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Nyheder2022august01

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Virologist: Monkeypox genome doesn't explain outbreak
The current monkeypox outbreak is moving faster than any in recent history, but virologist Heather Koehler doesn't see a reason for the rapid spread in the virus itself. An expert in virus-host interactions, Koehler is conducting research on the monkeypox strain that is currently circulating, working to understand the virus' genetics by studying its DNA sequence and protein structures. "We should
3min
Revealing physical mechanisms behind the movement of microswimmers
Bacteria and other unicellular organisms developed sophisticated ways to actively navigate their way, despite being comparably simple structures. To reveal these mechanisms, researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization (MPI-DS) used oil droplets as a model for biological microswimmers. Corinna Maass, group leader at the MPI-DS and associate professor at the Universi
4min
Researchers measure the binding state of light and matter for the first time
A special bonding state between atoms has been created in the laboratory for the first time: With a laser beam, atoms can be polarized so that they are positively charged on one side and negatively charged on the other. This makes them attract each other creating a very special bonding state—much weaker than the bond between two atoms in an ordinary molecule, but still measurable. The attraction c
4min
Revealing physical mechanisms behind the movement of microswimmers
Bacteria and other unicellular organisms developed sophisticated ways to actively navigate their way, despite being comparably simple structures. To reveal these mechanisms, researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization (MPI-DS) used oil droplets as a model for biological microswimmers. Corinna Maass, group leader at the MPI-DS and associate professor at the Universi
8min
Five new rotating radio transients discovered
Russian astronomers report the detection of five new rotating radio transients (RRATs) using the Big Scanning Antenna (BSA) of the Pushchino Radio Astronomy Observatory (PRAO). The discovery was detailed in a paper published July 22 on the arXiv pre-print repository.
16min
Ocean variability contributes to sandstorms in Northern China
Extreme events such as the "North China Super Sandstorms" in March 2021 have significant impacts on human life, socio-economics and agricultural production. In addition to local meteorological conditions, sea surface temperature (SST) variability in different ocean basins also contributes to sandstorm frequency through atmospheric teleconnection and wave trains. Therefore, it is of great significa
16min
New algorithm helps identify antibody genes
In a study published in the journal Genome Research, investigators in UC San Diego's Department of Computer Science and Engineering and Johns Hopkins University have illuminated the immunoglobulin (antibody) genes in 20 mammalian species, gaining new insights into their targets and evolutionary origins.
16min
Modeling reveals how dwarf planet Ceres powers unexpected geologic activity
For a long time, our view of Ceres was fuzzy, said Scott King, a geoscientist in the Virginia Tech College of Science. A dwarf planet and the largest body found in the asteroid belt—the region between Jupiter and Mars speckled with hundreds of thousands of asteroids—Ceres had no distinguishable surface features in existing telescopic observations from Earth.
16min
Stellar flybys leave a permanent mark on newly forming planetary systems
What do UX Tauri, RW Aurigae, AS 205, Z CMajoris, and FU Orionis have in common? They're young stellar systems with disks where planets could form. It appears those disks were disturbed by stellar flybys or other close encounters in the recent past. Astronomers want to know: did those events disrupt planet formation in the disks? What do they do? Does this happen in other systems? And, did our own
27min
Robots help farmers say goodbye to repetitive tasks
We do not often think about the labor that goes into bringing our favorite fruits and vegetables to our table. For farmers, growing healthy crops involves repetitive tasks such as weeding and spraying while the crop is growing. These tasks are not only repetitive, they are also costly and time-consuming. Robotic technologies can solve these problems by relieving farmers from work that is mundane,
34min
When stars eat their planets, the carnage can be seen billions of years later
The vast majority of stars have planets. We know that from observations of exoplanetary systems. We also know some stars don't have planets, and perhaps they never had planets. This raises an interesting question. Suppose we see an old star that has no planets. How do we know if ever did? Maybe the star lost its planets during a close approach by another star, or maybe the planets spiraled inward
35min
Planet 9 is running out of places to hide
We have a pretty good idea of what lurks within our solar system. We know there isn't a Mars-sized planet orbiting between Jupiter and Saturn, nor a brown dwarf nemesis heading our way. Anything large and fairly close to the sun would be easily spotted. But we can't rule out a smaller, more distant world, such as the hypothetical Planet 9 (or Planet 10 if you want to throw down over Pluto). The od
35min
Robots help farmers say goodbye to repetitive tasks
We do not often think about the labor that goes into bringing our favorite fruits and vegetables to our table. For farmers, growing healthy crops involves repetitive tasks such as weeding and spraying while the crop is growing. These tasks are not only repetitive, they are also costly and time-consuming. Robotic technologies can solve these problems by relieving farmers from work that is mundane,
47min
The Download: fighting fires and the chip industry's bill boost
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. Wildfires are raging across the US The news: Five large wildfires ignited across the US yesterday, with further outbreaks expected over the next few days, experts have warned. The new fires in California, Montana, Oklahoma, Oregon, and Texas have brought the t
1h
Lunar Pits Warm and Comfy
Building a base on the Moon in certainly going to be challenging. In fact, living anywhere other than the surface of the Earth is extremely challenging – the rest of our solar system is an unlivable hellscape. The thin biosphere clinging to the surface of Earth is the only place that humans can comfortably live (and even not everywhere there). But we will be returning to the Moon again with the u
1h
Should the Parkland Shooter Die?
