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Nyheder2022juli07

Take Away the President's Immunity
Donald Trump's interest in another run at the presidency is reportedly connected to his intensifying concerns over the January 6 Select Committee hearings. Most recently, after the vice chair, Representative Liz Cheney, suggested that the committee might make multiple criminal referrals for his conduct, Trump exploded at the "warmongering and despicable human being Liz Cheney, who … keeps saying,
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LATEST

Citizen scientist leads discovery of 34 ultracool dwarf binaries
How often do stars live alone? For brown dwarfs — objects that straddle the boundary between the most massive planets and the smallest stars — astronomers need to uncover more examples of their companions to find out. Ace citizen scientists have done just that by using the Astro Data Lab science platform at NSF's NOIRLab to discover 34 new ultracool dwarf binary systems in the Sun's neighborhood
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New insights about surface, structure of asteroid Bennu
When NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft collected samples from asteroid Bennu's surface in 2020, forces measured during the interaction provided scientists with a direct test of the poorly understood near-subsurface physical properties of rubble-pile asteroids. Now, a new study has characterized the layer just below the asteroid's surface as composed of weakly bound rock fragments containing twice the v
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The importance of elders
In a new paper, researchers challenge the longstanding view that the force of natural selection in humans must decline to zero once reproduction is complete. They assert that a long post-reproductive lifespan is not just due to recent advancements in health and medicine. The secret to our success? Our grandparents.
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The Shameless Boris Johnson
This is an edition of The Atlantic Daily, a newsletter that guides you through the biggest stories of the day, helps you discover new ideas, and recommends the best in culture. Sign up for it here . Boris Johnson, like so many other populist charlatans, is a symbol of how much has changed in modern politics—for the worse. But first, here are three new stories from The Atlantic . The most pathetic
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150 southern fin whales observed feeding together
After blue whales, fin whales are the largest whales in the world — and human beings have hunted both species to near-extinction. After the ban on commercial whaling in 1976, the stocks of these long-lived, but slow-growing creatures are rebounding: researchers have witnessed large groups of up to 150 southern fin whales in their historical feeding areas — more than has ever been documented befo
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WHO "Concerned" Over Skyrocketing Monkeypox Cases
It's looking more and more like, above all, a Hot Zone Summer: On Thursday, the World Health Organization reported the number of confirmed monkeypox cases to be skyrocketing — to the tune of a whopping 77 percent increase week-over-week worldwide, CNBC reports . There are now over 7,000 cases of the mysterious disease, spanning 60 countries — while the world continues reeling from a resurgence of
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Scientists Discover That Being "Hangry" Is a Real Phenomenon
According to a new study by a team of psychologists, being "hangry" — hungry and angry — is a very real thing, something anyone who's ever substituted breakfast with coffee before heading to work has known for years. While it's not the first study on being hangry, it's the first to examine the effects of being hangry in a real world environment instead of a lab. Professor Viren Swami of Anglia Ru
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Study provides new insights about the surface and structure of asteroid Bennu
When NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft collected samples from asteroid Bennu's surface in 2020, forces measured during the interaction provided scientists with a direct test of the poorly understood near-subsurface physical properties of rubble-pile asteroids. Now, a Southwest Research Institute-led study has characterized the layer just below the asteroid's surface as composed of weakly bound rock fra
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Molecules boosting plant immunity identified
Two studies published in the journal Science by researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research in Cologne, Germany in collaboration with colleagues in China have discovered natural cellular molecules that drive critical plant immune responses. These compounds have all the hallmarks of being small messengers tailored by plants to turn on key defense-control hubs. Harnessing the
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Molecules boosting plant immunity identified
Two studies published in the journal Science by researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research in Cologne, Germany in collaboration with colleagues in China have discovered natural cellular molecules that drive critical plant immune responses. These compounds have all the hallmarks of being small messengers tailored by plants to turn on key defense-control hubs. Harnessing the
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"Anti-Hangover" Pill Could Take All The Fun Out of Drinking — If It Actually Works
Swedish firm Myrkl claims to have developed a new pill that breaks down the alcohol in your blood to stop you from experiencing a deadly hangover after a wild night out. But on closer inspection, the company's ostentatious claims start to look a little suspect — not only is the company's study, on which it bases its claims, dubiously researched — the pill could also take all the fun out of drinki
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Scientists react to planned cull of Swedish wolves
The Swedish Parliament recently presented its ambition to drastically reduce number of wolves in Sweden—from approximately 400 down to approximately 200. Scientists are now reacting to this goal. In a letter published in Science, 18 researchers from five countries warn that such a cull would further threaten this already highly vulnerable population.
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Dark matter hunt heats up with first result from world's biggest detector
Physicists working with the world's biggest dark-matter detector—a behemoth in the United States known as LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ)—released their first results today. They see no sign of what they're searching for, so-called weakly interacting massive particles or WIMPs. Still, the result is sparking interest among particle physicists, as the nearly 4-decade-long search for WIMPs approaches a climax. The
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Cell protection, immunomodulation and virus inhibition by an endogenous substance
The endogenous molecule itaconic acid has antiviral and anti-inflammatory effects, as researchers from TWINCORE have recently shown. In cooperation with scientists from the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research in Braunschweig and the Helmholtz Institute for Pharmaceutical Research Saarland, they have now investigated the closely related substance citraconic acid. The result: Citraconic acid pro
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NASA releases James Webb telescope 'teaser' picture
NASA has a provided a tantalizing teaser photo ahead of the highly-anticipated release next week of the first deep-space images from the James Webb Telescope—an instrument so powerful it can peer back into the origins of the universe.
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Cell protection, immunomodulation and virus inhibition by an endogenous substance
The endogenous molecule itaconic acid has antiviral and anti-inflammatory effects, as researchers from TWINCORE have recently shown. In cooperation with scientists from the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research in Braunschweig and the Helmholtz Institute for Pharmaceutical Research Saarland, they have now investigated the closely related substance citraconic acid. The result: Citraconic acid pro
2h
Near-zero cohesion and loose packing of Bennu's near subsurface revealed by spacecraft contact
Abstract When the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft pressed its sample collection mechanism into the surface of Bennu, it provided a direct test of the poorly understood near-subsurface physical properties of rubble-pile asteroids, which consist of rock fragments at rest in microgravity. Here, we find that the forces measured by the spacecraft are best modeled as a granular bed with near-zero cohesion that i
2h
NASA helps decipher how some distant planets have clouds of sand
Most clouds on Earth are made of water, but beyond our planet they come in many chemical varieties. The top of Jupiter's atmosphere, for example, is blanketed in yellow-hued clouds made of ammonia and ammonium hydrosulfide. And on worlds outside our solar system, there are clouds composed of silicates, the family of rock-forming minerals that make up over 90% of Earth's crust. But researchers have
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Europe Plots High Speed Rail So Fast It Could Replace Airlines
All Aboard So long, budget airlines? European rail industry leaders met in Lyon, France late last month to outline their ambitious new vision for an expansive, ultra-modern, high-speed railway system, CNN Travel reports . The proposed railway would spiderweb between every major city in the EU, hopefully providing a sustainable — and equally efficient — alternative to the very eco-unfriendly airli
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NASA Shows Off Mesmerizing First Images From James Webb Telescope
Deep Deep Scientists behind NASA's James Webb Space Telescope have given us a first glimpse into the awe-inspiring power of the images it will produce — and what we're seeing is only a test run. As NASA proudly notes on its website, the calibration test image that was composited together from 32 hours and 72 exposures, "is among the deepest images of the universe ever taken" — and the telescope i
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How sound reduces pain in mice
Scientists have identified the neural mechanisms through which sound blunts pain in mice. The findings could inform development of safer methods to treat pain.
