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Nyheder2022august05

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Growing cereal crops with less fertilizer
Researchers at the University of California, Davis, have found a way to reduce the amount of nitrogen fertilizers needed to grow cereal crops. The discovery could save farmers in the United States billions of dollars annually in fertilizer costs while also benefiting the environment.
15min
No, the human brain did not shrink 3,000 years ago: research
Did the 12th century B.C.E.—a time when humans were forging great empires and developing new forms of written text—coincide with an evolutionary reduction in brain size? Think again, says a UNLV-led team of researchers who refute a hypothesis that's growing increasingly popular among the science community.
15min
Corruption is sending shock waves through China's chipmaking industry
China's chipmaking industry descended into chaos last week, with at least four top executives associated with a state-owned semiconductor fund arrested on corruption charges. It's an explosive turn of events that could force the country to fundamentally rethink how it invests in chip development, according to analysts and experts. On July 30, China's top anticorruption institution announced that
26min
Research team first to develop 3D structure of twinkle protein
Researchers from the National Institutes of Health have developed a three-dimensional structure that allows them to see how and where disease mutations on the twinkle protein can lead to mitochondrial diseases. The protein is involved in helping cells use energy our bodies convert from food. Prior to the development of this 3D structure, researchers only had models and were unable to determine how
27min
Research team first to develop 3D structure of twinkle protein
Researchers from the National Institutes of Health have developed a three-dimensional structure that allows them to see how and where disease mutations on the twinkle protein can lead to mitochondrial diseases. The protein is involved in helping cells use energy our bodies convert from food. Prior to the development of this 3D structure, researchers only had models and were unable to determine how
28min
Nutrition solution can help heat-stressed cows as US warms
Rising temperatures pose major challenges to the dairy industry — a Holstein's milk production can decline 30 to 70% in warm weather — but a new study has found a nutrition-based solution to restore milk production during heat-stress events, while also pinpointing the cause of the decline.
53min
No trace of Nathan: the desperate family waiting for news of a missing brother
When Nathan Brosnan went missing his family was plunged into the agony of 'not knowing'. A national DNA program is trying to give families like theirs answers Get our free news app , morning email briefing and daily news podcast In a life punctuated by cycles of chaos, there was always one thing 35-year-old Nathan Brosnan kept constant. "It didn't matter if he was having a mental health issue, co
54min
Concerned Shareholders Heckled While Addressing Tesla Ethics
Cyber Roundup Tesla's annual shareholder meeting, regrettably called the "Cyber Roundup," took place last night at the company's Texas Gigafactory — and it turned out to be a real dumpster fire. In light of wide-ranging reports of ethical issues and allegations — including reports of systemic racism and sexual misconduct , as well as concerns over child labor , COVID mishandling , and more — seve
1h
Artist to collaborate on creating diagrams of brain function
I'm a professional computational neuroscientist. wanting to communicate what we (I) know about brain function to interested non-scientists. I need just a few diagrams – I have four in mind. ​ I just want to create a few diagrams, and I'd like them to be more polished and beautiful than I have the skills for. So I'm offering a trade: I teach you about brain function, including answering your quest
1h
Bupropion and Mucuna Pruriens combined use, Potentially neurotoxic?
I was prescribed the drug called bupropion xl 150 mg for depression, I took it for 2 months straight with few issues until an online 'friend' forgot that I was on bupropion (I told him about it before), or maybe he was aware but didn't think it was bad, told me to try Mucuna Pruriens (contains L-Dopa) supplement for him because he thought it's good for video games after reading some research pape
1h
Cryo-EM structures of human hepatitis B and woodchuck hepatitis virus small spherical subviral particles | Science Advances
Abstract The loss of detectable hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) is considered a functional cure in chronic hepatitis B. Naturally, HBsAg can be incorporated into the virion envelope or assembled into subviral particles (SVPs) with lipid from host cells. Until now, there has been no detailed structure of HBsAg, and the published SVP structures are controversial. Here, we report the first subna
1h
Black carbon health impacts in the Indo-Gangetic plain: Exposures, risks, and mitigation | Science Advances
Abstract A large discrepancy between simulated and observed black carbon (BC) surface concentrations over the densely populated Indo-Gangetic plain (IGP) has so far limited our ability to assess the magnitude of BC health impacts in terms of population exposure, morbidity, and mortality. We evaluate these impacts using an integrated modeling framework, including successfully predicted BC concentr
1h
The membrane-actin linker ezrin acts as a sliding anchor | Science Advances
Abstract Protein linkages to filamentous (F)–actin provide the cell membrane with mechanical stability and support intricate membrane architectures. However, the actin cytoskeleton is highly dynamic and undergoes rapid changes in shape during cell motility and other processes. The molecular mechanisms that generate a mechanically robust yet fluid connection between the membrane and actin cytoskel
1h
Thermal stabilization of diverse biologics using reversible hydrogels | Science Advances
Abstract Improving the thermal stability of biologics, including vaccines, is critical to reduce the economic costs and health risks associated with the cold chain. Here, we designed a versatile, safe, and easy-to-use reversible PEG-based hydrogel platform formed via dynamic covalent boronic ester cross-linking for the encapsulation, stabilization, and on-demand release of biologics. Using these
1h
lncRNA-GM targets Foxo1 to promote T cell–mediated autoimmunity | Science Advances
Abstract RNA-RBP interaction is important in immune regulation and implicated in various immune disorders. The differentiation of proinflammatory T cell subset T H 17 and its balance with regulatory T cell (T reg ) generation is closely related to autoimmune pathogenesis. The roles of RNA-RBP interaction in regulation of T H 17/T reg differentiation and autoinflammation remain in need of further
1h
Toward exact predictions of spin-phonon relaxation times: An ab initio implementation of open quantum systems theory | Science Advances
Abstract Spin-phonon coupling is the main driver of spin relaxation and decoherence in solid-state semiconductors at finite temperature. Controlling this interaction is a central problem for many disciplines, ranging from magnetic resonance to quantum technologies. Spin relaxation theories have been developed for almost a century but often use a phenomenological description of phonons and their c
1h
Propagation-induced revival of entanglement in the angle-OAM bases | Science Advances
Abstract Although the continuous-variable position-momentum entanglement of photon pairs produced by parametric down-conversion has applicability in several quantum information applications, it is not suitable for applications involving long-distance propagation. This is because entanglement in the position-momentum bases, as seen through Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR)–correlation measurements, de
1h
Neonatal BCG vaccination is associated with a long-term DNA methylation signature in circulating monocytes | Science Advances
Abstract Trained immunity describes the capacity of innate immune cells to develop heterologous memory in response to certain exogenous exposures. This phenomenon mediates, at least in part, the beneficial off-target effects of the BCG vaccine. Using an in vitro model of trained immunity, we show that BCG exposure induces a persistent change in active histone modifications, DNA methylation, trans
1h
Spatial resolution of an integrated C4+CAM photosynthetic metabolism | Science Advances
Abstract C 4 and CAM photosynthesis have repeatedly evolved in plants over the past 30 million years. Because both repurpose the same set of enzymes but differ in their spatial and temporal deployment, they have long been considered as distinct and incompatible adaptations. Portulaca contains multiple C 4 species that perform CAM when droughted. Spatially explicit analyses of gene expression reve
1h
Lipid-driven condensation and interfacial ordering of FUS | Science Advances
Abstract Protein condensation into liquid-like structures is critical for cellular compartmentalization, RNA processing, and stress response. Research on protein condensation has primarily focused on membraneless organelles in the absence of lipids. However, the cellular cytoplasm is full of lipid interfaces, yet comparatively little is known about how lipids affect protein condensation. Here, we
1h
G9a dictates neuronal vulnerability to inflammatory stress via transcriptional control of ferroptosis | Science Advances
Abstract Neuroinflammation leads to neuronal stress responses that contribute to neuronal dysfunction and loss. However, treatments that stabilize neurons and prevent their destruction are still lacking. Here, we identify the histone methyltransferase G9a as a druggable epigenetic regulator of neuronal vulnerability to inflammation. In murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and hu
1h
A modern pulse of ultrafast exhumation and diachronous crustal melting in the Nanga Parbat Massif | Science Advances
Abstract We combine monazite petrochronology with thermal modeling to evaluate the relative roles of crustal melting, surface denudation, and tectonics in facilitating ultrafast exhumation of the Nanga Parbat Massif in the western Himalayan syntaxis. Our results reveal diachronous melting histories between samples and a pulse of ultrafast exhumation (9 to 13 mm/year) that began ~1 Ma and was prec
1h
Trace metal stoichiometry of dissolved organic matter in the Amazon plume | Science Advances
Abstract Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is a distinct component of Earth's hydrosphere and provides a link between the biogeochemical cycles of carbon, nutrients, and trace metals (TMs). Binding of TMs to DOM is thought to result in a TM pool with DOM-like biogeochemistry. Here, we determined elemental stoichiometries of aluminum, iron, copper, nickel, zinc, cobalt, and manganese associated with
1h
Enantioselective construction of ortho-sulfur- or nitrogen-substituted axially chiral biaryls and asymmetric synthesis of isoplagiochin D
Nature Communications, Published online: 05 August 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-32360-7 Ortho-heteroatom-substituted axially chiral biaryls are valuable structures in synthetic and medicinal chemistry. Here, the authors established an efficient synthesis of these chiral structures via asymmetric cross-coupling.
1h
'Black widow' star ate its pal to set a new record
A dense, collapsed star has shredded and consumed nearly the entire mass of its stellar companion. In the process, it's grown into the heaviest neutron star observed to date. The star is spinning 707 times per second—making it one of the fastest spinning neutron stars in the Milky Way galaxy. Weighing this record-setting neutron star, which tops the charts at 2.35 times the mass of the sun, helps
1h
The World's First-Ever "Synthetic Embryo" Is Already Causing Controversy
Scientists have created the world's first lab-grown "synthetic embryo," a groundbreaking moment in science that has reignited a fierce ethical debate. Led by molecular geneticist Joseph Hanna, a team of researchers at Israel's Wizemann Institute of Science managed to create a synthetic mouse "embryo" in a lab without fertilized eggs or a uterus, potentially allowing us to get a glimpse of what ha
2h
Dual-plasmid editing system improves DNA digital storage potential
DNA-based information is a new interdisciplinary field linking information technology and biotechnology. The field hopes to meet the enormous need for long-term data storage by using DNA as an information storage medium. Despite DNA's promise of strong stability, high storage density and low maintenance cost, however, researchers face problems accurately rewriting digital information encoded in DN
2h
The many ways nature nurtures human well-being
A systematic review of 301 academic articles on "cultural ecosystem services" has enabled researchers to identify how these nonmaterial contributions from nature are linked to and significantly affect human well-being. They identified 227 unique pathways through which human interaction with nature positively or negatively affects well-being. These were then used to isolate 16 distinct underlying m
2h
Dual-plasmid editing system improves DNA digital storage potential
DNA-based information is a new interdisciplinary field linking information technology and biotechnology. The field hopes to meet the enormous need for long-term data storage by using DNA as an information storage medium. Despite DNA's promise of strong stability, high storage density and low maintenance cost, however, researchers face problems accurately rewriting digital information encoded in DN
3h
The many ways nature nurtures human well-being
A systematic review of 301 academic articles on "cultural ecosystem services" has enabled researchers to identify how these nonmaterial contributions from nature are linked to and significantly affect human well-being. They identified 227 unique pathways through which human interaction with nature positively or negatively affects well-being. These were then used to isolate 16 distinct underlying m
3h
Almost Every Turtle Being Born Female Due to Global Warming
All Girl Scientists haven't seen almost any male sea turtle hatch in Florida for years due to record temperatures, Reuters reports . Around 99 percent of all baby sea turtles are being born female in the state — all because of climate change. "The frightening thing is the last four summers in Florida have been the hottest summers on record," Bette Zirkelbach, who manages a turtle hospital in the
3h
Netflix's The Sandman Is a Fan's Dream. Is That Good Enough?