Nikolas Cruz, 23, is guilty of murdering 17 people and injuring more with an AR-15 rifle at his former high school in Parkland, Florida, in February 2018. No one—not Florida prosecutors, not Cruz's defense team, not Cruz himself, who pleaded guilty to all charges levied against him—disputes those facts. On the contrary, Cruz recapitulated his guilt in each count of murder and attempted murder in
1h
Why Do Rich People Love Quiet?
N ew York in the summer is a noisy place, especially if you don't have money. The rich run off to the Hamptons or Maine. The bourgeoisie are safely shielded by the hum of their central air, their petite cousins by the roar of their window units. But for the broke—the have-littles and have-nots—summer means an open window, through which the clatter of the city becomes the soundtrack to life: motor
1h
What Counts as the Life of the Mother?
I looked at the clock glowing on the nightstand in my bedroom and it read 1:23, one-two-three , a neat set of numbers. I tossed and turned and writhed and looked again, and it read 1:17. Had I misread the clock? Maybe I was dreaming about the time. Maybe I was just confused. I slept, I woke up, I "slept," I "woke up." I hobbled into the bathroom, feeling shooting pain each time I moved my left si
1h
Grizzly man
Nature, Published online: 01 August 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-02077-0 Clayton Lamb tracks bears to reduce conflict with humans in the Canadian Rocky Mountains.
2h
UK farmers count cost as heatwave kills fruit and vegetable crops
Fears of future threats to food security if more extreme heat caused by climate crisis hits production The UK heatwave has caused fruit and vegetables to die on the vine as growers fear the drought and further hot temperatures could ruin harvests this year. Fruit and vegetable suppliers have been counting their losses after record temperatures in July caused crops to fail. Continue reading…
2h
'Reality is scary': climate culture war heats up for UK meteorologists
TV forecasters have been targeted by climate deniers during recent extreme temperatures Discussing the weather has long been a harmless British pastime, with forecasters relied on to ruin bank holidays with their predictions of drizzle or give good news of some gentle summer sunshine. But now TV meteorologists have found themselves on the frontline of the climate culture war after extreme tempera
2h
Photochemical spin-state control of binding configuration for tailoring organic color center emission in carbon nanotubes
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 August 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31921-0 Chemical functionalization of the sidewalls of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is an emerging route to introduce fluorescent quantum defects and tailor the emission properties. Here, authors demonstrate that spin-selective photochemistry diversifies SWCNT emission tunability by controlling the morphology
2h
Mindre ont med ny sorts tandställning
En ny slags självligerande tandställning gör mindre ont jämfört med en vanlig. Det visar en studie som jämfört barns upplevelser av smärta under första veckan med tandställning. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
3h
The Three Pillars of the Trumpist GOP
For all the defects Donald Trump has as a politician, he does possess certain skills, among them an almost preternatural ability to tap into the sensibilities—the id—of the American right. More than any other Republican candidate in 2016, Trump was in sync with the base of the party. He still is, as he prepares for what looks like another run for the presidency. Returning to Washington, D.C., for
3h
How Sterlin Harjo Exploded the Myths of Native American Life
F irst, a story. So this one time some rez kids messed up my car. It was my first "real" car. I'd had a '67 Catalina that started about half the time, and went off the road the other half because the tires were worn down to nubs. And then I'd had a '79 Thunderbird that everyone called the "Thunderchicken" because it had a broken door and one of the eight cylinders didn't work. This new car was se
3h
Social capital II: determinants of economic connectedness
Nature, Published online: 01 August 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04997-3 Social disconnection across socioeconomic lines is explained by both differences in exposure to people with high socioeconomic status and friending bias—the tendency for people to befriend peers with similar socioeconomic status even conditional on exposure.