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The beginning of life: The early embryo is in the driver's seat
One often thinks that the early embryo is fragile and needs support. However, at the earliest stages of development, it has the power to feed the future placenta and instructs the uterus so that it can nest. Using 'blastoids', in vitro embryo models formed with stem cells, scientists have shown that the earliest molecular signals that induce placental development and prepare the uterus come from t
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Smart textiles sense how their users are moving
MIT Media Lab researchers developed a novel fabrication process to create smart textiles that comfortably and snugly fit the user's body, enabling very precise pressure sensor data that can be used to analyze and classify the wearer's postures and motions.
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Machine learning begins to understand human gut
The communities formed by human gut microbes can now be predicted more accurately with a new computer model developed in a collaboration between biologists and engineers, led by the University of Michigan and the University of Wisconsin.
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Study identifies relationship between body size and soil community assembly in tropical rainforest
Soil microbiota diversity is closely related to nutrient cycling and sustainable soil management. Complex soil system harbors a vast range of soil organisms of different body sizes and is a regulatory center for the majority of ecosystem functions. However, there is still a lack of a clear understanding of the soil community assembly processes at the whole-community level, i.e., the size gradient
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Study identifies relationship between body size and soil community assembly in tropical rainforest
Soil microbiota diversity is closely related to nutrient cycling and sustainable soil management. Complex soil system harbors a vast range of soil organisms of different body sizes and is a regulatory center for the majority of ecosystem functions. However, there is still a lack of a clear understanding of the soil community assembly processes at the whole-community level, i.e., the size gradient
3h
Soft sounds numb pain. Researchers may now know why
In 1960, a group of dentists published a curious study: when they played music for their patients during operations, the people experienced less pain . Some didn't even need nitrous oxide or local anesthesia to get through unpleasant procedures. Now a new paper untangles why this works—at least in mice. It's an "elegant" study, says Eduardo Garza-Villarreal, a neurobiologist at the National Auton
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'Myconauts' aim to reveal the often hidden soil fungi that shape ecosystems
Chile's Villarrica National Park— As a motley medley of mycologists climbed the basalt slopes of the Lanín volcano earlier this year, the green foliage at lower elevations gave way to autumnal golds and reds. Chile's famed Araucaria —commonly called monkey puzzle trees—soon appeared, their spiny branches curving jauntily upward like so many cats' tails. Beneath the majestic trees, the scientists
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Scientists Predict That The Solar System Could Collapse If a Star Flew Too Close
Cosmic Collapse Have you ever indulged the depths of your intrusive thoughts and wondered how the universe is going to smash and chew up our little planet over billions of years? Well, that's more or less what scientists Garett Brown and Hanno Rein at the University of Toronto have done for their recent study on what would happen if a neighboring star flew just a little too close to our solar sys
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Audiovisual adaptation is expressed in spatial and decisional codes
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31549-0 The brain adapts dynamically to the statistics of its environment. Here, the authors use psychophysics and model-based representational fMRI and EEG to show that audiovisual recalibration relies on distinct spatial and decisional codes that are expressed with opposite gradients and time courses across the audito
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Study reveals yunnanozoans as the oldest known stem vertebrates
Scientists have long puzzled over the gap in the fossil record that would explain the evolution from invertebrates to vertebrates. Vertebrates, including fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds, mammals, and humans, share unique features, such as a backbone and a skull. Invertebrates are animals without backbones.
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Women's help desks in local police stations in India increased registration of cases of gender-based violence
A new study by J-PAL affiliate Sandip Sukhtankar (University of Virginia) and coauthors Gabrielle Kruks-Wisner (University of Virginia) and Akshay Mangla (Saïd Business School, University of Oxford) found that establishing specialized help desks for women in local police stations in the state of Madhya Pradesh, India led to increased registration of cases of gender-based violence (GBV), especially
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Is there a link between mental health and mass shootings?
There have already been more than 300 mass shootings in the United States this year—the latest at a 4th of July parade in the Highland Park suburb of Chicago that left seven people dead and dozens injured. As the nation reckons with these increasingly common public massacres, many blame mental illness as the fundamental cause.
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How to Hold a Charismatic Charlatan to Account
The head of government is caught in a series of scandals. The scandals are not necessarily so important in themselves. Many of them involve purely personal misconduct. But if exposed, they would shock public opinion and threaten the leader's hold on power. So he lies and lies and lies again. He mobilizes his cabinet and staff to lie for him. And when the truth does finally catch up with him, he t
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Saltier seas mean heavy summer rains for US Midwest
Farmers and city managers across the Midwest need to know how heavy summer rains will be to plan planting, fertilizer application and floodwater management, but predicting extreme rain events is difficult, especially months to a season in advance. A new study, published today in AGU's Geophysical Research Letters, reports how saltier ocean surface thousands of miles away are surprisingly good indi
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People who control their desires can face social isolation
Desire is part of human nature, and being vulnerable to desire is part of what differentiates humans from machines. However, a new international study has found that individuals who are better able to resist their desires are perceived as more robotic and dehumanized.
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Predicting restaurant survival: A picture can provide the answer
A picture is worth a thousand words… and to restaurant owners and investors it could be worth their livelihood. New research in the journal Management Science finds that consumer-posted photos can serve as a strong leading indicator of restaurant survival above and beyond reviews, company, competition and macro factors.
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Meta's Going After a Universal Translator. Its AI Now Works for 200 Languages
As the pandemic at long last winds down, international travel is picking up, with millions looking to make up for lost time. As travelers explore foreign lands, tools like Google's Neural Machine Translation system may come in handy; released in 2016, the software uses deep learning to draw links between words, figuring out how closely related they are, how likely they are to appear together in a
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Unlocking the secrets of the ancient coastal Maya
Georgia State University anthropologist Dr. Jeffrey Glover grew up in metro Atlanta, but speaking to him, it sounds like his heart is in Quintana Roo. This part of Mexico's Yucatán Peninsula has been the home base for an expansive research project spanning more than 10 years. His research there with Dr. Dominique Rissolo, a maritime archaeologist at UC San Diego's Qualcomm Institute, has uncovered
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Coming Undone in the Age of Mass Shootings
You develop certain psychological reflexes to get you through the initial shock of the first push alert: Some number dead, others wounded in a mass shooting someplace in America . At this point we all know that the earliest reports are typically flawed, so you can suspend belief a degree or two, just for the time being. It's summer; school's out, which means they—the murdered, whoever they were—l
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Towards autonomous prediction and synthesis of novel magnetic materials
In materials science, candidates for novel functional materials are usually explored in a trial-and-error fashion through calculations, synthetic methods, and material analysis. However, the approach is time-consuming and requires expertise. Now, researchers from Japan have used a data-driven approach to automate the process of predicting new magnetic materials. By combining first-principles calcu
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Area Residents Express Dismay As SpaceX Looks Poised To Downgrade "Starbase" R&D Facility
As the current testing grounds and launch site of SpaceX's massive Starship — a fully reusable rocket that very well may be the most powerful in the world — "Starbase" near Brownsville in South Texas, attracts plenty of space enthusiasts that want to catch a glimpse of the titanic rocket in action. But to their dismay, that privilege could soon end, National Geographic reports , with SpaceX CEO E
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The Minions Are Good. I'm Serious.
