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The Gray Man Takes the Stoic-Spy Cliché Way Too Far
Stoicism has long been a powerful weapon in Ryan Gosling's cinematic arsenal. One of his best-remembered films remains the taut 2011 thriller Drive , in which he played an unnamed stunt driver who is cool behind the wheel but monosyllabic in conversation. As Officer K in Blade Runner 2049 , he was quite literally robotic, an artificial "replicant" designed to be void of emotion. In First Man , he
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Supercharged biotech rice yields 40% more grain
By giving a Chinese rice variety a second copy of one of its own genes, researchers have boosted its yield by up to 40%. The change helps the plant absorb more fertilizer, boosts photosynthesis, and accelerates flowering, all of which could contribute to larger harvests, the group reports today in Science . The yield gain from a single gene coordinating these multiple effects is "really impressiv
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Radio bursts from 'zombie' black holes excite astronomers
When a hapless star ventures too close to one of the supermassive black holes that lurk at the center of galaxies, it's torn to shreds and stretched like spaghetti. In this so-called tidal disruption event (TDE), the black hole dines on the stellar remnants, which wrap around the black hole's belly in an accretion disk. During the feast, the black hole can glow brighter than a supernova for month
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Modulating the strong metal-support interaction of single-atom catalysts via vicinal structure decoration
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31966-1 A simple water soaking treatment significantly weakened the strong covalent metal-support interaction between the atomically dispersed Pt and CoFe2O4, which leads to an enhanced activity towards methane combustions by 55 times. This work highlights the critical role of altering the coordination structure of sing
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Best VPN Routers for 2022
Instead of installing your VPN service on each device you use, using the best VPN router can protect everything that connects to your network. VPN services encrypt your data end-to-end and allow you to keep your IP address private. Things like smart home devices and gaming consoles often don't support VPN services, but if they connect to your router and that router is running a VPN from your pref
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A Brief List of Bizarre Diseases Currently Spreading in the United States
Another day, another terrifying piece of health news. In light of the horrific-but-somehow-not-entirely-surprising confirmed United States case of — checks notes — polio , we've decided to compile a helpful list of all the trending contagions that you probably want to watch out for. Happy weekend! Polio Big shoutout to the new/old kid on the block! According to CNBC , health officials in New York
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China Is Sending More Space Junk Hurtling Down to Earth
Watch Out Below! Heads up, literally. This weekend, China plans to launch a powerful Long March 5B rocket called the Wentian from the Wenchang Space Launch Site in Hainan — and taking into account the history of the country's Long March 5B spacecraft, it's pretty likely parts of the rocket will crash land back onto Earth. As Gizmodo reports , the 174-foot-tall rocket launching this Sunday from Ha
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Chemists unlock secrets of molten salts
A chemist at the University of Cincinnati has come up with a novel way to study the thermodynamic properties of molten salts, which are used in many nuclear and solar energy applications.
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Uncovering temporospatial sensitive TBI targeting strategies via in vivo phage display
Abstract The heterogeneous pathophysiology of traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a barrier to advancing diagnostics and therapeutics, including targeted drug delivery. We used a unique discovery pipeline to identify novel targeting motifs that recognize specific temporal phases of TBI pathology. This pipeline combined in vivo biopanning with domain antibody (dAb) phage display, next-generation seque
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Cloning and base editing of GFP transgenic rhesus monkey and off-target analysis
Abstract We report the cloning of a 12-year-old transgenic green fluorescent protein (GFP) monkey by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and base editing of the embryos, accompanied with safety evaluation of adenine base editors (ABEs). We first show the ability of ABEmax to silence GFP through A-to-G editing of the GFP sequence in 293T cells. Subsequently, using donor cells from a monkey expres
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Hypoxia-mediated stabilization of HIF1A in prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia promotes cell plasticity and malignant progression
Abstract Prostate cancer (PCa) is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths. The slow evolution of precancerous lesions to malignant tumors provides a broad time frame for preventing PCa. To characterize prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) progression, we conducted longitudinal studies on Pten (i)pe−/− mice that recapitulate prostate carcinogenesis in humans. We found that early PINs are hyp
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The ER protein Creld regulates ER-mitochondria contact dynamics and respiratory complex 1 activity
Abstract Dynamic contacts are formed between endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria that enable the exchange of calcium and phospholipids. Disturbed contacts between ER and mitochondria impair mitochondrial dynamics and are a molecular hallmark of Parkinson's disease, which is also characterized by impaired complex I activity and dopaminergic neuron degeneration. Here, we analyzed the role o
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Global reduction in ship-tracks from sulfur regulations for shipping fuel
Abstract Ship-tracks are produced by ship-emitted aerosols interacting with low clouds. Here, we apply deep learning models on satellite data to produce the first global climatology map of ship-tracks. We show that ship-tracks are at the nexus of cloud physics, maritime shipping, and fuel regulation. Our map captures major shipping lanes while missing others because of background conditions. Ship
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Epigenetic controls of Sonic hedgehog guarantee fidelity of epithelial adult stem cells trajectory in regeneration
Abstract Given that adult stem cells (ASCs) fuel homeostasis and healing by providing tissue-specific descendants, the fidelity of ASC fate determination is crucial for regeneration. Here, we established that an epigenetic control of epithelial ASC fate fidelity via Ezh2/H3K27me3 was indispensable for incisor homeostasis and regeneration. Mechanistically, in homeostasis, H3K27me3 upstream occupie
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14-3-3-zeta mediates GLP-1 receptor agonist action to alter α cell proglucagon processing
Abstract Recent studies demonstrate that α cells contribute to glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists potently potentiate GSIS, making these drugs useful for diabetes treatment. However, the role of α and β cell paracrine interactions in the effects of GLP-1R agonists is undefined. We previously found that increased β cell GLP-1R signaling
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Future seasonal changes in habitat for Arctic whales during predicted ocean warming
Abstract Ocean warming is causing shifts in the distributions of marine species, but the location of suitable habitats in the future is unknown, especially in remote regions such as the Arctic. Using satellite tracking data from a 28-year-long period, covering all three endemic Arctic cetaceans (227 individuals) in the Atlantic sector of the Arctic, together with climate models under two emission
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Momentum space imaging of σ orbitals for chemical analysis
Abstract Tracing the modifications of molecules in surface chemical reactions benefits from the possibility to image their orbitals. While delocalized frontier orbitals with π character are imaged routinely with photoemission orbital tomography, they are not always sensitive to local chemical modifications, particularly the making and breaking of bonds at the molecular periphery. For such bonds,
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Engineered immunomodulatory accessory cells improve experimental allogeneic islet transplantation without immunosuppression
Abstract Islet transplantation has been established as a viable treatment modality for type 1 diabetes. However, the side effects of the systemic immunosuppression required for patients often outweigh its benefits. Here, we engineer programmed death ligand-1 and cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 immunoglobulin fusion protein–modified mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) as accessory cells for islet co
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An implantable ultrasound-powered device for the treatment of brain cancer using electromagnetic fields
Abstract Brain tumors have been proved challenging to treat. Here, we present a promising alternative by developing an implantable ultrasound-powered tumor treating device (UP-TTD) that electromagnetically disrupts the rapid division of cancer cells without any adverse effects on normal neurons, thereby safely inhibiting brain cancer recurrence. In vitro and in vivo experiments confirmed the sign
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Spatiotemporal gating of Stat nuclear influx by Drosophila Npas4 in collective cell migration
Abstract Collective migration is important to embryonic development and cancer metastasis, but migratory and nonmigratory cell fate discrimination by differential activity of signal pathways remains elusive. In Drosophila oogenesis, Jak/Stat signaling patterns the epithelial cell fates in early egg chambers but later renders motility to clustered border cells. How Jak/Stat signal spatiotemporally
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Plant diversity reduces satellite-observed phenological variability in wetlands at a national scale
Abstract Plant diversity may enhance stability of ecosystem function and its satellite-derived indicators. However, its potential to stabilize phenology, or seasonal changes in plant function, is little understood, especially in understudied systems with high biodiversity potential such as wetlands. Using a large sample of U.S. wetlands and a new satellite-based indicator of phenological stabilit
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Noodle-Like Object on Mars Has Disappeared, According to NASA Photos
String Theory An object that looks like a bundle of string, or possibly a noodle , that showed up in images taken by NASA's Mars Perseverance Rover earlier this month has suddenly disappeared, CNN reports . The object can clearly be seen in July 12 images taken by the rover's Right Hazard Avoidance Camera (Hazcam). Just four days later , the object was gone. To be clear, the object is likely Eart
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Giant Snails Invading Florida Carrying Dangerous Parasite, Scientists Say
It was only a matter of time before scientists found rat lungworm, a potentially deadly parasite, among the thousands of giant snails invading Pasco County, Florida . Authorities have found and killed around 2,000 of the Giant African Land Snails, or GALS, since they were found in June. Florida Department of Agriculture nematologist Jason Stanley warned local news station WFLA about the parasite
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The Novel That Captures New York City Right Now
Colson Whitehead once wrote that all it took to belong in New York City was an act of remembrance—the summoning of a piece of the city that no longer existed. "You are a New Yorker the first time you say, 'That used to be Munsey's' or 'That used to be the Tic Toc Lounge,'" he wrote. "You are a New Yorker when what was there before is more real and solid than what is here now." Whitehead wrote thi
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This Week in Space: SOFIA Takes One on the Nose
Good afternoon, folks, and happy Friday! Holy heat wave. We're not the only ones experiencing these torrid temperatures; another "canyon of fire" has opened up on the sun. Its associated solar flare let go when it was pointed directly at the Earth. In fact, much of this week's space news is actually about Earthly developments. This may be because so many of NASA's spacecraft are either in hiberna
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The right amount of sleep sets kids up best for kindergarten
Consistently sleeping for at least 10 hours a night helps kids adjust during the transition to kindergarten, a new study shows. In addition to an easier adjustment to kindergarten, children who sleep at least 10 hours during the night on a regular basis demonstrate more success in emotional development, learning engagement, and academic performance across the kindergarten year. The researchers ma
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New pit viper discovered in Jiuzhaigou National Nature Reserve, China
Jiuzhaigou National Nature Reserve, a World Heritage Site, lies in the transition zone from the eastern edge of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau to the Sichuan Basin in Sichuan Province, China, and occupies an area of 651 km2. The reserve is covered with well-preserved original forests, and numerous alpine lakes. Beautiful and picturesque, it is home to some rare animals, such as the Giant Panda (Ailurop
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Genetic defect leads to motor disorders in flies
In their study, the research groups looked at a protein called Creld. A study from Bonn had recently been able to demonstrate that Creld plays an important role in the development of the heart in mammals. "We wanted to find out exactly what the protein does," explains Dr. Margret Helene Bülow, a lecturer at the LIMES Institute of the University of Bonn.