Not long after the 1989 launch of The Sandman , Neil Gaiman's groundbreaking comic-book series, came the inevitable question that plagues critically acclaimed smash hits—how best to translate it to the screen? The series's central family, known as "The Endless," live in a vividly cinematic world; each member personifies a natural force, including dreams, death, and desire. But Gaiman's epic story
3h
New research on the emergence of the first complex cells challenges orthodoxy
In the beginning, there was boredom. Following the emergence of cellular life on earth, some 3.5 billion years ago, simple cells lacking a nucleus and other detailed internal structure dominated the planet. Matters would remain largely unchanged in terms of evolutionary development in these so-called prokaryotic cells—the bacteria and archaea—for another billion and a half years.
3h
Locusts can 'smell' human cancer cells
Researchers have shown that locusts can not only "smell" the difference between cancer cells and healthy cells, but they can also distinguish between different cancer cell lines. However, patients need not worry about locusts swarming their doctors' offices. Rather, the researchers say this work could provide the basis for devices that use insect sensory neurons to enable the early detection of c
3h
New research on the emergence of the first complex cells challenges orthodoxy
In the beginning, there was boredom. Following the emergence of cellular life on earth, some 3.5 billion years ago, simple cells lacking a nucleus and other detailed internal structure dominated the planet. Matters would remain largely unchanged in terms of evolutionary development in these so-called prokaryotic cells—the bacteria and archaea—for another billion and a half years.
3h
New at-home, saliva-based COVID test as effective as PCR in preliminary analysis
PCR tests, also called molecular tests or nucleic acid tests, are considered the gold standard in detecting the presence of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that gives rise to COVID-19. However, they can take a few days to process, resulting in unnecessary quarantine for negative individuals or delays for those who require proof of negative testing for travel or other commitments. Rapid antigen-detecting tes
3h
12 Books to Help You Love Reading Again
Reading is hard right now. The pandemic has pushed our already scattered attention spans to a crisis point. But even before 2020, stressors such as political chaos and the allure of our phones made it harder and harder to find the time and focus to get lost in a book. Even when we're not living through a distracting moment, we will inevitably have personal fallow periods when reading as a habit a
3h
Physicist Apologizes for Fooling Public Into Thinking a Picture of Chorizo Was a Star
How the Sausage is Made Back on July 31, Etienne Klein, a prominent French physicist, took to Twitter to share an alleged photo of Proxima Centauri, one of the Sun's closest neighboring stars. The image "was just taken by the [James Webb Space Telescope]," he mused in the post. "This level of detail… A new world is revealed day after day." But there was just one problem: it's not Proxima Centauri
4h
It's 2022, Let's Talk About (Really Good) Tech-y Sex Toys
We've always known tech can be sexy, but these toys take sleek lines and user friendliness to a, well, deeper level. No longer awkward, ugly, and oversized, today's sex toys rely on calibrated yet quiet motors and effective, aesthetically pleasing designs. Most importantly, modern sex toys get us in touch with what we like, how we like it, and who we like it with. First, check out this guide to t
4h
Best Hearing Aids Under $100 of 2022
Hearing aids under $100 save money and restore your ability to interact with the world. While these hearing aids aren't custom fit and lack some of the functionality of $1,000 models, they can improve hearing in select situations without the need for a long-term payment plan. These affordable hearing aids offer a comfortable fit, volume control, and sufficient battery life for extended use. Some
4h
Space-time wave packets localized in all dimensions
Nature Communications, Published online: 05 August 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-32240-0 Propagation-invariant wave packets confined in space and time can be useful for optical sensing, imaging, and nonlinear and quantum optics. Here the authors demonstrate control over the angular dispersion of optical wave packets in two-transverse dimensions to synthesize space-time wave packets localized in al
4h
'Shouting distance': That's how close the Inflation Reduction Act would get US to its climate goals
Fires, heat waves, floods—the reality of climate change is front and center for millions of Americans. Yet among the downbeat of climate-related disasters, some hopeful news rang out last week with Democrats' surprise announcement of a bill designed to help the country meet its goals of curbing greenhouse gas emissions enough to help the planet avoid the worst projections of global warming.
4h
'Simple yet powerful': Seeing cell secretion like never before
We have recently witnessed the stunning images of distant galaxies revealed by the James Webb telescope, which were previously visible only as blurry spots. Washington University in St. Louis researchers have developed a novel method for visualizing the proteins secreted by cells with stunning resolution, making it the James Webb version for visualizing single cell protein secretion.
4h
'Simple yet powerful': Seeing cell secretion like never before
We have recently witnessed the stunning images of distant galaxies revealed by the James Webb telescope, which were previously visible only as blurry spots. Washington University in St. Louis researchers have developed a novel method for visualizing the proteins secreted by cells with stunning resolution, making it the James Webb version for visualizing single cell protein secretion.
4h
How does red meat raise heart disease risk?
New research examines why eating meat—especially red meat and processed meat—raises the risk of cardiovascular disease. Despite intense study, the impact of animal source foods on atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) is vigorously debated, and the mechanisms underlying potential effects of animal proteins remain unclear. Understanding the impacts of meat consumption is particularly impo
4h
Hubble gazes at a star-studded skyfield
This star-studded image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope shows the heart of the globular cluster NGC 6638 in the constellation Sagittarius. The star-strewn observation highlights the density of stars at the heart of globular clusters, which are stable, tightly bound groups of tens of thousands to millions of stars. To capture the data in this image, Hubble used two of its cutting-edge astr
4h
Sanding trick gets water to slide right off surfaces
Researchers have developed a simple method to make surfaces superhydrophobic—that is, very water-repellant—without chemicals often used in such processes. Their technique involves sandpaper, a selection of powders, and some elbow grease. The researchers showed that sanding a surface increases its ability to shed water without getting wet . But grinding in a powder at the same time gives it hydrop
4h
Majority of Species We Know Little About Could be Heading Towards Extinction
The impact of having eight billion humans is undeniable — from climate change to omnipresent microplastics , Earth is becoming a very different place. Some scientists even believe we are witnessing a sixth mass extinction as a result of human activity. In light of this, a team from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology used computer models to study the risks to the species we know th
4h
NASA's ShadowCam launches aboard Korea Pathfinder Lunar Orbiter
NASA's ShadowCam is heading to the Moon aboard Korea Aerospace Research Institute (KARI)'s Korea Pathfinder Lunar Orbiter (KPLO) mission. KPLO, also known as Danuri, launched at 7:08 p.m. EDT on a SpaceX Falcon 9 from Launch Complex 40 on the Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida on August 4.
4h
Oregon's wildfire risk map emerges as new climate flashpoint
A new map in Oregon that rated the wildfire risk of every tax lot in the state—labeling nearly 80,000 structures as high-risk—generated so much pushback from angry homeowners that officials abruptly retracted it, saying they had not done enough local outreach before publicizing the ambitious project.
4h
Feeling the pressure
Researchers have used finite element simulations to test a new way of calculating the stiffness of plant cell walls. This allowed them to interpret AFM data more accurately compared with older equations, which may lead to more robust agriculture.
4h
Unexpected "Geological Activity" on Dwarf Planet Ceres Shocks Scientists
Surprise! Geoscientists at Virginia Tech may have figured out why Ceres — a dwarf planet and the largest celestial body in the solar system's asteroid belt — was found to show "unexpected geological activity," according to a recent press release . In fact, their findings, as detailed in a paper published in the journal AGU Advances earlier this year, might just change the way that we think about
5h
Machine learning reveals hidden components of X-ray pulses
Ultrafast pulses from X-ray lasers reveal how atoms move at timescales of a femtosecond. That's a quadrillionth of a second. However, measuring the properties of the pulses themselves is challenging. While determining a pulse's maximum strength, or 'amplitude,' is straightforward, the time at which the pulse reaches the maximum, or 'phase,' is often hidden. A new study trains neural networks to an
5h
Signs of disturbance in nearby dwarf galaxies indicate an alternative gravity theory
According to the standard model of cosmology, the vast majority of galaxies are surrounded by a halo of dark matter particles. This halo is invisible, but its mass exerts a strong gravitational pull on galaxies in the vicinity. A new study challenges this view of the Universe. The results suggest that the dwarf galaxies of Earth's second closest galaxy cluster — known as the Fornax Cluster — are
5h
How learning about wellbeing can benefit university students' own wellbeing
Studying wellbeing science as part of their courses could be a key way of improving how today's students cope with the barrage of stressors they face. Students are a high-risk population for mental ill-health and face increasing academic demands, loneliness and inancial pressures but now a team examined the benefit they could get from studying an optional wellbeing science module.
5h
High Temps Are Causing Most Florida Sea Turtles to be Born Female
(Photo: Daria Gordova/Unsplash) Climate change is having an unexpected and slightly jarring effect on the Florida sea turtle population: it's skewing baby turtles mostly female. Rising atmospheric temperatures are causing the sand in tropical regions to become hotter. Because female sea turtles nest and lay their eggs on the beach, the hot sand has the ability to impact embryonic development. Sea
5h
How gut bacteria evolve to become dangerous
A new study digs into the mystery of how good gut bacteria can go bad. Gut microbes have been linked to both good health and the promotion of diseases such as autoimmune disorders, inflammatory bowel diseases, metabolic syndrome, and even neuropsychiatric disorders. One popular explanation for these bad outcomes has been what is called the " leaky gut " hypothesis—in which potentially damaging ba
5h
Multi-cohort and longitudinal Bayesian clustering study of stage and subtype in Alzheimer's disease
Nature Communications, Published online: 05 August 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-32202-6 Different types of atrophy in Alzheimer's disease may reflect different disease stages or biologically distinct subtypes. Here the authors use longitudinal neuroimaging data to demonstrate five distinct patterns of atrophy with different demographical and cognitive characteristics.
5h
Biomimetic material degradation for synergistic enhanced therapy by regulating endogenous energy metabolism imaging under hypothermia
Nature Communications, Published online: 05 August 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-32349-2 Metal organic frameworks (MOF) coated with mammalian cell membranes have good biocompatibility. Here, the authors develop a cobalt based hydrogen sulphide producing MOF cloaked with a macrophage membrane and show that the subsequent system can reduce tumour growth in mice.
