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Nyheder2022juli05

LHCb discovers three new exotic particles: the pentaquark and the first-ever pair of tetraquarks
The international LHCb collaboration at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has observed three never-before-seen particles: a new kind of pentaquark and the first-ever pair of tetraquarks, which includes a new type of tetraquark. The findings, presented today at a CERN seminar, add three new exotic members to the growing list of new hadrons found at the LHC. They will help physicists better understand
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Scientists uncover novel aspects of HIV infection by monitoring sugars at the surface of individual immune cells
HIV researchers have long been trying to identify the specific cells that the virus prefers to infect and hide in. They know that HIV favors a special type of immune cells called memory CD4 T cells. But these cells come in many flavors, and it has been difficult to ascertain exactly what makes one type of memory CD4 T cell more attractive to HIV than another.
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Avian influenza: Past, present, future
Due to the possibility that bird flu viruses could mutate and gain the ability to spread easily between people, avian influenza poses a significant pandemic threat to birds and humans alike. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has been monitoring for illness among humans exposed to infected birds since outbreaks were detected in poultry and wild bird populations in late 2021-
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Avian influenza: Past, present, future
Due to the possibility that bird flu viruses could mutate and gain the ability to spread easily between people, avian influenza poses a significant pandemic threat to birds and humans alike. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has been monitoring for illness among humans exposed to infected birds since outbreaks were detected in poultry and wild bird populations in late 2021-
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The Future of Mud
When Germany's president, Frank-Walter Steinmeier, came to Senegal last February for an economic summit, he took a break from conference rooms in the capital city of Dakar to get his hands dirty, literally, as he learned to make compressed-earth blocks from a mix of iron-rich soil, sand, water, and a bit of cement. His block-making tutorial was part of a groundbreaking event for a cultural instit
24min
Glitch in 59,000 Teslas Fails to Call 911 When You Crash
Achtung! Tesla i s in the crosshairs of a major recall once again, after German regulators discovered a massive bug in its crash response system. As Reuters reported , German authorities claim that more than 59,000 Tesla Models Y and 3 globally have a software glitch that fails to call emergency services when the electric vehicles crash, a bespoke system that comes built into the cars. It's not a
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'Our deepest apology': Journal retracts 30 likely paper mill articles after investigation published by Retraction Watch
A journal has retracted 30 papers that "could be linked to a criminal paper mill." The move comes six and a half months after Retraction Watch published an investigation into the operation. The investigation, by Brian Perron of the University of Michigan, high school student Oliver Hiltz-Perron, and Bryan Victor of Wayne State University, identified … Continue reading
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In Sweden, municipal housing policy influences refugee reception
A new academic article, published in Frontiers in Political Science, analyzes how the Settlement Act is applied in Sweden's municipalities. Housing is an important prerequisite for the socioeconomic integration of refugees. The Settlement Act was implemented in 2016 and entails that municipalities are obliged to receive refugees according to quotas.
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How well do prematurely-born children do in school?
How does preterm birth affect children's school grades? Using Swedish registers for children born 1982–1994, a new study, published in Population Studies, investigates how prematurely born pupils perform in school at age 16.
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Cosmonauts Spread Anti-Ukraine Propaganda on Space Station
Space Propaganda Russia is using the International Space Station to spread anti-Ukraine propaganda, Ars Technica reports — an unfortunate turn of events after months of largely peaceful operations on board the orbital outpost despite the crisis unfolding back on the ground. In an image shared on Russian space corporation Roscosmos' official Telegram channel, three cosmonauts can be seen holding t
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Sustainable Personal Care Items to Add to Your Medicine Cabinet
Brushing your teeth, swiping on some deodorant, and showering are all essential daily hygiene habits, but our favorite products' packaging is often made of plastic and can be difficult to reuse or repurpose. We know you're probably up to your ears in infographics, ads, and friends telling you that switching to sustainable products is important — but they're right. Swapping out your current toothb
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NASA Loses Contact With Just-Launched Spacecraft Headed Toward Moon
Communication Issue NASA has encountered " communication issues " and is attempting to "re-establish contact" with its Moon-bound CAPSTONE satellite, which successfully broke free of Earth's orbit on Monday after launching atop a Rocket Lab Electron rocket. Though more info is needed, it's a serious problem that could jeopardize the entire mission. "Following successful deployment and start of sp
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When it comes to color, hummingbirds rule the roost
The range of colors in the plumage of hummingbirds exceeds the color diversity of all other bird species in total, a new study shows. Richard Prum has spent years studying the molecules and nanostructures that give many bird species their rich colorful plumage, but nothing prepared him for what he found in hummingbirds. "We knew that hummingbirds were colorful, but we never imagined that they wou
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Nerve-cancer distance may be key to oral cancer outcomes
A new study identifies a feature in cancer that could help pinpoint treatment-resistant tumors when they are diagnosed. As reported in the journal Clinical Cancer Research , researchers examined the role of perineural invasion—defined as when cancer invades the nerves—in oral cancer, and found that while perineural invasion is important, the distance between nerves and cancer may be as important
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Uber Pool Is a Zombie
In the end, Uber Pool had to go. By mid-March 2020, chunks of America were already in lockdown, AMC had boarded up its movie theaters, and the country's toilet-paper reserves were getting wiped out. The novel coronavirus was here, and sharing rides with strangers in a different stranger's car had become yet another part of life upended by the pandemic. "If you must travel" using any of Uber's oth
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Nano-rust: Smart additive for autonomous temperature control
The right temperature matters—whether in technical processes, for the quality of food and medicines, or the lifetime of electronic components and batteries. For this purpose, temperature indicators record (un)desired temperature increases that can be read out later. Researchers in the group led by Prof. Dr. Karl Mandel, professor of inorganic chemistry at FAU, have succeeded in developing a novel
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Research team validates new method for assessing antimicrobial efficacy of domestic cleaning products
Environmental awareness in society is changing household laundry habits, where the use of less bleach and lower temperatures during washing machine cycles is encouraged. In this context, disinfectants added to detergents have become an essential factor to compensate for these new habits and to prevent the transmission of bacteria, fungi and viruses in the house, as well as to control the level of
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Research team validates new method for assessing antimicrobial efficacy of domestic cleaning products
Environmental awareness in society is changing household laundry habits, where the use of less bleach and lower temperatures during washing machine cycles is encouraged. In this context, disinfectants added to detergents have become an essential factor to compensate for these new habits and to prevent the transmission of bacteria, fungi and viruses in the house, as well as to control the level of
2h
Should Americans Have a Right to Absolute Privacy?
This is an edition of Up for Debate, a newsletter by Conor Friedersdorf. On Wednesdays, he rounds up timely conversations and solicits reader responses to one thought-provoking question. Later, he publishes some thoughtful replies. Sign up for the newsletter here. Last week I asked : Should Americans have a right to privacy or bodily autonomy? If so, what should either right encompass and exclude
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Women in Congress are more likely to get interrupted in hearings
Women in Congress are significantly more likely to be interrupted than men during congressional committee hearings, researchers report. Committee hearings are where most business in Congress is done—especially in Senate committees, where women are about 10% more likely to be interrupted, according to new findings in American Political Science Review . Perhaps more strikingly, women are more than
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Why it is so hard for humans to have a baby?
New research by a scientist at the Milner Center for Evolution at the University of Bath suggests that "selfish chromosomes" explain why most human embryos die very early on. The study, published in PLoS Biology, explaining why fish embryos are fine but sadly humans' embryos often don't survive, has implications for the treatment of infertility.
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US announces a stop to testing anti-satellite weapons
The United States Government has declared that it will no longer be performing tests of anti-satellite (ASAT) weapons. In a public statement during a visit to the Vandenberg Space Force Base, Vice President Kamala Harris confirmed that this policy has the primary purpose of setting an example to other countries. It represents an important step in the direction of establishing "space norms" for all
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Tesla Unveils Trailer With Pop-Out Solar Panels
Solar Trailer While we're not expecting to see it hitting store shelves any time soon, Tesla has shown off a massive solar trailer during an exposition in Germany, as seen in new images shared online. The bulky range-extending trailer even includes a SpaceX Starlink internet satellite dish in the back. In short, it's the ultimate off-grid accessory for your Tesla — if it ever were to go into prod
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The solar system is stable for at least the next 100,000 years
It's nice to have a feel-good story every once in a while, so here's one to hold off the existential dread: the Earth isn't likely to get flung off into deep space for at least 100,000 years. In fact, all of the solar system's planets are safe for that time frame, so there is good news all around, for you and your favorite planetary body.
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First long-term evidence of microplastic pollution from deep water layers of the open ocean
For the first time, scientists from the Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research Warnemünde (IOW) analyzed a long-term sample series on microplastic pollution in the Northeast Atlantic from 2000 m water depth with respect to number, size, mass, material and possible origin of the particles. Samples were collected between 2003–2015 in the Madeira Basin by a sediment trap. Plastic type and particle
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Caught in the act: Key chemical intermediates in pollutant-to-fuel reaction identified
Carbon dioxide pollution continues to change the global climate. Researchers know how to pinpoint such pollution, even on a regional and near-real-time basis. As part of a solution to carbon dioxide pollution, many studies focus on how to convert this pollutant into a fuel, such as methanol. Copper-based catalysts are a tool for such conversions. Understanding the corresponding step-by-step chemis
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4 answers about Yellowstone's June megaflood
Last month, heavy rains fell on melting snowpack in and around Yellowstone National Park, resulting in widespread flooding, mudslides, and damage to infrastructure. The US Geological Survey described the storm, which forced the evacuation of visitors and closed parts of the park indefinitely, as a 1 in 500-year event. "The magnitude and rate of change right now are way beyond anything we humans h
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The symptoms can signal complex PTSD
A new study describes in detail how to diagnose complex PTSD, or post-traumatic stress disorder. People with PTSD typically suffer intrusive memories or flashbacks that may overwhelm them. But, experts around the world have been aware for decades that some trauma victims or survivors exhibit a broader pattern of psychological changes, most commonly after prolonged or repetitive events—such as exp
3h
Robotic ammonites recreate ancient animals' movements
In a university swimming pool, scientists and their underwater cameras watch carefully as a coiled shell is released from a pair of metal tongs. The shell begins to move under its own power, giving the researchers a glimpse into what the oceans might have looked like millions of years ago when they were full of these ubiquitous animals.