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Is going meat-free the answer to climate change?
When it comes to climate change, are cows as bad as cars? Probably not, says Dr. Frank Mitloehner, University of California, Davis researcher and air quality specialist. He asserts that meat and dairy animals are not major drivers of climate change and they might well be part of the solution.
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New pit viper discovered in Jiuzhaigou National Nature Reserve, China
Jiuzhaigou National Nature Reserve, a World Heritage Site, lies in the transition zone from the eastern edge of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau to the Sichuan Basin in Sichuan Province, China, and occupies an area of 651 km2. The reserve is covered with well-preserved original forests, and numerous alpine lakes. Beautiful and picturesque, it is home to some rare animals, such as the Giant Panda (Ailurop
4h
Review: Masterbuilt Gravity Series 800 is a Force of Nature
I wonder if that genius Isaac Newton knew that in the future people would be doing cool stuff with gravity. After all, when he discovered it back in the late 17th century, the only thing it did was make apples fall out of trees. Boring. Lame. Apples? No thanks. Gravity has come a long way since then, and we can now harness it to make a fantastic plate of tacos thanks to the folks at Masterbuilt.
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Healthy sleep habits before kindergarten help children adjust to school
The transition to kindergarten is a notable milestone for children and families, who typically prepare by gathering school supplies and meeting the teacher. New research suggests that one important way to prepare for the transition to first-time schooling is to develop a bedtime routine in which children consistently get at least 10 hours of sleep at night, which will help them adjust during the t
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Scientists develop novel electrochemical/fluorescent dual-mode biosensor
Researchers at the Suzhou Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Technology (SIBET) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have recently proposed a hand-in-hand structured DNA assembly strategy and developed an electrochemical/fluorescent dual-mode biosensor for circulating tumor DNA based on methylene blue and red-emissive carbon nanodots.
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Gender pay gap linked to unpaid chores in childhood
Young women and girls' time spent in unpaid household work contributes to the gender pay gap, according to new research. The research shows women's later employment participation is affected by taking on the weight of this care burden in childhood, thus adding to existing inequality gaps in the study countries.
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The best semiconductor of them all?
A material known as cubic boron arsenide has two major advantages over silicon, research shows. It provides high mobility to both electrons and holes, and it has excellent thermal conductivity. It is, the researchers say, the best semiconductor material ever found.
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Porous crystals bind fluorine-containing greenhouse gases
Emissions of greenhouse gases contribute significantly to global warming. Not only carbon dioxide (CO2) but also fluorine-containing gases—including so-called per- or polyfluorinated hydrocarbons, or PFCs—have a significant share in this development. Researchers at the Institute of Organic Chemistry of Heidelberg University led by Prof. Dr. Michael Mastalerz recently developed new crystalline mate
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Weight-loss surgery may double chance of marriage (or divorce)
Single adults in the US who get weight-loss surgery are more than twice as likely to get married within five years, when compared to the general population. Likewise, adults who are married and get bariatric surgery are more than twice as likely to get divorced, according to a new analysis. The study is the first to characterize marital outcomes among US adults who underwent bariatric surgery, gi
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A new understanding of human history and the roots of inequality | David Wengrow
What if the commonly accepted narratives about the foundation of civilization are all wrong? Drawing on groundbreaking research, archaeologist David Wengrow challenges traditional thinking about the social evolution of humanity — from the invention of agriculture to the formation of cities and class systems — and explains how rethinking history can radically change our perspective on inequality
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Light polarization creates art, explains mathematical concepts
The polarization of light underpins a variety of recent technological innovations, including 3D cinema and LCDs. In LCDs, tiny electronically controllable liquid crystal elements are sandwiched between polarizers. If, instead, other transparent polarization-altering films—like cellophane gift wrap and packaging tape—are placed between a set of polarizers, an array of polarization-filtered colors c
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International study identifies risks for long COVID in children
Nearly six percent of children who presented to the emergency department (ED) with COVID-19 reported symptoms of long COVID 90-days later, according to a study conducted in eight countries. Initial hospitalization of 48 or more hours, four or more symptoms at the initial ED visit, and age 14 years or older were associated with long COVID.
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Coinbase Manager Arrested as He Tries to Flee the Country
A Coinbase manager, who has since been let go from the cryptocurrency exchange for insider trading, has been arrested while attempting to flee the country, Bloomberg reports . Following a joint probe, the Southern District of New York and the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) are accusing former manager Ishan Wahi of leaking information to give his brother and friend early access to crypto
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CERN Scientists Annoyed That People Think They're Ripping a Hole in Reality
Please Stop CERN recently fired up its Large Hadron Collider for the first time in three years, discovering fascinating new particles in the process. At the same time, many conspiracy theorists have glommed onto the project, dubiously alleging that CERN's device is somehow altering or damaging the very fabric of reality. The many conspiracies around the particle collider have been, uh, interestin
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Mummy of the Mysterious Lady may have had nose or throat cancer
A team of researchers with the Warsaw Mummy Project, has announced on their webpage that a mummy in their collection that has come to be known as the Mysterious Lady may have had nasopharyngeal cancer. The mummy, which made headlines last year when researchers discovered she had been pregnant at the time of her death, was found in Thebes (now called Luxor) in Egypt sometime in the early part of th
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Dreaming up new proteins, AI churns out possible medicines and vaccines
Computational biologist Jue Wang was already striving to develop an artificial intelligence (AI) to churn out candidate medicines when he had to rush his 2-year-old son to the hospital with a potentially lethal respiratory infection. After seeing his son quickly recover from respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), Wang, a postdoctoral assistant at the University of Washington (UW), Seattle, and his co
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How the digital backpacker can positively impact tourism
In many ways, the travel industry has tended to focus on business travelers and richer tourists, ignoring travelers such as backpackers who tend to travel on a tight budget and have little to spend on their journey. However, there is a subset of backpackers, informed and educated and highly active on social media that the industry would do well to find ways of engaging with. These digital backpack
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Study aims to help Kentucky growers improve transplant quality of vegetables
Producing vegetable transplants—small starter plants for growers to begin gardens with—is a "budding" industry in Kentucky. Lark Wuetcher, senior horticulture major in the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, is helping Kentuckians address potential industry issues by studying the optimal lighting conditions needed to keep transplants in the Bluegrass healthy and hi
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Balancing act: Can precariously perched boulders signal long-term earthquake risk?
The trouble with big earthquakes is that their subterranean root systems can lurk for centuries or millennia before building enough energy to explode. Among many places, this is true of the New York City area, where scientists believe big quakes are possible—but probably so rare, it is hard to say exactly how often they come, or how big they could be.
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Why We Hate Rising Prices More Than We Fear Losing Our Jobs
If you listen to Americans right now, you'll be forgiven for thinking that when it comes to the economy, Joe Biden is the worst American president since Herbert Hoover. Every new poll seems worse than the last, and according to the polling-analysis site FiveThirtyEight , Biden has the lowest approval rating at this point in his presidency of any postwar president. Fewer than one in seven American
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America Is Running Out of 'COVID Virgins'
I am on a mission to preserve the most valuable item in my home: my fiancé, who has never had COVID. Through sheer luck and a healthy dose of terror, he made it through the first pandemic year without getting sick. Shielded by the J&J vaccine and a Moderna booster, he dodged infection when I fell ill last November and coughed up the coronavirus all over our cramped New York City apartment. Someho
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The Webb Space Telescope Is a Time Machine
The newly discovered galaxy looks a little bit like a squashed tomato, or maybe the crown of a cherry-flavored Ring Pop. Just a red blob, so blurry and edgeless that the first time I looked, I had to make sure I'd put my contact lenses in. I say these things because without invoking little earthly associations, I'm not sure how we'd even begin to fathom what this cosmic object is: not just a gala
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Through a GLASS Darkly: JWST Finds Oldest Galaxy in the Visible Universe
Image: Naidu et al, P. Oesch, T. Treu, GLASS-JWST, NASA/CSA/ESA/STScI Space telescopes offer the power to look deep into the night sky, and with it, the power to look back in time. In fact, looking back into the early Universe is one of the James Webb space telescope's primary mission objectives. Now, a new analysis of deep-field images from Webb reveals what may be the oldest galaxy in the visib
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Study aims to help Kentucky growers improve transplant quality of vegetables
Producing vegetable transplants—small starter plants for growers to begin gardens with—is a "budding" industry in Kentucky. Lark Wuetcher, senior horticulture major in the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, is helping Kentuckians address potential industry issues by studying the optimal lighting conditions needed to keep transplants in the Bluegrass healthy and hi
6h
Best ASMR Microphones of 2022
Contrary to what you might think, ASMR microphones aren't a special type of mic designed to record sounds that can trigger an Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response and possibly provide therapeutic benefits such as a lowered heart rate. Recording ASMR professionally is all about capturing the type of sound you want without unwanted background or microphone noise affecting the finished product. Choo
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Longer commutes affect the cost of living in large cities more than zoning restrictions
Conventional wisdom in recent years has placed much of the blame for the rising cost of living in American cities on overly strict zoning policies. But a research team featuring economists and alumni from the George Washington University Columbian College of Arts and Sciences (CCAS) discovered that higher transportation costs have a greater impact on the cost of living than zoning restrictions.
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New insights on pest fruit fly species across oceanic islands
Species that are dispersed across oceanic islands can have strong population structures due to genetic isolation. As an example, the mango fruit fly, Bactrocera frauenfeldi, is currently considered to be one of several similar members in a species group, including three major pests, distributed across Southeast Asia, Australasia, and Oceania. In a study published in Systematic Entomology, research
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New insights on pest fruit fly species across oceanic islands
Species that are dispersed across oceanic islands can have strong population structures due to genetic isolation. As an example, the mango fruit fly, Bactrocera frauenfeldi, is currently considered to be one of several similar members in a species group, including three major pests, distributed across Southeast Asia, Australasia, and Oceania. In a study published in Systematic Entomology, research
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Is there wealth stability across generations in the US?
A study published in Contemporary Economic Policy that analyzed U.S. data found that a substantial portion of grandparents with the lowest proportions of wealth in 1984–1989 are likely to have grandchildren who end up in the lowest wealth stratum in 2015–2017. Likewise, grandparents in the highest proportions of wealth are likely to have grandchildren in the highest wealth stratum.