5h
Detection of companion galaxies around hot dust-obscured hyper-luminous galaxy W0410-0913
Nature Communications, Published online: 05 August 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-32297-x Lyman-alpha emission is one of the observational probes for the high-redshift universe. Here, the authors show several Lyman-alpha emitting companion galaxies around the hot dust-obscured galaxy W0410-091 suggesting that the galaxy evolves in a very dense environment.
5h
A brain mechanism underlying the evolution of anxiety
New research using genome editing technology has allowed scientists to create a model and assess a gene mutation associated with neuropsychiatric disorders in humans. The study has revealed how the mutation functions in the brain and affects anxiety and sociality.
5h
New study calculates retreat of glacier edges in Alaska's Kenai Fjords National Park
As glaciers worldwide retreat due to climate change, managers of national parks need to know what's on the horizon to prepare for the future. A new study has measured 38 years of change for glaciers in Kenai Fjords National Park south of Anchorage and discovered that 13 of the 19 glaciers show substantial retreat, four are relatively stable, and two have advanced. It also finds trends in which gla
5h
Modern Men Are Still Figuring Out Fatherhood
A stomach-twisting thrill animates the Taken movies. As bullets fly across each progressively more ridiculous sequel, Liam Neeson kicks down the door to the pantheon of cultural Super Dads and asserts himself as its king. Here is a paragon of fatherhood , the films suggest; here is a dad endowed with "a very particular set" of parenting skills, a man who may struggle to connect with his daughter
6h
World's Biggest Ice Sheet in Antarctica in Serious Trouble Due to Global Warming
Breaking the Ice The East Antarctic ice sheet is the biggest in the world at around the size of the United States. But changing ocean currents, which are in large part driven by climate change, are forcing warmer waters its way and could cause the ice sheet to destabilize and melt, according to shocking new research published in Nature Climate Change this week. Until now, not a lot was known abou
6h
Beating the heat becoming more difficult, science says
An intense heatwave swept across Europe in July. The scorching heat fuelled fires in Spain, France and Portugal. With the thermometer topping 40 °C, the United Kingdom (UK) was the center of attention after breaking temperature records. The murderous heat nearly paralyzed the country.
6h
AI helps discover new space anomalies
The SNAD team, an international network of researchers including Matvey Kornilov, Associate Professor of the HSE University Faculty of Physics, has discovered 11 previously undetected space anomalies, seven of which are supernova candidates. The researchers analyzed digital images of the Northern sky taken in 2018 using a k-D tree to detect anomalies through the 'nearest neighbor' method. Machine
6h
No trace of dark matter halos
According to the standard model of cosmology, the vast majority of galaxies are surrounded by a halo of dark matter particles. This halo is invisible, but its mass exerts a strong gravitational pull on galaxies in the vicinity. A new study led by the University of Bonn (Germany) and the University of Saint Andrews (Scotland) challenges this view of the Universe. The results suggest that the dwarf
6h
Exploring arcobacter risk to the food industry and human health
The MikroIker team of the UPV/EHU's Department of Immunology, Microbiology and Parasitology has conducted a study into the prevalence and characterization of bacteria of the Arcobacter genus using a large number of samples of different foods (seafood, vegetables, meat products and fresh cheese), including some that have never been analyzed in our environment previously. In addition, they have stud
6h
Why early Romans used lopsided dice
A pair of researchers, one with the University of California, Davis, the other Drew University, believe they may have solved the mystery of why people living during the time of the Roman Empire used lopsided dice in their games. In their paper published in the journal Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences, Jelmer Eerkens and Alex de Voogt, describe their study of dice used during the days of
6h
Researchers unveil key processes in marine microbial evolution
A study published recently in Nature Ecology and Evolution has unveiled some of the key processes in marine microbial evolution. According to the study, led by the Uppsala University (Sweden) and with the participation of the Institut de Ciències del Mar (ICM-CSIC) of Barcelona, it is the large number of habitat transitions -from sea to land and vice versa- that have occurred in the last millions
6h
Reinforcement learning–based simulations show human desire to always want more may speed up learning
A trio of researchers, two with Princeton University, the other the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, has developed a reinforcement learning–based simulation that shows the human desire always to want more may have evolved as a way to speed up learning. In their paper posted in the open-access PLOS Computational Biology, Rachit Dubey, Thomas Griffiths and Peter Dayan describe the fa
6h
Exploring arcobacter risk to the food industry and human health
The MikroIker team of the UPV/EHU's Department of Immunology, Microbiology and Parasitology has conducted a study into the prevalence and characterization of bacteria of the Arcobacter genus using a large number of samples of different foods (seafood, vegetables, meat products and fresh cheese), including some that have never been analyzed in our environment previously. In addition, they have stud
6h
Researchers unveil key processes in marine microbial evolution
A study published recently in Nature Ecology and Evolution has unveiled some of the key processes in marine microbial evolution. According to the study, led by the Uppsala University (Sweden) and with the participation of the Institut de Ciències del Mar (ICM-CSIC) of Barcelona, it is the large number of habitat transitions -from sea to land and vice versa- that have occurred in the last millions
6h
The Saga Hits the Jackpot and Saves $10K! | Deadliest Catch
Stream Deadliest Catch on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/deadliest-catch #DeadliestCatch #Discovery #DiscoveryPlus Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Disco
6h
Treating cancer by sticking cells in place
Future treatments for advanced cancer could work by sticking cancer cells in place and preventing their spread around the body. A new study by researchers at UC Davis and the University of Washington shows how an antibody strengthens bonds between cells.
6h
A simple, cheap material for carbon capture, perhaps from tailpipes
Today, the dominant, though energy-intensive method for capturing carbon dioxide for storage involves bubbling industrial emissions through liquid amines. MOFs and other porous materials are promising and more energy efficient. Now, researchers have found an even cheaper and equally efficient material for capturing CO2: porous melamine networks. The main ingredient in Formica, melamine has lower r
6h
Researchers report solar energetic particle event observed by China's Tianwen-1 mission
Researchers from the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) and their collaborators have reported a solar energetic particle (SEP) event observed by the Mars Energetic Particle Analyzer (MEPA) carried on China's Tianwen-1 (TW-1) spacecraft. As the first scientific report based on MEPA, the paper was published in the Astrophysical Journal Letters.
7h
The First Small Modular Nuclear Reactor Was Just Approved by US Regulators
Nuclear power could play an important role in decarbonizing the energy sector, but reactors are simply too expensive and complicated to roll out quickly. A new, smaller reactor could soon change that after receiving certification from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission last week. As countries around the world race to replace fossil fuel power plants, the debate around whether nuclear power should
7h
Simulating infinitely many chaotic particles using a quantum computer
A team of researchers at Google's Quantinuum, working with a colleague at the University of Texas, Austin, has developed a way to simulate infinitely many chaotic particles using a quantum computer running with a limited number of qubits. In their paper published in the journal Nature Physics, the group describes their technique.
7h
The Radical Fringe That Just Went Mainstream in Arizona
It might be nice one day to wake up and feel serene—even hopeful—about the state of American politics. To know that all of those people who have been warning about the growing threat to democracy are way ahead of their skis. But today is not that day. Arizona Republicans are nominating an entire cast of characters who argue not only that Donald Trump won the election in 2020, but also that the st
7h
Tracking nitrogen pollution
Tropical coastal ecosystems are among the most biodiverse areas on Earth. And they're also on the front lines of effects caused by human activity. That's why it's becoming increasingly important, especially as human populations increase, to manage the impacts of runoff and wastewater that flow into the sea.
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The Download: experimental embryos and the US monkeypox emergency
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. This startup wants to copy you into an embryo for organ harvesting In a search for novel forms of longevity medicine, a biotech company based in Israel says it intends to create embryo-stage versions of people in order to harvest tissues for use in transplant
8h
Vaccine mod udbredt småbørns-virus er godt på vej
SSI er godt på vej med en vaccine mod RS-virus, der ramte danske børn i et stort udbrud sidste år. Vaccinen har haft succes i nyfødte mus og celler fra nyfødte børn og benytter sig netop af stoffer, der er særligt effektive i nyfødte.
8h
On-chip mid-infrared photothermoelectric detectors for full-Stokes detection
Nature Communications, Published online: 05 August 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-32309-w Mid-infrared polarization-sensitive photodetectors are desired for several applications, such as chemical analysis and biomedical diagnosis. Here, the authors report on-chip polarimeters based on the combination of plasmonic chiral metamaterials and 2D thermoelectric materials, showing tunable full-Stokes dete
8h
Tuning crystal-phase of bimetallic single-nanoparticle for catalytic hydrogenation
Nature Communications, Published online: 05 August 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-32274-4 Quantitatively describing the atomic configuration of the catalytically active sites is challenging. Here the authors demonstrate that tuning crystal-phase of metal single-particle enables to precisely describe the atomic structure of the active sites and accurately identify the activation routes of the reacti
8h
Putting a new spin on the football spiral
Only a handful of researchers have studied why an American football flies in such a unique trajectory, rifling through the air with remarkable precision, but also swerving, wobbling, and even tumbling as it barrels downfield. Now, ballistics experts have, for the first time, applied their understanding of artillery shells to explain this unique movement, creating the most precise model to date of
9h
How microglia contribute to Alzheimer's disease
A new study shows how a type of cells called microglia contribute to the slowdown of neuron activity seen in Alzheimer's disease. The study found that microglia that express the APOE4 gene, one of the strongest genetic risk factors for Alzheimer's disease, cannot metabolize lipids normally, leading to a buildup of excess lipids that interferes with nearby neurons' ability to communicate with each
9h
Metabolically engineered bacterium produces lutein?
A research group has engineered a bacterial strain capable of producing lutein. The research team applied systems metabolic engineering strategies, including substrate channeling and electron channeling, to enhance the production of lutein in an engineered Escherichia coli strain. The strategies will be also useful for the efficient production of other industrially important natural products used
9h
Simultaneous multi-gas detection needs only sub-μL analyte
Trace gas detection based on laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) is a powerful technique due to its high sensitivity and selectivity, and it is widely used in many fields. Most of current works are performed using a single frequency laser targeting only one species. Study of the interaction between different components needs simultaneous measurement of multi-species, which is still a challenge.
9h
A year in the life of the mouse lemur
Animals in the wild may not have an annual planner to keep track of the year, but they nonetheless manage to keep to a strict calendar—for example knowing just what time of the year to breed and when to hibernate. Research into the circadian clocks that regulate our 24-hour cycles led to a recent Nobel Prize, but very little is known about how animals maintain much longer-term seasonal rhythms.
