Search Posts

Nyheder2022juli06

Evidence found that insects are possibly able to feel pain
A trio of researchers, two from Queen Mary University of London, the other from the University of Tehran, has found evidence that suggests insects might be able to feel pain. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Matilda Gibbons, Lars Chittka and Sajedeh Sarlak, describe issues they encountered in attempting to find out whether insects feel pain, and the logic they used i
4h
Mathematical calculations show that quantum communication across interstellar space should be possible
A team of physicists at the University of Edinburgh's School of Physics and Astronomy has used mathematical calculations to show that quantum communications across interstellar space should be possible. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review D, the group describes their calculations and also the possibility of extraterrestrial beings attempting to communicate with us using such si
7h

LATEST

To tame lake-fouling algal blooms, try an ecosystem approach
Every summer, surges of toxic green muck plague lakes worldwide, sickening hikers who fail to purify drinking water, closing favorite swimming holes, and killing fish. The most feared—and studied—cause of these freshwater "algal" blooms is a genus of cyanobacterium called Microcystis . Its explosive summer growth is thought to be spurred by rising levels of phosphorus, nitrogen, and other nutrien
6min
Ex-Tesla Employee Says He Was Fired by Phone Call, While on Vacation
Getting Laid (Off) A Tesla employee says the company mishandled his firing when it let him go while he was on vacation — and he's not the only one. As Insider reports , Reno, Nevada's Roosevelt Jointer had been a Tesla maintenance supervisor from 2017 until last month, when he got a phone call from his boss while he was on vacation telling him he was "going to be let go effectively immediately."
11min
Mars Rock Samples Probably Won't Infect Earth With Deadly Martian Plague, Scientist Says
If you're worried about NASA's plan to bring Mars rocks back to Earth to study them, you probably don't need to be. In interviews with The Philadelphia Inquirer , scientists maintained that there's very little risk i nvolved in bringing samples from Mars back home. As Rutgers' Nathan Yee, a former NASA official who teaches astrobiology, reminded the Inquirer , Mars rocks have already fallen to Ea
11min
Biologists' fears confirmed on the lower Colorado River
For National Park Service fisheries biologist Jeff Arnold, it was a moment he'd been dreading. Bare-legged in sandals, he was pulling in a net in a shallow backwater of the lower Colorado River last week, when he spotted three young fish that didn't belong there. "Give me a call when you get this!" he messaged a colleague, snapping photos.
13min
Helping teens channel stress, grow in resilience
The mental health crisis among teens has prompted an urgent quest for preventive interventions. Researchers believe they have one. As the team explains in a recent study, the 30-minute online training module teaches teenagers to channel their stress responses away from something negative that needs to be feared and tamped down towards recognizing those responses — sweaty palms, a racing heart, fo
15min
Safety first: How stigma may impact health
Lack of safety, according to a new theory, may have a direct impact on the health of people in marginalized communities, particularly the LGBTQ community. The theory challenges decades of thinking that health disparities in the LGBTQ community are primarily due to encounters with stressful and discriminatory events, a concept called 'minority stress.'
15min
Imaging solves mystery of how large HIV protein functions to form infectious virus
Scientists have determined the molecular structure of HIV Pol, a protein that plays a key role in the late stages of HIV replication, or the process through which the virus propagates itself and spreads through the body. Importantly, determining the molecule's structure helps answer longstanding questions about how the protein breaks itself apart to advance the replication process. The discovery r
15min
Citizen scientists from 200 years ago and today help shed light on climate change trends
Nearly 200 years ago, a system of academies across New York set out to collect data on the state's climates and seasons. Equipped with thermometers, rain gauges and instructions for data collection, the schools' principals and teachers—and even a few students—recorded temperature measurements and observations: when the robins were first seen, when the red maples bloomed, when the strawberries ripe
21min
Citizen scientists from 200 years ago and today help shed light on climate change trends
Nearly 200 years ago, a system of academies across New York set out to collect data on the state's climates and seasons. Equipped with thermometers, rain gauges and instructions for data collection, the schools' principals and teachers—and even a few students—recorded temperature measurements and observations: when the robins were first seen, when the red maples bloomed, when the strawberries ripe
22min
Frequency-domain STED microscopy for selective background noise suppression
Nanoscopy describes the ability to see beyond the generally accepted optical limit of 200–300 nm. Stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy, developed by Stefan W. Hell and Jan Wichmann in 1994, and experimentally demonstrated by Hell and Thomas Klar in 1999, is a super-resolution technique for nanoscopy. STED microscopy has made considerable progress and is widely used in practical research
31min
Listen: Air pollution cuts the average lifespan by more than 2 years
We can't always see the consequences of air pollution around us, but it's taking years off our lives. According to a new Air Quality Life Index report from the Energy Policy Institute at the University of Chicago (EPIC), air pollution is taking 2.2 years off the average global life expectancy. In some of the most polluted regions in the world, residents are expected to lose an average five years
36min
How Stranger Things Became the Apotheosis of Postmodern TV
This article contains light spoilers through the fourth season of Stranger Things. Somehow, even thousands of viewing minutes in, my synapses numbed by a cinematic universe so squelchy that it induces visceral anxiety, I still don't really know how to feel about Stranger Things . It's hard to even say exactly what it is. TV watchers today are accustomed to streaming works that coalesce, murkily,
44min
America's Public-Health Efforts Have Slowed to a Crawl
This is an edition of Up for Debate, a newsletter by Conor Friedersdorf. On Wednesdays, he rounds up timely conversations and solicits reader responses to one thought-provoking question. Later, he publishes some thoughtful replies. Sign up for the newsletter here. Question of the Week I need a week's respite from heavy news, so it's time for your hot takes: What do you love or hate about summer––
44min
Physicists see electron whirlpools
Physicists have now observed electron whirlpools. Theorists have long predicted electrons should exhibit this hallmark of fluid flow; the findings could inform the design of more efficient electronics.
49min
Printing a new chapter in solar energy
A simple and versatile nanoparticle ink could help next-generation perovskite solar cells to be printed at scale and become the dominant force in commercial photovoltaics.
49min
Deep learning from phylogenies to uncover the epidemiological dynamics of outbreaks
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31511-0 Widely applicable, accurate and fast inference methods in phylodynamics are needed to fully profit from the richness of genetic data in uncovering the dynamics of epidemics. Here, the authors develop a likelihood-free, simulation-based deep learning approach.
1h
Florida Officials Alarmed by Invasion of Giant Snails That Can Cause Meningitis
Snail Fail Florida is facing yet another invasion of the giant African snail, according to the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS), which can grow to an astonishing eight inches in length and pose a serious health risk to humans. The state has already done battle with the formidable snails on a number of occasions within the last 50 or so years, including in 1975 and j
1h
'Supergene' wreaks havoc in a genome
Biologists have used population genomics to shed light on the evolution and consequences of a selfish genetic element known as Segregation Distorter (SD). The researchers report that SD has caused dramatic changes in chromosome organization and genetic diversity.
1h
New method for studying functionality of microbiota
A research group has developed a new method for studying the functionality of microbiota through metaproteomics. The new method poses broad potential for the study of microbiota on a new, functional level. The characterization of the functionality of gut microbiota is central in the study of human health and disease as well as disease prediction, prevention, and treatment. Previous studies have ma
1h
Scientists demonstrate machine learning tool to efficiently process complex solar data
Big data has become a big challenge for space scientists analyzing vast datasets from increasingly powerful space instrumentation. To address this, a team has developed a machine learning tool to efficiently label large, complex datasets to allow deep learning models to sift through and identify potentially hazardous solar events. The new labeling tool can be applied or adapted to address other ch
1h
Early stone tools were not rocket science
Archaeologically excavated stone tools—some as much as 2.6 million years old—have been hailed as evidence for an early cultural heritage in human evolution. But are these tools proof that our ancestors were already becoming human, both mentally and culturally?
1h
Psoriasis: Study lays foundation for new treatment strategy
About one third of those who suffer from psoriasis develop inflammation in their joints (psoriatic arthritis) as a result of the chronic skin condition. A research team has now discovered a key starting point for inhibiting inflammation in both psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. The researchers' findings may form the basis for developing new treatment, diagnostic and prevention strategies.