Minions! You know them, even if you don't want to. The banana-yellow, denim-clad, booger-shaped thingamabobs are so popular that they've overtaken the film franchise in which they originated. They've had their images stitched onto every piece of merchandise possible— sanctioned or not —and probably make up the bulk of those memes your one relative won't stop posting on Facebook. They're agents of
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EU decision on natural gas could threaten climate progress
The European Union's decision to include natural gas in a list of activities considered sustainable could derail its progress in reducing greenhouse gas emissions at a time when climate scientists are calling for dramatic reductions to planet-warming releases.
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Researchers achieve high-performance cryopreservation of living cells based on synergetic ice inhibition effects
A research team led by Prof. Zhao Gang from the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, collaborating with Prof. Liu Huilan from the First Affiliated Hospital of USTC, has achieved high-performance cryopreservation of living cells using synergetic ice inhibition effects of two-dimensional (2D) titanium carbide (Ti3C2Tx) MXene nanosheet.
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Biologists discover three new coral species in Hong Kong waters
Biologists from Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) have discovered in Hong Kong waters three new species of hard coral which have never been identified anywhere else in the world. The findings come shortly after their discovery of one new coral and two new nudibranch species, which was announced last year under their research project on coral health in Hong Kong.
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How nuclear war would affect earth today
Russia's invasion of Ukraine has brought the threat of nuclear warfare to the forefront. But how would modern nuclear detonations impact the world today? A new study published today provides stark information on the global impact of nuclear war.
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Brain pathway clarifies how light affects our mood
New findings clarify how quantity and quality of light affect mood. In a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science , the research team used functional MRI to reveal how light-intensity signals reach the brain, and how brain structures involved in mood process those signals. The study demonstrates that some regions of the cerebral cortex involved in cognitive proces
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Black nursing home residents are more likely to face hospital transfers
Black nursing home residents and those younger than 65 are more likely to face repeat transfers to the hospital, a new study shows. The study, one of the few to analyze the demographics of nursing home residents who get repeatedly transferred to the hospital, also found that these residents and those with "full-code" status were significantly more likely to be transferred to the hospital at least
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Biologists discover three new coral species in Hong Kong waters
Biologists from Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) have discovered in Hong Kong waters three new species of hard coral which have never been identified anywhere else in the world. The findings come shortly after their discovery of one new coral and two new nudibranch species, which was announced last year under their research project on coral health in Hong Kong.
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Letter: Sir Colin Blakemore obituary
A meeting with Colin Blakemore and Les Ward on the set of BBC One's Kilroy programme in 1991 led to us forming what eventually became the Boyd Group. At the time Les was director of Advocates for Animals, and I of the Research for Health Charities Group. Then as now I opposed animal research in principle, but felt that patients' needs and medical advances must come first in a society that chooses
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YouTube Marked Horror Video as "For Kids," Wouldn't Let Creator Reverse It
Horror Struck YouTube is once again screwing up its children's programming after designating a found footage horror video as "for kids" and not allowing the creator to change the erroneous rating manually. The issue apparently began over the holiday weekend, when, as YouTuber Kris Straub tweeted , the social network sent him an email informing him that it had auto-designated a video from his horr
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Residents Furious When Bill Gates Swoops in to Buy Huge Amounts of Farmland
Farmer Bill The Associated Press reports that last week, billionaire Microsoft founder Bill Gates was cleared to purchase 2,100 acres of rural North Dakota farmland. The acquisition, however, wasn't without drama — the tech mogul had to fight state law to buy it, and a number of locals are less than thrilled with the outcome. "I've gotten a big earful on this from clear across the state, it's not
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Researchers argue that long human lifespan is due in part to the contributions of elders
According to long-standing canon in evolutionary biology, natural selection is cruelly selfish, favoring traits that help promote reproductive success. This usually means that the so-called "force" of selection is well equipped to remove harmful mutations that appear during early life and throughout the reproductive years. However, by the age fertility ceases, the story goes that selection becomes
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Light sources with bias tunable spectrum based on van der Waals interface transistors
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31605-9 Here, the authors report the realization of light-emitting field-effect transistors based on van der Waals heterostructures with conduction and valence band edges at the Γ-point of the Brillouin zone, showing electrically tunable and material-dependent electroluminescence spectra at room temperature.
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Multi-scale computer-aided design and photo-controlled macromolecular synthesis boosting uranium harvesting from seawater
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31360-x Developing materials for uranium harvesting from seawater with high adsorption capacity remains challenging. Here, the authors develop a new protocol, by combining multi-scale computational simulations with the PET-RAFT polymerization, for rational design and precise synthesis of block copolymers with optimal ar
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Inhibitory role of Annexin A1 in pathological bone resorption and therapeutic implications in periprosthetic osteolysis
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31646-0 Periprosthetic osteolysis is a cause of arthroplasty failure without available therapies. Here the authors show that Annexin A1 (AnxA1) is involved in in periprosthetic osteolysis and exerts potential therapeutic effects through suppressing NFκB signaling and promoting the PPAR-γ pathway resulting in inhibition
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Researchers argue that long human lifespan is due in part to the contributions of elders
According to long-standing canon in evolutionary biology, natural selection is cruelly selfish, favoring traits that help promote reproductive success. This usually means that the so-called "force" of selection is well equipped to remove harmful mutations that appear during early life and throughout the reproductive years. However, by the age fertility ceases, the story goes that selection becomes
5h
The 2022 Audubon Photography Awards
The winners of this year's annual Audubon Photography Awards were just announced. Photographers were competing for eight prizes across five divisions, and more than 2,400 images depicting birdlife from all 50 states and seven Canadian provinces and territories were judged. The National Audubon Society was once again kind enough to share some of this year's winners with us below.
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What Brexit Did to Boris Johnson—And Britain
Not too long ago, I heard one of the leading Brexiteers describe his political philosophy in a room full of CEOs and senior politicians. He started by talking to this elite group about the great division between "elites" and "the people," the victors and the victims of globalization, the haves and the have-nots of modernity. The longer he spoke, the more his words began to seem rote, remote, and
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Female urinary tract lactobaccilli can kill pathogenic bacteria
Lactobacilli that live in the human female urinary tract's microbiome are competitive and kill nearby pathogenic bacteria, according to the first study of its kind by a team led by microbiologist Dr. Tanya Sysoeva of The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH). The study was recently published in Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology.
