same calorie-saving pace, regardless of the distance ran—contrary to the explicit goals of competitive racing.
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Correcting COVID-19 misinformation
There has been serious discussion about COVID-19 misinfomation. That misinformation has most likely cost many people their lives, driven by messages from those with a hidden agenda to drive everyday people away from science-based medical advice. The question remains as to what is the best way to counter the stream of misinfomation and fake news. Might the mainstream, mass media be able to correct
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Yeet Cute: Spiders Catapult Themselves In High-Stakes Mating Ritual
Researchers have found that a species of wee venomless orb weaver known as Philoponella prominens uses a truly unique strategy to prevent marital disharmony. After mating, the males bounce. Literally. P. prominens is a "social" spider. Social spiders live in communal webs that house up to 300 residents. They cooperate in web-building, prey capture, feeding, and sometimes they even share the respo
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Remote working: The future of work or just shirking from home?
Working from home during the pandemic has significantly impacted the economy in both the UK and internationally, but it certainly didn't dent one sub-sector: the Opinion Factories. These have been working overtime, either in support of, or opposed to, the idea that working from home (WFH) or hybrid working, as experienced during the pandemic, should become a permanent feature of our economic syste
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Risk factors for severe COVID-19 in hospitalized adults differ by age
A new study provides previously unknown answers about which hospitalized COVID-19 patients are most likely to need mechanical ventilation or to die. Researchers showed that vital signs and lab results at the time of hospital admission — not comorbidities and demographics — are the most accurate predictors of disease severity.
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CEOs are hindering LGBTQ+ equality in the workplace
Global acceptance of homosexuality has risen over the past two decades to 72 percent in 2019 from 51 percent in 2002. Despite this, a report from last year found that majority of American LGBTQ+ workers have faced job discrimination.
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Forest plants now flower a week earlier than a century ago
Early flowering plants in European forests today start their flowering season on average a week earlier than they did a hundred years ago. This is reflected by herbarium specimens, as Dr. Franziska Willems and Professor Oliver Bossdorf from the Institute of Evolution and Ecology at the University of Tübingen, together with Professor J. F. Scheepens from Goethe University Frankfurt, have discovered
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Does this dinosaur 'graveyard' reveal their final day on Earth? An expert explores the evidence
Buried in the rocks in North Dakota lies evidence of the exact day the dinosaurs were obliterated from the planet, some 66 million years ago. That's the claim of paleontologist Robert DePalma and colleagues, whose work was captured by the BBC in its recent landmark documentary "Dinosaurs: The Final Day with David Attenborough."
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Time Travel Could Be Possible, but Only if Multiple Histories Exist Too
Have you ever made a mistake that you wish you could undo? Correcting past mistakes is one of the reasons we find the concept of time travel so fascinating. As often portrayed in science fiction, with a time machine, nothing is permanent anymore—you can always go back and change it. But is time travel really possible in our universe , or is it just science fiction? Our modern understanding of tim
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Distrust keeps families on SNAP from buying groceries online
When buying groceries online, families eligible for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits are less likely to purchase both healthy foods, like fruits and vegetables, and sweets, a new study shows. Researchers examined shoppers' behaviors in 2021 during a pilot program in which the USDA authorized use of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits for purchasing grocerie
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Droughts to increase human migration at least 200%
Human migration due to droughts will increase by at least 200% as we move through the 21st century, research indicates. Based on a series of both climate and social science modeling systems and other social science data, the study findings imply that migration may force the need to adjust sociopolitical policies to offset widespread human displacement in the future. The study appears in Internati
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