1h
Robot learns to see water and pour it into a glass
A horse, a zebra, and artificial intelligence helped researchers teach a robot to recognize water and pour it into a glass. Water presents a tricky challenge for robots because it is clear. Robots have learned how to pour water before, but previous techniques like heating the water and using a thermal camera or placing the glass in front of a checkerboard background don't transition well to every
1h
Novel quantum simulation method clarifies correlated properties of complex material 1T -TaS2
A team led by Philipp Werner, professor of physics at the University of Fribourg and leader of NCCR MARVEL's Phase 3 project Continued Support, Advanced Simulation Methods, has applied their advanced quantum simulation method to the investigation of the complex material 1T -TaS2. The research, recently published in Physical Review Letters, helped resolve a conflict between earlier experimental and
1h
The "teapot in a city": A paradigm shift in urban climate modeling
Abstract Urban areas are a high-stake target of climate change mitigation and adaptation measures. To understand, predict, and improve the energy performance of cities, the scientific community develops numerical models that describe how they interact with the atmosphere through heat and moisture exchanges at all scales. In this review, we present recent advances that are at the origin of last de
2h
Transplanted organoids empower human preclinical assessment of drug candidate for the clinic
Abstract Pharmacodynamic (PD) studies are an essential component of preclinical drug discovery. Current approaches for PD studies, including the analysis of novel kidney disease targeting therapeutic agents, are limited to animal models with unclear translatability to the human condition. To address this challenge, we developed a novel approach for PD studies using transplanted, perfused human ki
2h
Direct search for dark matter axions excluding ALP cogenesis in the 63- to 67-μeV range with the ORGAN experiment
Abstract The standard model axion seesaw Higgs portal inflation (SMASH) model is a well-motivated, self-contained description of particle physics that predicts axion dark matter particles to exist within the mass range of 50 to 200 micro–electron volts. Scanning these masses requires an axion haloscope to operate under a constant magnetic field between 12 and 48 gigahertz. The ORGAN (Oscillating
2h
Instability mediated self-templating of drop crystals
Abstract The breakup of liquid threads into droplets is prevalent in engineering and natural settings. While drop formation in these systems has a long-standing history, existing studies typically consider axisymmetric systems. Conversely, the physics at play when multiple threads are involved and the interaction of a thread with a symmetry breaking boundary remain unexplored. Here, we show that
2h
Battery-free, tuning circuit–inspired wireless sensor systems for detection of multiple biomarkers in bodily fluids
Abstract Tracking the concentration of biomarkers in biofluids can provide crucial information about health status. However, the complexity and nonideal form factors of conventional digital wireless schemes impose challenges in realizing biointegrated, lightweight, and miniaturized sensors. Inspired by the working principle of tuning circuits in radio frequency electronics, this study reports a c
2h
Early knapping techniques do not necessitate cultural transmission
Abstract Early stone tool production, or knapping, techniques are claimed to be the earliest evidence for cultural transmission in the human lineage. Previous experimental studies have trained human participants to knap in conditions involving opportunities for cultural transmission. Subsequent knapping was then interpreted as evidence for a necessity of the provided cultural transmission opportu
2h
High-resolution spatial and genomic characterization of coral-associated microbial aggregates in the coral Stylophora pistillata
Abstract Bacteria commonly form aggregates in a range of coral species [termed coral-associated microbial aggregates (CAMAs)], although these structures remain poorly characterized despite extensive efforts studying the coral microbiome. Here, we comprehensively characterize CAMAs associated with Stylophora pistillata and quantify their cell abundance. Our analysis reveals that multiple Endozoico
2h
Structural basis for the calmodulin-mediated activation of eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase
Abstract Translation is a tightly regulated process that ensures optimal protein quality and enables adaptation to energy/nutrient availability. The α-kinase eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase (eEF-2K), a key regulator of translation, specifically phosphorylates the guanosine triphosphatase eEF-2, thereby reducing its affinity for the ribosome and suppressing the elongation phase of protein sy
2h
A handheld intelligent single-molecule binary bioelectronic system for fast and reliable immunometric point-of-care testing
Abstract Molecular tests are highly reliable and sensitive but lack portability and are not simple to use; conversely, easy-to-use antigenic tests still lack high performance. BioScreen combines single-molecule sensitivity and outstanding reliability with ultraportability and simplicity of use. This digital platform is capable of artificial intelligence–based binary classification at the limit of
2h
Cryo-EM structure of the HIV-1 Pol polyprotein provides insights into virion maturation
Abstract Key proteins of retroviruses and other RNA viruses are translated and subsequently processed from polyprotein precursors by the viral protease (PR). Processing of the HIV Gag-Pol polyprotein yields the HIV structural proteins and enzymes. Structures of the mature enzymes PR, reverse transcriptase (RT), and integrase (IN) aided understanding of catalysis and design of antiretrovirals, but
2h
Trans-splicing facilitated by RNA pairing greatly expands sDscam isoform diversity but not homophilic binding specificity
Abstract The Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule 1 ( Dscam1 ) gene can generate tens of thousands of isoforms via alternative splicing, which is essential for nervous and immune functions. Chelicerates generate approximately 50 to 100 shortened Dscam (sDscam) isoforms by alternative promoters, similar to mammalian protocadherins. Here, we reveal that trans-splicing markedly increases the reposit
2h
Rapid liquid phase–assisted ultrahigh-temperature sintering of high-entropy ceramic composites
Abstract High-entropy ceramics and their composites display high mechanical strength and attractive high-temperature stabilities. However, properties like strong covalent bond character and low self-diffusion coefficients make them difficult to get sintered, limiting their mass popularity. Here, we present a rapid liquid phase–assisted ultrahigh-temperature sintering strategy and use high-entropy
2h
Homeostatic neuro-metasurfaces for dynamic wireless channel management
Abstract The physical basis of a smart city, the wireless channel, plays an important role in coordinating functions across a variety of systems and disordered environments, with numerous applications in wireless communication. However, conventional wireless channel typically necessitates high-complexity and energy-consuming hardware, and it is hindered by lengthy and iterative optimization strat
2h
A lineage-specific Exo70 is required for receptor kinase–mediated immunity in barley
Abstract In the evolution of land plants, the plant immune system has experienced expansion in immune receptor and signaling pathways. Lineage-specific expansions have been observed in diverse gene families that are potentially involved in immunity but lack causal association. Here, we show that Rps8 -mediated resistance in barley to the pathogen Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (wheat stripe
2h
Systematic simulation of the interactions of pleckstrin homology domains with membranes
Abstract Pleckstrin homology (PH) domains can recruit proteins to membranes by recognition of phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP) lipids. Several family members are linked to diseases including cancer. We report the systematic simulation of the interactions of 100 mammalian PH domains with PIP-containing membranes. The observed PIP interaction hotspots recapitulate crystallographic binding sites
2h
Tumoral microenvironment prevents de novo asparagine biosynthesis in B cell lymphoma, regardless of ASNS expression
Abstract Depletion of circulating asparagine with l -asparaginase (ASNase) is a mainstay of leukemia treatment and is under investigation in many cancers. Expression levels of asparagine synthetase (ASNS), which catalyzes asparagine synthesis, were considered predictive of cancer cell sensitivity to ASNase treatment, a notion recently challenged. Using [U- 13 C 5 ]- l -glutamine in vitro and in v
2h
The seeds and homogeneous nucleation of photoinduced nonthermal melting in semiconductors due to self-amplified local dynamic instability
Abstract Laser-induced nonthermal melting in semiconductors has been studied over the past four decades, but the underlying mechanism is still under debate. Here, by using an advanced real-time time-dependent density functional theory simulation, we reveal that the photoexcitation-induced ultrafast nonthermal melting in silicon occurs via homogeneous nucleation with random seeds originating from
2h
Role of tropical lower stratosphere winds in quasi-biennial oscillation disruptions
Abstract In 2016, the westerly quasi-biennial oscillation (WQBO) in the equatorial stratosphere was unprecedentedly disrupted by westward forcing near 40 hPa; this was followed by another disruption in 2020. Strong extratropical Rossby waves propagating toward the tropics were considered the main cause of the disruptions, but why the zonal wind is reversed only in the middle of the WQBO remains u
2h
Preferred synonymous codons are translated more accurately: Proteomic evidence, among-species variation, and mechanistic basis
Abstract A commonly stated cause of unequal uses of synonymous codons is their differential translational accuracies. A key prediction of this long-standing translational accuracy hypothesis (TAH) of codon usage bias is higher translational accuracies of more frequently used synonymous codons, which, however, has had no direct evidence beyond case studies. Analyzing proteomic data from Escherichi
2h
Alzheimer's disease: Ablating single master site abolishes tau hyperphosphorylation
Abstract Hyperphosphorylation of the neuronal tau protein is a hallmark of neurodegenerative tauopathies such as Alzheimer's disease. A central unanswered question is why tau becomes progressively hyperphosphorylated. Here, we show that tau phosphorylation is governed by interdependence— a mechanistic link between initial site-specific and subsequent multi-site phosphorylation. Systematic assessm
2h
Computational design of a sensitive, selective phase-changing sensor protein for the VX nerve agent
Abstract The VX nerve agent is one of the deadliest chemical warfare agents. Specific, sensitive, real-time detection methods for this neurotoxin have not been reported. The creation of proteins that use biological recognition to fulfill these requirements using directed evolution or library screening methods has been hampered because its toxicity makes laboratory experimentation extraordinarily
2h
Those Headlines About Tesla Losing the Top EV Seller Spot Are Pretty Sketchy
Warren Buffett-backed Chinese carmaker BYD has had a stellar year — and if the headlines of news outlets like the Financial Times and Axios are to be believed, the company just overtook Tesla as the world's number one electric vehicle seller. But a closer look at BYD's company filings reveals that it isn't nearly that cut and dried. Specifically, BYD is making strides on hybrid vehicles, but Tesl
2h
Celebration Erupts as NASA Restores Comms With Lost Spacecraft
Comms Restored Finally some good news! NASA has restored communications with CAPSTONE, a spacecraft that was headed to the Moon when it plunged into radio silence on Tuesday, shortly after escaped Earth's orbit . "We have re-established communications with CAPSTONE," reads a tweet by Advanced Space, a spaceflight company that collaborated on the development of the spacecraft with NASA. "The space
2h
'Hangry is a real thing': psychologists find link between hunger and emotions
Hunger was associated with stronger feelings of anger and irritability and lower levels of pleasure in research For those who get snappy when they miss out on lunch, it may be the perfect excuse: researchers have confirmed that a lack of food makes otherwise bearable people "hangry" . In one of the first studies to explore how hunger affects emotions as people go about their daily lives, psycholo
2h
The Great Veterinary Shortage
When Michelle Stokes noticed a necrotic wound on her cat, Jellyfish, last July, she and her husband had to call about 50 vets before finding one that could squeeze them in. The local emergency animal hospital was so backed up that it said the wound—serious but not yet life-threatening—wasn't really an emergency. Jellyfish didn't have a regular vet, because Stokes and her husband had just moved to
2h
Shedding new light on dark matter
A team of physicists has developed a method for predicting the composition of dark matter — invisible matter detected only by its gravitational pull on ordinary matter and whose discovery has been long sought by scientists.