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Mid-depth waters off the United States East Coast are getting saltier
A new study led by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) shows a significant increase in frequency of warm saltwater intrusions from the deep ocean to the continental shelf along the Middle Atlantic Bight, which extends from the Gulf of Maine to Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. Using data collected from NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service Ecosystem Monitoring program, as well as data coll
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Female urinary tract lactobaccilli can kill pathogenic bacteria
Lactobacilli that live in the human female urinary tract's microbiome are competitive and kill nearby pathogenic bacteria, according to the first study of its kind by a team led by microbiologist Dr. Tanya Sysoeva of The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH). The study was recently published in Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology.
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Scientists hijack bacteria to ease drug manufacturing
For more affordable, sustainable drug options than we have today, the medication we take to treat high blood pressure, pain or memory loss may one day come from engineered bacteria, cultured in a vat like yogurt. And thanks to a new bacterial tool developed by scientists at The University of Texas at Austin, the process of improving drug manufacturing in bacterial cells may be coming sooner than w
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The Forgotten:
Image source: "New Awakenings: The Legacy & Future of Encephalitis Lethargica (EL)" (Sparacin 2012) Some call it "the sleepy-sickness", others encephalitis lethargica. This mysterious disease, lost to time, bears its colloquial name because those who contracted it entered an "all-enveloping trancelike sleep" (1); and some of those who entered this sleep, did not awake for […]
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Climate factors predict future mosquito activity
Increases in three climate factors — temperature, rainfall, and ocean warming — predicted mosquito population growth in Sri Lanka for the next one to six months, according to a new study. The findings can inform the design and timing of programs to limit the spread of mosquito-borne diseases like dengue.
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Scientists discover how glucose and lipid metabolism is regulated by non-coding RNA
A group of Skoltech researchers under Dr. Olga Sergeeva's supervision studied the functions of a long non-coding RNA, which is "read" from the genome, but does not carry the information about protein structure. In experiments on animals and cell lines, scientists have shown that long non-coding RNA LL35 regulates the metabolism of glucose and lipids. Moreover, its depletion suppresses liver cells'
6h
Scientists hijack bacteria to ease drug manufacturing
For more affordable, sustainable drug options than we have today, the medication we take to treat high blood pressure, pain or memory loss may one day come from engineered bacteria, cultured in a vat like yogurt. And thanks to a new bacterial tool developed by scientists at The University of Texas at Austin, the process of improving drug manufacturing in bacterial cells may be coming sooner than w
6h
Scientists discover how glucose and lipid metabolism is regulated by non-coding RNA
A group of Skoltech researchers under Dr. Olga Sergeeva's supervision studied the functions of a long non-coding RNA, which is "read" from the genome, but does not carry the information about protein structure. In experiments on animals and cell lines, scientists have shown that long non-coding RNA LL35 regulates the metabolism of glucose and lipids. Moreover, its depletion suppresses liver cells'
6h
Understanding how microbiota thrive in their human hosts
Scientists have made substantial progress in understanding how gut bacteria succeed in their human hosts on a molecular level. They investigated how bacteria produce inositol lipids, substances vital for many cellular processes in humans and other eukaryotes but hitherto rarely observed in bacteria. The results indicate that inositol lipids have implications for the symbiosis between the bacteria
6h
Towards autonomous prediction and synthesis of novel magnetic materials
In materials science, candidates for novel functional materials are usually explored in a trial-and-error fashion through calculations, synthetic methods, and material analysis. However, the approach is time-consuming and requires expertise. Now, researchers have used a data-driven approach to automate the process of predicting new magnetic materials. By combining first-principles calculations, Ba
6h
Thin mica shows semiconducting behavior, say scientists in new study
Muscovite mica (MuM) is a highly stable mineral that is commonly used as an insulator. However, the electrical properties of single-layer and few-layered MuM are not well understood. Now, a group of researchers reports and explains unusually high conductivity in MuM flakes that are only a few molecule layers thick. Their findings could open doors to the development of two-dimensional electronic de
6h
For dinos like T. rex, puny arms may have been the price of a giant head
In the rolling hills of Argentina's Patagonian Desert, Juan Canale struck paleontological gold. Within half the length of a soccer pitch, his team discovered five dinosaur skeletons, including a new species that's a Tyrannosaurus rex doppelgänger—the third known giant dinosaur to evolve stubby arms and cartoonishly large heads. In a new study , Canale's team suggests the forelimbs shrank as a con
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Virtual meetings stymie creative teamwork
Virtual meetings hinder creative collaboration, researchers report. Even if the pandemic abates enough for a return to normal, all evidence indicates that a substantial share of Americans will continue to work from home, relying on videoconferencing to team up. The new study in Nature finds that in-person teams generated more ideas than remote teams working on the same problem. "If your visual fi
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Scientists develop smart terahertz electro-optic modulator
A research group led by Prof. Sheng Zhigao from the Hefei Institutes of Physical Science (HFIPS) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) developed an active and smart Terahertz (THz) electro-optic modulator. Their results were published in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.
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Fin whale populations rebound in Antarctic feeding grounds
Southern fin whales have been documented feeding in large numbers in ancestral feeding grounds in Antarctica for the first time since hunting was restricted in 1976. The paper, published in Scientific Reports, includes the first video documentation of large groups of fin whales feeding near Elephant Island, Antarctica. The authors suggest that the recovery of fin whale populations could restore ma
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Time in the garden can ease anxiety and depression
Working with plants may give your mental health a boost, even if you've never gardened before. In a new study, researchers found that gardening activities lowered stress, anxiety, and depression in healthy women who attended twice-weekly gardening classes. None of the study participants had gardened before. "Past studies have shown that gardening can help improve the mental health of people who h
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Millionaire Refurbishing Cold War Radar Unit to Hunt UFOs
Millionaires are just like the rest of us — when they need help repairing their out-of-commission, Cold War-era radar units to detect UFOs, they turn to the good folks over at Reddit. As spotted by Vice , an anonymous Reddit post featuring a gigantic British AMES Type 84 radar unit led users on a quest to unmask the mysterious person who'd bought it — and their equally-out-there reason for doing
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Fin whale populations rebound in Antarctic feeding grounds
Southern fin whales have been documented feeding in large numbers in ancestral feeding grounds in Antarctica for the first time since hunting was restricted in 1976. The paper, published in Scientific Reports, includes the first video documentation of large groups of fin whales feeding near Elephant Island, Antarctica. The authors suggest that the recovery of fin whale populations could restore ma
6h
Researchers build longest highly-conductive molecular nanowire
As our devices get smaller and smaller, the use of molecules as the main components in electronic circuitry is becoming ever more critical. Over the past 10 years, researchers have been trying to use single molecules as conducting wires because of their small scale, distinct electronic characteristics, and high tunability. But in most molecular wires, as the length of the wire increases, the effic
6h
Hunting down toxic substances in sludge
Analytical chemists Gabriela Castro Varela and Alexandros Asimakopoulos are hunting for toxic and unregulated chemical substances in the sewage sludge that is a by-product from the water treatment plants of Trondheim municipality.