4h
The social connections that shape economic prospects
Nature, Published online: 01 August 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01843-4 Data on 21 billion Facebook connections reveal that a new measure of social capital — childhood friendships between people of high and low socio-economic status — is linked to economic mobility later in life.
4h
Record rain in St. Louis is what climate change looks like
This is a re-post from Yale Climate Connections by Bob Henson and Jeff Masters Torrents of rain that began before dawn on Tuesday, July 26, gave St. Louis, Missouri, its highest calendar-day total since records began in 1873. And the deadly event is just the latest example of a well-established trend of intensifying downpours in many places across the globe. The official reporting site at Lambert
5h
Why you need to worry about the 'wet-bulb temperature'
Scientists think we need to pay attention to a measure of heat and humidity – and it's edging closer to the limits of human survivability In March, April and May this year, India and its neighbours endured repeated heatwaves that exposed more than a billion people to dangerously hot conditions. India broke several temperature records. The warmest March in more than a century was recorded across t
5h
New study finds global forest area per capita has decreased by over 60%
Over the past 60 years, the global forest area has declined by 81.7 million hectares, a loss that contributed to the more than 60% decline in global forest area per capita. This loss threatens the future of biodiversity and impacts the lives of 1.6 billion people worldwide, according to a new study published today by IOP Publishing in the journal Environmental Research Letters.
5h
As species recover, some threaten others in more dire shape
Concealed behind trees near Lake Michigan, two scientists remotely manipulated a robotic owl on the forest floor. As the intruder flapped its wings and hooted, a merlin guarding its nest in a nearby pine darted overhead, sounding high-pitched, rapid-fire distress calls.
6h
The rise and fall of the lab leak hypothesis for the origin of SARS-CoV-2
Two new studies were published last week that strongly support a natural zoonotic origin for COVID-19 centered at the wet market in Wuhan, China. Naturally, lab leak proponents soberly considered this new evidence and thought about changing their minds. Just kidding! They doubled down on the conspiracy mongering, because of course they did. The post first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .
6h
Germanium silicon oxide achieves multi-coloured ultra-long phosphorescence and delayed fluorescence at high temperature
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 August 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-32133-2 Advanced security applications require materials responsive to different stimuli with remarkable stability. Here, Sargent et al. introduce Ge homogenously into a silica scaffold and obtain a colourtuned germanium silicon oxide with ultra-long phosphorescence and delayed fluorescence across a broad temperature
6h
Coupled influence of tectonics, climate, and surface processes on landscape evolution in southwestern North America
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 August 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31903-2 Cenozoic landscape evolution of southwestern North America remains debated. Here, the authors reconstruct landscape using 4-D numerical models, which can explain extensional collapse and superficial geological record for the Basin and Range Province
7h
Moder Teresa
This is not the saint you're looking for… Anjezë Gonxhe Bojaxhiu, mer känd som , föddes 26 augusti 1910 i Skopje i dåvarande Osmanska riket (numera huvudstad i Nordmakedonien). … Continued Inlägget Moder Teresa dök först upp på Vetenskap och Folkbildning .
7h
Starwatch: Mars guides way to spotting Uranus
Seventh planet technically visible as pale blue dot with help of binoculars It is a tale of two planets this week: Mars and Uranus. While Mars, the fourth planet of the solar system, will be relatively easy to see with the unaided eye, the seventh planet, Uranus, will be almost impossible unless you live somewhere with pristine skies and no light pollution. So, if you have a pair of binoculars, t
9h
Handmade Hemoglobin, 1912-2012
Makio Murayama, a Japanese-American biochemist who was turned away from the Manhattan Project due to his heritage, rose to prominence for his work uncovering the link between the structure of hemoglobin and the mechanisms of sickle cell disease.
9h
What Made Bill Russell a Hero
Not many people can make Charles Barkley, the former NBA MVP and legendarily outspoken broadcaster, pipe down. But the NBA icon Bill Russell, who died on Sunday age 88 , once called Barkley and did just that. "He called me. 'Charles Barkley, this is Bill Russell.' I said, 'Oh hey, Mr. Russell,'" Barkley told me. "He said, 'I need you to shut the fuck up.' I said, 'Okay.'" Russell had seen Barkley
9h
'We thought it was a shooting star': uncontrolled Chinese rocket fragments seen in Malaysia – video
A Chinese booster rocket has made an uncontrolled return to Earth. US defence department officials have chided Beijing for not sharing information on the potentially hazardous object's descent. The Long March 5B rocket re-entered Earth's atmosphere over the Indian ocean on Saturday. People in several parts of Malaysia reported seeing the fragments. 'At first we thought it was a shooting star,' sa
11h
GM's Robotaxis Are Losing a Fortune
Bruising Cruise The numbers on General Motors' Cruise project are looking pretty dark. On Wednesday, InsideEVs reported that the company's robotaxi unit is losing $5 million every day, for a total of about $5 billion since 2018. GM began charging for select rides in the driverless vehicles in early June, which was partially to cover higher compensation costs required to keep key staff on board. D
14h
Would you trust a robot to examine, diagnose and prescribe a treatment for you? Would you trust a robot as your physician or surgeon, if your doctor or family or friends suggests? – A Study on human psychology of trusting AI.