2h
Case solved: The biosynthesis of strychnine elucidated
A research team has disclosed the complete biosynthetic pathway for the formation of strychnine in the plant species Strychnos nux-vomica (poison nut). The researchers identified all genes involved in the biosynthesis of strychnine and other metabolites and expressed them in the model plant Nicotiana benthamiana. This enabled them to show that these extremely complex and pharmacologically importan
2h
Mass layoff looms for Japanese researchers
Thousands of researchers at Japanese institutes and universities may see their jobs disappear by next spring, an unintended result of labor legislation adopted a decade ago that gave researchers who have worked under fixed-term contracts for more than 10 years the right to permanent employment. Japan's science system has many such temporary workers—but rather than fully hire them, institutions ar
2h
Anisogamy explains why males benefit more from additional matings
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31620-w Why do males typically compete more intensely for mating opportunities than do females and how does this relate to sex differences in gamete size? A new study provides a formal evolutionary link between gamete size dimorphism and 'Bateman gradients', which describe how much individuals of each sex benefit from a
2h
Molecular-level insight into photocatalytic CO2 reduction with H2O over Au nanoparticles by interband transitions
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31474-2 While plasmonic metals show some activity for photocatalysis, they often must be paired with semiconductors or sacrificial reagents. Here, authors find quantum-sized Au nanoparticles can achieve photocatalytic CO2-to-CO conversion with H2O by charge carriers generated from interband transitions.
2h
Imaging solves mystery of how large HIV protein functions to form infectious virus
Understanding how HIV replicates within cells is key for developing new therapies that could help nearly 40 million people living with HIV globally. Now, a team of scientists from the Salk Institute and Rutgers University have for the first time determined the molecular structure of HIV Pol, a protein that plays a key role in the late stages of HIV replication, or the process through which the vir
2h
Imaging solves mystery of how large HIV protein functions to form infectious virus
Understanding how HIV replicates within cells is key for developing new therapies that could help nearly 40 million people living with HIV globally. Now, a team of scientists from the Salk Institute and Rutgers University have for the first time determined the molecular structure of HIV Pol, a protein that plays a key role in the late stages of HIV replication, or the process through which the vir
2h
These whales have babies in shallow waters to avoid 'eavesdroppers'
Whale mothers choose nursery sites in shallow waters where predators cannot "eavesdrop" on communication between a mother and her young, researchers say. Each winter, the whales migrate thousands of miles to these bay habitats to give birth and care for their young. But why choose such shallow nursery grounds that may be within dangerous proximity to human activity and where food supply is scarce
2h
Case solved: The biosynthesis of strychnine elucidated
A research team has disclosed the complete biosynthetic pathway for the formation of strychnine in the plant species Strychnos nux-vomica (poison nut). The researchers identified all genes involved in the biosynthesis of strychnine and other metabolites and expressed them in the model plant Nicotiana benthamiana. This enabled them to show that these extremely complex and pharmacologically importan
2h
Photorhabdus luminescens is a true all-rounder: Insect pathogenic bacterium also helps to combat fungal infestation
Future food shortages are expected to become exacerbated in many parts of the world. With this in view, sustainable biological techniques are being explored that could increase the yield of cereals and other food crops and which, unlike the use of chemical pesticides, are environmentally compatible. The bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens is already used as bioinsecticide to protect crops against a
2h
Photorhabdus luminescens is a true all-rounder: Insect pathogenic bacterium also helps to combat fungal infestation
Future food shortages are expected to become exacerbated in many parts of the world. With this in view, sustainable biological techniques are being explored that could increase the yield of cereals and other food crops and which, unlike the use of chemical pesticides, are environmentally compatible. The bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens is already used as bioinsecticide to protect crops against a
2h
Medicinal knowledge vanishes as Indigenous languages die
DAVOS, SWITZERLAND— Uldarico Matapí Yucuna, 63, is often called the last shaman of the Matapi, an Indigenous group of fewer than 70 people living along the Mirití-Paraná River in the Colombian Amazon rainforest. His father was a shaman and taught him ancestral knowledge, including how to use plants to treat all kinds of maladies. But Uldarico rejects the title because instead of living with his p
2h
College Football Is Cannibalizing Itself
College-sports traditionalists were appalled last week when the Big Ten athletic conference announced that it will add UCLA and the University of Southern California to its membership in 2024—creating a seismic shift in the college-sports landscape that will generate millions of dollars in revenue for the two California powerhouse programs. This reorganization is the strongest indicator yet that
2h
The key materials and devices for intrinsically flexible displays
This review is conceived by academician Yunqi Liu and professor Yunlong Guo (Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences). Dr. Zhiyuan Zhao, Dr. Kai Liu, and Yanwei Liu are the co-first authors. This research attaches significant attention to the key materials for intrinsically flexible organic thin film transistors (OTFTs) and electroluminescent devices. Specifically, we focus on the foll
3h
NASA Still Has No Contact With Spacecraft En Route to the Moon
Off the Grid Update: NASA has restored communication with CAPSTONE. Full story here . Yesterday, news broke that NASA lost contact with its just-launched CAPSTONE satellite, just a day after the spacecraft successfully escaped Earth's orbit and headed toward the Moon. With no further updates from NASA as of this morning, it can be only be assumed they're still experiencing their euphemistically d
3h
30-minute class can improve teenagers' stress response, study finds
Approach focusing on positives of stress is linked to academic improvement and lower anxiety Stress in teenagers can be reduced by a single 30-minute online training session aimed at encouraging a growth mindset and seeing the body's reaction to stress as a positive, according to scientists. A study involving more than 4,000 secondary school pupils and university undergraduates suggests the inter
3h
Single-cell roadmap of human gonadal development
Nature, Published online: 06 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04918-4 This study provides a comprehensive spatiotemporal map of human and mouse gonadal differentiation, using a combination of single-cell and spatial transcriptomics, chromatin accessibility assays and fluorescent microscopy, which can guide in vitro gonadogenesis.
3h
A synergistic mindsets intervention protects adolescents from stress
Nature, Published online: 06 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04907-7 An online training module that synergistically targets two different mindsets can reduce stress levels in adolescents in the context of social-evaluative stressors—stressful experiences in which individuals fear that others are judging them negatively.