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Key material development for fusion energy application
In a review paper recently published in the Journal of Nuclear Materials, Prof. Haug Qunying from the Hefei Institutes of Physical Science (HFIPS) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, together with collaborators, has introduced the latest development and strategy on fusion energy in China and reviewed the progresses of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel for engineering application
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New strategy for iron fortification in rice
Iron (Fe) deficiency has become one of the factors limiting plant quality and productivity around the world. IMA (IRONMAN), a family of small peptides, has been recently reported to play a positive role in the Fe deficiency response in Arabidopsis and rice (Oryza sativa). Two OsIMA genes were identified in rice. However, it was still unclear how OsIMA1 and OsIMA2 activate the Fe deficiency respons
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The James Webb Space Telescope Stores Its Data on a 68GB SSD
The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) may have had its problems on the ground, but it all paid off. The new space telescope is performing perfectly, and NASA just released the first images captured with the main mirror . With so much more power than Hubble, designers had to give the telescope a good-sized chunk of storage. However, it turns out Webb has just 68GB of solid-state storage, which is
6h
New strategy for iron fortification in rice
Iron (Fe) deficiency has become one of the factors limiting plant quality and productivity around the world. IMA (IRONMAN), a family of small peptides, has been recently reported to play a positive role in the Fe deficiency response in Arabidopsis and rice (Oryza sativa). Two OsIMA genes were identified in rice. However, it was still unclear how OsIMA1 and OsIMA2 activate the Fe deficiency respons
6h
Scientists expand entomological research using genome editing
Genome sequencing, where scientists use laboratory methods to determine a specific organism's genetic makeup, is becoming a common practice in insect research. A greater understanding of insect biology helps scientists better manage insects, both those that are beneficial to the ecosystem and those that damage the food supply and threaten human health by carrying diseases.
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Scientists expand entomological research using genome editing
Genome sequencing, where scientists use laboratory methods to determine a specific organism's genetic makeup, is becoming a common practice in insect research. A greater understanding of insect biology helps scientists better manage insects, both those that are beneficial to the ecosystem and those that damage the food supply and threaten human health by carrying diseases.
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A more concise way to synthesize tetrodotoxin
A small international team of researchers has developed a way to synthesize tetrodotoxin (TTX) using far fewer steps than prior methods. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their process and the steps they took to improve its efficiency.
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EarthCARE satellite's solar wing expanded for testing
ESA's upcoming EarthCARE satellite mission has just taken a big stretch. Engineers have gently unfolded this new satellite's huge five-panel solar wing to test that it will deploy correctly once it is in space. The solar wing is a critical part of the satellite, providing the energy for EarthCARE to do its job: to quantify the role that clouds and aerosols play in heating and cooling Earth's atmos
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Researchers determine the complex structure of the receptors related to opioid addiction
A study published in Pharmacological Research reveals the oligomeric molecular structure of the MOR-Gal1R complex, a component present in the brain which is involved in the analgesic and addictive effects of certain opioids. The study includes the participation of the experts Vicent Casadó, Estefanía Moreno and Verònica Casadó-Anguera, from the Molecular Neuropharmacology Research Group of the Fac
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Delaware Farmers Use Underwear to Check Soil Health
(Photo: Jed Owen/Unsplash) If you happen to catch a farmer tucking a pair of briefs into the soil, relax: they aren't trying to plant an underwear tree. They're actually testing the soil for beneficial microbes, which are key to keeping a steady supply of healthy crops. Farmers in Delaware have begun using cotton underwear to see just how healthy the soil is at Bethel's and Georgetown's agricultu
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Why do the minority who haven't had Covid account for most new infections?
About 15% of people in England have somehow never had Covid, yet 55% of new cases are from this group Having somehow dodged Covid since the pandemic kicked off, the proportion of people who have never seen the red line appear on a rapid test are a steadily shrinking minority. On Thursday, the White House announced that the US president, Joe Biden, had tested positive for Covid , becoming the most
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Kardashian Slammed for 17-Minute Private Jet Flight to Beat Traffic
Kylie Air Look, we won't not say that Los Angeles traffic is the stuff of the devil. Still, no matter how terrible it gets, it's pretty difficult to justify opting for a 17-minute trip on a private jet over sucking it up for a 45-minute drive. Kylie Jenner, " self-made " billionaire of Kylie Cosmetics and general Kardashian clan fame, has come under fire for doing exactly that. Last week, Jenner
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Researchers determine the complex structure of the receptors related to opioid addiction
A study published in Pharmacological Research reveals the oligomeric molecular structure of the MOR-Gal1R complex, a component present in the brain which is involved in the analgesic and addictive effects of certain opioids. The study includes the participation of the experts Vicent Casadó, Estefanía Moreno and Verònica Casadó-Anguera, from the Molecular Neuropharmacology Research Group of the Fac
7h
New findings may reduce the risk of infection for patients with urinary catheters
Patients who have indwelling urinary catheters often suffer from urinary tract infections, which can be difficult to treat. Now, researchers at Karolinska Institutet have discovered that the synthetic peptide CD4-PP has a good bactericidal effect against urinary tract bacteria, even those resistant to antibiotics. The study, published in the journal Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences, offers new
7h
AI could prevent thousands of sepsis deaths yearly
Patients are 20% less likely to die of sepsis because a new AI system catches symptoms hours earlier than traditional methods, new research shows. The system scours medical records and clinical notes to identify patients at risk of life-threatening complications. The work, which could significantly cut patient mortality from one of the top causes of hospital deaths worldwide, is published in Natu
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Rocket launches can create night-shining clouds away from the poles, NASA's AIM mission reveals
Near Earth's north and south poles, wispy, iridescent clouds often shimmer high in the summertime sky around dusk and dawn. These night-shining, or noctilucent, clouds are sometimes spotted farther from the poles as well, at a rate that varies dramatically from year to year. According to a new study using NASA's Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) satellite, which is managed by the Explorers P
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WMO has no immediate plans to name heatwaves
The top priority of the World Meteorological Organization and its Members is to save lives through accurate forecasts and early warnings. A very successful example of this, in recent years, is improvements in Heat-Health Early Warnings and Heat Action plans, underpinned by strong collaborations between the meteorological, health, disasters management, and scientific communities.
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New findings may reduce the risk of infection for patients with urinary catheters
Patients who have indwelling urinary catheters often suffer from urinary tract infections, which can be difficult to treat. Now, researchers at Karolinska Institutet have discovered that the synthetic peptide CD4-PP has a good bactericidal effect against urinary tract bacteria, even those resistant to antibiotics. The study, published in the journal Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences, offers new
7h
The observation of Chern mosaic and Berry-curvature magnetism in magic angle graphene
Researchers at the Weizmann Institute of Science, the Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology and the National Institute for Material Science in Tsukuba (Japan) have recently probed a Chern mosaic topology and Berry-curvature magnetism in magic-angle graphene. Their paper, published in Nature Physics, offers new insight about topological disorder that can occur in condensed matter physical s
7h
How ballistic trap-jaw ants prevent self-destruction with a perfect mandible arc
Most ants dexterously grasp and snip their food with a pair of chopstick-like mandibles. But trap-jaw ants are also capable of crashing their jaws together at blisteringly fast speeds, striking victims in 0.77 μs. Yet, unleashing such ballistic blows poses a risk. Animals that harness stored elastic energy like a catapult to hurl limbs at great speed—think leaping grasshoppers—are also in danger o
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Sunrise III found safe at landing site
Following the termination of the flight of the balloon-borne solar observatory Sunrise III on July 10, team members have reached the landing site and found the observatory's science payload largely intact. According to current information, the flight had to be ended a few hours after launch because the solar telescope it was carrying, the centerpiece of Sunrise III, could not be pointed at the sun
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'Quantum flute' gets light particles to move in strange ways
Physicists have invented a "quantum flute" that, like the Pied Piper, can coerce particles of light to move together in a way that's never been seen before. Described in two studies published in Physical Review Letters and Nature Physics , the breakthrough could point the way towards realizing quantum memories or new forms of error correction in quantum computers, and observing quantum phenomena
7h
How ballistic trap-jaw ants prevent self-destruction with a perfect mandible arc
Most ants dexterously grasp and snip their food with a pair of chopstick-like mandibles. But trap-jaw ants are also capable of crashing their jaws together at blisteringly fast speeds, striking victims in 0.77 μs. Yet, unleashing such ballistic blows poses a risk. Animals that harness stored elastic energy like a catapult to hurl limbs at great speed—think leaping grasshoppers—are also in danger o
7h
Supermassive black hole influences star formation
A European team of astronomers led by Professor Kalliopi Dasyra of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece, under participation of Dr. Thomas Bisbas, University of Cologne modeled several emission lines in Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) and Very Large Telescope (VLT) observations to measure the gas pressure in both jet-impacted clouds and ambient clouds. With these unprec
7h
Jackass Star Poopies Bit in the Hand by a Reef Shark! | Shark Week
Stream Jackass Shark Week on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/jackass-shark-week-us #discovery #sharkweek #shark About Jackass Shark Week: Johnny Knoxville sends Steve-O, Chris Pontius and new Jackass cast members on a Shark Week mission for the ages. They'll dial up a series of shark stunts that test their bravery and threshold of pain as they put common shark myths to the test. S
7h
Astronomer suggests it is time to look for near-Earth asteroids in the direction of the sun
Scott Sheppard, an astronomer with the Institute of Astronomy at the University of Hawaii, has published a Perspective piece in the journal Science suggesting that it is time for the space science community to take a closer look at near-Earth objects (NEOs) that lie in the direction of the sun. In his paper, he notes that the technology now exists to look for and find such NEOs, at least during th
8h
Authors Are Starting to Use AI to Quickly Churn Out Novels
Good Yarn It's hard to imagine a single author churning out a full-length novel every nine weeks, but that's exactly what writer Jennifer Lepp told the Verge she does constantly. To keep up with demand and make a decent living, indie novelists are cranking out books more quickly than ever before. Lepp, whose pen name is Leanne Leeds, told the pub that she's even started using an artificial intell
8h
Measuring the universe with star-shattering explosions
An international team of 23 researchers led by Maria Dainotti, Assistant Professor at the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ), has analyzed archive data for powerful cosmic explosions from the deaths of stars and found a new way to measure distances in the distant universe.