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Evolutionary biologists are ever adapting to progress in science | Letter
Many discoveries since the modern synthesis have been incorporated into evolutionary biology without substantially changing its major tenets, write Brian Charlesworth, Deborah Charlesworth and Jerry Coyne Stephen Buranyi's article ( Do we need a new theory of evolution?, 28 June ) discusses whether there are serious problems with the widely accepted view of evolution developed in the 1930s and 19
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Robotic ammonites recreate ancient animals' movements
Robotic ammonites, evaluated in a university pool, allow researchers to explore questions about how shell shapes affected swimming ability. They found trade-offs between stability in the water and maneuverability, suggesting that the evolution of ammonite shells explored different designs for different advantages, rather than converged toward a single best design.
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Using big data to better understand cancerous mutations
The ideal method of determining what type of cancer mutation a patient has is to compare two samples from the same patient, one from the tumor and one from healthy tissue. Such tests can be complicated and costly, however, so researchers hit upon another idea — using massive public DNA databases to look for common cell mutations that tend to be benign, so that researchers can identify rarer mutat
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Molecule boosts fat burning
A study has identified a molecule — the purine inosine — that boosts fat burning in brown adipocytes. The mechanism was discovered in mice, but probably exists in humans as well: If a transporter for inosine is less active, the mice remain significantly leaner despite a high-fat diet.
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Shedding light on comet Chury's unexpected chemical complexity
Researchers have for the first time identified an unexpected richness of complex organic molecules on a comet. This was achieved thanks to the analysis of data collected during ESA's Rosetta mission at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, also known as Chury. Delivered to the early Earth by impacting comets, these organics may have helped to kick-start carbon-based life as we know it.
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There's a NASA Satellite Headed Toward the Moon Right Now
Shoot for the Moon NASA's Capstone satellite is currently hurtling towards the Moon after successfully breaking free of Earth's orbit on Monday. Launched from New Zealand last Tuesday by aerospace startup Rocket Lab, the Capstone satellite marks the next step in not only NASA's plan to put humans on the Moon again, but also the future of low cost space exploration. The whole mission cost just $32
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SpaceX Slaps Logo on Starship, Drags Prototype to Launchpad
To the Pad SpaceX has dragged its latest orbital launch prototype of Starship to the launch pad, as seen in footage shared by NASASpaceFlight — in an exciting new development bringing us closer to the massive spacecraft's inaugural trip into space. The space company branded the prototype, dubbed Ship 24, with its logo and insignia, in what may be an early indication we're likely to actually see i
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Fast and facile synthesis of antibacterial amino acid Schiff base copper complexes
Ever since their development in the late 19th century, Schiff bases have been a popular group of organic compounds, owing to their wide variety of desirable properties. The presence of both nitrogen and oxygen in their structure makes them versatile molecules with an array of applications, ranging from dyes and catalysts to environmental sensors and raw materials for chemical synthesis.
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What is pond? Study provides first data-driven definition
Nearly everyone can identify a pond, but what, exactly, distinguishes it from a lake or a wetland? A new study co-led by Cornell offers the first data-driven, functional definition of a pond and evidence of ponds' distinct ecological function, which could have broad implications for science and policy.
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Fast and facile synthesis of antibacterial amino acid Schiff base copper complexes
Ever since their development in the late 19th century, Schiff bases have been a popular group of organic compounds, owing to their wide variety of desirable properties. The presence of both nitrogen and oxygen in their structure makes them versatile molecules with an array of applications, ranging from dyes and catalysts to environmental sensors and raw materials for chemical synthesis.
3h
New advances in the search for molecular magnets
Scientists from the University of Lisbon (Portugal) and the University of Stuttgart (Germany) have managed to synthesize and extensively characterize a series of cobalt molecules that exhibit the properties of molecular magnets, an encouraging result for the future of quantum-scale computing.
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Unchecked emissions could double heat-related child mortality
If carbon emissions are limited to slow temperature rise, up to an estimated 6,000 child deaths could be prevented in Africa each year, according to new research. New work estimated the impact of climate change on annual heat-related deaths of children under five years old in sub-Saharan Africa, from 1995 — 2050. It shows that thousands of heat-related child deaths could be prevented if temperatu
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Europe's most recent fossil of giant tortoise discovered
An international team of scientists, including Uwe Fritz and Christian Kehlmaier from Senckenberg, has made an astonishing discovery in the Zubbio di Cozzo San Pietro cave in Sicily, a burial site from the Copper/Bronze Age: bones of a giant tortoise. The skeletal fragments have been dated to 12,500 years ago, which is at odds with the temporal context of the other finds in the cave. Nevertheless,
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Working towards a quick and gentle breast cancer diagnosis
If breast cancer is suspected, doctors carry out a biopsy. However, this is invasive, painful and costly. It also takes several days to get the results. In the future, diagnosis could be made via a liquid biopsy of a patient's blood—a gentle, cost-effective method that would deliver the results within just a few hours. A team of researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Polymer Research
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Examining the effects of PFAS 'forever chemicals' on soil structure and function
Soils are impacted globally by several anthropogenic factors, including chemical pollutants. Among those, perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are of concern due to their high environmental persistence, which are therefore also called "forever chemicals" in public discourse. However, their effects on soil structure and function have been largely ignored. A recent study by Dr. Baile
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New hypothesis about crocodiles' ears may help people with impaired hearing
Impaired hearing affects over 1.2 billion people worldwide. But crocodiles, who live almost as long as humans and can surpass 70 years of age, have good hearing throughout their lives. One reason is that crocodiles can create new hair cells, and a research group from Uppsala University is now on the path to finding out why. Hopefully, knowledge from the world of crocodiles will be able to help peo
3h
Europe's most recent fossil of giant tortoise discovered
An international team of scientists, including Uwe Fritz and Christian Kehlmaier from Senckenberg, has made an astonishing discovery in the Zubbio di Cozzo San Pietro cave in Sicily, a burial site from the Copper/Bronze Age: bones of a giant tortoise. The skeletal fragments have been dated to 12,500 years ago, which is at odds with the temporal context of the other finds in the cave. Nevertheless,
3h
Examining the effects of PFAS 'forever chemicals' on soil structure and function
Soils are impacted globally by several anthropogenic factors, including chemical pollutants. Among those, perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are of concern due to their high environmental persistence, which are therefore also called "forever chemicals" in public discourse. However, their effects on soil structure and function have been largely ignored. A recent study by Dr. Baile
3h
New hypothesis about crocodiles' ears may help people with impaired hearing
Impaired hearing affects over 1.2 billion people worldwide. But crocodiles, who live almost as long as humans and can surpass 70 years of age, have good hearing throughout their lives. One reason is that crocodiles can create new hair cells, and a research group from Uppsala University is now on the path to finding out why. Hopefully, knowledge from the world of crocodiles will be able to help peo
3h
Why natural gas is not a bridge technology
The expansion of natural gas infrastructure jeopardizes energy transition, as natural gas is not a bridge technology towards a 100 per cent renewable energy system as defined by the Paris Climate Agreement. The researchers have examined the natural gas issue from five perspectives and given gas a fairly poor climate balance, comparable to that of coal or oil. They recommend that politicians and sc
4h
Blog Floating Buttonの導入から設定・使い方を解説
アフィリエイトをやっている人のお悩み!それは、 なかなか購買ページへのボタンをクリックしてもらえない ことです。 リンクやボタンの設置だけでは、なかなか購入ページに遷移してもらえないのが実情です。 そこで登場するのが、フロートボタンを実装できるプラグイン「 Blog Floating Button For WP 」です。 Blog Floating Button For WP は、かんたん設定でページ遷移に効果的なフロートボタンを設置することが可能です。 この記事では、購買ページへの遷移を増やすことが期待できるプラグイン「 Blog Floating Button For WP 」を紹介します。 Blog Floating Button For WPは、WordPressテーマMERIL(メリル)の推奨プラグイン なので相性は抜群なのでぜひ導入することをおすすめします。 【参考】いちばん
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A low temperature nanoparticle ink
A simple and versatile nanoparticle ink could help next-generation perovskite solar cells to be printed at scale and become the dominant force in commercial photovoltaics.
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Making it easier to differentiate mirror-image molecules
Using a new method, scientists are better able to distinguish between mirror-image substances. This is important amongst others in drug development, because the two variants can cause completely different effects in the human body. Researchers from PSI, EPFL, and the University of Geneva describe the new method in Nature Photonics.