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Scientists develop tools for early detection of SARS-CoV-2 variants in wastewater
It can be a bit smellier than other ways of monitoring COVID-19, but analyzing wastewater is a cheaper, faster and more accurate way for public health officials and researchers to detect rising cases. Bits and pieces of the SARS-CoV-2 virus are flushed down toilets and washed down sinks by infected individuals; more copies of the virus found in sewage means more people are sick. But until now, mos
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New giant carnivorous dinosaur discovered with tiny arms like T. rex
Tyrannosaurs (like the famous T. rex) is not the only group of giant carnivorous dinosaur with tiny arms. Researchers discovered a new species of dinosaur with disproportionally short arms just like T. rex called the Meraxes gigas. The findings, published in the journal Current Biology on July 7, argued that T. rex and M. gigas evolved to have tiny arms independently, and proposed some potential f
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The beginning of life: The early embryo is in the driver's seat
One often thinks that the early embryo is fragile and needs support. However, at the earliest stages of development, it has the power to feed the future placenta and instructs the uterus so that it can nest. Using blastoids, in vitro embryo models formed with stem cells, the lab of Nicolas Rivron at IMBA showed that the earliest molecular signals that induce placental development and prepare the u
7h
Highly robust and soft biohybrid mechanoluminescence for optical signaling and illumination
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31705-6 Despite the advantages of biohybrid systems for soft robotics, most systems have short lifetime, require complex fabrication, and only remain functional with careful maintenance. Here, the authors report biohybrid mechanoluminescence in soft elastomer-encapsulated bioluminescent dinoflagellates.
7h
Ozone depletion over North Pole produces weather anomalies
Many people are familiar with the hole in the ozone layer over Antarctica, but what is less well known is that occasionally, the protective ozone in the stratosphere over the Arctic is destroyed as well, thinning the ozone layer there. This last happened in the spring months of 2020, and before that, in the spring of 2011.
7h
Protecting our coastline: Researchers develop new model to better predict barrier island retreat
Barrier islands protect the coastline from storms, storm surge, waves and flooding. They can act as a buffer between the ocean and beachfront property. As sea level rises, barrier islands retreat, or move closer toward the shore, which diminishes the buffer and protection. New information published today shows the retreat of coastal barrier islands will accelerate by 50 percent within a century, e
7h
Scientists develop tools for early detection of SARS-CoV-2 variants in wastewater
It can be a bit smellier than other ways of monitoring COVID-19, but analyzing wastewater is a cheaper, faster and more accurate way for public health officials and researchers to detect rising cases. Bits and pieces of the SARS-CoV-2 virus are flushed down toilets and washed down sinks by infected individuals; more copies of the virus found in sewage means more people are sick. But until now, mos
7h
New giant carnivorous dinosaur discovered with tiny arms like T. rex
Tyrannosaurs (like the famous T. rex) is not the only group of giant carnivorous dinosaur with tiny arms. Researchers discovered a new species of dinosaur with disproportionally short arms just like T. rex called the Meraxes gigas. The findings, published in the journal Current Biology on July 7, argued that T. rex and M. gigas evolved to have tiny arms independently, and proposed some potential f
7h
The beginning of life: The early embryo is in the driver's seat
One often thinks that the early embryo is fragile and needs support. However, at the earliest stages of development, it has the power to feed the future placenta and instructs the uterus so that it can nest. Using blastoids, in vitro embryo models formed with stem cells, the lab of Nicolas Rivron at IMBA showed that the earliest molecular signals that induce placental development and prepare the u
7h
Porosity of the moon's crust reveals bombardment history
Around 4.4 billion years ago, the early solar system resembled a game of space rock dodgeball, as massive asteroids and comets, and, later, smaller rocks and galactic debris pummeled the moon and other infant terrestrial bodies. This period ended around 3.8 billion years ago. On the moon, this tumultuous time left behind a heavily cratered face, and a cracked and porous crust.
7h
How ethics can help you make better decisions | Michael Schur
What would Immanuel Kant say about a fender bender? In a surprisingly funny trip through the teachings of some of history's great philosophers, TV writer and producer Michael Schur (from hit shows like "The Office" and "The Good Place") talks through how to confront life's moral dilemmas — and shows how understanding ethical theories can help you make better, kinder decisions.
7h
How to find, read and organize papers
Nature, Published online: 07 July 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01878-7 Maya Gosztyla decided to rethink her approach to research papers after she had trouble keeping track of the published literature.
7h
City heat extremes captured by instrument on the ISS
With air temperatures in excess of 10°C above the average for the time of year in parts of Europe, the United States and Asia, June 2022 has gone down as a record breaker. The fear is that these extreme early-season heatwaves are a taste of what could soon be the norm as climate change continues to take hold. For those in cities, the heat dissipates slower creating "urban heat islands," which make
7h
Mercury exposure disrupts the lipid metabolism of migratory birds
Migratory birds have been called the super-athletes of the animal kingdom because of the remarkable endurance they display during hours-long, non-stop flights that can span thousands of kilometers. Their endurance is made possible by several unique physiological adaptations that allow birds to fuel long bouts of high-intensity exercise with fat rather than less energy-dense and less storable carbo
7h
Black, Hispanic men more often die from HPV throat cancer
Hispanic and Black men are dying from HPV-associated throat cancer at a higher rate than are white men, research finds. And most new cases are being diagnosed in white men at late-stage when it's more difficult to treat, according to the findings published in the Annals of Cancer Epidemiology . "Since these oropharyngeal cancers are all potentially preventable through the administration of the HP
7h
Mercury exposure disrupts the lipid metabolism of migratory birds
Migratory birds have been called the super-athletes of the animal kingdom because of the remarkable endurance they display during hours-long, non-stop flights that can span thousands of kilometers. Their endurance is made possible by several unique physiological adaptations that allow birds to fuel long bouts of high-intensity exercise with fat rather than less energy-dense and less storable carbo
7h
Testing the possibility of using nickel-containing catalysts to produce multi-carbon products
A team of researchers from ETH Zurich, the National University of Singapore and the Institute of Chemical Research of Catalonia, has found that it is possible to use nickel-containing catalysts to produce multi-carbon products. In their paper published in the journal Nature Catalysis, the group describes the ways they tested the idea of using nickel-containing catalysts to produce hydrocarbons fro
7h
The Most Pathetic Men in America
W hen he wasn't melting down over how "very badly" he was treated or acting like a seditious lunatic, Donald Trump could be downright serene in certain Washington settings—and never more so than when he would swan in for dinner at the Trump International Hotel, a few blocks down Pennsylvania Avenue from the White House and the only other place where he would ever agree to eat. Unlike the Obamas,
7h
The secret police: A private security group regularly sent Minnesota police misinformation about protestors
When US marshals shot and killed a 32-year-old Black man named Winston Boogie Smith Jr. in a parking garage in Minneapolis's Uptown neighborhood on June 3, 2021, the city was already in a full-blown policing crisis. Around 300 officers had quit over the previous two years amid near-constant protests and public criticism in the wake of George Floyd's murder by a member of the police force in May 2
7h
Swiss 'Water Battery' Now Online After 14 Years
Emosson Lake, one of the two reservoirs Switzerland's new water battery sits between. (Photo: Mercvrie/Unsplash) A "water battery" hidden deep in the Swiss Alps is finally ready to begin storing 400,000 electric vehicles' worth of energy. The facility, also known as a pumped storage power plant, is a form of hydroelectric energy storage. This one will both generate and store energy for power grid
7h
Exploring the deep sea as a new source of rare earth elements
Rare earth elements (REEs), like lanthanum and cerium, are vital components in many everyday and emerging technologies, including smartphones, hard disks and clean energy. However, as concerns about the environmental impact of REE extraction and supply chain vulnerabilities grow (China dominates the REE market, accounting for 57.5% of production in 2020), researchers are looking to new sources of
7h
New indicators for marine ecosystem protection developed
Together with an international team, Senckenberg scientists have developed new monitoring indicators for the protection of marine and coastal areas. In their study, published in the journal Scientific Data, they show that large gaps exist in the protection of marine ecosystems. According to the research team, the high seas, for example, have a high conservation potential for biodiversity—but there
7h
New indicators for marine ecosystem protection developed
Together with an international team, Senckenberg scientists have developed new monitoring indicators for the protection of marine and coastal areas. In their study, published in the journal Scientific Data, they show that large gaps exist in the protection of marine ecosystems. According to the research team, the high seas, for example, have a high conservation potential for biodiversity—but there
7h
Characterization of core fucosylation via sequential enzymatic treatments of intact glycopeptides and mass spectrometry analysis
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31472-4 Core fucosylation of N-linked glycoproteins has been linked to physiological and pathological processes. Here, the authors develop a mass spectrometry-based method that utilizes Endo F3 followed by PNGase F treatment to quantify site-specific glycoprotein core fucosylation in protein mixtures.