9h
George Clooney's Tequila Is Taking Over Rap
In the beginning, there was Hennessy. "The Genesis," the first track on Nas's 1994 debut studio album, Illmatic , packs in four mentions of the cognac brand. "Take this Hennessy," Nas says. "Pass that henrock, pass that henrock," says Nas's younger brother, Jungle. "We drinkin' this straight up with no chaser," replies the rapper AZ. In the decades that followed, Hennessy became a fixture of rap
9h
Between Not Wanting to Live and Not Wanting to Die
If you are having thoughts of suicide, please know that you are not alone. If you are in danger of acting on suicidal thoughts, call 911. For support and resources, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 988 or text 741-741 for the Crisis Text Line. S hortly after 2 p.m. on January 31, 2019, I left my Dartmouth College office to kill myself. It was 11 days after my 57th birthday. At my
9h
A year in the life of the mouse lemur
Animals in the wild may not have an annual planner to keep track of the year, but they nonetheless manage to keep to a strict calendar—for example knowing just what time of the year to breed and when to hibernate. Research into the circadian clocks that regulate our 24-hour cycles led to a recent Nobel Prize, but very little is known about how animals maintain much longer-term seasonal rhythms.
9h
Distinguishing scientific results from experimental artifacts
While conducting fieldwork at a lab at Princeton University, Talia Dan-Cohen, associate professor of sociocultural anthropology at Washington University in St. Louis, observed a common but perplexing problem. For her book "A Simpler Life: Synthetic Biological Experiments," Dan-Cohen was tracking the work of practitioners in the developing field of synthetic biology, and she noticed two researchers
9h
Data-driven discovery of NbOI2 as a high performance layered piezoelectric
Piezoelectric materials can convert mechanical energy to electrical energy, and vice versa. In recent years, there has been growing interest in the search for two-dimensional (2D) layered piezoelectrics. Such layered van der Waals piezoelectrics are particularly useful for niche applications such as actuators with atomic-scale precision and wearable sensors. In addition, 2D piezoelectrics can func
9h
Contemplation can help problem-solving and boost creativity, study claims
People prefer to keep busy rather than to enjoy a moment of reflection, researchers find Losing oneself in one's thoughts or letting the mind wander is an underrated activity that is more rewarding the more it is practised, an academic study has claimed. Psychologists who studied a group of more than 250 people encouraged to engage in directionless contemplation or free-floating thinking said tha
9h
Automated techniques could make it easier to develop AI
Machine-learning researchers make many decisions when designing new models. They decide how many layers to include in neural networks and what weights to give inputs at each node. The result of all this human decision-making is that complex models end up being "designed by intuition" rather than systematically, says Frank Hutter , head of the machine-learning lab at the University of Freiburg in
9h
How to get fit
Discovering exactly how to get fit is the first step in a journey to better overall health, but exactly where do you start?
9h
How Do You Actually Stop the Steal?
P reventing the next attempt to overturn an election is a bit like playing whack-a-mole. Plug one gap in the nation's rickety, interlocking system for counting votes—say, by ensuring that a power-hungry vice president cannot unilaterally declare his or her ticket the winner—and another pest seems to materialize immediately. Congress is confronting this reality as it tries to rewrite a 135-year-ol
10h
Hjälp att dricka mindre med stöd i mobilen
Den som vill sluta röka blir peppad av sin omgivning. Att sluta dricka alkohol är ofta mer stigmatiserande – och det talas lite om hur man ska gå tillväga. Ett digitalt hjälpmedel har visat god effekt. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
10h
Hedersförtryck stärks av slutenhet
Slutenhet är avgörande för att hedersnormer ska uppstå. Ett välfärdssamhälle som inkluderar alla kan däremot skydda människor från våld inom familjen och försvaga starka släktskapsband. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
10h
God effekt av behandling mot tonårsdepression
Forskare har undersökt hur bra en ny internetbaserad psykodynamisk terapi fungerar för ungdomar som mår dåligt. Resultatet har jämförts med internetbaserad KBT, en behandling som visat sig ha god effekt. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
10h
Mettl3-mediated mRNA m6A modification controls postnatal liver development by modulating the transcription factor Hnf4a
Nature Communications, Published online: 05 August 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-32169-4 m6A is the most abundant RNA modification of eukaryotic mRNAs and is involved in various physiological and pathological processes. Here the authors show a role for Mettl3-mediated RNA m6A modification in postnatal liver development by regulating the Hnf4a-centered transcriptional network
10h
Have your parents messed you up? And three other key questions to help you regain control of your life
From genes to environment to personality, we are all manipulated by forces seemingly outside our control. But there are ways to get back in the driving seat Do you ever feel as though you're not in control of your thoughts and actions? Perhaps you become irrational when you're tired or have skipped lunch. Pour yourself a drink when you swore you wouldn't. If so, you are certainly not alone. All o
11h
Metabolic reprogramming from glycolysis to fatty acid uptake and beta-oxidation in platinum-resistant cancer cells
Nature Communications, Published online: 05 August 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-32101-w Metabolic reprogramming is associated with cancer initiation, progression and resistance to therapy. Here, the authors show that metabolic reprogramming from glycolysis to fatty acid uptake and beta-oxidation is associated with cancer-cell platinum-based chemotherapy resistance.
12h
Reactive oxygen species-responsive and Raman-traceable hydrogel combining photodynamic and immune therapy for postsurgical cancer treatment
Nature Communications, Published online: 05 August 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-32160-z Combined immune checkpoint blockade (ICB) and photodynamic therapies have huge potential but suffer from possible damage of the antibodies. Here, the authors create a ROS-responsive hydrogel that protects the ICB antibodies and allows for sustained co-delivery and demonstrate restrained regrowth of tumours in
12h
Worrying finding in California's climate initiative reveals problem with using forests to offset CO2 emissions
Researchers have found that California's forest carbon buffer pool, designed to ensure the durability of the state's multi-billion-dollar carbon offset program, is severely undercapitalized. The results show that, within the offset program's first 10 years, estimated carbon losses from wildfires have depleted at least 95% of the contributions set aside to protect against all fire risks over 100 ye
13h
The Animal Worlds That Lie Beyond Our Perception
Three recent books seek to reveal the rich sensory worlds of other animals, breaking down our human-centered perspective by pointing out our sensory blind spots and using various strategies to illuminate the vast array of non-human sensory realms that are often incredibly different from our own.
13h
LGBTQ+ groups unite to urge UK ministers to act against monkeypox
Groups across political spectrum call for outbreak of virus to be treated as public health emergency LGBTQ+ groups from across the political spectrum have joined forces to demand the government increase efforts to combat monkeypox or risk it becoming endemic in the UK. There have been more than 2,600 cases of monkeypox in the UK so far, which in the majority of the cases affects gay and bisexual
14h
Intrinsically fluorescent polyureas toward conformation-assisted metamorphosis, discoloration and intracellular drug delivery
Nature Communications, Published online: 05 August 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-32053-1 Biomimetic materials are of interest but can often suffer from limitations caused by the non-native linkages used. Here, the authors report on the creation of amino acid constructed polyureas which can self-assemble into vesicles and nanotubes with aggregation induced fluorescence and the potential for drug de
14h
Recursive Editing improves homology-directed repair through retargeting of undesired outcomes
Nature Communications, Published online: 05 August 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31944-7 CRISPR-Cas induced HDR methods tend to have a low efficiency. Here the authors report an HDR improvement strategy, Recursive Editing, that selectively retargets undesired indel outcomes to create additional opportunities for HDR; they introduce REtarget, a tool for Recursive Editing experimental design.
14h
Schneider Shorts 5.08.2022 – Useful Idiots
Schneider Shorts 5.08.2022 – russia's useful idiots, Dr Oz' emails to Dr Birx about Dr Raoult, with Harvard's undead pigs, Weizmann's artificial baby mice, Neanderthals trapped in the metaphase, four humours of depression, punished fraudsters, papermills, retractions, and new cures for cancer and obesity.
15h
Photos of the Week: Knife Angel, Paris Henge, Flamingo Tagging
Scenes from the Commonwealth Games in England, flooding in the U.S. and Japan, continued fighting in Ukraine, a new sinkhole in Chile, Beluga whales near Svalbard, an orphaned dolphin in Thailand, the McKinney Fire in California, an airshow above the Giza Pyramids, a performance at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe, and much more
15h
Metabolically engineered bacterium produces lutein?
A research group has engineered a bacterial strain capable of producing lutein. The research team applied systems metabolic engineering strategies, including substrate channeling and electron channeling, to enhance the production of lutein in an engineered Escherichia coli strain. The strategies will be also useful for the efficient production of other industrially important natural products used
18h
Sponge-like electrodes inspired by sugar cubes could improve medical monitoring
To monitor heart rhythms and muscle function, doctors often attach electrodes to a patient's skin, detecting the electrical signals that lie beneath. These impulses are vital to the early diagnosis and treatment of many disorders, but currently available electrodes have limited function or are expensive to manufacture. Researchers however, have now developed a low-cost, spongy version with improve
18h
Sponge-like electrodes inspired by sugar cubes could improve medical monitoring
To monitor heart rhythms and muscle function, doctors often attach electrodes to a patient's skin, detecting the electrical signals that lie beneath. These impulses are vital to the early diagnosis and treatment of many disorders, but currently available electrodes have limited function or are expensive to manufacture. Researchers however, have now developed a low-cost, spongy version with improve
18h
A new low-calorie sweetener could also improve gut health
From the wide variety of sodas, candies and baked goods that are sold worldwide, it's clear that people love their sweet treats. But consuming too much white table sugar or artificial sweetener can lead to health issues. In the search for a better sweetener, researchers now report a low-calorie mixture that is as sweet as table sugar and, in lab experiments, feeds 'good' gut microbes.
18h
Staff and facility administrator retention has been challenging for long-term care facilities
The pandemic has called attention to an issue that nursing home residents, their families and those who work in nursing homes have been aware of for a long time. Recruiting and retaining both the nursing home staff who provide the very personal care needed by residents and the administrators who set the tone of the workplace are key challenges in nursing homes. Regenstrief Institute and Indiana Un
18h
The Billionaire's Dilemma
Usually when rich people rage against the possibility that someone less wealthy might become their neighbor, nobody bats an eye. Why would they? NIMBYism is the dominant fact of American urban geography. But in recent years, a number of very rich people, including the billionaire investor Marc Andreessen, have positioned themselves on the other side of the debate, arguing against supply restricti
19h
Biden Admin Declares Monkeypox a Public Health Emergency
The Biden administration has officially declared monkeypox a national health emergency, nearly three months since the first outbreak of the case was detected on American soil back in May. The decision, made by the Department of Health and Human Services, comes after growing pressure from health officials and the World Health Organization declaring the outbreaks a world health emergency over a wee
21h
What Should Worry Most Americans About Our Monkeypox Response
Seventy-eight days and more than 7,000 documented cases into the United States' 2022 outbreak of monkeypox , federal officials have declared the disease a nationwide public-health emergency. With COVID-19 (you know, the other ongoing viral public-health emergency) still very much raging, the U.S. is officially in the midst of two infectious-disease crises, and must now, with limited funds, wrangl
21h
The Right's Rising Authoritarian Ally
This is an edition of The Atlantic Daily, a newsletter that guides you through the biggest stories of the day, helps you discover new ideas, and recommends the best in culture. Sign up for it here . I'm sorry to say it: We really must talk about CPAC. But first, here are three new stories from The Atlantic . Alex Jones can't pretend his way out of this reality. To Putin, Brittney Griner is a pawn
21h
E. coli engineered from stool samples can survive the hostile gut environment long enough to treat disease
Scientists have long tried to introduce genetically engineered bacteria into the gut to treat diseases. In the past, these attempts have focused on engineering common lab strains of E. coli, which cannot compete with the native gut bacteria that are well adapted to their host. Now, a group of researchers successfully engineered E. coli collected from both human and mice gut microbiomes and showed
21h
Flow-driven rotors at the nanoscale
Researchers have constructed the smallest flow-driven motors ever. Inspired by iconic Dutch windmills and biological motor proteins, they created a self-configuring flow-driven rotor from DNA that converts energy from an electrical or salt gradient into useful mechanical work. The results open new perspectives for engineering active robotics at the nanoscale.