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Exploring how animals navigate
The Arctic Tern migrates an extraordinarily long way—from pole to pole. And while this bird is unique in the distance it traverses, its excellent sense of direction is shared by many other animals that use a variety of environmental factors to optimize their routes. In a new review paper in EPJ Special Topics, Roswitha and Wolfgang Wiltschko from the Goethe-Universität in Frankfurt am Main, German
4h
Exploring how animals navigate
The Arctic Tern migrates an extraordinarily long way—from pole to pole. And while this bird is unique in the distance it traverses, its excellent sense of direction is shared by many other animals that use a variety of environmental factors to optimize their routes. In a new review paper in EPJ Special Topics, Roswitha and Wolfgang Wiltschko from the Goethe-Universität in Frankfurt am Main, German
4h
Scientists identify gaps in the protection of Vietnam's amphibians
As was highlighted in the foreword to the WWF Greater Mekong Report 2021, written by Prof. Dr. Thomas Ziegler, Curator for Herpetology, Ichthyology, and Invertebrates, at Cologne Zoo (Köln, Germany), there is an urgent need for more studies that identify the gaps in species conservation.
4h
Why natural gas is not a bridge technology
The expansion of natural gas infrastructure jeopardizes energy transition, as natural gas is not a bridge technology towards a 100 per cent renewable energy system as defined by the Paris Climate Agreement. The researchers have examined the natural gas issue from five perspectives and given gas a fairly poor climate balance, comparable to that of coal or oil. They recommend that politicians and sc
4h
COVID-19 virus spike protein flexibility improved by human cell's own modifications
When the coronavirus causing COVID-19 infects human cells, the cell's protein-processing machinery makes modifications to the spike protein that render it more flexible and mobile, which could increase its ability to infect other cells and to evade antibodies, a new study from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign found.
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Researchers discover a voltage that depends on the wavelength of incident light
Scientists from the Institute for Open and Transdisciplinary Research Initiatives at Osaka University discovered a new feature of solar cells made from antimony sulfiodide:sulfide composite, which they termed the wavelength-dependent photovoltaic effect (WDPE). The team determined that changing the color of incident light from visible to ultraviolet induced a reversible change in the output voltag
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New photocatalytic membrane that can be cleaned using light energy
An international collaboration lead by Kobe University researchers has successfully developed a nanosheet-laminated photocatalytic membrane that demonstrates both excellent water permeance and photocatalytic activity. The membrane's photocatalytic properties make it easier to clean as irradiating the membrane with light successfully reduces fouling. They developed this membrane by laminating 2D na
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8,000 kilometers per second: Star with the shortest orbital period around black hole discovered
Researchers at the University of Cologne and Masaryk University in Brno (Czech Republic) have discovered the fastest known star, which travels around a black hole in record time. The star, S4716, orbits Sagittarius A*, the black hole in the center of our Milky Way, in four years and reaches a speed of around 8,000 kilometers per second. S4716 comes as close as 100 AU (astronomical unit) to the bla
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Bring back the wolves, but not as heroes or villains
In a new finding that goes against current conservation paradigms, re-introducing wolves and other predators to our landscapes does not miraculously reduce deer populations, restore degraded ecosystems or significantly threaten livestock, according to a new study.
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Earth orbit, Moon, Mars: ESA's ambitious roadmap
In a bold vision to secure Europe's role in space exploration and so benefit from the many scientific, economic, and societal rewards, ESA is publicly releasing its new exploration roadmap after its presentation to its Council, the agency's highest ruling body.
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How NASA Got Price Gouged on the SLS, According to Its Former Second-in-Command
It may come as a shock now, but during the salad days of Barack Obama's first term, lots of people in the US government believed that we could get back to the Moon without the help of billionaires. That's how we ended up with the Space Launch System, an enormous and staggeringly expensive rocket that's poised to return human beings to the Moon for the first time since the early 1970s as part of N
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Eight Books in Which Ignorance Is the Point
In 1893, Henry James complained about the recent publication of Gustave Flaubert's letters. The French novelist was famous for his stylistic perfectionism. What treachery, then, to publish his casual missives, ones that he hadn't had time to labor over. To James's regret, the new collection left Flaubert's "every weakness exposed, every mystery dispelled, every secret betrayed." James understood
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Thermoelectrics: From heat to electricity
A lot of heat gets lost during the conversion of energy. Estimates even put it at more than 70%. However, in thermoelectric materials, such as those being studied at the Institute of Solid State Physics at TU Wien, heat can be converted directly into electrical energy. This effect (the Seebeck effect) can be used in numerous applications in industry but also in everyday life.
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Fossils confirm early diversification of spiny plants in central Tibet
Spinescence (a general term for the phenomena of spines, prickles, and thorns on plants) is an important functional trait shared by numerous plant families worldwide and mainly provides physical protection against vertebrate herbivores. Even though spiny plants are distributed worldwide, our understanding of their evolutionary history remains incomplete, largely due to a dearth of fossil records.
4h
Fossils confirm early diversification of spiny plants in central Tibet
Spinescence (a general term for the phenomena of spines, prickles, and thorns on plants) is an important functional trait shared by numerous plant families worldwide and mainly provides physical protection against vertebrate herbivores. Even though spiny plants are distributed worldwide, our understanding of their evolutionary history remains incomplete, largely due to a dearth of fossil records.
4h
Microbes support adaptation to climate change
Researchers from Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU) and Kiel University (CAU) led by Professor Sebastian Fraune use the example of the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis to investigate the contribution of the microbiome to the thermal adaptation of living organisms. As they discovered, this contribution is critical and they report on it in the current issue of the journal Nature Communicat
4h
Microbes support adaptation to climate change
Researchers from Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU) and Kiel University (CAU) led by Professor Sebastian Fraune use the example of the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis to investigate the contribution of the microbiome to the thermal adaptation of living organisms. As they discovered, this contribution is critical and they report on it in the current issue of the journal Nature Communicat
4h
Magnetic spins that 'freeze' when heated
Physicists observed a strange new type of behavior in a magnetic material when it's heated up. The magnetic spins "freeze" into a static pattern when the temperature rises, a phenomenon that normally occurs when the temperature decreases. They published their findings in Nature Physics on July 4.
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How to alter the perception of mental health care in Russia | Olga Kitaina
During the Soviet Union era, therapy was often used as a tool of political oppression. Since then, Russia has seen major reforms in mental health care — but stigmas and distrust for the practice still live on. Psychologist and TED Fellow Olga Kitaina shares the current state of therapy in Russia (where tarot card readers and astrologers sometimes pass as psychoanalysts) and outlines her solution
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cognitive scientists' opinion on Leibniz's Monadology specifically or any non-materialist philosophy generally.
Ive been read quite alot cogsci and cogsci informed philosophy, I recently read Leibniz's Monadology(along with other writings). I thought it would be an outdated piece of philosophy, debunked/weakened by cog sci, but holy shit; It was an amazing and coherent piece of metaphysics that has potentional nowadays. Whats your conception of reality in philosophical terms? I know, according to some neur
5h
Exceptionally high pressure to raise the price of food in Finland
According to a recent agri-food sector outlook by the Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), there is an exceptionally high pressure to raise the price of food this year, as the prices of inputs required in the food chain, such as energy and fertilizers, have experienced a significant increase. Producer prices for cereals and oil crops have already risen to record highs both globally and in F
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Plant-based prawns to protect the marine environment
Around the world, people are consuming more and more fish and seafood, such as mussels and prawns. This includes Switzerland, where consumption has risen by 60 percent over the past quarter of a century to reach 75,000 metric tons a year. Of this volume, 97 percent is imported, with predictable consequences for the environment: overfishing, along with permanently depleted stocks, and fish and praw
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Letter: The NIH Has Responded Forcefully to COVID-19
The Missing Part of America's Pandemic Response Last month, Cary P. Gross and Ezekiel J. Emanuel argued that scientific advances are essential to fighting a pandemic, and they faulted America's top medical-research agency, the renowned National Institutes of Health, for not moving faster to produce more research on COVID-19. During the coronavirus pandemic, they wrote, "the NIH has appeared more
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Link between recognizing our voice and feeling in control
Being able to recognize our own voice is a critical factor for our sense of control over our speech, according to a new study. If people think they hear someone else's voice when they speak, they do not strongly feel that they caused the sound. This could be a clue to understanding the experience of people who live with auditory hallucinations and could help to improve online communication and vir
5h
Plant-based prawns to protect the marine environment
Around the world, people are consuming more and more fish and seafood, such as mussels and prawns. This includes Switzerland, where consumption has risen by 60 percent over the past quarter of a century to reach 75,000 metric tons a year. Of this volume, 97 percent is imported, with predictable consequences for the environment: overfishing, along with permanently depleted stocks, and fish and praw
5h
Cloned mice created from freeze dried skin cells in world first
Breakthrough could help conservationists revive dwindling populations of endangered species Researchers have created cloned mice from freeze dried skin cells in a world first that aims to help conservationists revive populations of endangered species. The breakthrough paves the way for countries to store skin cells from animals as an insurance policy, as the cells can be used to create clones tha
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Found: The 'holy grail of catalysis' turning methane into methanol under ambient conditions using light
Scientists have developed a fast and economical method of converting methane, or natural gas, into liquid methanol at ambient temperature and pressure. The method takes place under continuous flow over a photo-catalytic material using visible light to drive the conversion.To help observe how the process works and how selective it is, the researchers used neutron scattering.
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Is the German discount on fuel being passed on to consumers?
The German federal government introduced the "fuel discount" on June 1, 2022. This reduction in energy taxes means that consumers should pay less for fuel. A team of researchers from Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have now investigated to what extent the oil companies pass on the tax cuts and what impact the fuel discount is actually having on consumers' wallets.