3h
Decatungstate-catalyzed radical disulfuration through direct C-H functionalization for the preparation of unsymmetrical disulfides
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31617-5 Despite the importance of unsymmetrical disulfides in various fields such as food chemistry, pharmaceutical industry, and polymer science, the nondirected intermolecular disulfuration of C-H bonds remains challenging. Here, the authors report the conversion of aliphatic C(sp3)-H bonds and aldehydic C(sp2)-H bond
3h
Multi-layered strategies needed to protect public health from oil and gas drilling impacts
Efforts to mitigate the potentially harmful effects of oil and gas drilling are often focused on single measures, such as increasing setbacks, the minimum allowable distance between drilling and homes, schools, and other sensitive locations. However, in a July 6 commentary in Environmental Research Letters, a group of public health experts from several universities and organizations urges adoption
3h
Spintronics: Giant Rashba semiconductors show unconventional dynamics with potential applications
Germanium telluride is a strong candidate for use in functional spintronic devices due to its giant Rashba-effect. Now, scientists at HZB have discovered another intriguing phenomenon in GeTe by studying the electronic response to thermal excitation of the samples. To their surprise, the subsequent relaxation proceeded fundamentally different to that of conventional semimetals. By delicately contr
3h
Climate evolution in the Southeast Indian Ocean during the Miocene
The Miocene, 23 to 5 million years ago, was an important period for the formation of the Antarctic ice sheets (AIS). The mid-latitudes in the southern hemisphere are the area where the westerlies prevailed and the climate there is sensitive to the volume changes of the AIS. Recently, the research team led by Prof. Li Tiegang from the Institute of Oceanology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (IOCA
3h
Hybrid Work Is Doomed
I noticed the shoes first. That I was wearing them. Real shoes, the leather kind, with laces. After a year and a half, I was finally returning to the office, and that meant giving up the puffer slippers and slides that had sustained me for so long. Real shoes, I quickly remembered, are terrible . Likewise pants. Likewise getting to work, and being at work. Whew. That was summer 2021. I've since a
3h
Stronger integration of international negotiations needed to protect the ocean
International solutions are needed to protect the ocean. Two sets of regulations currently under development offer an opportunity to expand protections, but a greater degree of alignment between the two must be achieved. In a new article published in Frontiers in Marine Science, researchers from the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies in Potsdam, Germany, outline how this could be realiz
3h
Shedding new light on coral's Black Band Disease
UNC-Chapel Hill biologists examine the links between microbial mats and a type of coral disease that has become an urgent conservation concern, and they suggest mitigation strategies to help reduce its spread. Coral reefs are valuable to marine ecosystems and the global economy. We talked with Sophie McCoy, assistant professor of biology in the College of Arts and Sciences, and Ph.D. candidate Eth
3h
Shedding new light on coral's Black Band Disease
UNC-Chapel Hill biologists examine the links between microbial mats and a type of coral disease that has become an urgent conservation concern, and they suggest mitigation strategies to help reduce its spread. Coral reefs are valuable to marine ecosystems and the global economy. We talked with Sophie McCoy, assistant professor of biology in the College of Arts and Sciences, and Ph.D. candidate Eth
4h
Abysmal New Numbers Show the NFT Market Is in Deep Trouble
Non-Fungible Trepidation It seems that endless Snoop Dogg (and Doop Snogg) promo has not been enough to save the NFT market, or at least not in the short-term. As predicted , June shaped up to be a pretty horrific month for the industry. Reuters reports that the median NFT price currently sits at about $412, a disappointing figure compared to April's $1,754 average. Additionally, the popular trad
4h
China Says It's Developing an AI to Detect Party Loyalty
The latest dystopian nightmare AI just dropped — and it's raising a lot of questions that are absolutely NOT answered by its social media announcement. As The Times of London reports , China's Hefei Comprehensive National Science Center announced the development of a program featuring "artificial intelligence empowering party-building" last week in a post on Weibo, the country's second-largest so
4h
Sizing up special light to downsize particle accelerators
Researchers have developed a new technique to better measure special "terahertz" light. This light travels in waves longer than the infrared light that is beyond what the human eye perceives. The new sampling technique preserves the correlations between position and time in a pulse of terahertz light. The technique allows researchers to measure the shape of terahertz "light bullets," focused flash
4h
Capturing California's biodiversity for the future of conservation
When UC Santa Cruz postdoctoral scholar Merly Escalona assembled the first-ever reference genome for the Stephen Colbert Trapdoor Spider, she was shocked by the dataset's unexpectedly large size. For a small invertebrate, this California native spider's genetic code was very fragmented and consisted of about four billion bases (four gigabases)—larger than the human genome's size of a little more t
4h
Capturing California's biodiversity for the future of conservation
When UC Santa Cruz postdoctoral scholar Merly Escalona assembled the first-ever reference genome for the Stephen Colbert Trapdoor Spider, she was shocked by the dataset's unexpectedly large size. For a small invertebrate, this California native spider's genetic code was very fragmented and consisted of about four billion bases (four gigabases)—larger than the human genome's size of a little more t
4h
Testing the effect of multicolor lighting on improving people's psychological state
As missions for deep space exploration and space habitats are put on the agenda, astronauts need to withstand being tested by multiple stressors in confined and isolated conditions during such long flights, especially because in deep space exploration, problems such as signal delays make astronauts feel the anxiety of being far away from Earth and the psychological fear of deep space.
4h
Super-enhancer hypermutation alters oncogene expression in B cell lymphoma
Nature, Published online: 06 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04906-8 Active super-enhancers are highly and specifically hypermutated in 92% of diffuse large B cell lymphoma samples and display signatures of activation-induced cytidine deaminase activity, leading to the dysregulation of genes encoding B cell developmental regulators and oncogenes.
4h
The neuronal logic of how internal states control food choice
Nature, Published online: 06 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04909-5 High-resolution volumetric calcium imaging was used to create a functional atlas of the Drosophila melanogaster ventral brain and identify how and where metabolic and reproductive states alter processing of food-related sensory stimuli.
4h
Direct observation of vortices in an electron fluid
Nature, Published online: 06 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04794-y Vortices in an electron fluid are directly observed in a para-hydrodynamic regime in which the spatial diffusion of electron momenta is enabled by small-angle scattering rather than electron–electron scattering.
4h
Entangling single atoms over 33 km telecom fibre
Nature, Published online: 06 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04764-4 Heralded entanglement between two independently trapped single rubidium atoms is generated over long telecom fibre links using quantum frequency conversion in an important step towards the realization of large-scale quantum network links.
4h
Biosynthesis of strychnine
Nature, Published online: 06 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04950-4 The biosynthetic pathway of strychnine, brucine and diaboline is described, and the biosynthesis of these complex, pharmacologically active compounds has been successfully recapitulated in Nicotiana benthamiana from an upstream intermediate.
4h
A gene-expression axis defines neuron behaviour
Nature, Published online: 06 July 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01640-z A combination of functional imaging and gene-expression profiling in brain tissue has been used to unravel the properties of 35 subtypes of neuron in mice, revealing a gene-expression axis that governs each subtype's activity.
4h
Revealing the origin of the first supermassive black holes
Nature, Published online: 06 July 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01560-y State-of-the-art computer simulations show that the first supermassive black holes were born in rare, turbulent reservoirs of gas in the primordial Universe without the need for finely tuned, exotic environments — contrary to what has been thought for almost two decades.
4h
Synthetic molecular cluster hints at mechanism of nitrogen fixation
Nature, Published online: 06 July 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01787-9 Enzymes use molecular clusters containing iron and sulfur atoms to bind and 'fix' nitrogen gas into a bioavailable form. A synthetic cluster that binds and reduces nitrogen molecules casts light on the mechanism of fixation.
4h
Quantum memories entangled over tens of kilometres of optical fibre
Nature, Published online: 06 July 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01554-w Quantum entanglement has been generated between two single-atom quantum memories over a 33-kilometre optical-fibre link. The wavelength of the photons emitted by these quantum memories was converted to one that works in telecommunications without altering the polarization of the photons, paving the way for the long-distance li
4h
Vortices produced and studied in electron fluids
Nature, Published online: 06 July 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01557-7 Swirling vortices have been directly observed in a flow of electric current for the first time. Unlike conventional viscous fluids, collective fluid-like behaviour in this case is not caused by particle–particle collisions, but results from a previously unidentified mechanism involving single electrons scattering from material
4h
Topology turns the crank on a magnetoelectric switch
Nature, Published online: 06 July 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01786-w A mechanism resembling a crankshaft switches the electric polarization of a material in response to changes in an applied magnetic field. The resulting four-state switch is linked to the material's intriguing topology.
4h
Online mindset training protects adolescents from stress
Nature, Published online: 06 July 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01746-4 Adolescence is an intensely stressful life stage. We developed a brief online training module to help young people to understand stress and to respond to it constructively. The module improved their psychological and physiological responses to stress and boosted academic performance.
4h
A new role of autophagy in plant cell differentiation revealed
A midlife career change is hard to pull off, because it can involve reinventing yourself and adopting a completely new professional role. Now, researchers from Japan show that some plant cells get a helping hand from autophagy when they switch primary functions partway through their lifespan.
4h
Could you inhale a future COVID vaccine?