22h
NASA Confirms Launch Date for Its Massive Moon Rocket
Roll Out The mission NASA is calling " humanity's return to the Moon " is taking a big step forward after years of hang ups. The space agency announced its first uncrewed mission around the Moon called Artemis I is now set to roll out to the launch pad on August 18 and finally launch on August 29. The first backup date is set for September 2, should something go amiss — and given NASA's disastrou
22h
Blood protein levels may flag risk of diabetes and death by cancer, shows study
People with highest levels of prostasin twice as likely to have diabetes and 43% more likely to die from cancer Doctors have identified a protein in the blood they believe could serve as an early warning sign for patients who are at risk of diabetes and death from cancer. Researchers in Sweden and China analysed two decades of health records from more than 4,500 middle-aged adults on the Malmö di
22h
Flow-driven rotors at the nanoscale
Researchers have constructed the smallest flow-driven motors ever. Inspired by iconic Dutch windmills and biological motor proteins, they created a self-configuring flow-driven rotor from DNA that converts energy from an electrical or salt gradient into useful mechanical work. The results open new perspectives for engineering active robotics at the nanoscale.
22h
Optimizing SWAP networks for quantum computing
Researchers have demonstrated how a smart compiler specifically tailored for superconducting quantum hardware can optimize circuits and networks and execute less error-prone quantum algorithms such as Quantum Approximate Optimization Algorithm (QAOA) important for quantum computing.
22h
North Korean Hackers Are Reportedly Going After Gmail Accounts
Skimming Emails North Korean hackers are using never-before-seen methods to bypass Google's email security measures to read and download messages and attachments — all without Google detecting it. They're using simple browser extensions to steal mail data directly, and are reportedly targeting users in the US, Europe, and South Korea, according to a blog post by cybersecurity firm Volexity — soph
23h
Air Force Pilots to Fight AI-Based Enemies Using AR Helmets
Ender's Game Like something yanked straight out of a sci-fi movie, Air Force fighter pilots are going to start using augmented reality headsets for combat training. "Better, faster, cheaper," Daniel Robinson, founder and CEO of Red 6, the AR manufacturer that nabbed a $70 million contract with the Air Force, told the Washington Post . "This is the way we'll train [pilots] in the future." Accordin
23h
Whither Batgirl?
In the world of moviemaking, it's generally considered good business to release the movies you make. After all, they can cost tens of millions of dollars to produce, and (pardon me for getting overly technical here) selling tickets for the general public to view them can help recoup that cost. Streaming TV has changed that calculation a little. Now films are sometimes made not to sell tickets but
23h
Cancer immune therapy using engineered ‛tail-flipping' nanoliposomes targeting alternatively activated macrophages
Nature Communications, Published online: 04 August 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-32091-9 Tumor-associated macrophages are mostly pro-tumorigenic, due to their re-programming by the tumor microenvironment. Here authors show that nanoliposomes, incorporating phospholipids with a flipping-tail chain, are engulfed specifically by intratumoral, alternatively activated macrophages, while delivering a ca
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Upgrade Your Rig With $120 Off During the SteelSeries Gaming Bundle Deal
It's hot as heck out, and one of the best ways to beat the heat is to buckle down inside your house and get your game on. If your rig is a bit outdated, there's never been a better time to improve your setup with the latest and greatest gaming tech from SteelSeries. There are big sales on its line of mechanical keyboards, or if you prefer, an all-in-one gaming tech package. Here's a selection of
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Elon Musk Responds to Rumors That He's Building His Own Texas Airport
Not True Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk took to Twitter today — where else? — to quell rumors that he intends to build his own private airport in central Texas. "Not true," he tweeted at the Texas outlet My San Antonio . "Tesla is five mins from Austin International airport," he wrote, adding that it "would be silly to build another private airport, however the existing commercial airport needs a
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Best RC Cars in 2022
RC cars are perfect for kids, or kids at heart. Like Nerf guns, Lego, and Transformers, there's a timeless quality to RC cars that makes them beloved — whether you're a boomer or a zoomer. Of course, because RC technology spans decades, RC cars have come a long way since Don Draper's times and can pull off some seriously surprising feats including super-fast speeds, sleek aesthetics, and the abil
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These baboons borrowed a third of their genes from their cousins
Genetic analyses of baboons in Kenya reveals that most of them carry traces of hybridization in their DNA. As a result of interbreeding, about a third of their genetic makeup consists of genes from another, closely-related species. Fifty years of observations turned up no obvious signs that hybrids fare any worse than their counterparts. But the new findings suggest that appearances can be deceivi
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Complex coacervate droplets as a model material for studying the electrodynamic response of biological materials
Manipulating solid particles of a few micrometers in size using an electric field has been of great interest to physicists. These controllable particles can be assembled into dynamic chains that can effectively control the flow of liquids in thin tubes like capillaries. Replacing these solid particles with liquid droplets would allow for previously unachievable electrorheology applications in biot
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Fruit flies: Summer pests or scientific marvel?
Fly-swatting season is here. No sooner will you place your fresh strawberries on the kitchen counter than will the first fruit fly arrive. It won't take long for a platoon of Drosophila buddies to be hovering about the spoils.
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Earbud chirps may one day detect infections
Earbuds may soon be able to detect common ear infections and other ailments, according to a new study. The "EarHealth" system pairs Bluetooth earbuds with a smartphone that's equipped with a deep learning platform. Deep learning is a type of machine learning, which itself is a form of artificial intelligence. EarHealth works by sending a chirp through the earbuds of a healthy user. It records how
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A new therapeutic drug for Alzheimer's disease without inflammatory side effects
Although Aduhelm, a monoclonal antibody targeting amyloid beta (A?), recently became the first US FDA approved drug for Alzheimer's disease (AD) based on its ability to decrease A? plaque burden in AD patients, its effect on cognitive improvement is still controversial. Moreover, about 40% of the patients treated with this antibody experienced serious side effects including cerebral edemas (ARIA-E
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Kids with obesity often get too few (or too many) tests
Most kids in the United States diagnosed with obesity don't receive recommended laboratory tests for co-occurring conditions such as diabetes and liver disease, according to a new study. Many also receive potentially unnecessary tests, and both can be harmful to patients, the researchers say. In 2007, the American Academy of Pediatrics released a set of recommendations for how to assess the healt
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Up a creek without paddle? Researchers suggest 'gunwale bobbing'
Stand up in a canoe and you'll probably find yourself in the water before too long. Jump up and down on the upper edges of the sides of the canoe, and you'll likely end up in the drink as well. But get the balance right and you'll be able to move yourself along by as much as one meter per second, according to a study published in Physical Review Fluids examining gunwale bobbing.
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Spain Forcing Public Places to Set AC at or Above 81 Degrees Fahrenheit
Hot Topic Despite Europe wilting under some of the hottest heatwaves on record, Spain has issued a controversial decree preventing its citizens from setting the thermostat too low in public areas. As Euronews reports , the decree bans air conditioning units from being set at temperatures lower than 81 degrees Fahrenheit in all public and commercial buildings, which includes shops, train stations,
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The Race to Remake the $2.5 Trillion Steel Industry With Green Steel
In the city of Woburn, Massachusetts, a suburb just north of Boston, a cadre of engineers and scientists in white coats inspected an orderly stack of brick-sized, gunmetal-gray steel ingots on a desk inside a neon-illuminated lab space. What they were looking at was a batch of steel created using an innovative manufacturing method, one that Boston Metal , a company that spun out a decade ago from
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Nine Years? Brittney Griner Is a Political Prisoner
Sign up for Tom's newsletter, Peacefield, here. Brittney Griner has been sentenced to nine years in a Russian penal colony for possessing a tiny amount of cannabis oil. Griner's case was never about a minor offense against Russia law (which was real, for what that's worth). It's about what kind of country Russia has become as its president, Vladimir Putin, has descended into anti-Western hysteria
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Team discovers new plant gene reprogramming mechanism
Researchers Albert Cairó and Karel Riha of the Central European Institute of Technology (CEITEC) and their colleagues have discovered a previously unknown mechanism that is responsible for reprogramming gene expression in plants during the transition period when one cell differentiates into another one. The mechanism occurs at the end of meiosis, a specialized cell division essential for sexual re
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Team discovers new plant gene reprogramming mechanism
Researchers Albert Cairó and Karel Riha of the Central European Institute of Technology (CEITEC) and their colleagues have discovered a previously unknown mechanism that is responsible for reprogramming gene expression in plants during the transition period when one cell differentiates into another one. The mechanism occurs at the end of meiosis, a specialized cell division essential for sexual re
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Jaw-Dropping Video Shows Massive Volcano Erupting Near Airport
Dancing Fire Talk about a warm welcome. Iceland's colossal Fagradalsfjall volcano erupted not far from its capital's airport on Wednesday afternoon — and judging by the photos captured by adventurous onlookers, it was certainly a sight to behold. According to The Washington Post , the eruption took place roughly ten miles from the Keflavik International Airport and 20 miles from the Icelandic cap
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The unrecognized value of grass | Science
FULL ACCESSIntroduction to Special Issue Share on The unrecognized value of grassBianca Lopez, Pamela J. Hines, and Caroline AshScience4 Aug 2022Vol 377, Issue 6606pp. 590-591DOI: 10.1126/science.add6362 NEXT ARTICLEThe history and challenge of grassy biomesNext Meadows of Neptune seagrass (Posidonia oceanica) were once widespread throughout the Mediterranean but are threatened by climate chang…
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When internships disappoint | Science
Add your voice to Science! In this NextGen Voices survey, a reader asks for your advice! Have you been in this situation or one like it? Do you have any tips that you would like to share? Become a NextGen Voices peer mentor by contributing your thoughts!