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Pivoting on greenhouse gas regulation
As expected, in West Virginia v. EPA, the Supreme Court continued its radical right-wing and ideological effort to limit the regulatory authority of federal administrative agencies. This terrible decision among a series of terrible decisions is unfortunate but far from fatal to efforts to transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy. Fortunately for our planet, fossil fuels are already more ex
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Study sheds light on the core of pro-coal logic
To push ahead with the now urgently needed global coal phase-out, the concerns of the affected regions about their future viability must be taken seriously. New coal-fired power plants, as damaging as they are to the climate, have been economically lucrative in the past. A new study by the Berlin-based climate research institute MCC (Mercator Research Institute on Global Commons and Climate Change
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Emancipation laws often kept people in bondage
A new book describes how millions of enslaved people were kept in what was effectively a continuing bondage after emancipation. In 1790—six years after the state of Connecticut officially abolished slavery—James Mars was born there to a Black family that had been enslaved in the state. The law gave the former owner of the family the right to keep the newborn child enslaved until he was 25, even t
5h
'Fake' data gets robots to learn new stuff faster
In a step toward robots that can learn on the fly like humans do, a new approach expands training data sets for robots that work with soft objects like ropes and fabrics, or in cluttered environments. It could cut learning time for new materials and environments down to a few hours rather than a week or two. In simulations, the expanded training data set improved the success rate of a robot loopi
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Buying into conspiracy theories can be exciting—that's what makes them dangerous
Conspiracy theories have been around for centuries, from witch trials and antisemitic campaigns to beliefs that Freemasons were trying to topple European monarchies. In the mid-20th century, historian Richard Hofstadter described a "paranoid style" that he observed in right-wing U.S. politics and culture: a blend of "heated exaggeration, suspiciousness, and conspiratorial fantasy."
5h
Evaluating new processing platforms for pharmaceutical production
The pharmaceutical industry is one of the most relevant sectors in today's economy. For more than a century, pharmaceutical production has relied on batch production, but this lacks the agility, flexibility, and robustness to comply with today's challenges. With an exponentially growing population and rapidly diminishing resources, the pharmaceutical industry is confronted with public health threa
5h
Eavesdropping on whales in the high Arctic
Earth's oceans are crisscrossed with roughly 1.2 million km of fiber optic telecommunication cables. Researchers have now succeeded in using a fiber in a submarine cable as a passive listening system, enabling them to listen to and monitor whales.
6h
Coevolution of mammals and their lice
According to a new study, the first louse to take up residence on a mammalian host likely started out as a parasite of birds. That host-jumping event tens of millions of years ago began the long association between mammals and lice, setting the stage for their coevolution and offering more opportunities for the lice to spread to other mammals.
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How the birds and the bees help coffee plants
Sipping a coffee on your way to work is a ritual most people take for granted without thinking about how the delicious coffee beans reached their cup. You probably know it comes from tropical regions. But what is less well-known is that coffee is the product of an incredible partnership between the birds and the bees.
6h
In pretending that Covid is over, the UK government is playing a dangerous game | Stephen Reicher
Acting like the virus is no longer a risk undermines our trust in public health measures and the scientists proposing them Covid is alive and kicking. About 2.3 million people are infected with the virus in the UK, including as many as one in 18 in Scotland. There are more than 10,000 Covid patients in hospital. These infections are increasing the burden on the NHS and contributing to the staff s
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Found: The 'holy grail of catalysis' turning methane into methanol under ambient conditions using light
Scientists have developed a fast and economical method of converting methane, or natural gas, into liquid methanol at ambient temperature and pressure. The method takes place under continuous flow over a photo-catalytic material using visible light to drive the conversion.To help observe how the process works and how selective it is, the researchers used neutron scattering.
6h
Team of Three Women Score a Huge Fishing Haul | Naked and Afraid XL
Stream Naked and Afraid XL on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/naked-and-afraid #NakedAndAfraid #Discovery #Survival #NakedAndAfraidXL Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https:/
6h
Gear-based mechanical metamaterials allow for creation of configurable sheets
A team of researchers from the National University of Defense Technology, Hong Kong Polytechnic University and Karlsruhe Institute of Technology has developed a host of gear-based mechanical metamaterials that allow for the creation of configurable sheets. In their paper published in the journal Nature Materials, the group describes how they developed their sheets and possible uses for them.
6h
7% of American adults have good cardiometabolic health
Less than 7% of the adult population of the United States has good cardiometabolic health, research finds. It's a devastating health crisis requiring urgent action, according to research led by a team from the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University. Their work appears in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology . Researchers evaluated Americans across five co
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NASA considers sending swimming robots to habitable 'ocean worlds' of the solar system
NASA has recently announced US$600,000 (£495,000) in funding for a study into the feasibility of sending swarms of miniature swimming robots (known as independent micro-swimmers) to explore oceans beneath the icy shells of our Solar System's many "ocean worlds". But don't imagine metal humanoids swimming frog-like underwater. They will probably be simple, triangular wedges.
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Shedding light on comet Chury's unexpected chemical complexity
A team of researchers led by the University of Bern has for the first time identified an unexpected richness of complex organic molecules at a comet. This was achieved thanks to the analysis of data collected during ESA's Rosetta mission at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, also known as Chury. Delivered to the early Earth by impacting comets, these organics may have helped to kick-start carbon-bas
6h
Greater insight into the pinning effects of skyrmions
When researchers use an optical Kerr microscope to zoom in on thin films of magnetic material, given the right conditions, they observe a sort of micro-scale magnetic hurricane. Physicists call these whirlwind-like magnetic structures skyrmions. The idea is to use this phenomenon for data storage or processing devices. For those applications, the motion of the mini-whirlwinds, which themselves act
6h
Research reveals British people feel very differently about some refugees than others
As of late May, in the three months since Russia invaded Ukraine, 6.8 million refugees had fled the war into other countries. The majority, some 3.6 million people, headed to Poland, while another million went to Romania. European Union nations and others began offering visa waivers and other schemes to help Ukrainians. The UK, for example, is currently home to about 60,000 refugees from Ukraine.
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The Download: India's deadly heatwaves, and the need for carbon removal
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. No power, no fans, no AC: The villagers fighting to survive India's deadly heatwaves The residents of Nagla Tulai, a farming village in the north Indian state of Uttar Pradesh, have always had to endure hot summers, but the past few years of punishingly cruel
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Hubble delves into cosmic treasure trove
This image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope captures the sparkling globular cluster NGC 6569 in the constellation Sagittarius. Hubble explored the heart of this cluster with both its Wide Field Camera 3 and Advanced Camera for Surveys, revealing a glittering hoard of stars in this astronomical treasure trove.
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Bad sleep amps up EMS worker anger
Anger levels among EMS workers rise when the quality of their sleep falls, researchers report. Emergency medical services (EMS) work is notorious for long and oftentimes odd hours, with overnight shift work a part of the job. It's bound to affect one's mood and now, a new study shows just how much. The researchers looked at the sleep patterns of 79 EMS workers from Central New York. They found th
7h
Bioinformatics data reduction techniques must be used with caution
In the field of bioinformatics, DNA analysis can be performed with data sketching, a method that systematically reduces the size of a dataset to a smaller sample that allows scientists to analyze and approximate it at greater speeds. While the scalability of this method is appealing, two common tools used for data sketching allow for inaccuracies and inconsistencies in the analysis and results, a
7h
UK Covid cases are rising – should we wear masks again?
Three experts weigh in on the benefits of reintroducing face coverings in certain settings With Covid infection levels increasing and hospitalisations following suit with the rise of the Omicron sub-variants BA.4 and BA.5, some experts have called for a reintroduction of mask-wearing in certain settings, with the chair of the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation, Sir Andrew Pollard, sa
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High harmonics illuminate the movement of atoms and electrons
Laser light can radically change the properties of solid materials, making them superconducting or magnetic within millionths of a billionth of a second. The intense light causes fundamental, immediate changes in a solid by "shaking" its atomic lattice structure and moving electrons about. But what exactly is happening at that elementary level? How do those atoms and electrons actually move?
7h
Bioinformatics data reduction techniques must be used with caution
In the field of bioinformatics, DNA analysis can be performed with data sketching, a method that systematically reduces the size of a dataset to a smaller sample that allows scientists to analyze and approximate it at greater speeds. While the scalability of this method is appealing, two common tools used for data sketching allow for inaccuracies and inconsistencies in the analysis and results, a
7h
Researchers pinpoint location of extremely energetic particles in a 'space manatee'
An international team of astrophysicists has identified the location where powerful and highly energetic X-rays are being shot out into space from inside a region in space shaped like a giant aquatic mammal called a manatee. They found the spectrum of the object at this location shows there is a "non-classical acceleration process" where particles are being injected and re-accelerated in immensely
7h
Recycling is the ambulance at the bottom of the cliff
Plastic Free July has rolled around again and we'll all be hearing about reducing plastic use in our daily lives. Much of the messaging is targeted toward young people through school and youth-focused messaging. As a science and environmental educator and parent, I often think about what it means to teach young people about environmental action.
7h
What comes after the Higgs boson
Ten years ago this week, two international collaborations of groups of scientists, including a large contingent from Caltech, confirmed that they had found conclusive evidence for the Higgs boson, an elusive elementary particle, first predicted in a series of articles published in the mid-1960s, that is thought to endow elementary particles with mass.
7h
Gamma-ray pulsations detected from pulsar PSR J1835−3259B
Using NASA's Fermi space telescope, Chinese astronomers have investigated a newly discovered millisecond pulsar known as PSR J1835−3259B. As a result, they identified gamma-ray pulsations from this source. The finding is reported in a paper published June 27 on the arXiv pre-print server.