A new inhalable COVID-19 vaccine is shelf stable at room temperature for up to three months, targets the lungs specifically and effectively, and allows for self-administration via an inhaler, researchers report. The researchers also found that the delivery mechanism for this vaccine—a lung-derived exosome called LSC-Exo—is more effective at evading the lung's mucosal lining than the lipid-based n
4h
Novel imaging method developed for fast-moving objects
A research team from the Hefei Institutes of Physical Science (HFIPS) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) has proposed a new anti-motion blur single-pixel imaging method for fast-moving objects. This method takes advantage of the wide spectrum and high sensitivity of a single-pixel detector and contributes to breaking through the bottleneck of single-pixel imaging of fast-moving objects.
4h
Better estimating the risk of coastal flooding for nuclear power plants
Coastal facilities around the world must be designed to be protected against extreme sea levels. However, according to a team of Quebecois and French researchers from the Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS), the Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), and the Université Gustave Eiffel, current estimates of coastal flood risks contain biases. The scientists ther
4h
A four-stroke engine for atoms
If you switch a bit in the memory of a computer and then switch it back again, you have restored the original state. There are only two states that can be called "0 and 1."
4h
Evidence found that insects are possibly able to feel pain
A trio of researchers, two from Queen Mary University of London, the other from the University of Tehran, has found evidence that suggests insects might be able to feel pain. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Matilda Gibbons, Lars Chittka and Sajedeh Sarlak, describe issues they encountered in attempting to find out whether insects feel pain, and the logic they used i
4h
Circular RNA found to promote progression of small cell lung cancer
Researchers led by Prof. Lin Wenchu from the Hefei Institutes of Physical Science (HFIPS) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have proposed a mechanism by which circular RNA (circRNA) can promote the progression of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) in vitro and in vivo. Results were published in Molecular Cancer.
5h
Man Uses Life Savings to Buy Nonexistent Metaverse Land
Lord of Khorum A Texas man named Justin Reed told Austin's KXAN News that he dropped $18,000 — his entire life savings — on a piece of virtual "land" called the Khorum Coast, located within a videogame called Entropia Universe . "I know it sounds like a lot, and it's a crazy thing to tell someone that, you know, I'm a virtual landowner, and I put my life savings into it. But I believe in Entropia
5h
Case solved: Researchers show how the poison nut tree forms strychnine
A research team at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena disclosed the complete biosynthetic pathway for the formation of strychnine in the plant species Strychnos nux-vomica (poison nut). The researchers identified all genes involved in the biosynthesis of strychnine and other metabolites and expressed them in the model plant Nicotiana benthamiana. This enabled them to show that t
5h
Making CRISPR hype more of a reality
This year, we celebrate 10 years of genome editing with CRISPR. The system is often referred to as molecular scissors, and this designation is quite accurate for its first applications. These short 10 years were marked by stunningly swift development and a great promise to cure thousands of genetic diseases with relative ease—with a single treatment dose that specifically corrects disease-causing
5h
Case solved: Researchers show how the poison nut tree forms strychnine
A research team at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena disclosed the complete biosynthetic pathway for the formation of strychnine in the plant species Strychnos nux-vomica (poison nut). The researchers identified all genes involved in the biosynthesis of strychnine and other metabolites and expressed them in the model plant Nicotiana benthamiana. This enabled them to show that t
5h
Making CRISPR hype more of a reality
This year, we celebrate 10 years of genome editing with CRISPR. The system is often referred to as molecular scissors, and this designation is quite accurate for its first applications. These short 10 years were marked by stunningly swift development and a great promise to cure thousands of genetic diseases with relative ease—with a single treatment dose that specifically corrects disease-causing
5h
Scientists demonstrate machine learning tool to efficiently process complex solar data
Big data has become a big challenge for space scientists analyzing vast datasets from increasingly powerful space instrumentation. To address this, a Southwest Research Institute team has developed a machine learning tool to efficiently label large, complex datasets to allow deep learning models to sift through and identify potentially hazardous solar events. The new labeling tool can be applied o
5h
More water evaporates from lakes than we thought
A new dataset quantifies trends of evaporative water loss from 1.4 million global lakes and artificial reservoirs. A white mineral ring as tall as the Statue of Liberty creeps up the steep shoreline of Lake Mead, a Colorado River reservoir just east of Las Vegas on the Nevada-Arizona border. It is the country's largest reservoir, and it's draining rapidly. With much of the United States experienc
5h
Programmable synthetic cell networks regulated by tuneable reaction rates
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31471-5 Our understanding of how compartmentalisation and intercellular communication can tune enzyme reactions is still in its infancy. Here, the authors show that multi-enzyme reactions within semi-permeable compartments have distinct properties compared to reactions in buffer solution.
5h
5 gut bacteria strains fight IBD symptoms
Researchers have isolated five strains of gut bacteria that could pave the way for new inflammatory bowel disease treatments and potentially help prevent some forms of bowel cancer. The study identifies gut bacterial strains that suppress inappropriate gut inflammation and debilitating inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) symptoms. IBD is a chronic condition characterized by relapsing gut inflammatio
5h
How the body senses an essential amino acid
A new paper from Whitehead Institute researchers reveals how mice sense an essential amino acid called leucine, which many people get from eating fish, eggs, or nuts. Down the line, the work could inform research into creating drugs that target specific parts of a key metabolic and growth-regulating pathway called the mTOR pathway to treat some cancers or other metabolic diseases.
5h
How the body senses an essential amino acid
A new paper from Whitehead Institute researchers reveals how mice sense an essential amino acid called leucine, which many people get from eating fish, eggs, or nuts. Down the line, the work could inform research into creating drugs that target specific parts of a key metabolic and growth-regulating pathway called the mTOR pathway to treat some cancers or other metabolic diseases.
5h
Delay and deflect: How women gig workers respond to sexual harassment
These days, we use apps to order food, call ride-sharing vehicles, assign home improvement tasks and personal errands. But these apps depend on people to deliver the promised service—to deliver food, provide rides and complete tasks. These gig workers use the apps to find work, and in North America, nearly half of these service workers are women.
5h
Higher eating disorder risk for gender-diverse college students
Some transgender and gender-diverse college students are at a heightened risk of developing an eating disorder, research shows. Just before swimmer Schuyler Bailar made history as the first openly transgender athlete to compete in an NCAA Division I men's team, he took a year out to deal with an eating disorder. After five months in treatment, Bailar returned ready to swim—and share publicly that
6h
Nation-building or nature-destroying? Why it's time NZ faced up to the environmental damage of its colonial past
The ways in which New Zealand remembers European colonisation have changed markedly in recent years. Critics have been chipping away at the public image of Captain James Cook, the New Zealand Wars have been included in the new compulsory history curriculum, and streets honouring colonial figures have been renamed.
6h
Scientists Tracked 77 Species for Decades to Reveal Secrets of Long Life
Ever wondered about the secret to a long life? Perhaps understanding the lifespans of other animals with backbones (vertebrates) might help us unlock this mystery. You've probably heard turtles live a long (and slow) life. At 190 years, Jonathan the Seychelles giant tortoise might be the oldest land animal alive. But why do some animals live longer than others? Research published last month in th
6h
Tech Accessories That Are Worth the Upgrade
Sometimes, you don't realize that you need a tech upgrade until someone points it out — like, why are you still using the one charger you got five years ago to charge all of your Apple products? From chargers to speakers, we've got you covered with must-have tech that is definitely worth the upgrade. 3-in-1 Wireless Charger with MagSafe 15W Key Selling Point: Get rid of wires once and for all wit
6h
The Cornelia Marie Gets Help from … a Killer Whale?! | Deadliest Catch
Stream Deadliest Catch on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/deadliest-catch #DeadliestCatch #Discovery #killerwhale Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discove
6h
Why lectures are like blind dates
Nature, Published online: 06 July 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01798-6 How I learnt to woo the audience after attending a public-speaking class.
6h
The Download: Tweaking AI for energy efficiency, and China's leaked data
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. These simple changes can make AI research much more energy efficient What's the news?: Deep learning is behind machine learning's most high-profile successes. But this incredible performance comes at a cost: training deep-learning models requires huge amounts
6h
Excavations reveal first known depictions of two biblical heroines, episode in ancient Jewish art
A team of specialists and students led by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill professor Jodi Magness recently returned to Israel's Lower Galilee to continue unearthing nearly 1,600-year-old mosaics in an ancient Jewish synagogue at Huqoq. Discoveries made this year include the first known depiction of the biblical heroines Deborah and Jael as described in the book of Judges.
6h
Cities need to embrace green innovation now to cut heat deaths in the future
In late June 2021, North America's most severe heat wave in history hit British Columbia and the U.S. Pacific Northwest. In many areas, temperatures soared above 40 C, 15 C hotter than the normal average high. Although other places in North America regularly hit these highs, the extreme contrast to "normal" is what exposes acute infrastructure, economic, environmental and social vulnerabilities.