7h
TET1 dioxygenase is required for FOXA2-associated chromatin remodeling in pancreatic beta-cell differentiation
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31611-x Here the authors show that TET1 is required for the generation of functional insulin-producing cells, FOXA2 physically interacts with TET1 and contributes to specific recruitment of TET1 to mediate chromatin opening at the regulatory elements of pancreatic lineage determinants.
7h
Researchers achieve record entanglement of quantum memories
A network in which data transmission is perfectly secure against hacking? If physicists have their way, this will become reality one day with the help of the quantum mechanical phenomenon known as entanglement. For entangled particles, the rule is: If you measure the state of one of the particles, then you automatically know the state of the other. It makes no difference how far away the entangled
8h
Snapping shrimp orbital hood protects against shockwave blasts
A team of researchers from the University of Tulsa and the University of South Carolina, has found that the reason bigclaw snapping shrimp do not suffer from their own shock waves is that they are protected by orbital hoods. In their paper published in the journal Current Biology, the group describes experiments they conducted in their lab that involved removing the hoods from wild shrimp.
8h
Turkish astronomers discover new short-period pulsating variable star
Astronomers from the Istanbul University in Turkey report the finding of a new short-period pulsating variable star during observations of the field of exoplanet host star XO-2. The newly detected object is most likely a Delta Scuti type variable with a pulsation period of less than one hour. The discovery was detailed in a paper published June 29 on arXiv.org.
8h
Snapping shrimp orbital hood protects against shockwave blasts
A team of researchers from the University of Tulsa and the University of South Carolina, has found that the reason bigclaw snapping shrimp do not suffer from their own shock waves is that they are protected by orbital hoods. In their paper published in the journal Current Biology, the group describes experiments they conducted in their lab that involved removing the hoods from wild shrimp.
8h
Super Fast Air Cannon Car Made from an Old Glider! | Street Outlaws: Farmtruck and AZN
Stream Street Outlaws: Farmtruck and AZN on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/street-outlaws-farmtruck-and-azn-us #StreetOutlaws #FarmtruckAndAZN #Discovery Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow U
8h
The Worst, Best Prime Minister
And just like that, he was gone. Well, ish. Boris Johnson finally gave up this morning and announced that he is quitting as prime minister following a tsunami of resignations from within his own government that have made his position untenable. "When the herd moves, it moves," he said today outside 10 Downing Street. The "brilliant Darwinian system" of British politics, as he called it, had got h
8h
Taxing animal production to reduce animal density in agriculture
A huge proportion of the world's population is vegetarian, eating no meat for a range of reasons, including lack of availability and poverty, ethical and religious reasons, personal health and environmental health reasons. Among that number are many who are vegan, eating no animal products. However, the environmental impact of raising livestock remains incredibly high; natural ecosystems are remov
8h
Taxing animal production to reduce animal density in agriculture
A huge proportion of the world's population is vegetarian, eating no meat for a range of reasons, including lack of availability and poverty, ethical and religious reasons, personal health and environmental health reasons. Among that number are many who are vegan, eating no animal products. However, the environmental impact of raising livestock remains incredibly high; natural ecosystems are remov
8h
Removing the nitrogen bottleneck in the world's food supply
A University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa researcher is a part of a team that developed a synthetic way to transform nitrogen into a bioavailable form that could allow for the production of ammonia fertilizer at a much lower cost and ultimately lead to greater food production across the globe. Though nitrogen is inexhaustible in the atmosphere, scientists say creating enough bioavailable forms of nitrogen
8h
Removing the nitrogen bottleneck in the world's food supply
A University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa researcher is a part of a team that developed a synthetic way to transform nitrogen into a bioavailable form that could allow for the production of ammonia fertilizer at a much lower cost and ultimately lead to greater food production across the globe. Though nitrogen is inexhaustible in the atmosphere, scientists say creating enough bioavailable forms of nitrogen
8h
Why These Frogs Make 'the Grossest Blunder in Sexual Preference'
When rain falls and water is plentiful, the sex lives of plains spadefoot toads are pretty, well, plain. Females prowl ponds for the suitor with the most winsome call; they pair off to couple, churning out legions of eggs that will hatch into, as genetics might predict, more plains spadefoot toads. But when the weather gets drier and deep ponds more scant, as they often do in the North American d
8h
Garmin Forerunner 945 review
The Garmin Forerunner 945 is an excellent sports tracking companion for multi-sport athletes seeking an abundance of metrics and solid battery life
9h
Study indicates link between climate fluctuations and mass extinction
Researchers investigating rocks in India have found chemical evidence of a series of rapid fluctuations in climate during the greatest known mass extinction event, around 252 million years ago. Michael Brookfield at the University of Texas at Austin, U.S., with colleagues in Taiwan, report their findings and interpretations in the Journal of Asian Earth Sciences.
9h
Low-cost anti-mycobacterial drug discovery using engineered E. coli
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31570-3 Whole-cell screening for Mycobacterium tuberculosis inhibitors is complicated by the pathogen's slow growth and biocontainment requirements. Here the authors develop engineered E. coli as a synthetic biology tool to express and screen metabolic targets from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.
9h
Here Lies Boris Johnson
Watching someone take the slow train to an obvious conclusion is always frustrating. Yesterday afternoon, the Conservative politician Sajid Javid stood up in the British Parliament to criticize his party leader, Boris Johnson, for being careless with the truth. "It's not fair on my ministerial colleagues to go out every morning defending lines that don't stand up, or don't hold up," he said. "At
9h
Human bones used for making pendants in the Stone Age
In the Stone Age, pendants with potent symbolism were made from animal teeth and bones, adorning clothes or accessories and serving as rattles. Human bones were also used as a raw material for pendants, as demonstrated by a study where burial finds dating back more than 8,200 years were re-examined after 80 years.