7h
Cause of 'staggering' disease in cats in Europe unraveled
A large team of researchers affiliated with multiple institutions in Germany, Austria and Sweden has found the virus behind the mysterious "staggering" disease killing cats across Europe. The group has written a paper describing their work but it has not yet been peer-reviewed—they have posted it on the bioRxiv preprint site.
7h
Metaproteomics reveals enzymatic strategies deployed by anaerobic microbiomes to maintain lignocellulose deconstruction at high solids
Nature Communications, Published online: 05 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31433-x Efficient solubilization of plant cell wall carbohydrates is required for microbial production of biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass. Here, the authors employ metaproteomics to interrogate enzymatic strategies of a methanogenic microbiome deconstructing switchgrass at increasing solids loading.
8h
Sports can help prevent violent extremism in youth
Instances of violent extremism such as the recent attacks on Chinese workers in Pakistan have been on a rise globally. These incidents have forced nations across the world to take serious measures—including declaring zero-tolerance policies—to curb the violence.
8h
U.S. anti-trans laws won't 'save women's sports'
A tsunami of intolerance has engulfed the sporting world. Wave after wave of prejudice continues to make equitable sports participation difficult, and the most recent news heaves trans athletes of all ages overboard into a swirling current of exclusion and stigmatization.
8h
Do humanitarian agencies help refugees become independent? Evidence from history
When 5.3 million Ukrainians entered the EU between February and June 2022, alongside life-saving emergency assistance came similarly crucial support: the right to stay and work in the EU for up to three years. This arose out of the recognition that people deserve the chance to make a living in exile—and that doing so can benefit host countries as well.
8h
Study sees potential ways to mitigate India's risk of groundwater depletion
Groundwater depletion in regions of India where grain is grown for public distribution is a huge challenge for the country of 1.4 billion people. A new study identifies specific adjustments in the Indian government's procurement and distribution system that could rectify this issue, particularly in regard to irrigation systems that utilize groundwater pumped by subsidized electricity. This kind of
8h
Soft CRISPR For Genetic Diseases
The technology of CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat) continues to advance as a rapid pace. A recent study, Cas9/Nickase-induced allelic conversion by homologous chromosome-templated repair in Drosophila somatic cells , provides the potential for a new method of treating certain kinds of genetic diseases. This approach also appears to be safer, with fewer off-site ge
8h
Rare thymocyte cells can turn into blood cancer
Dysfunction involving an unusual type of thymocyte cell found in small amounts in every person may be why some people develop T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, research finds. T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, or T-ALL, affects more than 6,000 Americans each year. Researchers characterized the thymocyte cells—an immune cell present in the thymus—while studying mice with T-ALL. They determin
8h
Need web data? Here's how to harvest them
Nature, Published online: 05 July 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01830-9 Webscraping is a useful tool for gathering data from public websites, but researchers must develop some fundamental software skills to use it.
8h
Inferring the epidemiological benefit of indoor vector control interventions against malaria from mosquito data
Nature Communications, Published online: 05 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30700-1 Estimating the effectiveness of malaria vector control interventions has typically relied on resource-intensive cluster randomised trials. Here, the authors estimate changes in malaria prevalence using entomological data from experimental hut trials, which may provide an alternative route to approval of interven
9h
Vibrio cholerae O139 genomes provide a clue to why it may have failed to usher in the eighth cholera pandemic
Nature Communications, Published online: 05 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31391-4 The O139 Vibrio cholerae serogroup emerged in the 1990s and spread rapidly but did not become globally dominant. Here, the authors describe the genomic epidemiology of this strain and identify changes in virulence and antimicrobial resistance characteristics that they hypothesise may have contributed to its decl
9h
An expanded reference map of the human gut microbiome reveals hundreds of previously unknown species
Nature Communications, Published online: 05 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31502-1 Here, Leviatan et al. produce 241,118 genome assemblies to produce a new human gut microbiome reference set of 3,594 species genomes, of which 310 represent previously undescribed species, making the catalog a valuable resource for further research.
9h
Dynamic enlargement and mobilization of lipid droplets in pluripotent cells coordinate morphogenesis during mouse peri-implantation development
Nature Communications, Published online: 05 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31323-2 Prior to its implantation into the uterus, the mammalian embryo stores substantial lipids. Here the authors unveil how lipid storage and morphogenesis of pluripotent stem cells are fundamentally connected during peri-implantation development.
9h
Who Is June Huh?
He wanted to be a poet, then a science journalist. Only in his last year in college did Dr. Huh discover math as a calling.
9h
The Older Woman Comes of Age
The uterus has long doubled as a political tool. Summoned as a metaphor—for emptiness, for deficiency, for obligation—it has conflated a body part with womanhood, and used the logic of maternal sacrifice to limit women's lives. Mental stimulation, some 19th-century doctors argued , could harm their reproductive systems. Exercise could , too. We might laugh, today, at the transparency of such tact
9h
A Crisis Historian Has Some Bad News for Us
This article was featured in One Story to Read Today, a newsletter in which our editors recommend a single must-read from The Atlantic , Monday through Friday. Sign up for it here. A merica and the world are living through what Adam Tooze, the internet's foremost historian of money and disaster, describes as a "polycrisis." As he sips a beer at a bar near Columbia University, where he is the dire
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Humpback whales may steer clear of Hawaiʻi due to climate change
Humpback whales may one day avoid Hawaiian waters due to climate change and rising greenhouse gasses, according the findings of a new paper published in Frontiers in Marine Science by a team of researchers including three University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa graduate students—Hannah von Hammerstein and Renee Setter from the Department of Geography and Environment in the College of Social Sciences, and M
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Humpback whales may steer clear of Hawaiʻi due to climate change
Humpback whales may one day avoid Hawaiian waters due to climate change and rising greenhouse gasses, according the findings of a new paper published in Frontiers in Marine Science by a team of researchers including three University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa graduate students—Hannah von Hammerstein and Renee Setter from the Department of Geography and Environment in the College of Social Sciences, and M
9h
Scientists warn MEPs against watering down EU deforestation law
More than 50 experts say proposal redefining forest degradation could undermine net zero emissions plans More than 50 scientists have warned MEPs that a high-level move to water down EU legislation on deforestation could undermine Europe's net zero emissions plans. European environment ministers rewrote a draft regulation last week to define "forest degradation" as the replacement of primary fore
9h
Ecosystems get increasingly thirsty due to climate change
A new study shows that future ecosystem functioning will increasingly depend on water availability. Using recent simulations from climate models, an international team of scientists found several "hot spot regions" where increasing water limitation strongly affects ecosystems. These include Central Europe, the Amazon, and western Russia. Pinpointing such regions is essential: Healthy ecosystems ar
9h
New Beer in Singapore is Made From Recycled Sewage Water
(Photo: Brewerkz) Your local craft brewery might have a range of beers made with creative ingredients, like small-batch coffee, native botanicals, or even steeped pizza crusts. But unless you're in Singapore, it'll be difficult to find this one: a blonde ale brewed with recycled sewage water. Singaporean brewery Brewerkz worked with the country's Public Utilities Board (PUB) to produce the unique
9h
How land deformation occurs when fault sections creep
Strike-slip faults can be fickle about their movement—they can move slow and steady or remain stationary until their built-up stress is let loose in one go. But how do these faults' movements change from a locked and sudden release to a steady creep? And how does this change affect the rocks around the fault? Understanding where these deformation styles occur and the variables that contribute to t
9h
Eavesdropping on whales in the high Arctic
Whales are huge, but they live in an even larger environment—the world's oceans. Researchers use a range of tools to study their whereabouts, including satellite tracking, aerial surveys, sightings and deploying individual hydrophones to listen for their calls. But now, for the first time ever, researchers have succeeded in passively listening to whales—essentially, eavesdropping on them—using exi
9h
Eavesdropping on whales in the high Arctic
Whales are huge, but they live in an even larger environment—the world's oceans. Researchers use a range of tools to study their whereabouts, including satellite tracking, aerial surveys, sightings and deploying individual hydrophones to listen for their calls. But now, for the first time ever, researchers have succeeded in passively listening to whales—essentially, eavesdropping on them—using exi
9h
To end coal, adapt to regional realities
Nature, Published online: 05 July 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01828-3 Four broad categories capture countries' political and economic barriers to quit coal. Use these to tailor solutions.
9h
The fight to fund abortions in post-Roe America
In post-Roe America, money is even more determinative of who can get an abortion and who can't. Abortion funds are trying to close the gap, but they are now forced to navigate a murky legal landscape. (Image credit: Samuel Corum/AFP via Getty Images)
10h
The Scientist Who Developed a New Way to Understand Communication
By the time he was 17, Mark Braverman had lived in three countries and spoke as many languages. But though he doesn't have a hometown, he's quick to call theoretical computer science his home. "Theoretical computer science is whatever you want it to be," he said in his airy office at Princeton University, sitting between a whiteboard bursting with mathematical equations and a wall decorated with.
10h
Giant African Land Snails Have Invaded a County in Florida
(Photo: Charles J. Sharp/Wikimedia Commons) Florida's Pasco County has been under quarantine for over a week, thanks to a growing population of invasive, disease-carrying giant snails. The giant African land snail is native to, well, Africa, but was confirmed to have appeared in Florida by the state's Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS). The species' invasion was first identif
10h
A conversation on using chemical probes to study protein function in cells and organisms
Nature Communications, Published online: 05 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31271-x Chemical probes are selective small-molecule modulators, usually inhibitors, of their target protein's function, that can be used in cell or even animal studies to interrogate the functions of their target proteins. Cheryl Arrowsmith, the leader of a new initiative called Target 2035, which seeks to identify a p
11h
Preparation of photonic molecular trains via soft-crystal polymerization of lanthanide complexes
Nature Communications, Published online: 05 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31164-z Soft-crystals are molecular solids with highly ordered structures. Here, authors report the soft-crystal copolymerization of green-luminescent Tb(III) and yellow-luminescent Dy(III) complexes, and study the long-range energy transfer from one crystal to the other.