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Primary forest loss in biodiverse Indian states | Science
Primary forests—old-growth forests that have remained undisturbed by humankind—comprise one-third of the world's forests. These dense, wild forests are important habitats for unique species (1) and provide a variety of ecosystem services, including global biosphere-atmosphere CO2 exchange (2). Such forests are irreplaceable in terms of biodiversity value and ecosystem services, and replantation to
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Climate change threatens Pakistan's snow leopards | Science
The snow leopard (Panthera uncia) population currently spans the mountainous regions of 12 countries, including more than 80,000 square kilometers in northern Pakistan (1). As a result of human encroachment and hunting, snow leopards are classified as Vulnerable (2). Climate change is exacerbating the threats the snow leopard already faces as well as transforming their environment in ways that mak
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Ozone-reducing urban plants: Choose carefully | Science
FULL ACCESSLetter Share on Ozone-reducing urban plants: Choose carefullyPierre Sicard [email protected], Evgenios Agathokleous, Alessandra De Marco, and Elena PaolettiScience4 Aug 2022Vol 377, Issue 6606p. 585DOI: 10.1126/science.add9734 PREVIOUS ARTICLEInequality goes viralPreviousNEXT ARTICLEClimate change threatens Pakistan's snow leopardsNext References and NotesMature common beech trees ar…
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A key time for UK–Europe science | Science
The opening line of a recent Financial Times article put it best: "Relations between the UK and EU badly need a reset." Although the article was mostly about geopolitics, the disconnect also applies to science and the current uncertainty about whether the …
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Watch a Guy Take Off With an Electric Backpack Helicopter
Chopper Jetpack Ever wondered what it's like to fly around with an electric helicopter strapped to your back? Australian company CopterPack just teased a second generation of its part-helicopter, part-jetpack design — and we're still not entirely sure how it works or how safe it is. The flashy video , which was shared on YouTube this week, shows a man taking off into the night sky, with an epic s
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The Earth Is Spinning so Fast, We Might Have to Turn Back the Clock
The Earth's spin is really starting to pick up speed. As CBS News reports , June 29 was the fastest day in recorded history, clocking in at 1.59 milliseconds shorter than the average 24 hours we know and love. According to a recent study , the Earth started to spin faster back in 2016 — and, on average, the days have become shorter ever since. The rotation change hasn't been enough to render ever
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Pregnant women with IBD face increased birth risks
Pregnant women with inflammatory bowel disease and their babies face increased risks and complications compared to women without the disease, according to a new study. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a term used for Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, which are characterized by chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. IBD mainly affects young people, which includes women who ar
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Children with rare genetic disorders more likely to be diagnosed with developmental, behavioral and mental health problems, study finds
With the advent of rapid whole genome sequencing, children presenting with an intellectual disability or developmental delay are recommended to have their DNA sequenced to identify the underlying genetic cause. Researchers have now published the results of an analysis of data from almost 2,800 young people with rare genomic variants — changes to their DNA — that are associated with intellectual
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The Horrors of Being Extremely Online
Influencers love Hollywood, but Hollywood doesn't seem to love them back. Social-media celebrities might star in movies and reality shows, but stories about them tend to be less kind. Emily in Paris scoffs at its protagonist's need to post everything she sees. Ingrid Goes West treats Instagram as a breeding ground for stalkers. Even Zola , which capably captures the internet's dissociative effect
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How do PA, ABA, and CBF pathways synergistically regulate melon cold tolerance?
Polyamines (PAs), including putrescine (Put, a diamine), spermidine (Spd, a triamine), and spermine (Spm, a tetramine), are low-molecular-weight polycations and aliphatic nitrogen-containing substances. They play important roles in the overall life cycle of plants, from seed germination to fruit ripening, abscission, and senescence. There has been a growing interest in the study of PAs involved in
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How do PA, ABA, and CBF pathways synergistically regulate melon cold tolerance?
Polyamines (PAs), including putrescine (Put, a diamine), spermidine (Spd, a triamine), and spermine (Spm, a tetramine), are low-molecular-weight polycations and aliphatic nitrogen-containing substances. They play important roles in the overall life cycle of plants, from seed germination to fruit ripening, abscission, and senescence. There has been a growing interest in the study of PAs involved in
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A matter of concentration: Molecular mechanisms of water homeostasis
When making a soup, maintaining the correct balance of liquid and salt is key. Similarly, maintaining the balance of water and electrolytes is an important physiological process in the human body, and disruption of this process can have serious consequences. The kidneys regulate the amount of water and solutes taken in and excreted from the body through a process known as urine concentration. Rece
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A matter of concentration: Molecular mechanisms of water homeostasis
When making a soup, maintaining the correct balance of liquid and salt is key. Similarly, maintaining the balance of water and electrolytes is an important physiological process in the human body, and disruption of this process can have serious consequences. The kidneys regulate the amount of water and solutes taken in and excreted from the body through a process known as urine concentration. Rece
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Byte-Sized Review: Dyson V12 Detect Slim Is Powered With Freaking Lasers
There are vacuum cleaners, and there are Dyson vacuum cleaners. Once you take the expensive plunge, there's really no going back. But what if the top-of-the-line cordless vacuum became just a little more powerful when it came to busting dust? Dyson V12 Detect has taken the Dr. Evil approach and attached lasers to the head of its main head attachment, aiming to amplify its perfect 10 performance u
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Critical thinking protecting Ukrainians against Russia's disinformation campaign
In disinformation campaigns, like the long-standing pro-Kremlin campaign targeted at Ukraine by the Russian government, who is most at risk of believing false information? A study led by McGill University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) found that Ukrainians who engaged in more analytic thinking were less likely to believe the pro-Kremlin disinformation, even if they were gener
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New chip-based beam steering device lays groundwork for smaller, cheaper lidar
Researchers have developed a new chip-based beam steering technology that provides a promising route to small, cost-effective and high-performance lidar systems. Lidar, which uses laser pulses to acquire 3D information about a scene or object, is used in a wide range of applications such as autonomous driving, free-space optical communications, 3D holography, biomedical sensing and virtual reality
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Monoclonal antibody prevents malaria in US adults: Study
One injection of a candidate monoclonal antibody (mAb) known as L9LS was found to be safe and highly protective in U.S. adults exposed to the malaria parasite, according to new results. Additional clinical trials evaluating if L9LS can prevent malaria over six to 12 months against seasonal and perennial transmission are underway in infants and children in Mali and Kenya, where malaria is endemic.
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All roads lead to big cities
When the evolution of towns and of roads are modeled together, the natural landscape alone is enough to predict the actual arrangement of real towns.
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How the visual system develops in mice
A new study in mice has revealed never-before-seen details about how the complicated visual network forms in them. This research could inform future research into the treatment of congenital blindness. But given the parallels between biological neural tissue and digital artificial intelligence, this research could also help software engineers develop better and more general-purpose artificial inte
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Metabolically engineered bacterium produces lutein
Lutein is classified as a xanthophyll chemical that is abundant in egg yolk, fruits, and vegetables. It protects the eye from oxidative damage from radiation and reduces the risk of eye diseases including macular degeneration and cataracts. Commercialized products featuring lutein are derived from the extracts of the marigold flower, which is known to harbor abundant amounts of lutein. However, th
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Metabolically engineered bacterium produces lutein
Lutein is classified as a xanthophyll chemical that is abundant in egg yolk, fruits, and vegetables. It protects the eye from oxidative damage from radiation and reduces the risk of eye diseases including macular degeneration and cataracts. Commercialized products featuring lutein are derived from the extracts of the marigold flower, which is known to harbor abundant amounts of lutein. However, th
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Putting a new spin on the football spiral
Only a handful of researchers have studied why an American football flies in such a unique trajectory, rifling through the air with remarkable precision, but also swerving, wobbling, and even tumbling as it barrels downfield. Now, ballistics experts at Stevens Institute of Technology have, for the first time, applied their understanding of artillery shells to explain this unique movement, creating
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Wide view of early universe hints at galaxy among earliest ever detected
Two new images from NASA's James Webb Space Telescope show what may be among the earliest galaxies ever observed. Both images include objects from more than 13 billion years ago, and one offers a much wider field of view than Webb's First Deep Field image, which was released amid great fanfare July 12. The images represent some of the first out of a major collaboration of astronomers and other aca
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Sponge-like electrodes inspired by sugar cubes could improve medical monitoring
To monitor heart rhythms and muscle function, doctors often attach electrodes to a patient's skin, detecting the electrical signals that lie beneath. These impulses are vital to the early diagnosis and treatment of many disorders, but currently available electrodes have limited function or are expensive to manufacture. Researchers reporting in ACS Nano, however, have now developed a low-cost, spon
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Most people with opioid use disorder don't get medications
The vast majority, or 86.6%, of people living with opioid use disorder are not receiving evidence-based, life-saving medications, research indicates. Medications such as methadone, buprenorphine, and extended-release naltrexone are proven to reduce opioid overdoses by more than 50%. The study, published in the International Journal of Drug Policy , examines the gap between new estimates of opioid
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An electronic nematic liquid in BaNi2As2
Nature Communications, Published online: 04 August 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-32112-7 Electronic nematicity is typically associated with the breaking of rotational symmetry. Here the authors report unusual nematicity in BaNi2As2, manifested in a large splitting of the optical phonon mode above the structural transition temperature, and link it to the coupling between the lattice and nematic flu
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Shiver me muscles: why do you shake when you're cold?
As a proud mid-Atlantic East Coaster, I thought I was relatively well adapted to colder winter climates. After being in sunny San Diego for a few years, however, I have realized that this is NOT so when a slight breeze invokes a shiver in my spine, or sitting outside on a 55 degree day can […]
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Building molecular bridges: New crystal engineering strategy to design ultrabright fluorescent solid dyes
When it comes to designing ultrabright solid-state fluorescent materials, bridged crystal designs might be the key to enabling monomeric emission and accessing novel crystalline systems, reveals a new study. A research team has now prepared ultrabright fluorescent dyes using di-bridged distyrylbenzenes (DSBs) with flexible alkylene bridges, using a novel crystal engineering study. The findings are
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This startup wants to copy you into an embryo for organ harvesting
In a search for novel forms of longevity medicine, a biotech company based in Israel says it intends to create embryo-stage versions of people in order to harvest tissues for use in transplant treatments. The company, Renewal Bio, is pursuing recent advances in stem-cell technology and artificial wombs demonstrated by Jacob Hanna, a biologist at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot. Earli
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Revealed: how climate breakdown is supercharging toll of extreme weather
Guardian analysis shows human-caused global heating is driving more frequent and deadly disasters across the planet, in most comprehensive compilation to date The devastating intensification of extreme weather is laid bare today in a Guardian analysis that shows how people across the world are losing their lives and livelihoods due to more deadly and more frequent heatwaves, floods, wildfires and
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Building molecular bridges: New crystal engineering strategy to design ultrabright fluorescent solid dyes
When it comes to designing ultrabright solid-state fluorescent materials, bridged crystal designs might be the key to enabling monomeric emission and accessing novel crystalline systems, reveals a new study. A research team has now prepared ultrabright fluorescent dyes using di-bridged distyrylbenzenes (DSBs) with flexible alkylene bridges, using a novel crystal engineering study. The findings are
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Giant Pieces of Chinese Space Junk Reportedly Found by Fishermen
Safety Hazard According to a report by the Filipino government , pieces of a recently-launched Chinese Long March 5B rocket were discovered by fishermen in the island nation's Mindoro Strait — which could add to growing public safety concerns over recent Chinese space activity. To recap: China's Long March 5B rockets, used in its efforts to build a new space station , have proven to be incredibly
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Bacteria busting proteins offer potential for smarter drugs
A specific group of bacteria-killing proteins inside the immune system could hold the key to developing smarter and more effective drugs capable of eliminating certain infectious diseases including meningitis, pneumonia and sepsis, according to new research.