8h
What a Warming Planet Means for Literature
This week, temperatures of 40 degrees Celsius (about 104 degrees Fahrenheit) were recorded in the United Kingdom for the first time in history. Across the ocean, more than 100 million Americans were under a heat warning. In May, a brutal heat wave swept across India and Pakistan. The planet is getting hotter and the weather more unpredictable, and events like this are becoming more frequent and m
8h
The Risk and Opportunity of Online Fertility Groups
When I was first trying to get pregnant, I stumbled upon all kinds of online forums full of people in the interminable two-week waiting period—the time between the day you try to conceive and the day you should take a pregnancy test (according to some guidelines). Here, on the internet, were millions of others wondering the same things I was, attempting to identify any signs they could be pregnan
8h
The World's Biggest Vertical Farm Just Opened in Dubai
As the climate in many parts of the world gets hotter and drier, it's becoming increasingly crucial to find innovative ways to grow food. Vertical farming is one solution that's being widely adopted, with farms springing up everywhere from the Netherlands to Pennsylvania to Singapore , and big retailers like Walmart jumping on the bandwagon too. The United Arab Emirates—one of the hottest, driest
8h
Nonthermal plasma-promoted CO2 hydrogenation in presence of alloy catalysts
Nonthermal plasma (NTP) is used to activate CO2 molecules for hydrogenation into alternative fuels at low temperatures, also enabling the conversion of renewable electricity to chemical energy. Researchers from Tokyo Tech combined experimental and computational methods to investigate the hydrogenation pathway of NTP-promoted CO2 on the surface of Pd2Ga/SiO2 catalysts. The mechanistic insights from
8h
Human activities increase likelihood of more extreme heatwaves, researchers find
July 19 was the hottest day ever recorded in the United Kingdom, with temperatures surpassing 40 degrees Celsius (about 104 degrees Fahrenheit). The heatwave serves as an early preview of what climate forecasters theorized will be typical summer weather in the U.K. in 2050. The heat continues across Europe today, as well as in the United States, where more than a third of the country is under heat
8h
Tiny bat bodies evolved for a perfect heat-flight balance
New research sheds light on a long-standing debate over bats' body sizes. The researchers focused on why bats are seemingly non-conforming to ecogeographical patterns found in other mammals. Many mammal species living in cold climates tend to have large bodies and short limbs to reduce heat loss—a general pattern known as Bergmann's rule The new findings offer a method for investigating complex m
8h
Presenting 'Cascade at the Bat': A Bad Intel CPU Poem
I wrote this poem — "poem" — around the time Intel launched Cascade Lake back in 2019. I held off publishing back then because I didn't want to leave people thinking we'd reviewed a CPU in truly bad poetry instead of my typical second-rate prose. I also didn't want it to come off as mean-spirited. I set it aside and forgot I wrote it, only to rediscover it again this week. "Cascade at the Bat" is
8h
Natural food more mouth-watering to children than processed fare
Children are more likely to prefer foods they believe to be natural to lab-grown options, rating them higher for tastiness, safety and desirability, a study shows. Researchers say the tendency in adults to prefer natural food is well documented. However, the latest findings found this food preference exists in early and middle childhood as well.
8h
Torrey pine genetic research may benefit efforts to save chestnut, ash trees
A new genomic study of the rarest pine tree in the world, the Torrey pine, aimed at bolstering the case for a genetic rescue of the species barely surviving in the western U.S., revealed the complexity and risk associated with the endeavor. However, a tree geneticist at Penn State who oversaw the research suggests it may benefit efforts she is involved in to save other species in the East.
8h
Torrey pine genetic research may benefit efforts to save chestnut, ash trees
A new genomic study of the rarest pine tree in the world, the Torrey pine, aimed at bolstering the case for a genetic rescue of the species barely surviving in the western U.S., revealed the complexity and risk associated with the endeavor. However, a tree geneticist at Penn State who oversaw the research suggests it may benefit efforts she is involved in to save other species in the East.
9h
Temperature fluctuation control with a switchable spin-crossover material
Alleviating the heat-island effect through thermal regulation mechanisms in building elements can improve human thermal comfort and the living environment in urban areas. Passive thermal regulation systems incorporated with roofs, windows or walls, and operating without the need for electricity, are an energy-efficient and environmentally sustainable solution.
9h
Engineering team develops process to make implants safer
An interdisciplinary team of researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham have developed a new plasma-enabled process that could limit the proliferation of toxins from implants into a patient's bloodstream. The team, led by Vinoy Thomas, Ph.D., associate professor in the UAB School of Engineering's Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, recently published findings in the ACS
9h
Physicists find signatures of highly entangled quantum matter
Via large-scale simulations on supercomputers, a research team from the Department of Physics, the University of Hong Kong (HKU), discovered clear evidence to characterize a highly entangled quantum matter phase—the quantum spin liquid (QSL), a phase of matter that remains disordered even at very low temperatures. This research has recently been published in npj Quantum Materials.
9h
Moths use ultrasound to defend against bats
While a clear night sky might seem quiet and peaceful to us, empty of everything but stars, this nocturnal world is filled with a high-pitched cacophony of sound just beyond our ability to hear. Bats pierce the shadows with ultrasonic pulses that enable them to construct an auditory map of their surroundings, which is bad news for moths, one of their favorite foods.
9h
Scientists identify 'bottleneck' in drug delivery pathways in stem cells
Our bodies have evolved formidable barriers to protect themselves against foreign substances—from our skin, to our cells and every component within the cells, each part of our bodies has protective layers. These defenses, while essential, pose a significant challenge for pharmaceutical drugs and therapies, such as vaccines, that have to bypass multiple barriers to reach their targets.
9h
New method to map the surface of the moon increases accuracy to unprecedented levels
Topography: The surface of the moon and rocky planets, Mars in particular, are of huge interest to anyone trying to explore our solar system. The surface must be known in as much detail as possible, for missions to land safely, or for any robotic vessel to drive across the surface. But until now, the methods to analyze images from e.g. orbiting spacecraft have entailed a huge work load and immense
9h
Why some flu viruses cause more severe infections
Research uses computational modeling to try to understand the body's immune response to avian flu. His latest work finds that the levels of interferon may be responsible for its more severe presentation — and may also be the key to treating it.
9h
Moths use ultrasound to defend against bats
While a clear night sky might seem quiet and peaceful to us, empty of everything but stars, this nocturnal world is filled with a high-pitched cacophony of sound just beyond our ability to hear. Bats pierce the shadows with ultrasonic pulses that enable them to construct an auditory map of their surroundings, which is bad news for moths, one of their favorite foods.
9h
A critical role of the mechanosensor PIEZO1 in glucose-induced insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31103-y Insulin secretion depends on action potential firing in pancreatic islet beta-cells, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here, the authors show that activation of the mechanosensor ion channel PIEZO1 plays a central role in beta-cell electrical activity and insulin release.
9h
Not only are bird species going extinct, but they might also lose the features that make each species unique
Climate change is causing a mass extinction the likes of which has not been seen in recorded history. For birds, this biodiversity loss has implications beyond just species loss. Researchers use statistical modelling to predict that extinction will decrease morphological diversity among remaining birds at a rate greater than species loss alone. The team's results reveal which birds we are at risk
9h
Overconfidence and Opposition to Scientific Consensus
There has been a lot of research exploring the phenomenon of rejection of established science, even to the point of people believing demonstrably absurd things. This is a complex phenomenon, involving conspiracy thinking, scientific illiteracy, group identity, polarization, cognitive styles, and media ecosystems, but the research has made significant progress unpacking these various contributing
10h
The Download: dodging China's porn ban, and a crypto fraud first
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. Chinese gamers are using a Steam wallpaper app to get porn past the censors If you have been on Steam, the world's largest PC gaming platform, you might have noticed an anomaly on the chart of the top 20 most popular apps: Wallpaper Engine. The software lets y
10h
Papers in Croce case with "blatantly obvious" problems still aren't retracted after misconduct investigation: sleuth
This week, Nature reported on two institutional reports that found scientists in Carlo Croce's cancer research lab at The Ohio State University had committed research misconduct including plagiarism and data falsification. Another institutional investigation directed at Croce did not find he committed research misconduct but did identify problems with how he managed his lab, according … Continue r
10h
The Myth That America's Abortion Laws Are More Permissive Than Europe's
Stripping millions of American women of their constitutional right to decide whether to bear a child has potentially serious consequences for the political party that made it happen. Hoping to blunt the possible repercussions, Republicans have been arguing that the Mississippi abortion ban at the center of the Supreme Court case that overturned Roe v. Wade is a moderate law, in line with global s
11h
Imaging topological and correlated insulating states in twisted monolayer-bilayer graphene
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31851-x Twisted van der Waals structures represent a versatile platform to investigate topological and correlated electronic states. Here, the authors report the visualization of an electron crystal phase in twisted monolayer-bilayer graphene via scanning tunnelling microscopy, studying the coupling between strong elect
11h
Myasthenia gravis-specific aberrant neuromuscular gene expression by medullary thymic epithelial cells in thymoma
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31951-8 Myasthenia Gravis and thymoma are frequently associated with patients suffering from both diseases. Here the authors perform single cell sequencing of thymoma and find that there are autoimmune antigens such as neuromuscular proteins expressed aberrantly in neuromuscular mTECs in patients with both diseases.
11h
Construction of the axolotl cell landscape using combinatorial hybridization sequencing at single-cell resolution
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31879-z The Mexican axolotl is a well-established tetrapod model for regeneration and development. Here the authors report a scRNA-seq method to profile neotenic, metamorphic and limb development stages, highlighting unique perturbation patterns of cell type-related gene expression throughout metamorphosis.
11h
Nanoscale regulation of Ca2+ dependent phase transitions and real-time dynamics of SAP97/hDLG
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31912-1 SAP97/hDLG is a ubiquitous, alternatively spliced, and conserved modular scaffolding protein involved in the organization cell junctions and excitatory synapses. Here, authors confirm that SAP97/hDLG condenses in to nanosized molecular domains in both heterologous cells and hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Authors
11h
A temperature-regulated circuit for feeding behavior
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31917-w Feeding behavior is modulated by ambient temperature, as lower temperatures increase the necessity for energy intake and vice versa. Here the authors identify neuronal pathways that control feeding in a temperature-dependent manner.
11h
COMIC: How living on Mars time taught me to slow down
NASA engineer Nagin Cox lives on Earth but works on Mars time, where days are longer and time works differently. Her work with the rovers has entirely changed the way she thinks about time on Earth. (Image credit: Anuj Shrestha for NPR)
13h
Highly selective single and multiple deuteration of unactivated C(sp3)-H bonds
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31956-3 Deuteration of unactivated C(sp3)̵̵̵̵̵̵̵̵–H bonds is a simple route to deuterated compounds, of use in pharmaceutical chemistry, material science, and synthetic chemistry. Here, the authors describe a hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange of remote unactivated C(sp3)̵̵̵̵̵̵̵̵–H bonds via photocatalysis, proceeding th
13h
Georgia spaceport land deal is off, site owner says
The owner of a large industrial site on the Georgia coast said Thursday that it has ended a longstanding agreement to sell the property to a county government whose officials worked for years on a plan to build a launch pad for commercial rockets there.