11h
We need to draw down carbon—not just stop emitting it
The UN's climate panel warns that the world may need to remove billions of tons of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere each year in the coming decades, on top of rapid emissions cuts, to prevent or pull the planet back from increasingly dangerous warming levels. A growing number of research groups and startups are working on a variety of ways to do this, including building greenhouse-gas-sucking f
11h
What is Paris syndrome?
Some people who visit Paris develop extreme symptoms — such as nausea, vomiting and hallucinations — when their expectations of the city do not jibe with reality.
11h
The Origin of Vibes
V ibes has become a ubiquitous word in the past half decade, one many people now reach for when describing the distinct emotion given off by a place, or a thing. It is the prevailing shorthand for a cultural atmosphere, mood, and zeitgeist. Vibe talk has also entered politics. In this magazine in 2021, Derek Thompson invited readers to think of politics as a " vibes war ." This spring, again in t
11h
Let the Rich Have Their Supertalls
E very year, the word skyscraper sounds less like a metaphor and more like a description. Right now, the world's tallest building—at 828 meters, or 2,717 feet—is Dubai's Burj Khalifa. But if Saudi Arabia's Jeddah Tower is completed as planned, it will claim that mantle, reaching one kilometer, or 3,280 feet. Properly, buildings that exceed 300 meters, or 984 feet, aren't even skyscrapers but "sup
11h
Snusning kan minska antalet spermier
Män som snusar kan minska sina chanser att bli pappa med tio procent. Förklaringen är att snusare har cirka 25 procent färre spermier jämfört med män som inte snusar. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
11h
Bättre hörsel med öron som en krokodil
Krokodiler har bra hörsel livet ut. Tricket som människor inte kan – är att bilda nya hårceller i örat. Kunskap om hur krokodilerna gör kan hjälpa människor med nedsatt hörsel. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
11h
Structures of LIG1 that engage with mutagenic mismatches inserted by polβ in base excision repair
Nature Communications, Published online: 05 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31585-w Ligase I seals two ends of DNA during DNA repair and replication. Here — solving structures of Ligase I with imperfect DNA harboring mismatches incorporated by DNA polymerase — the authors reveal how the repair proteins maintain fidelity at final ligation step.
12h
Fields medal: Kyiv-born professor and Oxford expert among winners
Maryna Viazovska's work on packing spheres and James Maynard's solving of prime number conundrum honoured in Helsinki A Ukrainian mathematician who proved the best way to pack spheres in eight dimensions to take up the least space, and an Oxford expert who has solved conundrums in the spacing of prime numbers, are among the winners of the Fields medal, considered the equivalent of a Nobel prize f
12h
No power, no fans, no AC: The villagers fighting to survive India's deadly heatwaves
Suman Shakya wants me to touch the concrete wall of her bedroom, where her one-year-old son lies soaked with sweat. It burns my hand as if it were a hot pan. "Now imagine sitting in front of a hot pan in this weather for as long as it takes to make rotis for the whole family," she says. Outside the temperature is 44 °C (111 °F). My throat is dry and my head spins. Sweat pours down my face, gettin
12h
A Solver of the Hardest Easy Problems About Prime Numbers
In 2013, one of the best — but also one of the worst — things that can happen to a mathematician happened to James Maynard. Fresh out of graduate school, he solved one of the discipline's oldest and most central problems, about the spacing of prime numbers. It was an achievement that ordinarily would have garnered him fame even beyond the cloistered world of pure math research. There was just one
12h
For His Sporting Approach to Math, a Fields Medal
The math department at the University of Geneva is usually quiet and still — that is, except when voices boom down the hall from the office of Hugo Duminil-Copin, a not infrequent occurrence. "We were known within the department for shouting at each other all the time, because we would get very excited about what we were doing," said Ioan Manolescu, a mathematician at the University of Fribourg..
12h
He Dropped Out to Become a Poet. Now He's Won a Fields Medal.
June Huh often finds himself lost. Every afternoon, he takes a long walk around Princeton University, where he's a professor in the mathematics department. On this particular day in mid-May, he's making his way through the woods around the nearby Institute for Advanced Study — "Just so you know," he says as he considers a fork in the path ahead… Source
12h
In Times of Scarcity, War and Peace, a Ukrainian Finds the Magic in Math
In late February, just weeks after Maryna Viazovska learned she had won a Fields Medal — the highest honor for a mathematician — Russian tanks and war planes began their assault on Ukraine, her homeland, and Kyiv, her hometown. Viazovska no longer lived in Ukraine, but her family was still there. Her two sisters, a 9-year-old niece and an 8-year-old nephew set out for Switzerland… Source
12h
How Abortion Rules Impact Prenatal Genetic Screening
Only 10 states with gestational limits on abortion have exemptions for conditions lethal before or at birth. None allow exemptions for serious but nonlethal conditions. But this leaves people who can't afford to travel to an out-of-state clinic or raise a child with a disability in a difficult spot.
13h
Wavelength-multiplexed hook nanoantennas for machine learning enabled mid-infrared spectroscopy
Nature Communications, Published online: 05 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31520-z Infrared spectroscopy with plasmonic nanoantennas is limited by small overlap between molecules and hot spots, and sharp resonance peaks. The authors demonstrate spectral multiplexing of hook nanoantennas with gradient dimensions as ultrasensitive vibrational probes in a continuous ultra-broadband region and uti
13h
Statistical Shenanigans?
The manufacturers of Covid-19 vaccines say they are 95% effective. Peter Doshi re-examined the evidence and estimates they are only 19-29% effective. This pre-print of an as-yet unpublished re-analysis raises many questions but doesn't support the claims being made on antivaccine sites. The post first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .
13h
Atomic-scale insights on hydrogen trapping and exclusion at incoherent interfaces of nanoprecipitates in martensitic steels
Nature Communications, Published online: 05 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31665-x By trapping hydrogen, nanoprecipitates can mitigate the hydrogen embrittlement of high strength steels. Here, the authors report direct evidences on the structural and chemical features underlying distinct hydrogen-trapping behaviors at the incoherent interfaces of precipitates and steel matrix.
14h
Handle with care: mistakes and near-misses at UK Covid labs
A coronavirus-infected ferret bite is among many mishaps investigated during the pandemic A week before the UK's first coronavirus lockdown, a lab worker at Aneurin Bevan University Health Board in Newport was screening nose and throat swabs from an intensive care patient. The paperwork carried no clinical details and the swabs were not double-bagged to indicate high risk. As such, the work was d
14h
Dangerous incidents at UK laboratories 'potentially exposed staff to Covid'
Official reports describe leaks of virus-laden fluids, a flood and a researcher bitten by an infected ferret Dangerous incidents at UK laboratories, hospitals and Covid test centres potentially exposed staff to coronavirus and other hazards over the course of the pandemic, according to official reports obtained by the Guardian. Many involved leaks and spillages of virus-laden fluids, but investig
14h
Spatial regulation of AMPK signaling revealed by a sensitive kinase activity reporter
Nature Communications, Published online: 05 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31190-x AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a master regulator of cellular metabolism, but how AMPK activity is spatiotemporally regulated remains unclear. Here, Schmitt et al develop a sensitive biosensor for AMPK, which they use to uncover mechanisms for AMPK activity in the lysosome and nucleus.
15h
Bixbyite-type Ln2O3 as promoters of metallic Ni for alkaline electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution
Nature Communications, Published online: 05 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31561-4 While renewable H2 evolution will require inexpensive, abundant catalysts, non-noble metals typically show relatively low activities. Here, authors examine lanthanide metal sesquioxide doped metallic Ni and show efficient, stable performances for alkaline H2 evolution electrocatalysis.
15h
High output mode-locked laser empowered by defect regulation in 2D Bi2O2Se saturable absorber
Nature Communications, Published online: 05 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31606-8 Bi2O2Se holds potential for the realization of 2D optical modulators due to its broadband nonlinear response, air stability and carrier mobility. Here, the authors report the realization of defect-engineered Bi2O2Se nanoplates as saturable absorbers for femtosecond solid-state lasers, showing improved output pow
15h
GymShark Ab Roller review
The GymShark Ab Roller provides the perfect amount of instability to help carve a leaner torso, but it's more suited to those adept at handling ab wheels
16h
Masking Up, 1619 to present
Putting on a mask to protect oneself and others against disease is nothing new, nor is resistance to mask-wearing, but mask designs have changed considerably from their first iterations.
16h
New Covid wave: Is this what 'living with covid' looks like?
The UK is yet again facing a wave of Covid infections, with cases soaring by more than half a million in a week at the end of June. This time, the wave is driven by even more transmissible variants of Omicron known as BA.4 and BA.5. But with all Covid precautions gone, and many of us heading to bars, pubs, festivals and sporting events as the summer rolls on, is it much of a surprise? Ian Sample a
16h
New Covid wave: Is this what 'living with covid' looks like?
The UK is yet again facing a wave of Covid infections, with cases soaring by more than half a million in a week at the end of June. This time, the wave is driven by even more transmissible variants of Omicron known as BA.4 and BA.5. But with all Covid precautions gone, and many of us heading to bars, pubs, festivals and sporting events as the summer rolls on, is it much of a surprise? Ian Sample
16h
Researchers use AI to detect new family of genes in gut bacteria
Using artificial intelligence, researchers have discovered a new family of sensing genes in enteric bacteria that are linked by structure and probably function, but not genetic sequence. The findings offer a new way of identifying the role of genes in unrelated species and could lead to new ways to fight intestinal bacterial infections.