9h
How nuclear war would affect Earth today
Russia's invasion of Ukraine has brought the threat of nuclear warfare to the forefront. But how would modern nuclear detonations impact the world today? A new study published today in AGU Advances provides stark information on the global impact of nuclear war.
9h
The Download: a military AI boom, and China's industrial espionage
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. Why business is booming for military AI startups Exactly two weeks after Russia invaded Ukraine in February, Alexander Karp, the CEO of data analytics company Palantir, made his pitch to European leaders. With war on their doorstep, Europeans ought to moderniz
9h
Swarms of tiny robots could one day floss your teeth
A shapeshifting swarm of tiny robots could one day brush, rinse, and floss your teeth. The system could be particularly valuable for those who lack the manual dexterity to clean their teeth effectively themselves. The building blocks of these microrobots are iron oxide nanoparticles that have both catalytic and magnetic activity. Using a magnetic field, researchers could direct their motion and c
9h
A plasmid system with tunable copy number
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31422-0 The range of available copy numbers for cloning vectors is largely restricted to the handful of ORIs that have been isolated from plasmids found in nature. Here the authors introduce a plasmid system that allow for the continuous, finely-tuned control of plasmid copy number between 1 and 800 copies per cell.
10h
Daily briefing: Mice cloned from freeze-dried skin cells
Nature, Published online: 06 July 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01875-w The first cloned mice from skin cells that had been freeze-dried for up to nine months. Plus, what to expect from the revved-up LHC and what the data say about whether COVID passes and vaccine mandates work.
10h
Will Supreme Court decision on abortion topple other rights?
Abortion may be only the first domino to fall among rights that Americans enjoy, legal experts say. The Supreme Court's June 24 decision in Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health marked the end of the constitutional right to an abortion. A 5-4 vote overturned the landmark 1973 Roe v. Wade decision, leaving individual states to determine the legality of abortion . The majority opinion—which was leaked in
10h
How Are We Possibly Still Disinfecting Things?
Two weeks into the pandemic, a box of Cheerios sent me into an existential tailspin. I'd just returned from an unnerving trip to a New York City supermarket, where bandanna-masked customers with carts full of toilet paper dodged one another like bandits. As I unpacked my groceries, I was gripped by fear. If I don't Lysol the living daylights out of this cardboard , I wondered, will I die? I kept
11h
Cities Aren't Built for Kids
T o the east of Amsterdam's city center sits Funenpark , a peaceful little quarter shaped like a triangle. Its edges are lined with stores and public spaces, including a day care, a bookstore, and a primary school next to a large playground. Sprinkled across the enclave, apartment buildings sit amid plots of grass that blend into smooth stone walkways. There are no private yards or driveways in F
11h
Biomimetic generation of the strongest known biomaterial found in limpet tooth
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31139-0 The highest tensile strength biomaterial known exists in limpet teeth and replicating this material is of interest. Here, the authors report on the ex vivo growth of teeth and use of isolated limpet tissue and cells providing foundations for the development of this high-tensile biomaterial.
11h
Modulating mitofusins to control mitochondrial function and signaling
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31324-1 Mitofusins regulate mitochondrial fusion. Here the authors identify small molecules that activate or inhibit mitofusins' activity and modulate mitochondrial fusion and functionality. Inhibition of mitochondrial fusion promotes minority MOMP, caspase-3/7 activation, and DNA damage.
11h
How the UN Security Council Can Reinvent Itself
S eventy-seven years into its troubled existence, the United Nations Security Council confronts a consequential decision: Transform or die. The choice was vividly illustrated in the first weeks of the war in Ukraine, when Russia's United Nations ambassador served as the president of the Security Council even as his country committed a flagrant violation of the UN's founding principles. That spect
12h
Six Reasons the Murder Clearance Rate Is at an All-Time Low
Sign up for Derek's newsletter here . American violence is resurgent. Gun murders rose to their highest figure on record in 2020, the last year for which we have complete data. While violent crime is rising, America's police departments are struggling more than ever to bring the perpetrators to justice. In the 1960s, more than 90 percent of all homicides were "cleared" by police, with an arrest o
12h
The Magic of a Little Danger
" How to Build a Life " is a weekly column by Arthur Brooks, tackling questions of meaning and happiness. Click here to listen to his podcast series on all things happiness, How to Build a Happy Life . "Y ou wouldn't believe it. It's like a wonderful nightmare." This is how Bill Gorton, the hard-drinking veteran in Ernest Hemingway's 1926 novel The Sun Also Rises , describes the running of the bu
12h
Why business is booming for military AI startups
Exactly two weeks after Russia invaded Ukraine in February, Alexander Karp, the CEO of data analytics company Palantir, made his pitch to European leaders. With war on their doorstep, Europeans ought to modernize their arsenals with Silicon Valley's help, he argued in an open letter . For Europe to "remain strong enough to defeat the threat of foreign occupation," Karp wrote, countries need to em
12h
Yellowstone flooding reveals forecast flaws as climate warms
The Yellowstone National Park area's weather forecast the morning of June 12 seemed fairly tame: warmer temperatures and rain showers would accelerate mountain snow melt and could produce "minor flooding." A National Weather Service bulletin recommended moving livestock from low-lying areas but made no mention of danger to people.
13h
Coin-sized device detects measles virus in saliva
Measles is one of the most infectious airborne viruses worldwide. An inexpensive and effective vaccine is available, but Measles is common in developing countries and sporadic outbreaks also occur in developed countries, primarily due to non-vaccinated people. New research published in Advanced Functional Materials describes a novel point-of-care biosensing device capable of detecting measles viri
14h
How might Big Tech affect financial inclusion and stability?
New technologies and widespread internet and smart phone adoption have led to an increased availability of digital financial services, many of which are offered by non-traditional financial-service providers including so-called Big Techs such as Apple, Alibaba, Amazon, Facebook, eBay, Google, and Tencent. A recent analysis published in Contemporary Economic Policy notes that the entry of Big Techs
14h
In Bioethics, Ignoring Racism Is Itself a Kind of Racism
GUEST ESSAY | Given the abundant evidence of racism's health impacts, one would expect bioethicists, of all people, to grapple with the problem in a substantive way. But close scrutiny of the "Encyclopedia of Bioethics," the field's central reference text, suggests that's not what's happening.
14h
Eiffeltårnet er fyldt med rust
Ifølge fortrolige rapporter har det internationale symbol for Frankrig brug for mere end en 447 millioner kroners makeover for at blive fri af korrosion. Men bly i gammel maling er et problem.