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Our brain is a prediction machine that is always active
Our brain works a bit like the autocomplete function on your phone — it is constantly trying to guess the next word when we are listening to a book, reading or conducting a conversation. Contrary to speech recognition computers, our brains are constantly making predictions at different levels, from meaning and grammar to specific speech sounds.
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Low addiction risk with medical use of ketamine: Animal study
Commonly used in medicine as an anaesthetic, ketamine is also increasingly prescribed to relieve depressive symptoms. This very fast-acting psychotropic drug is particularly indicated for the treatment of patients resistant to conventional antidepressants. However, its prescription has been the subject of debate: some believe that it presents a strong addictive risk.
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Ultrathin 2D cuprate with active periodic copper single sites, a new catalyst for Chan-lam coupling
This study is led by Dr. Lu Jiong from National University of Singapore (NUS), in collaboration with Dr. Koh Ming Joo (NUS), Dr. Chun Zhang (NUS) and Dr. Honghan Fei from (Tongji University). This team has devised a ligand exchange strategy to exfoliate bulk cuprate crystals into atomically thin 2D cuprate layers whose basal plane contains periodic arrays of accessible unsaturated Cu(II) single si
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New method enables efficient sample preparation for single-cell proteomics
Single-cell proteomics provides information about a cell at its protein level, which can prove useful for anticancer drug resistance and cell differentiation research. However, current proteomics methods are not versatile and often lead to high sample losses. To overcome this issue, researchers have now developed a new sample preparation method called 'water droplet-in-oil digestion' that minimize
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A better way to quantify radiation damage in materials
Researchers find much of the damage inside nuclear reactors is so small that it has eluded previous tests. Their new tool provides a way to directly measure this damage, potentially opening a path for the safe operation of nuclear power plants far beyond their present licensed lifetimes.
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Machine learning enables optimal design of anti-biofouling polymer brush films
Machine learning, a tool increasingly used for the discovery and design of new materials, has now been adopted by researchers to design polymer brush films with desirable protein adsorption properties. Using a random forest regression model, they have identified the properties that affect protein adsorption and cell adhesion onto these films, providing a guideline for the development of anti-biofo
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Ziggy Stardust and the 54 Spiders: New spider genus named after David Bowie
Senckenberg arachnologist Dr. Peter Jäger named a new genus from the wandering spider family in honor of the late pop musician David Bowie—on the occasion of the music legend's 75th birthday. Within the genus Bowie gen. nov. originating in Asia, he described 54 new species of spiders and named them after Bowie's musical work. By naming the spiders after a celebrity, the spider researcher from Fran
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Ziggy Stardust and the 54 Spiders: New spider genus named after David Bowie
Senckenberg arachnologist Dr. Peter Jäger named a new genus from the wandering spider family in honor of the late pop musician David Bowie—on the occasion of the music legend's 75th birthday. Within the genus Bowie gen. nov. originating in Asia, he described 54 new species of spiders and named them after Bowie's musical work. By naming the spiders after a celebrity, the spider researcher from Fran
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Microbes emit nitrogen oxides—perhaps more than you think
Microbes emit nitrogen oxides, or NOx. This is important because it involves surface-earth nitrogen (N) cycle, which strongly interacts with environmental quality, food production, biosphere and climate changes. A study led by Drs. Wei Song and Xue-Yan Liu from Tianjin University, China, shows that NOx emissions from the microbial N cycle account for about 24%, 58%, and 31% of the total NOx emissi
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How do plants regulate their sugar metabolism?
To carry out their functions in the cell, many proteins require the chemical properties of bound metals such as copper. If this nutrient is in short supply, plants respond by enhancing its uptake and by replacing some copper-utilizing proteins by copper-independent proteins. Squamosa promoter binding protein-like 7 (SPL7) mediates this response. Researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) have no
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Early-life acquisition of antimicrobial resistance in newborn children from low- and middle-income countries
Every year, almost 7 million potentially serious bacterial infections are estimated to occur in newborns, resulting in more than 550,000 annual neonatal deaths. Most of these infections and deaths happen in LMICs, where often scarce resources can limit the capacity to diagnose and treat sepsis. These problems are further complicated by the global rise of antimicrobial resistance (AMR), particularl
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E. coli engineered from stool samples can survive the hostile gut environment long enough to treat disease
Scientists have long tried to introduce genetically engineered bacteria into the gut to treat diseases. In the past, these attempts have focused on engineering common lab strains of E. coli, which cannot compete with the native gut bacteria that are well adapted to their host. Now, a group of researchers from the University of California, San Diego, successfully engineered E. coli collected from b
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In search of universal laws of diffusion with resetting
The manner in which animals penetrate a neighborhood searching for food shows similarities to the movements of liquid particles in plant capillaries or gas molecules near an absorbing wall. These phenomena—and many others in nature—can be thought of as processes called anomalous diffusion with resetting. Recent research suggests that they have properties of a very universal nature.
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Microbes emit nitrogen oxides—perhaps more than you think
Microbes emit nitrogen oxides, or NOx. This is important because it involves surface-earth nitrogen (N) cycle, which strongly interacts with environmental quality, food production, biosphere and climate changes. A study led by Drs. Wei Song and Xue-Yan Liu from Tianjin University, China, shows that NOx emissions from the microbial N cycle account for about 24%, 58%, and 31% of the total NOx emissi
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How do plants regulate their sugar metabolism?
To carry out their functions in the cell, many proteins require the chemical properties of bound metals such as copper. If this nutrient is in short supply, plants respond by enhancing its uptake and by replacing some copper-utilizing proteins by copper-independent proteins. Squamosa promoter binding protein-like 7 (SPL7) mediates this response. Researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) have no
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Access to services is often worst in suburban areas
The world we live in is often divided using a binary urban-rural distinction, despite a huge gradient of settlement patterns in and around cities—ranging from urban to the most remote rural areas. New research led through a joint U.K.-India research project and published in Nature Sustainability, considers urbanization by looking at shifts in natural, engineered and institutional infrastructure. T
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Optimizing SWAP networks for quantum computing
A research partnership at the Advanced Quantum Testbed (AQT) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and Chicago-based Super.tech (acquired by ColdQuanta in May 2022) demonstrated how to optimize the execution of the ZZ SWAP network protocol, important to quantum computing. The team also introduced a new technique for quantum error mitigation that will improve the network protocol'
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Early-life acquisition of antimicrobial resistance in newborn children from low- and middle-income countries
Every year, almost 7 million potentially serious bacterial infections are estimated to occur in newborns, resulting in more than 550,000 annual neonatal deaths. Most of these infections and deaths happen in LMICs, where often scarce resources can limit the capacity to diagnose and treat sepsis. These problems are further complicated by the global rise of antimicrobial resistance (AMR), particularl
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Researchers create flow-driven rotors at the nanoscale
Researchers from TU Delft have constructed the smallest flow-driven motors in the world. Inspired by iconic Dutch windmills and biological motor proteins, they created a self-configuring, flow-driven rotor from DNA that converts energy from an electrical or salt gradient into useful mechanical work. The results open new perspectives for engineering active robotics at the nanoscale. The article is
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E. coli engineered from stool samples can survive the hostile gut environment long enough to treat disease
Scientists have long tried to introduce genetically engineered bacteria into the gut to treat diseases. In the past, these attempts have focused on engineering common lab strains of E. coli, which cannot compete with the native gut bacteria that are well adapted to their host. Now, a group of researchers from the University of California, San Diego, successfully engineered E. coli collected from b
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Sterile mice produce rat sperm
Researchers generated rat sperm cells inside sterile mice using a technique called blastocyst complementation. The advance appears August 4 in the journal Stem Cell Reports.
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Machine learning enables optimal design of anti-biofouling polymer brush films
Machine learning, a tool increasingly used for the discovery and design of new materials, has now been adopted by researchers to design polymer brush films with desirable protein adsorption properties. Using a random forest regression model, they have identified the properties that affect protein adsorption and cell adhesion onto these films, providing a guideline for the development of anti-biofo
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Ambitious Researchers Want to Use AI to Talk to All Animals
Kingdom Come A group of researchers are looking to use machine learning to translate animal "languages" into something humans can understand — and they want to apply it to the whole animal kingdom, a highly ambitious plan to say the least. As The Guardian reports , California-based nonprofit Earth Species Project (ESP) — which was founded in 2017 with the help of Silicon Valley investors like Lin
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NASA: Tonga Volcanic Eruption Blasted 'Unprecedented' Amount of Water Into Atmosphere
In late 2021, an underwater volcano in the Tonga island chain awakened and began belching ash into the sky. The eruption culminated with an enormous explosion on January 15, 2022, and scientists are still working to understand the impact of this cataclysmic event. A new study from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory suggests that the eruption may have sent so much water vapor into the atmosphere tha
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At Long Last, Mathematical Proof That Black Holes Are Stable
In 1963, the mathematician Roy Kerr found a solution to Einstein's equations that precisely described the space-time outside what we now call a rotating black hole. (The term wouldn't be coined for a few more years.) In the nearly six decades since his achievement, researchers have tried to show that these so-called Kerr black holes are stable. What that means, explained Jérémie Szeftel… Source
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Bacterial membrane transporter helps pathogens to hide from immune system
The transport of substances across the membrane into the cell is linked to specific membrane transport proteins. Researchers at the University Hospital Bonn (UKB) and the University of Bonn, in collaboration with an international team, have now succeeded in elucidating the molecular structure of a completely new class of such membrane transporters. In addition to the Bonn scientists, researchers f
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Proteins and natural language: Artificial intelligence enables the design of novel proteins
Artificial intelligence (AI) has created new possibilities for designing tailor-made proteins to solve everything from medical to ecological problems. A research team at the University of Bayreuth led by Prof. Dr. Birte Höcker has now successfully applied a computer-based natural language processing model to protein research. Completely independently, the ProtGPT2 model designs new proteins that a
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Individual genetics help determine composition of the gut microbiome
Microorganisms are involved in nearly all biological processes on earth. As an important component of a metaorganism, i.e., the community of a complex living organism with colonizing microorganisms, they are a central building block of life on our planet and of great importance to the health of humans, animals and plants. For several years, scientists at Kiel University, among others, have investi
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Unlocking the recipe for designer magnetic particles for next generation computing technologies
Traditional computing is increasingly being replaced by artificial intelligence (AI) techniques to achieve pattern recognition capabilities across many domains, including healthcare, manufacturing and personal computing. The increasing complexity of "neural networks" required for AI capabilities causes an exponential rise in energy consumption. In the face of ever-shrinking energy budgets, there i
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Bacterial membrane transporter helps pathogens to hide from immune system
The transport of substances across the membrane into the cell is linked to specific membrane transport proteins. Researchers at the University Hospital Bonn (UKB) and the University of Bonn, in collaboration with an international team, have now succeeded in elucidating the molecular structure of a completely new class of such membrane transporters. In addition to the Bonn scientists, researchers f
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New magnesium superionic conductor for lithium-free solid-state batteries
The development of highly efficient energy storage devices that can store renewable energy is crucial to a sustainable future. In today's world, solid-state rechargeable lithium ion (Li+) batteries are the state of the art. But lithium is a rare earth metal, and society's dependence on the element is likely to lead to a rapid decline in resources and subsequent price hikes.