6h
More frequent european heat waves linked to changes in jet stream
Heat waves over Europe have increased three to four times faster than in the rest of the northern mid-latitudes, including the United States and Canada. Why? In a new study, an international team of scientists has shown the increase is linked to changes in the jet stream, the fast air current that flows west to east about 10 kilometers above the surface of the Northern Hemisphere. Periods during w
6h
Solving algorithm 'amnesia' reveals clues to how we learn
A discovery about how algorithms can learn and retain information more efficiently offers potential insight into the brain's ability to absorb new knowledge. The findings by researchers at the University of California, Irvine School of Biological Sciences could aid in combatting cognitive impairments and improving technology. Their study appears in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
6h
Deep-sea expeditions over a century ago offer new insight into climate change
In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, German scientists and surveyors crossed choppy waters and braved dangerous conditions on ships called the Gazelle, Valdivia and Planet. These arduous expeditions, one of which circumnavigated the globe, yielded several discoveries—including the first documented vampire squid—at a time when little was known about life in the deep sea.
6h
Solving algorithm 'amnesia' reveals clues to how we learn
A discovery about how algorithms can learn and retain information more efficiently offers potential insight into the brain's ability to absorb new knowledge. The findings by researchers at the University of California, Irvine School of Biological Sciences could aid in combatting cognitive impairments and improving technology. Their study appears in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
6h
The World Is Turning Back to Coal
Sign up for The Weekly Planet, Robinson Meyer's newsletter about living through climate change, here. Happy July! The year is now more than halfway over, so I want to take a look at how a few big sources of carbon pollution are shaping up in 2022. To understand what's going on, it's first worth reflecting on last year. In 2021, the world pumped 36.3 metric gigatons of carbon pollution from fossil
6h
Let's Use Chicago Rules to Beat Russia
Carl von Clausewitz observed in his classic On War that "the maximum use of force is by no means incompatible with the simultaneous use of the intellect." That means, in part, acting thoughtfully but with the utmost effort, understanding that war is more bar fight than chess game. Or, to put it in the simpler words of Jim Malone, Eliot Ness's counselor in The Untouchables , "You wanna know how to
6h
Understanding of vortex spread in superfluids expanded
Researchers have created a model that describes the spread and speed of tornado-like vortex tubes in superfluids. This work expands on a previous study that reported experimental results obtained in superfluid helium-4 within a narrow temperature range.
6h
Study sets new constraints on dark photons using a new dielectric optical haloscope
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the Perimeter Institute recently set new constraints on dark photons, which are hypothetical particles and renowned dark matter candidates. Their findings, presented in a paper published in Physical Review Letters, were attained using a new superconducting nanowire single-photo
6h
Catabolic processes in cells: Controlling the danger within
Trillions of cells in our body work non-stop to keep us alive. This generates waste that is decomposed in specialized cellular organs. But what happens if the cellular trash cans don't work? Researchers assume that this is the cause of numerous diseases. Biologists at the University of Duisburg-Essen (UDE), together with a team from Munich, have now been able to show how cells protect themselves f
6h
Catabolic processes in cells: Controlling the danger within
Trillions of cells in our body work non-stop to keep us alive. This generates waste that is decomposed in specialized cellular organs. But what happens if the cellular trash cans don't work? Researchers assume that this is the cause of numerous diseases. Biologists at the University of Duisburg-Essen (UDE), together with a team from Munich, have now been able to show how cells protect themselves f
6h
Could we eavesdrop on communications that pass through our solar system?
Communications across the vastness of interstellar space could be enhanced by taking advantage of a star's ability to focus and magnify communication signals. A team of graduate students at Penn State is looking for just these sorts of communication signals that might be taking advantage of our own sun if transmissions were passing through our solar system.
6h
Startup Shows Off Working AR Contact Lens You Can Actually Wear
Smart Contact Mojo Vision, a California-based startup, has shown off a " feature-complete " prototype of its augmented reality smart contact lens — and this time you can actually wear it, in your eye, like a contact. In fact, CEO Drew Perkins says he's already worn the prototype contact — which successfully augmented his vision thanks to a tiny MicroLED display — in his left eye for an hour at a
7h
Two new rotating radio transients discovered by astronomers
Using the Pushchino Radio Astronomy Observatory (PRAO), Russian astronomers have carried out a search for rotating radio transients (RRATs). In a recently published paper on the arXiv pre-print server, they report the detection of two new RRATs as part of this observational campaign.
7h
Researchers seek genes responsible for good eyesight
Many people suffer from eye diseases that can lead to blindness in the worst cases. Eye-related diseases including cataracts, glaucoma and macular degeneration are well described; nevertheless, the underlying causative genes are frequently unknown. A team of scientists from Frankfurt and Dresden has now set out to identify some of these undiscovered genes in mammals that take over functions in the
7h
Protecting family treasures during hurricane season
When preparing for what could be a busy hurricane season, LSU Archival Expert Ed Benoit warns planning ahead is critical. When responding to a natural disaster gathering precious items and documents can be low on the priority list when life is at stake. These are the ways Benoit recommends you should store and preserve irreplaceable items and documents ahead of the possibility of storm damage.
7h
Revealing atomistic structures behind AFM imaging
Atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows us to visualize the dynamics of single biomolecules during their functional activity. All observations are, however, restricted to regions accessible by a fairly big probing tip during scanning. Hence, AFM images only the biomolecular surface with limited spatial resolution, missing important information required for a detailed understanding of the observed phe
7h
Evidence found that colorful ventral wings help colonizing birds avoid collisions
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in China, the U.S. and Germany has found evidence that suggests that colorful ventral wings help colonizing birds to avoid running into one another. In their paper published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes comparing ventral wing colors from 1,780 bird species comprising 75% of orders.
7h
Sharing economy
Nature, Published online: 06 July 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01835-4 A helping hand.
7h
100-year-old pandemic flu viruses yield new genomes
Nature, Published online: 06 July 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01741-9 Lung samples housed in medical archives have yielded three genomes for the influenza A virus that caused the 1918 global pandemic. The sequences reveal mutations that might have triggered the pandemic's devastating second wave.
7h
Researchers seek genes responsible for good eyesight
Many people suffer from eye diseases that can lead to blindness in the worst cases. Eye-related diseases including cataracts, glaucoma and macular degeneration are well described; nevertheless, the underlying causative genes are frequently unknown. A team of scientists from Frankfurt and Dresden has now set out to identify some of these undiscovered genes in mammals that take over functions in the
7h
Revealing atomistic structures behind AFM imaging
Atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows us to visualize the dynamics of single biomolecules during their functional activity. All observations are, however, restricted to regions accessible by a fairly big probing tip during scanning. Hence, AFM images only the biomolecular surface with limited spatial resolution, missing important information required for a detailed understanding of the observed phe
7h
Evidence found that colorful ventral wings help colonizing birds avoid collisions
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in China, the U.S. and Germany has found evidence that suggests that colorful ventral wings help colonizing birds to avoid running into one another. In their paper published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes comparing ventral wing colors from 1,780 bird species comprising 75% of orders.
7h
Stem cells reveal underpinnings of rare immune disease
A new stem cell study by KAUST researchers helps to explain a rare genetic disease called Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS), yielding molecular clues that could lead to new treatments for a devastating immune deficiency disorder. The results are published in Nature Communications.
7h
Researchers develop a new method for studying functionality of microbiota
A research group from Turku Bioscience Center, Finland, has developed a new method for studying the functionality of microbiota through metaproteomics. The new method shows broad potential for the study of microbiota on a new, functional level. The characterization of the functionality of gut microbiota is central in the study of human health and disease as well as disease prediction, prevention,
7h
Researchers develop a new method for studying functionality of microbiota
A research group from Turku Bioscience Center, Finland, has developed a new method for studying the functionality of microbiota through metaproteomics. The new method shows broad potential for the study of microbiota on a new, functional level. The characterization of the functionality of gut microbiota is central in the study of human health and disease as well as disease prediction, prevention,
7h
King of the River
Illustrations by Miki Lowe The poet Stanley Kunitz was reading Time magazine, he recalled in 1982, when something caught his eye: an article about Pacific salmon. The creature's life cycle is nothing short of dramatic. After being born in the fresh water of a river, a young fish migrates into the ocean, where it lives most of its adult life. But eventually, ready to lay eggs of its own, it journe
8h
We've Never Seen Mars Quite Like This
When Corrine Rojas comes into work, Mars is waiting for her. She drives to the office, grabs a cup of coffee, and then pulls up the latest dispatches from Perseverance, a car-size NASA rover situated inside a crater in Mars's northern hemisphere. Rojas, an operations engineer at Arizona State University, checks that the rover's main cameras are working well, and that they took the shots scientist
8h
Monsoon rains kill 77 in Pakistan
At least 77 people have died in monsoon rains lashing Pakistan, the country's climate change minister said Wednesday, warning more heavier-than-usual downpours lay ahead.