14h
Book Review: Helping Water Find Its Own Level
In "Water Always Wins," Erica Gies demonstrates how "water detectives" are seeking to slow and reshape the movement of a vital resource, from Peru to San Francisco, to help mitigate the ravages of climate change while providing a host of other environmental benefits.
14h
Taking the Temperature: a dispatch from the UK
Well, it has happened. Forty degrees Celsius. It was bound to happen eventually, given the lack of determined action to halt our rising temperatures worldwide. Those who insisted such a temperature was impossible here in the UK have been left with egg on their faces. It was not a case of if, but when. The synoptic pattern, high pressure to our east and a cut-off low to our far south-west (and app
16h
Schneider Shorts 22.07.2022 – Cancel Culture
Schneider Shorts 22.07.2022 – Racist's talk cancelled in Vienna, Polish plant scientist sees career cancelled, grand old cancer fraudster sacrifices two lambs, Spiderman to focus on fiction full-time, with aspiring Greek cheaters, sexy sockpuppets, Ayurveda for diabetes, proof that birds aren't real and US Congress celebrating the real papermill heroes.
17h
Photos of the Week: Swan Upping, Worm Charming, Living Bridge
A bird market in Afghanistan, wildfires in several European countries, river surfing in Germany, record-setting heat in England, heavy snow in Argentina, a huge water fight in Spain, an abandoned theme park in Turkey, scenes from the World Athletics Championships in Oregon, and much more
17h
The Inescapable Conclusion From the January 6 Hearings
A mericans aren't the most attentive political observers. But thanks in part to Hollywood, they have a pretty clear vision of what they expect their president to do in an unfolding crisis, especially an attack on U.S. citizens at home or abroad. He ( or she , in the movies at least) will march down to the Situation Room , confer with advisers, and at some point address the nation in a sober telev
17h
'Weird, wonderful': rare dig at Arthur's Stone writes new story of neolithic site
Visitors flock to Herefordshire burial plot that inspired CS Lewis amid excitement at what is being found High above one of western Britain's loveliest valleys, the silence is broken by the sound of gentle digging, scraping and brushing, along with bursts of excited chatter as another ancient feature is revealed or a curious visitor stops by to find out what is going on. This summer archaeologist
17h
Bananas and salmon help counter effect of salt in women's diet, study finds
Research links potassium-rich foods to lower blood pressure – particularly in women with high salt intake Eating foods such as bananas, avocados and salmon could help reduce the negative effects of salt in women's diet, research suggests. The study found that potassium-rich diets were associated with lower blood pressure, particularly in women with high salt intake. Continue reading…
18h
Cancer cells make unique form of collagen, protecting them from immune response
Cancer cells produce small amounts of their own form of collagen, creating a unique extracellular matrix that affects the tumor microbiome and protects against immune responses. This abnormal collagen structure is fundamentally different from normal collagen made in the human body, providing a highly specific target for therapeutic strategies.
20h
The Opening for Democrats on Abortion
This is an edition of The Atlantic Daily, a newsletter that guides you through the biggest stories of the day, helps you discover new ideas, and recommends the best in culture. Sign up for it here . House Democrats are rolling out a new strategy to protect civil rights post- Roe. Senate Democrats should get on board. But first, here are three new stories from The Atlantic . Of course Biden has CO
22h
Biden to tap prominent Harvard cancer surgeon to head National Cancer Institute
President Joe Biden is expected to pick cancer surgeon Monica Bertagnolli as the next director of the National Cancer Institute (NCI). Bertagnolli, a physician-scientist at Brigham and Women's Hospital, the Dana-Farber Cancer Center, and Harvard Medical School, specializes in gastrointestinal cancers and is well known for her expertise in clinical trials. She will replace Ned Sharpless, who stepp
23h
Study details U.S. health spending by region
A new study provides the first nationwide, small-area analysis of the variation in spending by the three main funders of health care in the United States: Medicare, Medicaid, and private insurers. The researchers' goal: to see whether there are regions that have low health spending by each of the three payers simultaneously or whether distinct factors drive health spending variation among the paye
23h
Mars Satellite Captures Breathtaking View of Deepest Canyon in Entire Solar System
Grander Canyon New imagery of the largest canyon in the solar system just dropped, and it's absolutely breathtaking. The European Space Agency released images taken by its Mars Express mission yesterday of the epic geological structure, known as Valles Marineris and which is 20 times wider than our own Grand Canyon, as well as ten times longer and seven times deeper. Also unlike the Grand Canyon,
23h
Robots learn household tasks by watching humans
Researchers have developed a new learning method for robots called WHIRL, short for In-the-Wild Human Imitating Robot Learning. WHIRL is an efficient algorithm for one-shot visual imitation. It can learn directly from human-interaction videos and generalize that information to new tasks, making robots well-suited to learning household chores. People constantly perform various tasks in their homes.
23h
The Secret Service Texting Scandal Makes No Sense
The United States Secret Service is reported to have permanently deleted or lost a host of data, including text messages, that relate to the January 6 insurrection . The Secret Service says that the deletions came about as part of a routine, long-planned update to its phone system and that, as part of this update, it factory-reset its agents' mobile devices, deleting all data. Skeptical observers
1d
Company Providing Carbon Offsets Accidentally Sets Large Forest Fire
Paging Billy Joel Land Life, a Dutch reforestation company that offers carbon offsets to polluting industries by planting trees, has accidentally started a massive forest fire in Spain — the second in just a month's time, Vice reports — in a genuinely staggering unintended consequence. The ironic twist underlines just how dangerous the current situation in Europe is, with at least 20 wildfires bu
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Study finds ultimate limits of spaceplates in optical systems
Engineers working to miniaturize optical systems for modern electronics have seen great success when it comes to the most familiar components, the lenses and optical sensors. It's been more challenging to reduce the size of the third component of an optical system, the free space between the lens and the sensor needed for light waves to achieve focus.
1d
China Accuses United States of Militarizing Outer Space
Warning Shot China and the US are once again at odds over their rival space programs. In the latest shot, state-affiliated news outlet China Global Television Network reported that this week Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesperson Zhao Lijian urged the US to be a little more friendly while in orbit. "The US has stolen intelligence information and engaged in close-in reconnaissance in the space doma
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Tour de France Pouring Water to Keep Roads From Melting Amid Deadly Heatwave
Bicycle Hell Despite deadly wildfires and record heat across Europe, the Tour de France is doing everything in its power to keep cyclists on the route — to the degree that its organizers have even taken to pouring water on parts of the course to make sure the roads don't melt. Jalopnik reports that Amaury Sport Organization (ASO), which manages the Tour, has allocated 10,000 liters (about 2,642 g
1d
Best Android Emulators in 2022
There's never been a better time to tap into the best Android emulators. After all, smart devices are becoming more and more powerful. Lower-end legacy systems like the NES and GBA can run on just about any inexpensive Android phone, but mid-priced and high-end phones and tablets will be able to emulate everything from the PS2 to the GameCube, and even the Wii. Throw in a good Bluetooth or Androi
1d
Tesla Drives 200,000 Miles, Only Loses Ten Percent of Battery Capacity
Built to Last Electric vehicle batteries are a hot topic — sometimes literally — but fiery opinions aside, their longevity can in some cases be impressive. Case in point, the auto enthusiasts at YouTube channel Out of Spec Reviews say they've tracked down a Tesla Model X that's clocked an impressive 200,000 miles while only losing 10 percent of its battery capacity. Not bad. Large Charge The owne
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Checking the quality of EEG signal
Hey guys, I'm trying to figure out how to check whether the signal that I get from an EEG is good. Once I've put the gel and the lights are more or less all green, what do I have to look at to understand if the signal is good or if I have to adjust a few electrods (and which electrods)? Can any of you recommend a source to learn about this? Thank you very much! submitted by /u/sovra_pensiero [lin
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Taste sensors keep proteins in order in flies
A set of genes that promote sweet taste sensation is also crucial for protein management during fly development, according to a new study. The finding expands the understanding of a key process in successful development, and suggests a connection between taste-related genes and disorders of protein aggregation.
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Sick animals struggle to problem solve and adapt to changing environments
Even common infections can come with acute or lingering cognitive symptoms; one of the best-known examples is 'COVID fog.' In a new review article, cognitive and disease ecologists discuss how infection-associated decline in learning, memory, or decision making can affect how well animals, such as birds and bees, adapt to urbanization or climate change.
1d
An anti-bacterial liaison
Macrophages play a central role in our immune response. They can trap and digest invading pathogens. However, specific bacteria such as Salmonella or Mycobacteria can survive the digestive system of macrophages and escape the control of immune cells. Research reveals how different organelle systems communicate to activate a more effective anti-bacterial defense mechanism. Successful elimination of
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Blockchain gives Indigenous Americans control over their genomic data
Despite existing tools that facilitate the sharing of genomic information with researchers, none of those options give Indigenous governments control over how these data are used. In a new article, authors propose a new blockchain model where researchers are only allowed to access the genomic data after the Indigenous entities have approved the research project.
1d
Patient deterioration predictor could surpass limits of traditional vital signs
A device driven by artificial intelligence that works to predict when a patient will deteriorate could provide a more accurate picture than traditional vital signs, a new study suggests. The technology continuously monitors patients using data from a single electrocardiogram lead, and researchers say it has the potential to save lives anywhere from the hospital to the battlefield.
1d
Silk offers an alternative to some microplastics
Researchers developed a biodegradable system based on silk to replace microplastics added to agricultural products, paints, and cosmetics. The processing method is simple and tunable, so the material could be adapted to work on existing manufacturing equipment.
1d
Team tests the effects of oxygen on uranium
A team of researchers from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the University of Michigan has found that the rate of cooling in reactions dramatically affects the type of uranium molecules that form.
1d
How 'Shark Week' could inspire love for ocean predators
Videos of shark attacks are popular—some of Discovery's "Shark Week" videos of sharks attacking cages or people have attracted millions of views online. But according to a new study from North Carolina State University, positive videos of sharks could help change people's attitudes in the predators' favor.
1d
North Atlantic temperature helps forecast extreme events in Northeast Brazil up to three months in advance
The sea surface temperature in the North Atlantic Ocean can be a predictor up to three months in advance of extreme climate events involving reduced rainfall and intense drought in the Northeast region of Brazil. This is one of the main findings of a study by researchers in Brazil, China, Australia and Germany, according to an article published in Geophysical Research Letters.