20h
New antibody detection method for coronavirus that does not require a blood sample
Researchers have developed a rapid and effective antibody detection method for SARS-CoV-2 that is minimally invasive and applicable in resource-limited settings. Their methodology, which uses a patch sensor containing porous microneedles and a paper-based immunoassay, could have far-reaching implications for the blood-free detection of COVID-19 and many other infectious diseases.
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Like in a narrative, can a dream set up a later reveal?
TL;DR HERE IS THE POINT……………………….. I'm feeling compelled to tell the story from the dream when the significance of all this is not the story but the fact of the way dreams work as revealed in this story. That is, I had understood one theory of dreams being something like part of your mind is just RANDOMLY throwing up memory bits from the day as it consolidates memory and your mi
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SKLZ Core Wheels review
Our in-house tester put the SKLZ Core Wheels through their paces, and it's safe to say they were impressed with the results
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Unforced Variations: July 2022
This month's open thread. Please keep to climate-related issues, stay substantive, no abuse, no repetition, one-comment per day. The post first appeared on RealClimate .
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Fast and facile synthesis of antibacterial amino acid Schiff base copper complexes
Schiff base-metal complexes exhibit promising antibacterial and antioxidant properties. However, conventional methods for their preparation can be time-consuming. To reduce the reaction time and improve the quality and quantity of the products, researchers designed a new synthesis technique that uses microwave irradiation and methanol for the preparation of amino acid Schiff base copper complexes
22h
Structures of the T cell potassium channel Kv1.3 with immunoglobulin modulators
Nature Communications, Published online: 04 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31285-5 The Kv1.3 potassium channel is expressed abundantly on activated T cells and mediates the cellular immune responses. Here, the authors report structures of the Kv1.3 potassium channel with and without immunoglobulin modulators, shedding light on the mechanisms of Kv1.3 gating and modulation.
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Scaling the cost of government programs using a cost-per-person price tag improves comprehension by the general public
Government policies often are presented with hefty price tags, but people often zone out as more zeros are added to the total cost. A new study from Carnegie Mellon University suggests that rescaling the cost of programs can increase a person's understanding of funding choices, which may improve how people participate in the policy debate. The results are available in the July issue of the journal
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5 Secret Ingredients That Will Seriously Improve Your Cooking Game
Far too many home cooks are more obsessed with hardware than they are about software. What good is a $700 knife if your ingredients are sub-par? Half the battle of making your meals taste good has to do with how you flavor everything from skinless chicken breasts to chopped dinosaur kale. I'm willing to bet that the spices and seasonings in your pantry haven't been replaced since the tail end of
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Calcium-tin alloys as anodes for rechargeable non-aqueous calcium-ion batteries at room temperature
Nature Communications, Published online: 04 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31261-z The key challenge for rechargeable Ca batteries originates from the severe passivation of the calcium metal anode in electrolyte solutions. Here, the authors demonstrate the feasibility and elucidate the electrochemical properties of calcium-tin (Ca–Sn) alloy anodes for rechargeable Ca batteries.
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Design principles for water dissociation catalysts in high-performance bipolar membranes
Nature Communications, Published online: 04 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31429-7 It is important yet challenging to elucidate the mechanism of water dissociation in bipolar membrane electrolysers. Here the authors show how water dissociation is accelerated by electric-field-focusing and catalytic effects and uncover design principles to optimize the performance.
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Spain, Portugal dryness 'unprecedented' in 1,200 years
Parts of Portugal and Spain are the driest they have been in a thousand years due to an atmospheric high-pressure system driven by climate change, according to research published Monday, warning of severe implications for wine and olive production.
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Cern gears up for more discoveries 10 years after 'God particle' find
With the Higgs boson already in the bag, the Large Hadron Collider begins another period of data collection It's 10 years to the day since evidence of the Higgs boson – the elusive particle associated with an invisible mass-giving field – was announced . But for Prof Daniela Bortoletto the memories are as fresh as ever. "I just remember joy. I remember that everybody was so happy. And what surpri
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Deepmind's New AI May Be Better at Distributing Society's Resources Than Humans Are
How groups of humans working together collaboratively should redistribute the wealth they create is a problem that has plagued philosophers, economists, and political scientists for years. A new study from DeepMind suggests AI may be able to make better decisions than humans. AI is proving increasingly adept at solving complex challenges in everything from business to biomedicine, so the idea of
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Study explores coevolution of mammals and their lice
According to a new study, the first louse to take up residence on a mammalian host likely started out as a parasite of birds. That host-jumping event tens of millions of years ago began the long association between mammals and lice, setting the stage for their coevolution and offering more opportunities for the lice to spread to other mammals.
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The big idea: should we worry about sentient AI?
A Google employee raised the alarm about a chatbot he believes is conscious. A philosopher asks if he was right to do so There's a children's toy, called the See 'n Say, which haunts the memories of many people born since 1965. It's a bulky plastic disc with a central arrow that rotates around pictures of barnyard creatures, like a clock, if time were measured in roosters and pigs. There's a cord
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Daily briefing: Ten years of CRISPR
Nature, Published online: 30 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01838-1 How CRISPR gene editing has transformed the life sciences. Plus, a stark warning about global efforts to save species from extinction, and what ancient wolf genomes tell us about the origins of modern dogs.
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The Higgs boson, ten years after its discovery
Ten years ago, on July 4 2012, the ATLAS and CMS collaborations at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) announced the discovery of a new particle with features consistent with those of the Higgs boson predicted by the Standard Model of particle physics. The discovery was a landmark in the history of science and captured the world's attention. One year later it won François Englert and Peter Higgs the N
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What are whale sharks up to?
Satellite-tracking of the largest fish in the ocean offered insight into their migratory and feeding behavior, but their breeding grounds are still a mystery.
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Bear Grylls Eats the Biggest Grubs He's Ever Seen | Man vs. Wild
Stream Man vs. Wild on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/man-vs-wild #ManVsWild #BearGrylls #Survival Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery From: Disco
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Daily briefing: US Supreme Court defangs the EPA
Nature, Published online: 01 July 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01852-3 A Supreme Court decision will make it harder for the United States to curb greenhouse gases. Plus, how Russia's war against Ukraine is disrupting palaeontology and evidence in mice that some stomach bugs can spread in saliva.
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Myotonic dystrophy RNA toxicity alters morphology, adhesion and migration of mouse and human astrocytes
Nature Communications, Published online: 04 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31594-9 Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is characterized by debilitating neurological symptoms. Dinca et al. demonstrate the pronounced impact of DM1 on the morphology and RNA metabolism of astrocytes. Their findings suggest astroglial pathology in DM1 brain dysfunction.
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The Download: China's livestreaming crackdown, and a huge police data hack
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. China wants to control how its famous livestreamers act, speak, and even dress For Zeng, a young Chinese woman, an hour scrolling Douyin, the domestic version of TikTok, has become a daily ritual. Livestreaming took off in China in 2016 and has since become on
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Neutralization capacity of antibodies elicited through homologous or heterologous infection or vaccination against SARS-CoV-2 VOCs
Nature Communications, Published online: 04 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31556-1 Emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants raise concerns on protective immunity. Here the authors show that convalescent sera from people infected with Alpha, Beta, Gamma or Delta show a significant drop of Omicron-BA.1 neutralization and that vaccine-breakthrough infections with Omicron-BA.1 or Delta result in robust neutra
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How to Forgive Ourselves for What We Can't Change
Listen and subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Googl e | Pocket Casts When we regret our past, it can feel like we're incapable of changing our future. But it may be our past "mistakes" that help us realize there is room to evolve. In the finale episode of How to Start Over , we explore how regret can be a catalyst of change, what holds us back from self-forgiveness, and how to recon
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Actually Good News About Voting for a Change
In 2020, with the coronavirus pandemic ravaging the country, many states altered their election systems to try to ease voting. Since then, some of those states, especially Republican-led ones , have aggressively reversed course, taking steps to make voting harder . This sort of bad news has overshadowed one of the more interesting and encouraging changes in the country. Starting in May 2020, Colo
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Hell Yeah, Tom Cruise
Top Gun came out in the spring of 1986, a movie so big, so wall-to-wall, so resistance-is-futile that you just had to coexist with the damn thing until it finally went away. Now—like one of those flowers that comes into bloom only once every 40 years—it's back. Apparently Paramount had been after Tom Cruise to make a sequel before the original even opened , which is no surprise. In the 1980s stud
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Books for a Sun-Addled Mind
Summer is a season for vacations, relaxation, and restoration. As such, it can prove an ideal time to return to the classic texts we all know and love (and with some well-earned, unencumbered attention to boot). Close and serious reading can happen anywhere: no matter if you're splayed on a towel atop a sandy swath, or lounging on a back porch with a boozy spritz by your side. While the body enjo
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Magnetic molecules as local sensors of topological hysteresis of superconductors
Nature Communications, Published online: 04 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31320-5 Magnetic molecules have long been seen to hold promise in magnetic sensing applications. In this paper, Serrano et al show that a single layer of a magnetic molecule, a terbium based complex, is sensitive to the local magnetic field variation of a superconducting surface on which it is deposited.