8h
The Cult Classic That Captures the Grind of Dead-End Jobs
Many writers have to wait until old age to see their work reissued. Imogen Binnie, whose debut novel, Nevada , came out in 2013, only had to wait nine years. Nevada was first released by Topside Press, an indie publisher that was run by trans editors and that put out primarily trans literature. It became a word-of-mouth hit, generating what the writer Casey Plett calls a "communal response," espe
9h
Mojo Vision Details Its First Smart Contact Lens
The way we interact with technology is always changing, and some in the industry claim the next big step is the metaverse; a spatial version of the internet that mixes digital content with the real world. But how is one supposed to interact with the metaverse? Today's virtual and augmented reality hardware is clunky and inefficient, but a smart contact lens? That sounds like science fiction, but
9h
Daily briefing: Ukrainian mathematician wins Fields Medal
Nature, Published online: 05 July 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01871-0 Ukrainian number theorist Maryna Viazovska is among the four winners of the prestigious mathematics prize. Plus, the long-overdue rise of gun-violence research in the United States and how to support scientists who stutter.
9h
SSD Cooling Tower Reduces Temps by 50 Percent
(Image: JiuShark) We all love moving into new generations of power and performance on our PCs. Going from DDR4 to DDR5, PCIe 4 to PCIe 5, and so forth is always exciting. However, there's always one big drawback, and that's the fact that there's rarely a free lunch in the world of PC performance. Getting twice the horsepower usually means a lot more heat is produced. That could be the case with n
9h
A Simple Fix for a Better Marriage Proposal
This article was featured in One Story to Read Today, a newsletter in which our editors recommend a single must-read from The Atlantic , Monday through Friday. Sign up for it here. Tatiana Caicedo's job is to help people plan their marriage proposals. Secrecy is important in her line of work—the business she co-owns is called Proposal 007—but sometimes her clients' partners figure out what's goin
10h
Ligand-induced transmembrane conformational coupling in monomeric EGFR
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31299-z EGFR regulates cellular processes across the animal kingdom. Here, the authors show that transmembrane conformational coupling is the first step in EGFR signaling, providing evidence for the existence of transmembrane intramolecular conformational changes in a single pass membrane protein.
10h
Comparison of chromatin accessibility landscapes during early development of prefrontal cortex between rhesus macaque and human
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31403-3 The evolution of epigenetic regulation of brain development in primates is not well understood. Here, the authors perform a comparative study of epigenetic dynamics of early prefrontal cortex development between human and rhesus macaque, finding divergent regulatory elements that may be related to cognitive capa
10h
Switching labs during a PhD
Nature, Published online: 06 July 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01867-w Jonathan Park's scientific interests changed after caring for a cancer patient. He ended up bidding an amicable farewell to Mark Gerstein, a supportive supervisor who had taught him a lot.
10h
Did COVID vaccine mandates work? What the data say
Nature, Published online: 06 July 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01827-4 A measure of last resort got a major workout during the pandemic. Scientists are now trying to determine whether the benefits outweighed the potential damage to public trust.
10h
These simple changes can make AI research much more energy efficient
Deep learning is behind machine learning's most high-profile successes, such as advanced image recognition, the board game champion AlphaGo, and language models like GPT-3. But this incredible performance comes at a cost: training deep-learning models requires huge amounts of energy. Now, new research shows how scientists who use cloud platforms to train deep-learning algorithms can dramatically
11h
Snusning kan minska antalet spermier
Män som snusar kan minska sina chanser att bli pappa med tio procent. Förklaringen är att snusare har cirka 25 procent färre spermier jämfört med män som inte snusar. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
11h
Blandat avfall blir prima plast – utan fossila råvaror
Kolatomerna i våra sopor kan ersätta fossila råvaror inom plastindustrin. – I avfallet finns tillräckligt med kolatomer för att täcka all global plastproduktion, menar forskarna bakom ny återvinningsteknik, inspirerad av naturens egen kolcykel. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
11h
Varg blev hund både i öst och väst
Dagens hundar härstammar från två olika vargpopulationer som tämjdes i östra eller centrala Asien. Det har forskare kommit fram till efter att ha analyserat dna från förhistoriska vargar på norra halvklotet. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
11h
How a shape-shifting receptor influences cell growth
Receptors found on cell surfaces bind to hormones, proteins, and other molecules, helping cells respond to their environment. MIT chemists have now discovered how one of these receptors changes its shape when it binds to its target, and how those changes trigger cells to grow and proliferate.
11h
Mitochondrial fission induces immunoescape in solid tumors through decreasing MHC-I surface expression
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31417-x Cancer cells downregulate surface expression of major histocompatibility complex I (MHC-I) for immune evasion. Here, the authors show that rapid mitochondrial fission activates the ER-stress response leading to reduced MHC-I complex formation and cell surface expression in solid cancer cells; moreover inhibition
11h
New research challenges long-held beliefs about limb regeneration
Ken Muneoka is no stranger to disrupting the field of regeneration; for example, in a 2019 ground-breaking publication in Nature, the Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences (CVMBS) professor proved for the first time that joint regeneration in mammals was possible.
12h
Researchers expand understanding of vortex spread in superfluids
An international team of scientists featuring Florida State University researchers has developed a model that predicts the spread of vortices in so-called superfluids, work that provides new insight into the physics that govern turbulence in quantum fluid systems such as superfluid neutron stars.
12h
EU scraps 115 grants for UK scientists and academics amid Brexit row
Move follows dispute over Northern Ireland protocol, as one academic says UK is going down a 'dark path' British scientists and academic researchers have been dealt a blow after 115 grants from a flagship EU research programme were terminated because of the continuing Brexit row over Northern Ireland. One academic said he was "relieved" to be exiting the country and feared the UK was going down a
12h
In Agriculture, a Perennial Problem with Grains
Some researchers think that replacing annual grains with Kernza could counter intensive agriculture. Whether Kernza's potential can be realized on a meaningful scale hinges on one measure of agricultural productivity — yield per area — and some skeptics say that it's time to stop counting on the perennial.
13h
What causes such extreme fluctuation in cognitive abilities?
Not sure about a better place to post this but I notice that there seem to be an extremely inconsistent cognitive ability that I sometimes exert, one day I can perform at peak or even above my peak at an activity that requires heavy cognition, like games, sports, whatever else, but the next it's completely gone and disappeared. One good example is monkeytype.com , it measures your typing speed, a
13h
Discovery of archaeal fusexins homologous to eukaryotic HAP2/GCS1 gamete fusion proteins
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31564-1 Sexual reproduction in eukaryotes involves gamete fusion, mediated by fusogenic proteins. Here, the authors identify fusogenic protein homologs encoded within mobile genetic elements in archaeal genomes, solve the crystal structure of one of the proteins, and show that its ectopic expression can fuse mammalian c
13h
SIMPLE BLOG DESIGN┃読みやすいブログにするためのプラグインを徹底解説
記事作成で便利な機能を使えるようになるプラグイン「 SIMPLE BLOG DESIGN 」ですが、単独で買おうとすると9,800円(税込)と高額になってしまいます。 ただ、 WordPressテーマ MERIL(メリル) の購入者には、 SIMPLE BLOG DESIGN for meril が同梱されていてとてもお得になっています。 MERIL(メリル)は、2022年にリリースされ現在は特別価格7,800円(税込)で販売されています。 今回は、 WordPressテーマ MERIL(メリル) に同梱されている 読みやすいブログにするためのプラグインSIMPLE BLOG DESIGN を紹介します。 実際に記事内で使っていきますので参考にしてみてください。また、レビューや評判・口コミも載せておきます。 読みやすいブログにするためのプラグイン SIMPLE BLOG DESIGN公式
13h
'I feel disorientated': replicating a real car crash to research rescue techniques
Linda Geddes took part in simulated car crash rescue for research into how entrapment affects patient outcomes • Doctors to overhaul car wreck rescue techniques amid new evidence "Linda, Keep looking forward, OK? I'm just making some space and I'll be coming into the front of the vehicle with you just as soon as I can," booms a voice in my left ear. "Are you bleeding anywhere?" I struggle to form
14h
Turkey Discovers 694 million mt of Rare Earth Element Reserves – 6x the size of all other global reserves and _15x_ the reserves of China, which currently dominates the market. Enough for >1,000 years at current demand.