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Climate change and land-use changes increase likelihood of flood events
The German government estimates the total losses resulting from the disastrous floods in July 2021 at 32 billion euros. In two studies, one of which is currently available in Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences, researchers at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have investigated how precipitation, evaporation processes, water flow, and runoff led to this flooding. To improve future prep
1d
North 'plaza' in Cahokia was likely inundated year-round
The ancient North American city of Cahokia had as its focal point a feature now known as Monks Mound, a giant earthwork surrounded on its north, south, east and west by large rectangular open areas. A new study of the north plaza suggest it was almost always underwater, calling into question earlier interpretations of the north plaza's role in Cahokian society.
1d
At the water's edge: Self-assembling 2D materials at a liquid-liquid interface
Molecular 2D materials find immense applications in materials science, owing to their wide structural variety and easy controllability. Establishing a simple and efficient method for their synthesis is, therefore, important. Now, scientists present a simple method for synthesizing heterolayer coordination nanosheets, a promising 2D material, shedding light on how certain chemical coordination reac
1d
Of Course Biden Has COVID
And there it is: President Joe Biden has tested positive for the coronavirus , the White House announced Thursday morning, and is dosing up with Paxlovid to keep his so-far "very mild symptoms" from turning severe. In some ways, this is one of the cases the entire world has been waiting for—not sadistically , necessarily, but simply because, like so many other infections as of late, it has felt i
1d
We're Testing for Monkeypox the Wrong Way
In early July, Sebastian Kohn, a 39-year-old nonprofit professional in Brooklyn, woke up with a fever, a sore back, and swelling in the lymph nodes of his throat and groin. He took a COVID test, which was negative. But Kohn had some clue as to what might be going on. Pride celebrations had taken place a week earlier, and a newly infamous disease was circulating largely in the gay community : monk
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Are you clumsy—or just mean? Your dog may know the difference
Does your dog know what you're thinking? Cognitive biologists have shown our canine companions understand what we mean when we point at something , like a hidden snack. But are dogs really reading our minds? Or have they just lived with us so long that they've simply learned to make an association between, say, a hand and a tasty treat? "I still think there's a lot of controversy about this parti
1d
Electric nanomotor made from DNA material
A research team has succeeded for the first time in producing a molecular electric motor using the DNA origami method. The tiny machine made of genetic material self-assembles and converts electrical energy into kinetic energy. The new nanomotors can be switched on and off, and the researchers can control the rotation speed and rotational direction.
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Electric nanomotor made from DNA material
A research team has succeeded for the first time in producing a molecular electric motor using the DNA origami method. The tiny machine made of genetic material self-assembles and converts electrical energy into kinetic energy. The new nanomotors can be switched on and off, and the researchers can control the rotation speed and rotational direction.
1d
Global goals overlook freshwater conservation
As global conservation and restoration policies focus on a land and sea framework, freshwater biodiversity and services continue to decline at alarming rates (1). If freshwater ecosystems are overlooked, their sustainability could be compromised when decision-makers evaluate trade-offs with land and sea conservation and development goals. To protect freshwater biodiversity and vital services, inte
1d
China's restoration fees require transparency
China is home to 10% of the world's wetland areas, but many of those wetlands are threatened by development (1). To increase conservation efforts, China's first wetland protection law, which came into force on 1 June (2), will charge a fee to developers whose projects result in wetland area losses. The fees will pay for restoring wetlands with comparable qualities and quantities elsewhere. When th
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Research backing experimental Alzheimer's drug was first target of suspicion
When Vanderbilt University physician and neuroscientist Matthew Schrag first grew suspicious of work underlying a major theory of Alzheimer's disease (see main story, p. 358), he was following a different trail. In August 2021, he provided analysis for a petition to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), requesting that it pause two phase 3 clinical trials of Cassava Sciences's Alzheimer's drug S
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Research backing experimental Alzheimer's drug was first target of suspicion
When Vanderbilt University physician and neuroscientist Matthew Schrag first grew suspicious of work underlying a major theory of Alzheimer's disease (see main story, p. 358), he was following a different trail. In August 2021, he provided analysis for a petition to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), requesting that it pause two phase 3 clinical trials of Cassava Sciences's Alzheimer's drug S
1d
Working to discover new treatments for tuberculosis
Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, remains the leading cause of infectious disease worldwide, affecting approximately a quarter of the globe's population. Treatment of infections is problematic due to the emergence of drug-resistant strains; however, University of Oklahoma professor Helen Zgurskaya, an expert in antibiotic resistance, is leading research on new potent
1d
Working to discover new treatments for tuberculosis
Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, remains the leading cause of infectious disease worldwide, affecting approximately a quarter of the globe's population. Treatment of infections is problematic due to the emergence of drug-resistant strains; however, University of Oklahoma professor Helen Zgurskaya, an expert in antibiotic resistance, is leading research on new potent
1d
A fast, efficient COVID-19 biosensor is under development
As the BA.5 omicron variant continues to spread, health experts are increasingly preparing for a future in which such COVID-19 variants emerge, surge and recede, similar to seasonal flu. An important part of staying on top of these changes will be the ability to quickly monitor the virus at a "population scale," an effort that will require accurate and ultra-fast testing.
1d
The birds and the bees — and the temperature gauge
Animals will often put their lives on the line for reproduction, even if it comes at the cost of being the wrong temperature. Thermal biology co-adapts with the traits favored by sexual selection, including things like courtship displays, ornamental coloration and enlarged weapons like horns or claws.
1d
A fast, efficient COVID-19 biosensor is under development
As the BA.5 omicron variant continues to spread, health experts are increasingly preparing for a future in which such COVID-19 variants emerge, surge and recede, similar to seasonal flu. An important part of staying on top of these changes will be the ability to quickly monitor the virus at a "population scale," an effort that will require accurate and ultra-fast testing.
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If one asthma biologic doesn't work, try another one
People who supplement rescue inhalers with a second asthma medication sometimes get little relief at first, but there's good news: Those who keep trying different options often find one that works, researchers report. "The available products aren't all me-too drugs." For a new study, the researchers analyzed data from 2,025 patients who used any of six FDA-approved severe asthma treatments known
1d
Examining the effect of temperature on animals' reproductive strategies
Temperature affects nearly every part of an animal's day-to-day existence. Biologists have, for good reason, spent a huge amount of time trying to understand how animals can survive in the climates in which they live. They have learned a lot about the strategies that animals use to keep themselves from overheating or freezing to death.
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'Sensing system' spots struggling ecosystems
A new "resilience sensing system" can identify ecosystems that are in danger of collapse, research shows. The system uses satellites to spot areas of concern—including those at risk of "tipping points"—and can also measure the success of conservation and restoration efforts.
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New method to map the surface of the moon increases accuracy to unprecedented levels
The surface of the moon and rocky planets—Mars in particular—are of huge interest to anyone trying to explore our solar system. The surface must be known in as much detail as possible, for missions to land safely, or for any robotic vessel to drive across the surface. But until now, the methods to analyze images from orbiting spacecraft have entailed a huge work load and immense computer power—wit
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North 'plaza' in Cahokia was likely inundated year-round, study finds
The ancient North American city of Cahokia had as its focal point a feature now known as Monks Mound, a giant earthwork surrounded on its north, south, east and west by large rectangular open areas. These flat zones, called plazas by archaeologists since the early 1960s, were thought to serve as communal areas that served the many mounds and structures of the city.
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Examining the effect of temperature on animals' reproductive strategies
Temperature affects nearly every part of an animal's day-to-day existence. Biologists have, for good reason, spent a huge amount of time trying to understand how animals can survive in the climates in which they live. They have learned a lot about the strategies that animals use to keep themselves from overheating or freezing to death.
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Hacker Mounts Submachine Gun on Robodog, Shoots Live Ammo
Blunderbuss Bot Alarming video went viral this week of a robot dog blasting off round after round with submachine gun. The minute-and-a-half clip has already accumulated more than five million views on Twitter, and it's not hard to see why it's morbidly fascinating. It shows a silver, four-legged dog robot prancing around some outdoor brick flooring and pointing the gun toward the open area beyon
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NFT Guy Accidentally Spends $150K on Stupid Joke He Tried to Make
Ha Ha On Wednesday, a prominent NFT collector who goes by the pseudonym "Franklin" took to Twitter to admit that he'd made a truly horrible mistake. In a puzzling and poorly executed attempt to parody the practice of purchasing expensive Ethereum Name Service (ENS) addresses — by, oddly, registering a "joke" ENS name and self-bidding on it over $150,000 worth of crypto — Franklin ultimately had t
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Biallelic and gene-wide genomic substitution for endogenous intron and retroelement mutagenesis in human cells
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31982-1 Functional annotation of the vast noncoding landscape of the diploid human genome still remains a major challenge of genomic research. Here the authors present a scarless, biallelic, and 100 kb-scale mutagenesis in human cells that uncovers functional significances of endogenous introns and retrotransposons in t
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Competition limits the ranges of mountain birds
A new study helps reveal why tropical mountain birds occupy such narrow elevation ranges, a mystery that has puzzled scientists for centuries. While many assumed temperature was responsible for these limited distributions, the latest research suggests competition from other species plays a bigger role in shaping bird ranges.
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At the water's edge: Self-assembling 2D materials at a liquid–liquid interface
The past few decades have witnessed a great amount of research in the field of two-dimensional (2D) materials. As the name implies, these thin film-like materials are composed of layers that are only a few atoms thick. Many of the chemical and physical properties of 2D materials can be fine-tuned, leading to promising applications in many fields, including optoelectronics, catalysis, renewable ene
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Deep learning for new alloys
Supercomputer simulations are helping scientists discover new high-entropy alloys. XSEDE allocations on TACC's Stampede2 supercomputer supported density function theory calculations for largest database yet of high-entropy alloy properties. Deep Sets architecture generated predictive models on Stampede2 for the properties of new high-entropy alloys. Study of high-entropy alloys represents an effor
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Putting the brakes on 'budding' viruses
Paramyxoviruses have the potential to trigger a devastating pandemic. This family of viruses includes measles, Nipah virus, mumps, Newcastle disease and canine distemper. An international team has examined key stage in the life cycles of measles and Nipah viruses. It reveals how future therapies might stop these viruses in their tracks.