15h
Why chase tornadoes? It's 'the wonder of nature'
This is a re-post from Yale Climate Connections by Charlie Randall A tribute to storm chasers At its core, storm chasing is an extremely dangerous pursuit, as witness several events in late April and early May: Some storm chasers were killed or severely injured, not from a tornado directly, but as a result of the countless hours of driving to successfully encounter and chase a storm across the la
15h
Skeptical Science New Research for Week #27 2022
Stuck at 68% The Policy Institute of King's College, London this week provides us a report from our government/NGO section, Public perceptions on climate change (pdf) . The authors survey citizens of six European Union countries. A key finding is a bit disturbing: despite the scientific consensus on anthropogenic (human caused) climate change having converged long ago at 98%+ , the Policy Institu
15h
Fluorescence turn on amine detection in a cationic covalent organic framework
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31393-2 Ionic covalent organic frameworks (iCOFs) are new examples of porous materials and show great potential for various applications. Here, the authors demonstrate functionalization of an iCOFs with suitable emission sites and application as chemosensor for amine detection with high sensitivity which can be used to
16h
Reports of fireball over New Zealand in what scientists think was rare daytime meteor
People across the North Island flooded social media with reports of the object, with some describing the sound as being like an earthquake New Zealanders across the North Island have reported rumbling, crackling sounds, a fireball and a huge flash of light streaking across the sky on Thursday afternoon, in what scientists believe was likely a meteor. Local media outlets and social media were floo
16h
Roe v Wade: why vasectomies are no answer to abortion restrictions
The US supreme court's decision to overturn Roe v Wade will have a significant impact on the reproductive health and the safety of women who become pregnant in the US. Researchers have estimated it could increase maternal mortality in the country by 20%. The ruling also sparked debates around men's reproductive options, including the role of vasectomies in pregnancy and abortion prevention. Madel
18h
Roe v Wade: why vasectomies are no answer to abortion restrictions
The US supreme court's decision to overturn Roe v Wade will have a significant impact on the reproductive health and the safety of women who become pregnant in the US. Researchers have estimated it could increase maternal mortality in the country by 20%. The ruling also sparked debates around men's reproductive options, including the role of vasectomies in pregnancy and abortion prevention. Madele
18h
Elon Musk Reportedly Had Two More Secret Children This Year
Neuralink Daycare An eyebrow-raising scoop from Insider found that Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk's brood of children is even larger than previously known, with two new twins having been born last November. For those keeping score, the infants are not Musk's first secret offspring that have come to light. Back in March of this year, it emerged in a Vanity Fair profile that Musk had had a second b
20h
Determining the interlayer shearing in twisted bilayer MoS2 by nanoindentation
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31685-7 The study of the mechanical properties of twisted van der Waals structures can provide important information about their interlayer coupling and electronic behaviour. Here, the authors report a nanoindentation-based technique to determine the interlayer shear stress in bilayer MoS2, showing its independence as a
22h
Thyroid problems linked to increased risk of dementia
Older people with hypothyroidism, also called underactive thyroid, may be at increased risk of developing dementia, according to a new study. The risk of developing dementia was even higher for people whose thyroid condition required thyroid hormone replacement medication.
23h
Study shows increase in COVID-19 vaccine acceptance around the world
COVID-19 vaccine acceptance increased 3.7% between 2020 and 2021, according to a new study. In a June 2021 survey of over 23,000 individuals across 23 countries, the researchers found that more than three-quarters (75.2%) of respondents reported vaccine acceptance, up from 71.5% one year earlier.
23h
Participants needed for masters dissertation on vaping
Hi everyone. I'm a MSc Health Psychology student, and I'm looking for participants to take part in my dissertation. I'm exploring, the different attitudes, beliefs and opinions in relation to vaping and vaping cessation. I need approx. another 80 participants. There are two sections to the study with the second part being optional: Part 1 is comprised of 4 questionnaires. Will take no longer than
23h
Are the Last Rational Republicans in Denial?
This is an edition of The Atlantic Daily, a newsletter that guides you through the biggest stories of the day, helps you discover new ideas, and recommends the best in culture. Sign up for it here . I wonder if the remaining sensible Republicans have accepted the irretrievable loss of the GOP they once knew. But first, here are three new stories from The Atlantic . Let's use Chicago rules to beat
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Upside-down design expands wide-spectrum super-camera abilities
By turning the traditional lab-based fabrication process upside down, researchers have greatly expanded the abilities of light-manipulating metasurfaces while also making them much more robust against the elements. The combination could allow these quickly maturing devices to be used in a wide range of practical applications, such as cameras that capture images in a broad spectrum of light in a si
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New study sheds light on why opioids can cause gastrointestinal problems
Opioids are the gold standard for treatment of chronic and acute pain; however, their use may result in significant gastrointestinal side effects, including nausea, vomiting, and constipation. The reasons behind these side effects are not well understood. A new study reports on how opioids like morphine cause gastric inflammation and how this condition can be reversed through treatment with proton
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Birdwatching brings millions of dollars to Alaska
A committed and lucky birdwatcher in Alaska may see an elusive bluethroat north of the Brooks Range, catch a glimpse of the bold markings on a harlequin duck as it zips along an Interior river, encounter all four species of eider in Utqiaġvik, or take in the sounds of thousands of feeding shorebirds in the Copper River Delta.
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Weird Storm Turns Sky Green
Spooky Skies Nothing quite says "apocalypse" like Melon Powerade-colored heavens. Case in point, before a bout of severe weather yesterday, the sky in Sioux Falls, South Dakota turned a shade of green akin to that of the gamma radiation that turned Bruce Banner into the Hulk. The ominous occurrence took place as a massive thunderstorm system called a derecho swept through the region, injuring sev
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Cell Providers Are Apparently Gonna Put Ads on Your Phone's Lock Screen
Lock Screen Ads Google's Android smartphone platform could soon be getting flooded with ads — right on the lock screen. According to TechCrunch , a Google-backed subsidiary of Indian advertising company inMobi Group called Glance is in talks with US-based wireless carriers to launch several smartphone models, which could feature ads on the lock screen. If your reaction to that is "hell no," you'r
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AI Referee Will Track Players' Individual Limbs at World Cup
PlAI Ball FIFA — the international overlord of soccer-slash-football — has revealed that it'll be implementing a complex offsides-detecting AI system at the upcoming 2022 World Cup in Qatar. The assistive technology takes into consideration a dizzying array of data points. A dozen strategically-placed, AI-connected cameras continuously collect data from 29 specific points on players' bodies, whil
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News at a glance: Debate over classifying research, giant water lilies, and new hummingbird feather colors
ECOLOGY Scientists find new hummingbird colors The plumage of hummingbirds has more color diversity than the feathers of all other birds combined, a recent study finds. Researchers from Yale University collected feathers from specimens of 114 hummingbird species and, using a spectrometer, documented the wavelengths of light they reflected. These wavelengths were then compared with those found in
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Citizen scientists from 200 years ago and today help shed light on climate change trends
Citizen science observations across two centuries reveal a dramatic, climate-driven shift to earlier leaf out and flowering, which varies across settings, species and functional groups. Plants in urban areas, insect pollinated trees, and early-season species show the greatest rate of advancement overall. This unprecedented comparison of historic-modern network observations illustrates how long-ter
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Using the power of the sun to roast green chile
Roasting green chile is an important cultural touchstone for New Mexico, but it leads to a seasonal emission of approximately 7,800 metric tons of carbon dioxide — the equivalent of driving 1,700 cars for a year. Sandia National Laboratories engineer Kenneth Armijo, who grew up on a chile farm in Sabinal, located between Albuquerque and Socorro, New Mexico, thought there was a 'greener' way to ro
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Team creates first ever VX neurotoxin detector
City College of New York associate professor of physics Ronald Koder and his team at the Koder Lab are advancing the field of molecular detection by developing the first proteins that can detect a deadly nerve agent called VX in real-time and without false positives from insecticides.
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