1,000 years at current demand." title="" src="https://external-preview.redd.it/iR3078n8Sg1vSUw2vEJIBWX5PxKBWaQV5GLlPRQ0v0k.jpg?width=640&crop=smart&auto=webp&s=d0f34d716bf89b11d29949c46cf162b062839d6b"> submitted by /u/ForHidingSquirrels [link] [comments]
17h
What is a pond? Study provides first data-driven definition
Nearly everyone can identify a pond, but what, exactly, distinguishes it from a lake or a wetland? A new study offers the first data-driven, functional definition of a pond and evidence of ponds' distinct ecological function, which could have broad implications for science and policy.
19h
Shapeshifting microrobots can brush and floss teeth
A robotic microswarm may one day automate the routine of rinsing, brushing, and flossing teeth. A multidisciplinary team developed the technology, which employs a magnetic field to direct the iron oxide nanoparticle-based microrobots into antimicrobial bristle- and floss-shaped arrays.
20h
New research challenges long-held beliefs about limb regeneration
Researchers are challenging a centuries-old beliefs about how mammals might regenerate damaged parts of the body. In humans, the natural ability to regenerate is limited to tissues like the epidermis, the outermost layer of skin, and some organs, such as the liver. Other species, most notably salamanders, have the ability to regenerate complex structures such as bones, joints, and even entire limb
20h
The Game Is (Probably) Up for Boris Johnson
Don't stop me just because you've heard this story before, but Prime Minister Boris Johnson is once again fighting for his political life. And once again, this time it might be the end. After yet another scandal, once again made worse by an absurdly stupid cover-up, two very senior members of Johnson's government—his finance minister and his health minister—quit in disgust. Is the game really up,
20h
New photocatalytic membrane that can be cleaned using light energy
Researchers have developed a nanosheet-laminated photocatalytic membrane that demonstrates both excellent water permeance and photocatalytic activity. The membrane's photocatalytic properties make it easier to clean as irradiating the membrane with light successfully reduces fouling. This revolutionary membrane technology can be applied to water purification, and thus has the potential to contribu
21h
Scientists Discover Giant Alcohol Molecule Near The Center of Our Galaxy
Alcoholic Scientists say they've found alcohol molecules in space — though, unfortunately, it's not the type that gets you drunk. A team from the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy in Germany have discovered a cloud of propanol alcohol molecules — according to the researchers, the largest alcohol molecule ever found in space — near the center of the Milky Way, a finding they believe could h
21h
Beautiful Render Shows Starship With Full NASA Paint Job
Star-Studded After video footage released this morning of SpaceX's Starship prototype rolling onto its launch site , a Twitter user shared a stunning render of the Starship in NASA livery. The artist, Erc X, whose work has been featured on here before, regularly uploads renders of Starship on their Twitter and YouTube pages, and on more than one occasion has been given a shout out by Elon Musk hi
21h
New photocatalytic membrane that can be cleaned using light energy
Researchers have developed a nanosheet-laminated photocatalytic membrane that demonstrates both excellent water permeance and photocatalytic activity. The membrane's photocatalytic properties make it easier to clean as irradiating the membrane with light successfully reduces fouling. This revolutionary membrane technology can be applied to water purification, and thus has the potential to contribu
21h
It takes three: The genetic mutations that made rice cultivation possible
New research suggests that the historical emergence of cultivated rice from wild rice plants resulted from a combination of three gene mutations that make the seeds (i.e., the grains of rice) fall from the plant less easily. These results not only shed light on early history but will hopefully contribute towards the development of more efficient rice cultivars in the future.
21h
Maybe Ridding the World of Superheroes Isn't Such a Bad Idea
By far the most arresting character in Thor: Love and Thunder , the twenty-bajillionth Marvel movie, is the splendidly named villain Gorr the God Butcher. Bald, covered in scars, and draped in monklike robes, Gorr (played by Christian Bale) is a vengeful wraith who wields a mystical blade and has only one goal in mind: killing gods. Any deity he can get his hands on, no matter the faith or civili
22h
Airline's decision to end monkey transports will worsen shortage in research
Air France announced last week it will stop transporting nonhuman primates. The decision will create additional problems for biomedical research, which already faces increasing difficulty getting monkeys. Air France was the last major airline still carrying nonhuman primates as cargo, as other companies have increasingly refused to do so over the past 2 decades. The policy change, announced on Tw
22h
Large Hadron Collider Discovers Strange New Particles
Quark Express Just as news started to circulate that CERN was firing up the Large Hadron Collider for the first time in three years, scientists there announced that they had observed three new "exotic" particles. Their findings, presented today at a CERN seminar ? A new type of "pentaquark" and the first-ever pair of "tetraquarks," with one of the pair being a new type of tetraquark entirely. "Th
22h
Nervous system workings related to PTSD, other mental health disorders
A new study measures changes in the human brain's response to a perceived threat following non-invasive stimulation of the nervous system via the vagus nerve. The results have implications for the development of treatments for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other mental health conditions, as well as for increasing alertness and attention during learning.
22h
Odd fish has adapted to Canada's deepest, coldest lakes
The deepwater sculpin is not an attractive fish by any conventional standard. You won't find it hanging on a plaque or landing a feature role in a Disney movie. What you might say about the bottom-dweller is that it's a survivor, having managed to eke out an existence at the bottom of Canada's deepest and coldest lakes since the last ice age. Researchers are now sequencing its entire genome to see
22h
Discovery reveals large, year-round ozone hole over tropics
Scientist reveal a large, all-season ozone hole in the lower stratosphere over the tropics comparable in depth to that of the well-known springtime Antarctic hole, but roughly seven times greater in area. The observed data agree well with the cosmic-ray-driven electron reaction (CRE) model and strongly indicate the identical physical mechanism working for both Antarctic and tropical ozone holes.
22h
A Nation of Hostages
This is an edition of The Atlantic Daily, a newsletter that guides you through the biggest stories of the day, helps you discover new ideas, and recommends the best in culture. Sign up for it here . At the start of a different week, I might have written about many things, including politics. But not today. Instead, I am watching a group of my fellow citizens deal with a slaughter of defenseless p
22h
New head of U.S. aid program for HIV/AIDS vows to refocus attention on the other, 'silent' pandemic
On 13 June, John Nkengasong, 58, was appointed the first African-born head of the U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), a program that helps more than 50 countries respond to their HIV/AIDS epidemics. Nkengasong, who grew up in Cameroon and became a U.S. citizen in 2007, previously ran the Africa Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (Africa CDC). PEPFAR is credited with
22h
In Krabbe disease, neurons may bring about their own destruction
The gene defect underlying Krabbe disease causes degeneration of neurons directly, independent of its effects on other cell types, according to a new study. The discovery represents a new mechanism of action for the mutant gene, presenting a more accurate picture of the disease process that may help in the development of therapies.
22h
Bring back the wolves — but not as heroes or villains
In a new finding that goes against current conservation paradigms, re-introducing wolves and other predators to our landscapes does not miraculously reduce deer populations, restore degraded ecosystems or significantly threaten livestock, according to a new study.
23h
Scientists look to the sky in effort to mitigate carbon problem
A global research effort has assessed two promising technologies to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. While still in the early stages of development, direct air carbon capture and sequestration (DAC) — together with other carbon dioxide removal strategies — are considered critical to achieving a net-zero greenhouse gas emissions economy by 2050 and limiting global warming to less than 1
23h
A Paralyzed Man Used His Mind to Control Two Robotic Arms to Eat Cake
The man sat still in the chair, staring intently at a piece of cake on the table in front of him. Wires protruded from electrode implants in his brain. Flanking him were two giant robotic arms, each larger than his entire upper body. One held a knife, the other a fork. "Cut and eat food. Move right hand forward to start," ordered a robotic voice. The man concentrated on moving his partially-paral
23h
Shapeshifting microrobots can brush and floss teeth
A shapeshifting robotic microswarm may one day act as a toothbrush, rinse, and dental floss in one. The technology, developed by a multidisciplinary team at the University of Pennsylvania, is poised to offer a new and automated way to perform the mundane but critical daily tasks of brushing and flossing. It's a system that could be particularly valuable for those who lack the manual dexterity to c
23h
Unrelated Teams Install "Sand Battery" and "Water Battery"
Battery Pack Two new high capacity battery prototypes are pushing the frontiers of energy storage — and in a beachy twist, one is based on sand and the other on water. Finnish researchers installed the first working "sand battery" prototype, according to the BBC News , while Euronews reports that a team in Switzerland is already putting a new " water battery " into full operation. Both confront t
23h
China Furious After NASA Accuses It of Stealing the Moon
Space Dibs Tell us how you really feel, Bill! In an interview with German newspaper Bild , NASA boss Bill Nelson had some choice words to say about China's upcoming space exploration ventures — alleging, among other things, that the rival nation intends to pretty much steal the Moon for itself. "We must be very concerned that China is landing on the moon and saying: 'It's ours now and you stay ou
23h

Leave a Reply