Hi Everyone, I am a Masters student at the De Montfort University, currently researching on Human trust on Artificial Intelligence. This research study is a short online survey investigating the factors influencing human trust on Artificial Intelligence, especially on Artificial Intelligence applications on healthcare considering the responded personal characteristics. The study has been approved
14h
New York Declares State of Emergency As Monkeypox Infections Increase
New York Governor Kathy Hochul declared a state of emergency Friday as monkeypox infection rates rise. Hochul said it will run through August 28, and that she hopes to increase vaccine availability. "This executive order enables us to respond more swiftly, and allows health care professionals to take additional steps that will help get more New Yorkers vaccinated," Hochul said on Twitter Friday .
16h
Best Gaming Laptops Under $1,000 in 2022
Playing modern PC games used to require a desktop machine worth thousands of dollars, but the gaming laptops under $1,000 offer similar performance for a lot less. Yes, desktop PCs still have an advantage over portables because they don't have to balance power consumption with battery life, but laptops win on portability. A gaming laptop allows you to play the latest titles wherever you go, be it
21h
Scientists Discover Unique Triple Star System
Three's Company There's something pretty special about the star system that a team of researchers just discovered. The international group of scientists published a study in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society in June, and yesterday Axios revealed additional details about the stars. The triple system features two stars that orbit each other in a binary, as well as a tert
21h
Exclusive: NHS to use AI to identify people at higher risk of hepatitis C
Screening programme will detect people with the deadly infection, which is often symptomless in early stages The NHS is to use artificial intelligence to detect, screen and treat people at risk of hepatitis C under plans to eradicate the disease by 2030. Hepatitis C often does not have any noticeable symptoms until the liver has been severely damaged, which means thousands of people are living wi
21h
Can artificial intelligence really help us talk to the animals?
A California-based organisation wants to harness the power of machine learning to decode communication across the entire animal kingdom. But the project has its doubters A dolphin handler makes the signal for "together" with her hands, followed by "create". The two trained dolphins disappear underwater, exchange sounds and then emerge, flip on to their backs and lift their tails. They have devise
22h
Taylor Swift Didn't Rack Up Wasteful Private Jet Miles Alone, Team Says
Seeing Red A solid portion of the internet flipped out on Taylor Swift this week after a marketing firm dropped a report that says she and her private jet are the world's worst celeb CO2 emission offenders. Yard said Friday they used publicly available data scraped from a Twitter account called Celebrity Jets to create a list of the top ten worst climate change contributors. The bot posts updates
22h
German Government Says It May Keep Nuclear Plant Open After All
Germany's environment minister is a member of the Green Party in the country — so she's supposed to oppose nuclear energy for idealogical reasons. But recent changes in Europe's energy landscape means Steffi Lemke may have to change her mind. Earlier today, Bloomberg reported that Lemke may decide to extend the lifespan of Isar 2. The nuclear plant provides about 12 percent of Bavaria's annual el
22h
Scientists Hunt for an Elusive Particle to Unlock the Mystery of Dark Matter
Australian scientists are making strides towards solving one of the greatest mysteries of the universe: the nature of invisible dark matter. The ORGAN Experiment, Australia's first major dark matter detector, recently completed a search for a hypothetical particle called an axion—a popular candidate among theories that try to explain dark matter. ORGAN has placed new limits on the possible charac
23h
Bring the OJ
Josh, when living your best life you are a floodgate, the last restraint between us open mouths and feelings we had never had or have had since. Until you, we didn't know the sky could turn purple, or that our bruised bodies could be targets for a kiss—from beneath a mustache, yes, or from a needle. Thank you for teaching me to suffer with company. Thank you for showing us that together we can we
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I'll Always Love the Original Buffy the Vampire Slayer
"A ll I want to do is graduate from high school, go to Europe, marry Christian Slater, and die." That line, from the 1992 movie Buffy the Vampire Slayer , may have been spoken by a teenager, but they were the words of a child. That's why it stood out to me as a prepubescent girl—before I got my period, before I got existential, before I stopped caring about vampires (if I ever did). The line capt
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