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Telescope detects radio 'heartbeat' from far away galaxy
Astronomers have detected a strange and persistent radio signal from a far-off galaxy, that appears to be flashing with surprising regularity. Classified as a fast radio burst, or FRB , this new signal persists for up to three seconds, about 1,000 times longer than the average FRB. Within this window, the team detected bursts of radio waves that repeat every 0.2 seconds in a clear periodic patter
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An AI-assisted analysis of three-dimensional galaxy distribution in our universe
By applying a machine-learning technique, a neural network method, to gigantic amounts of simulation data about the formation of cosmic structures in the universe, a team of researchers has developed a very fast and highly efficient software program that can make theoretical predictions about structure formation. By comparing model predictions to actual observational datasets, the team succeeded i
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Blood test may improve lung cancer screening
A blood test may help determine if nodules detected during CT scans are lung cancer, researchers report. Annual screenings of patients at high risk for lung cancer can catch tumors early and improve a patient's long-term prognosis. However, low-dose computer tomography (LDCT) has a high false-positive rate that can lead to unnecessary biopsies. The researchers found a biomarker in the blood that
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Taste sensors keep proteins in order in flies
A set of genes that promote sweet taste sensation is also crucial for protein management during fly development, according to a new study by Eugenia Piddini of the University of Bristol, United Kingdom, and colleagues, publishing July 21st in PLOS Biology. The finding expands the understanding of a key process in successful development and suggests a connection between taste-related genes and diso
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Taste sensors keep proteins in order in flies
A set of genes that promote sweet taste sensation is also crucial for protein management during fly development, according to a new study by Eugenia Piddini of the University of Bristol, United Kingdom, and colleagues, publishing July 21st in PLOS Biology. The finding expands the understanding of a key process in successful development and suggests a connection between taste-related genes and diso
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What will it take to stabilize the Colorado River?
Lakes Powell and Mead, the two major reservoirs fed by the Colorado River, reached record lows this year nearing 25% capacity. An ongoing megadrought, impacts from climate change and systematic overuse have created a deep management crisis. Although there is growing public acknowledgement that cuts in consumptive use are inevitable and that policy changes are needed, renegotiation of the rules gov
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Buckyballs on gold are less exotic than graphene
Graphene consists of carbon atoms that crosslink in a plane to form a flat honeycomb structure. In addition to surprisingly high mechanical stability, the material has exciting electronic properties. The electrons behave like massless particles, which can be clearly demonstrated in spectrometric experiments. Measurements reveal a linear dependence of energy on momentum, namely the so-called Dirac
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Potential fabrication in research images threatens key theory of Alzheimer's disease
.news-article__hero–featured .parallax__element{ object-position: 50% 30%; -o-object-position: 50% 30%; } In August 2021, Matthew Schrag, a neuroscientist and physician at Vanderbilt University, got a call that would plunge him into a maelstrom of possible scientific misconduct. A colleague wanted to connect him with an attorney investigating an experimental drug for Alzheimer's disease called S
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Best Car Stereo Microphones for 2022
If you spend a lot of time in traffic, a good car stereo microphone can vastly improve the quality of your phone calls while keeping you safe on the road. Holding your phone to talk while you drive can be dangerous (and illegal). Most car stereos today have Bluetooth, but the microphones are usually not that great — they have a hard time picking up voices from the passenger seat or when there's l
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Tesla Sells Off Most of Its Bitcoin, at a Huge Loss
Sell! Sell! In February of 2021, Tesla announced that it was planning to sell cars using Bitcoin, while also buying up an appreciable $1.5 billion worth of the cryptocurrency. While the move initially looked balmy, with the investment spiking in value by an impressive $1 billion by October, this year's crypto crash brought the assets crashing down to Earth, with the value of Bitcoin being approxi
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How biology's hardest working pigments and 'MOFs' might just save the climate
Some of the economic sectors that are the hardest to decarbonize would benefit from the emergence of substantially more efficient catalysts involved in energy conversion chemical reactions. A breakthrough here might depend upon the use of pigments widely deployed in biological processes integrated as a catalyst into novel and highly porous molecular structures that act sort of like sponges.
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How biology's hardest working pigments and 'MOFs' might just save the climate
Some of the economic sectors that are the hardest to decarbonize would benefit from the emergence of substantially more efficient catalysts involved in energy conversion chemical reactions. A breakthrough here might depend upon the use of pigments widely deployed in biological processes integrated as a catalyst into novel and highly porous molecular structures that act sort of like sponges.
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Mattress uses heat and cold to trick the body into sleep
A new mattress and pillow system uses heating and cooling to tell the body it's time to go to sleep. Sleep is possible when the body temperature declines at night as part of the 24-hour rhythm. The new mattress stimulates the body to trigger the sleepy feeling, helping people fall asleep faster and improving the quality of sleep. "We facilitate the readiness to fall asleep by manipulating interna
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U.K. outlines 'Plan B' research funding to skirt EU impasse
The U.K. government has outlined how it will replace the European Union's flagship research funding scheme with a domestic program if ongoing Brexit squabbles prevent the country from participating in the EU program. The outline, published on Wednesday, describes how the government's "Plan B" would give U.K.-based researchers the funding they would have had access to as part of the 7-year, €95 bi
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U.S. innovation bill clears major Senate hurdle with research provisions intact
A massive bill to bolster U.S. innovation took a big step toward becoming law this week after a bipartisan coalition of senators defeated an attempt to strip away most of its research components. The latest version of the U.S. Innovation and Competition Act (USICA) also includes new language requiring the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Department of Energy (DOE) to allocate their resea
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Engineered biomimetic nanoparticles achieve targeted delivery and efficient metabolism-based synergistic therapy against glioblastoma
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31799-y Targeting cancer-associated metabolism is evolving as a promising approach for cancer therapy. Here, the authors generate cancer cell-membrane encapsulated nanoparticles to induce cell cycle arrest and cytotoxicity in lactate-high cancer cells, reducing tumourigensis in glioblastoma cell-line and patient-derived
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Subsurface ocean warming preceded Heinrich Events
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31754-x The mechanism driving past Laurentide Ice-Sheet instabilities remains elusive Here, the authors present a sediment record from the subpolar western North Atlantic and show that massive warming of the upper interior ocean was the likely trigger for repeated collapses of the Laurentide Ice-Sheet and iceberg discha
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Population genomics of Group B Streptococcus reveals the genetics of neonatal disease onset and meningeal invasion
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31858-4 Group B Streptococcus (GBS) causes neonatal disease and mortality worldwide. Here, the authors use genome-wide association analyses to identify bacterial genetic signatures associated with disease onset time and meningeal tissue infection in acute invasive neonatal GBS disease.
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Are Latinos Really Realigning Toward Republicans?
O nce the backbone of the Democratic base, working-class white voters have been migrating toward the Republican Party since the 1960s, largely out of alienation from the Democrats' liberal stands on cultural and racial issues. Half a century later, those working-class white voters—usually defined as having less than a four-year college education—have become the indisputable foundation of the Repu
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How schools can nurture every student's genius | Trish Millines Dziko
Forget home economics and standardized tests, education visionary Trish Millines Dziko has a much more engaging and fulfilling way for students to develop real-world skills. Get schooled by Dziko as she shares how project-based learning can transform public education and unlock genius for the next generation of critical thinkers, problem solvers, ideators and leaders.
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White House Says President Joe Biden Has COVID
According to a White House statement , president Joe Biden has tested positive for COVID-19. They say he's experiencing "very mild symptoms," likely because he's vaccinated and has also received two booster shots so far. In other words, it appears to be yet more evidence that vaccinations are indeed effective at preventing more severe symptoms of the disease — even for people of Biden's age. The
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How Can Infinitely Many Primes Be Infinitely Far Apart?
If you've been following the math news this month, you know that the 35-year-old number theorist James Maynard won a Fields Medal — the highest honor for a mathematician. Maynard likes math questions that "are simple enough to explain to a high school student but hard enough to stump mathematicians for centuries," Quanta reported, and one of those simple questions is this: As you move out along..
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More news, more worry during pandemic
Anxiety and fear went hand in hand with trying to learn more about COVID-19 in the early days of the pandemic in the United States—and the most distressed people were turning on the television and scrolling through social media, according to research from the University of Wisconsin–Madison.
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You can see where the Webb Telescope took a direct hit from a micrometeorite on one of its mirrors
The world is still reeling from the release of the James Webb Space Telescope's (JWST) first images. These provided a comprehensive overview of the kind of science operations that Webb will conduct over its 20-year mission. They included the most sensitive and detailed look at some iconic astronomical objects, spectra from an exoplanet atmosphere, and a deep field view of some of the most distant
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When hippos roamed, past temperatures were much higher
Although Oxford's meteorological records go back 250 years, to before the French Revolution and even the American war of independence, scientists have gone back thousands of years to discover that our world has been much hotter and, more often, much colder than today's records.
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A model trained to predict spectroscopic profiles helps to decipher the structure of materials
Carbon-based materials hold enormous potential for building a sustainable future, but material scientists need tools to properly analyze their atomic structure, which determines their functional properties. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is one of the tools used to do this, but XPS results can be challenging to interpret. Now, researchers at Aalto have developed a machine-learning tool to
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New analyses of giant fossilized megalodon teeth are helping scientists unravel the mystery of their extinction
Millions of years ago, giant sharks three times larger than today's great whites stalked the world's ocean. They're long gone now, but occasionally, someone walking on a beach spots an odd triangular shape in the sand. On closer inspection, they realize it's a fossilized tooth as large as a human hand, with sharp serrated edges. And they have to wonder: What was that beast eating?
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New analyses of giant fossilized megalodon teeth are helping scientists unravel the mystery of their extinction
Millions of years ago, giant sharks three times larger than today's great whites stalked the world's ocean. They're long gone now, but occasionally, someone walking on a beach spots an odd triangular shape in the sand. On closer inspection, they realize it's a fossilized tooth as large as a human hand, with sharp serrated edges. And they have to wonder: What was that beast eating?
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'Gold mine of unexplored biology': Short protein sequences could dramatically expand human genome
The relatively small universe of human genes could grow by up to one-third, if a concerted effort to search for new genes that encode short proteins is successful. Many known miniproteins have already been shown to play key roles in cellular metabolism and disease, so the international effort to catalog new ones and determine their functions, announced last week in Nature Biotechnology , could sh
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Mortality caused by heatwaves in China has increased since 1979
Since the beginning of the summer in 2022, China has been sweltering under the worst heatwave in decades. A number of people in Zhejiang, Henan, Jiangsu, and Sichuan provinces were diagnosed with thermoplegia, the most severe form of heatstroke, and some have died of this disease.
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How forest structure drives productivity
Forests make large contributions to Earth's climate, from releasing water vapor to pulling in carbon dioxide from the air, which mitigates global warming. The arrangement of trees affects how forests use light and water for photosynthesis, and it is known that more complex forests have higher productivity, or rates of photosynthesis. But the specific factors driving this relationship are lacking.