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Clonal barcoding with qPCR detection enables live cell functional analyses for cancer research
Nature Communications, Published online: 04 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31536-5 DNA barcoding methods for the analysis of clonal heterogeneity in cancer have been limited in terms of throughput and practical requirements. Here, the authors develop SunCatcher, a rapid and sensitive barcoding approach for live single-cell clonal evolution analysis, and use this method to study breast cancer c
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America Is in Denial
Even as we watch the reservoirs and lakes of the West go dry, we keep watering our lawns, soaking our golf courses, and growing water-thirsty crops. As inflation mounts and the national debt balloons, progressive politicians vote for ever more spending. As the ice caps melt and record temperatures make the evening news, we figure that buying a Prius and recycling the boxes from our daily Amazon d
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EWWW Image Optimizerの設定と使い方【画像圧縮・最適化プラグイン】
「 画像圧縮プラグインで人気のEWWW Image Optimizerを使いたい 」と思っても、設定が難しそうだし英語ばっかりでよく分からない方も多いと思います。 プラグインってまだまだ純日本製って少ないんですよね・・・ そこで今回は『EWWW Image Optimizerの設定方法と使い方』について詳しく解説していきます。 英語については、日本語訳もつけていますので EWWW Image Optimizerの設定 のお役に立てれば幸いに思います。 最初に、あなたのブログの表示速度を計測することから始めてみましょう。 ページの読み込み速度 まず、あなたのブログのページ読み込み速度を計測してみましょう。 PageSpeed Insights(ページスピードインサイト) で簡単に確認できます。 検索窓にURLを打ち込んで「分析」をクリックしてみましょう。 「携帯電話」と「デスクトップ」での
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Ode to the Spring review – Chinese exploration of pandemic ground zero in Wuhan
Telling five Covid-related stories, this platitudinous urban-interconnection drama offers lectures on virtue and self-sacrifice and feels like state propaganda This interminable anthology film about the pandemic feels like being force-fed lectures on altruism, family responsibility, self-sacrifice and neighbourly forbearance by the Chinese government (which produced it). Set almost entirely in Wu
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What's Better in Britain
This September marks my fifth year of living in Britain, a milestone that comes with its own special reward: a test. Specifically, the " Life in the U.K. Test ," an examination that anyone seeking to obtain permanent residency rights in the country and ultimately British citizenship must take. The test covers all sorts of questions on Britain's history—including such seeming trivia as the specifi
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America's Necessary Myth for the World
F or European officials and politicians, a great fear gnaws at the back of their minds when they look at the ongoing war in Ukraine : What happens if the United States loses interest? Despite the war being in Europe, involving European powers, with largely European consequences, America remains the essential partner for Ukraine. For most of Eastern Europe, Scandinavia, and Britain, in particular,
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ATLAS and CMS release results of most comprehensive studies yet of Higgs boson's properties
Today, exactly ten years after announcing the discovery of the Higgs boson, the international ATLAS and CMS collaborations at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) report the results of their most comprehensive studies yet of the properties of this unique particle. The independent studies, described in two papers published today in Nature, show that the particle's properties are remarkably consistent wi
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Russia releases photo of cosmonauts holding Luhansk flag on ISS
Trio were praised in February for wearing yellow uniforms in apparent show of support for Ukraine Russia-Ukraine war: live updates Russia's space agency has published photos appearing to show cosmonauts on the International Space Station (ISS) holding the flags of the self-proclaimed republics in Luhansk and Donetsk. In a message posted to the official Roscosmos Telegram channel, Oleg Artemyev, D
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Oxygen isotope (δ18O, Δ′17O) insights into continental mantle evolution since the Archean
Nature Communications, Published online: 04 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31586-9 The 18 O/16 O ratio of the subcontinental mantle has decreased by 0.2‰, while crustal values increased by 4‰ via fluid transfer since the Archean due to the initiation of plate tectonics and subduction, in line with the crust-upper mantle mass balance
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General recipe to realize photonic-crystal surface-emitting lasers with 100-W-to-1-kW single-mode operation
Nature Communications, Published online: 04 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30910-7 Here, the authors analytically derive the general conditions for 100-W-to-1-kW-class single-mode operation in ultra-large-area (3~10 mm) photonic crystal lasers. Such high power single-mode semiconductor lasers will bring innovation to a wide variety of fields.
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The Higgs boson turns ten
Nature, Published online: 04 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04899-4 Ten years since the discovery of the Higgs boson, the exploration of the Higgs sector, as this overview shows, has progressed far beyond original expectations, but many research questions still remain open.
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'One of the botanical wonders of the world': Giant waterlily grown at Kew Gardens named new to science
A new paper, published today in the journal Frontiers in Plant Science, outlines a new botanical discovery in the genus Victoria, the famous giant waterlily genus named after Britain's Queen Victoria in 1852. Until now, there have only been two known species of giant waterlily, the new species makes it three. Specimens of the new species, Victoria boliviana, have been sitting in Kew's Herbarium fo
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'One of the botanical wonders of the world': Giant waterlily grown at Kew Gardens named new to science
A new paper, published today in the journal Frontiers in Plant Science, outlines a new botanical discovery in the genus Victoria, the famous giant waterlily genus named after Britain's Queen Victoria in 1852. Until now, there have only been two known species of giant waterlily, the new species makes it three. Specimens of the new species, Victoria boliviana, have been sitting in Kew's Herbarium fo
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China wants to control how its famous livestreamers act, speak, and even dress
For Zeng, a young Chinese woman, an hour scrolling Douyin, the domestic version of TikTok, has become a daily ritual. Among its broad range of videos and livestreams, she particularly likes one creator: "Lawyer Longfei." Every day, Longfei answers her 9 million followers' legal inquiries live. Many deal with how women should approach tricky divorce cases. But in May, Longfei's account went dark f
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What polio's UK presence means for global health
Nature, Published online: 04 July 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01802-z A form of polio derived from the vaccine is probably circulating in the United Kingdom, highlighting the ongoing need for polio vaccination worldwide.
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Starwatch: Matariki appearance marks start of Māori new year
Pleiades star cluster in Taurus marks month-long time of remembrance and celebration Midsummer is definitely not a time of the year that northern hemisphere observers think about looking for the Pleiades star cluster in Taurus; January and February are far more favourable. However, if you move to the southern hemisphere – New Zealand to be precise – the cluster, which is also known as Matariki, t
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Goodbye silicone? A new era of breast reconstruction is on the horizon
Tissue-regrowing implants, which will enter human trials next week, could provide comfortable and accessible alternatives to silicone Having an ice pack strapped to your chest – that's how some describe the experience of taking a walk in cold weather when you have breast implants. Silicone only slowly reaches body temperature once out of the cold, so that icy feeling can persist for hours. As wel
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What Can Menstrual Blood Reveal about Health and Disease?
Researchers routinely examine saliva, skin, teeth, and even feces for clues about health and disease. The conventional view suggests menstrual blood is merely a waste product. However, some scientists are studying menstrual effluent as well, making a case against longstanding taboos and stigma.
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Engineering probiotics to inhibit Clostridioides difficile infection by dynamic regulation of intestinal metabolism
Nature Communications, Published online: 04 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31334-z Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI) results in significant morbidity and mortality in hospitalised patients. Here the authors engineer probiotics to restore intestinal bile salt metabolism in response to antibiotic-induced microbiome dysbiosis significantly inhibit Clostridioides difficile infection in mode
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Lögn
Reflektioner omfalska påståenden och lögner Vad kännetecknar en lögn? Med att ljuga menar vi när någon medvetet säger som det inte är. I vissa fall räknar vi det också som … Continued Inlägget dök först upp på Vetenskap och Folkbildning .
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World's largest water lily is a species of its own
When 19th century European botanists came across majestic water lilies with leaves bigger than a pingpong table, they first thought these South American plants constituted just one species. Soon they realized the Victoria genus—named after the contemporaneous British monarch—comprised two species, V. amazonica and V. cruziana . Now, researchers have discovered there are really three species, and
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Hypothesis: The 'mind' is just the system processing information, consciously
Hypothesis: The 'mind' is the result of the system (that we call a human) processing the stimuli from its environment, and its awareness of that processing of information. This only seems intuitive. Do you agree with this perception of the 'mind?' Correct me if you disagree but I would describe the mind as: mind = An imagined 'space' in which some subconscious cognitive processes and yields of th
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Newly identified water lily species is world's largest
Leaves of species grown at Kew Gardens can reach up to three metres in the wild A giant waterlily grown at Kew Gardens has been named as new to science, in the first discovery of its type in more than a century. Scientists at the south-west London garden suspected for decades there could be a third species of giant waterlily and worked with researchers in its native home in Bolivia to see if thei
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Apples, Oranges, and How Not to Analyze a Vaccine RCT
The evidence is overwhelming that COVID vaccines keep people alive and out of the hospital. Only someone who starts with the conclusion that vaccines don't work and then works backwards to find the evidence could claim otherwise. The post first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .
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The splicing factor RBM17 drives leukemic stem cell maintenance by evading nonsense-mediated decay of pro-leukemic factors
Nature Communications, Published online: 04 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31155-0 Leukemic stem cells (LSCs) drive chemoresistance and relapse in acute myeloid leukemia. Here, the authors show that the splicing factor RBM17 supports LSCs through avoiding nonsense-mediated decay of pro-leukaemic factors such as the translation initiation factor EIF4A2.
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Man Who Accidentally Got Paid 330x His Salary Quits, Disappears
Peace Out A guy in Chile really hit the jackpot this week when his employer accidentally paid him 330 times his salary on accident. An Insider report yesterday said authorities haven't released the man's name, but that he's been "uncontactable" and has basically disappeared. Meat factory CIAL Alimentos paid the man 165,398,851 Chilean pesos, or about $180,418, instead of the expected 500,000 Chil
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