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Tuning strategies and structure effects of electrocatalysts for the carbon dioxide reduction reaction
Excessive carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel consumption lead to serious climate and environmental problems, such as increasing global average temperature and sea-level rise. The crucial link is diminishing greenhouse gas (mainly CO2) concentrations in the air, which requires efficient CO2 conversions and utilizations. Electrocatalytic reduction reaction of carbon dioxide (CO2RR) can direct
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Proteins and natural language: Artificial intelligence enables the design of novel proteins
Artificial intelligence (AI) has created new possibilities for designing tailor-made proteins to solve everything from medical to ecological problems. A research team at the University of Bayreuth led by Prof. Dr. Birte Höcker has now successfully applied a computer-based natural language processing model to protein research. Completely independently, the ProtGPT2 model designs new proteins that a
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Individual genetics help determine composition of the gut microbiome
Microorganisms are involved in nearly all biological processes on earth. As an important component of a metaorganism, i.e., the community of a complex living organism with colonizing microorganisms, they are a central building block of life on our planet and of great importance to the health of humans, animals and plants. For several years, scientists at Kiel University, among others, have investi
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Primary care physicians need 26.7 hours in the day
It would take a primary care physician 26.7 hours per day to follow national recommendation guidelines for preventative, chronic disease and acute care for an average number of patients, research finds. That breaks down to 14.1 hours/day for preventive care, 7.2 hours/day for chronic disease care, 2.2 hours/day for acute care, and 3.2 hours/day for documentation and inbox management. The research
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When the Whole Team Can't Stop Fighting | Naked and Afraid XL
Stream Naked and Afraid XL on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/naked-and-afraid-xl #NakedAndAfraid #Discovery #NakedAndAfraidXL Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitte
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Testing shows photoemission orbital tomography can detect sigma orbitals
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Germany and Austria reports that it is possible to use photoemission orbital tomography to detect σ orbitals. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes modifying one aspect of photoemission orbital tomography to make σ orbitals visible.
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New chip-based beam steering device lays groundwork for smaller, cheaper lidar
Researchers have developed a new chip-based beam steering technology that provides a promising route to small, cost-effective and high-performance lidar (or light detection and ranging) systems. Lidar, which uses laser pulses to acquire 3D information about a scene or object, is used in a wide range of applications such as autonomous driving, free-space optical communications, 3D holography, biome
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The Coronavirus Has One Strategy We Can't Vaccinate Against
By the time a cell senses that it's been infected by a virus, it generally knows it is doomed. Soon, it will be busted up by the body's immunological patrol or detonated by the invader itself. So the moribund cell plays its trump card: It bleats out microscopic shrieks that danger is nigh. These intercellular messages, ferried about by molecules called interferons, serve as a warning signal to ne
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NIH To Fund Scientific Rigor Initiative
This is a great idea, and in fact is long overdue. The NIH is awarding various grants to establish educational materials and centers to teach principles of scientific rigor to researchers. This may seem redundant, but it absolutely isn't. At present principles of research are taught in basic form during scientific courses, but advanced principles are largely left to individual mentorship. This cr
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Astronomy data and the search for habitable worlds
In 1610, Galileo Galilei peered through a telescope and observed, "I have seen Jupiter accompanied by three fixed stars, totally invisible by their smallness. The planets are seen very rotund, like little full moons." In fact, what he saw with his eyes, magnified by his early telescope, were the largest moons of our solar system's largest planet, Jupiter. Galileo eventually identified Europa, Call
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Demographic dilemma: Slowing population growth, not pandemic, at the root of US worker shortage
Supply chain struggles have been widely blamed for the inability to meet consumer and business demand throughout the pandemic. While fixing the supply chain should be a top priority, it is worker scarcity, driven by the lack of basic, long-term population growth that is the true underlying cause—and a critical future challenge for the economies of the United States, and particularly California, ac
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A Surgery Robot Will Board the ISS in 2024
(Photo: Craig Chandler/University of Nebraska-Lincoln, University Communication) After nearly 20 years of development, a small remote-controlled surgery robot is preparing to join the most exclusive medical arena currently known: the International Space Station (ISS). In partnership with robotics company Virtual Incision, engineers at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln have devised a narrow robot
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Science and practice work together to develop insect protection measures
In the FInAL project, researchers from the Leibniz Center for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF) are testing measures for insect protection. Since 2018, they have been investigating possibilities for the insect-friendly management of lowland fen soils in a specially established landscape laboratory in Havelland, Brandenburg. These soils can only be used to a limited extent for agriculture, but
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Digital dermatitis: Genes influence risk for global cattle disease
Two tiny mutations in the genome of cattle likely cause some animals to be significantly more susceptible to digital dermatitis, an extremely painful disease that is widespread in cattle kept indoors. The two candidate genes were discovered by an international team of researchers from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU), the University of Göttingen and the University of Wisconsin-Madis
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Science and practice work together to develop insect protection measures
In the FInAL project, researchers from the Leibniz Center for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF) are testing measures for insect protection. Since 2018, they have been investigating possibilities for the insect-friendly management of lowland fen soils in a specially established landscape laboratory in Havelland, Brandenburg. These soils can only be used to a limited extent for agriculture, but
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Digital dermatitis: Genes influence risk for global cattle disease
Two tiny mutations in the genome of cattle likely cause some animals to be significantly more susceptible to digital dermatitis, an extremely painful disease that is widespread in cattle kept indoors. The two candidate genes were discovered by an international team of researchers from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU), the University of Göttingen and the University of Wisconsin-Madis
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An interstellar meteor struck Earth in 2014, and now scientists want to search for it at the bottom of the ocean
In 2014, an object crashed into the ocean just off the coast of Papua New Guinea. Data collected at the time indicated that the meteorite just might be an interstellar object, and if that's true, then it's only the third such object known (after 'Oumuamua and Borisov), and the first known to exist on Earth. Launching an undersea expedition to find it would be a long shot, but the scientific payoff
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How well can weather experts predict unprecedented heat waves?
In late June 2021, an extreme heat wave impacted the Pacific Northwest of North America, with temperatures surpassing previous records by significant margins, causing more than 1,000 excess deaths and affecting infrastructure and wildlife. An analysis published in Weather evaluated the prediction of this heat wave by the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts' (ECMWF) Integrated Foreca
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Addressing climate change: Plants instead of industrial solutions
Growing up in Fairhope, Alabama, in the mid-20th century, Gregory Benford engaged in more than his share of character-building employment. In sun-parched farm fields, he chopped sugar cane and bagged potatoes. On shrimping and fishing boats operating out of Mobile Bay, he hauled in nets laden with the ocean's produce.
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Climate windows of opportunity for plant expansion during the Phanerozoic
Nature Communications, Published online: 04 August 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-32077-7 Climatic variables have played a significant role in plant evolution across the Phanerozoic. Here, the authors link climate with a new dynamic vegetation model to identify two windows of opportunity for plant biomass expansion, corresponding with the expansion of land plants and the angiosperm radiation.
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Americans tend not to know about AI in journalism
Although artificial intelligence has a growing role in journalism, research finds that Americans don't know about AI's role in their lives—or their news. Technology has repeatedly transformed the news media industry—telegraph, radio, television , and then the internet. Yet despite these evolutions, technology remained the medium and human journalists the messengers. The introduction of AI has cha
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Drinking Coffee Reduces Risk of Kidney Injury, Study Finds
(Photo: Emre/Unsplash) Good news for those reading this over their morning cuppa: Research has shown coffee consumption is associated with a lower risk of kidney damage. Researchers at John Hopkins Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland have found that those who drink at least one cup of coffee per day are less likely to experience acute kidney injury (AKI) than those who don't partake. The study , publ
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How Hitler's Favorite Passion Play Lost Its Anti-Semitism
I t would be hard to choose the most Jewish moment in this year's production of Oberammergau's Passion Play, the grand spectacle that recounts the story of Jesus Christ's trial, suffering, and resurrection. Begun in 1634 and performed roughly every 10 years, the play is produced by the inhabitants of this Bavarian village located in the foothills of the Alps. Maybe it was the scene where Jesus ho
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No, My Breast Milk Is Not a Bomb
Had someone asked me when I started my first job what I thought would be the greatest challenge for a female professional, I probably would have popped out some big-concept answer: gender equality, equal pay, or work-life balance. During the 18 years since, I have generally thrived as a scholar in the think-tank world. I've had difficult times—raising every penny to support research projects, dea
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The Download: repairing pig cells and Pelosi's trip fallout
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. Researchers repaired cells in damaged pig organs an hour after it died The news: A new system called OrganEx stopped the deterioration of cells in pig organs one hour after the animal's death, a finding that suggests cells don't die as quickly as previously un
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Tiny device models leukemia's growth in bone marrow
A new microchip-like device can reliably model changes in the bone marrow as leukemia takes root and spreads, data show. Ben Frisch, assistant professor of pathology and laboratory medicine and biomedical engineering at the University of Rochester's Wilmot Cancer Center, and colleagues have been building what is known as a modular bone-marrow-on-chip to enhance the investigation of leukemia stem
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Below-average Gulf of Mexico 'dead zone' measured
Today, NOAA-supported scientists announced that this year's Gulf of Mexico "dead zone"— an area of low to no oxygen that can kill fish and marine life—is approximately 3,275 square miles. That's more than 2 million acres of habitat potentially unavailable to fish and bottom species—larger than the land area of Rhode Island and Delaware combined.
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Fiber optics open new frontier for landslide monitoring
Reservoirs provide water storage, hydropower, and recreation for local communities. However, adding a reservoir significantly changes a landscape's geological conditions and ushers in new and unpredictable hazards—most notably, landslides. Understanding the factors that drive reservoir landslides is paramount to maintaining reservoir infrastructure and public safety.
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The Three COVID Developments I'm Still Holding Out Hope For
W e are in a COVID rut. Early on in the pandemic, we could look forward to the arrival of vaccines. But the vaccines came, and though they did wonders in bringing down the daily death toll, COVID is ever present in our lives. When we step back and assess the news in totality, we might feel that we are stuck, that things aren't going to get better, and that, no matter what progress we make, the vi
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