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Examining how crosstalk between organelles restricts the growth of bacteria inside macrophages
Macrophages are key cells of our innate immune response. By populating almost all tissues in our body, these cells have an essential role in maintaining our organs in a healthy state, as they constantly remove dying cells or eliminate microbes that have invaded tissues. As cells specialized in eating and devouring, macrophages are exceptionally well adapted to take up, digest and destroy foreign m
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Examining how crosstalk between organelles restricts the growth of bacteria inside macrophages
Macrophages are key cells of our innate immune response. By populating almost all tissues in our body, these cells have an essential role in maintaining our organs in a healthy state, as they constantly remove dying cells or eliminate microbes that have invaded tissues. As cells specialized in eating and devouring, macrophages are exceptionally well adapted to take up, digest and destroy foreign m
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Most ecology research is 'wasted': Researchers call for urgent action
Climate change, pollution, and the lack of pollinators are just a few of the many challenges we face, both locally and globally. Ecology plays a key role in addressing these challenges. While ecological research produces a wealth of valuable scientific knowledge, emerging evidence suggests that much of the research effort is wasted, and a large fraction of information is not available to users—oth
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Most ecology research is 'wasted': Researchers call for urgent action
Climate change, pollution, and the lack of pollinators are just a few of the many challenges we face, both locally and globally. Ecology plays a key role in addressing these challenges. While ecological research produces a wealth of valuable scientific knowledge, emerging evidence suggests that much of the research effort is wasted, and a large fraction of information is not available to users—oth
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Mangrove forest found living in freshwater
An international team of researchers has found a mangrove forest living in a freshwater part of the Amazonian delta. In their paper published in the journal Current Biology, the group describes their study of the Amazonian delta and explain why their find is so important.
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Low muscle mass linked to cognitive decline
A new study finds an association between low muscle mass and cognitive decline in older adults. Increasingly prevalent worldwide, dementia negatively affects the lives of millions of people and their families. By the time of diagnosis, the process appears to be irreversible. The new research in JAMA Network Open , however, identifies muscle mass as a modifiable factor that could potentially be us
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NOAA shares first imagery from GOES-18 SUVI instrument
The Solar Ultraviolet Imager, or SUVI, onboard NOAA's GOES-18 satellite, which launched on March 1, 2022, began observing the sun on June 24, 2022. SUVI monitors the sun in the extreme ultraviolet portion of the electromagnetic spectrum.
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The most distinctive birds are the ones most at risk of extinction
It's bad enough that Earth could be losing thousands of species each year. Now two independent studies of birds have concluded the ones most likely to disappear are those that serve unique—and possibly irreplaceable—functions in their ecosystems. Consider the toucan: Its iconic beak lets it eat and disperse seeds and fruit too large for other birds in South American rainforests. Yet these strikin
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The outer limits: Future economic growth in the face of diminishing resources
The 1972 book "The Limits to Growth" shared a somber message for humanity: the Earth's resources are finite and probably cannot support current rates of economic and population growth to the end of the 21st century, even with advanced technology. Although disparaged by economists at the time, it turns out that, 50 years later, the message still deserves our attention.
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Not only are bird species going extinct, but they might also lose the features that make each species unique
Climate change is causing a mass extinction the likes of which has not been seen in recorded history. For birds, this biodiversity loss has implications beyond just species loss. In research publishing in the journal Current Biology on July 21, researchers use statistical modeling to predict that extinction will decrease morphological diversity among remaining birds at a rate greater than species
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Blockchain gives Indigenous Americans control over their genomic data
Scientists today can access genomic data from Indigenous Peoples without their free, prior, and informed consent, leading to potential misuse and the reinforcement of stereotypes. Despite existing tools that facilitate the sharing of genomic information with researchers, none of those options give Indigenous governments control over how these data are used.
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Effective laws needed to protect large carnivores from extinction
Effective national and international laws are needed to reverse the decline of populations of large carnivores—such as tigers, wolves, and eagles—and reduce their risk of extinction, reports a paper published in Scientific Reports. The authors find that of 362 carnivore species assessed, only 12 species (mostly marine mammals) have shown genuine improvement in extinction risk. Carnivores protected
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Researchers chart advances in ancient DNA technology
Over the past 10 years, researchers led by Fu Qiaomei from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) have used ancient DNA (aDNA) technology to unearth the history of ancient human populations, especially those in East Asia.
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How the zebrafish repairs a broken heart
An MDC research team led by Jan Philipp Junker and Daniela Panáková has found that zebrafish can regenerate heart tissue after injury. Connective tissue cells play an important role in the process by temporarily entering an activated state, as the team reports in Nature Genetics.
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Quantum computer works with more than zero and one
We all learn from early on that computers work with zeros and ones, also known as binary information. This approach has been so successful that computers now power everything from coffee machines to self-driving cars and it is hard to imagine a life without them.
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Not only are bird species going extinct, but they might also lose the features that make each species unique
Climate change is causing a mass extinction the likes of which has not been seen in recorded history. For birds, this biodiversity loss has implications beyond just species loss. In research publishing in the journal Current Biology on July 21, researchers use statistical modeling to predict that extinction will decrease morphological diversity among remaining birds at a rate greater than species
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Blockchain gives Indigenous Americans control over their genomic data
Scientists today can access genomic data from Indigenous Peoples without their free, prior, and informed consent, leading to potential misuse and the reinforcement of stereotypes. Despite existing tools that facilitate the sharing of genomic information with researchers, none of those options give Indigenous governments control over how these data are used.
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Effective laws needed to protect large carnivores from extinction
Effective national and international laws are needed to reverse the decline of populations of large carnivores—such as tigers, wolves, and eagles—and reduce their risk of extinction, reports a paper published in Scientific Reports. The authors find that of 362 carnivore species assessed, only 12 species (mostly marine mammals) have shown genuine improvement in extinction risk. Carnivores protected
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Researchers Believe Alzheimer's Could Be Genetically Linked to Gut Health
(Photo: Buddha Kumar Shrestha/Unsplash) Data from several Alzheimer's disease and gastrointestinal disorder studies appear to suggest the conditions are genetically linked. Researchers at Edith Cowan University (ECU) conducted a meta-analysis of several Alzheimer's and gut health studies in an attempt to determine whether the two are associated. Each study involved the genetic information of abou
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Why Jupiter doesn't have rings like Saturn
Because it's bigger, Jupiter ought to have larger, more spectacular rings than Saturn has. But new UC Riverside research shows Jupiter's massive moons prevent that vision from lighting up the night sky.
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Parents Crowdfund to Send 11-Year-Old Son's Ashes to the Moon
Matthew's Moon A Florida family has successfully raised enough funds to carry out a beautiful — though heartbreaking — mission: in light of their space-loving young son's unexpected death, they're trying to raise the funds to rest his ashes on the Moon. Matthew Gallagher, who was only 11 when he recently passed away, was described by his parents to Houston's KHOU11 News as a true space enthusiast
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Plant buddies now at odds over declining pollinators
Competition for pollinating insects may reduce the ability of plant species to coexist, according to a paper published in Nature. This effect, which may impact plant diversity, is expected to be heightened as the number of pollinators decreases.
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Modified method helps to induce transgenic hairy roots from stem of tung tree seedling
Tung tree is an oil-bearing woody plant species in the Euphorbiaceae family. The oil extracted from tung tree seeds, called tung oil, is an excellent dry oil that is resistant to heat, cold, acid, alkali and corrosion, and has insulating properties. However, the molecular breeding of this species has been hampered by the lack of an efficient genetic transformation system.
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First electric nanomotor made from DNA material
A research team led by the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has succeeded for the first time in producing a molecular electric motor using the DNA origami method. The tiny machine made of genetic material self-assembles and converts electrical energy into kinetic energy. The new nanomotors can be switched on and off, and the researchers can control the rotation speed and rotational direction.
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Modified method helps to induce transgenic hairy roots from stem of tung tree seedling
Tung tree is an oil-bearing woody plant species in the Euphorbiaceae family. The oil extracted from tung tree seeds, called tung oil, is an excellent dry oil that is resistant to heat, cold, acid, alkali and corrosion, and has insulating properties. However, the molecular breeding of this species has been hampered by the lack of an efficient genetic transformation system.
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A simpler way to differentiate B cells and T cells
Our immune system is essential for our survival, as our bodies are constantly being exposed to bacteria, viruses, parasites, and other pathogens. Without an immune system, we would quickly lose the war against these pathogens and succumb to these outside invaders. The immune system is made up of billions of individual white blood cells that circulate in our bloodstream and move around in our tissu
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A simpler way to differentiate B cells and T cells
Our immune system is essential for our survival, as our bodies are constantly being exposed to bacteria, viruses, parasites, and other pathogens. Without an immune system, we would quickly lose the war against these pathogens and succumb to these outside invaders. The immune system is made up of billions of individual white blood cells that circulate in our bloodstream and move around in our tissu
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Robert Irwin Tests a Shark's Biting Power | Shark Week
Stream Crikey! It's Shark Week on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/crikey-its-shark-week-us #discovery #sharkweek #shark About Crikey! It's Shark Week: Robert Irwin comes face to face with a Great White Shark for the first time ever. Following his father's footsteps, he will get as close as possible to these incredible creatures to determine which apex predator reigns supreme – Cro
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Chinese gamers are using a Steam wallpaper app to get porn past the censors
If you have been on Steam, the world's largest PC gaming platform, you might have noticed an anomaly on the chart of the top 20 most popular apps: Wallpaper Engine. The software is pretty cool—it lets you download animated and interactive wallpapers for your machine's monitor—but it's hard to explain why an obscure wallpaper app consistently ranks alongside global blockbuster franchises like Coun
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Microbial 'dark matter': Centuries-old lava caves of Hawaiʻi Island contain thousands of unknown bacterial species
The lava caves, lava tubes and geothermal vents on the big island of Hawaiʻi have higher bacterial diversity than scientists expected, reports a new study in Frontiers in Microbiology. These habitats represent how life might have existed on Mars and early Earth in the past, and this study explores the diversity and interactions within these microbial ecosystems.
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Federated learning uses the data right on our devices
An approach called federated learning trains machine learning models on devices like smartphones and laptops, rather than requiring the transfer of private data to central servers. The biggest benchmarking data set to date for a machine learning technique designed with data privacy in mind is now available open source. "By training in-situ on data where it is generated, we can train on larger rea
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Beloved monarch butterflies are now listed as endangered
The International Union for the Conservation of Nature added the migrating monarch butterfly for to its "red list" of threatened species and categorized it as "endangered" — two steps from extinct. (Image credit: Nic Coury/AP)
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Scientists Studied the Antarctic Ice Sheet Over 10,000 Years. Their Findings Hold Insight for the Future
Alarming stories from Antarctica are now more frequent than ever; the ice surface is melting , floating ice shelves are collapsing , and glaciers are flowing faster into the ocean. Antarctica will be the largest source of future sea-level rise. Yet scientists don't know exactly how this melting will unfold as the climate warms. Our latest research looks at how the Antarctic ice sheet advanced and
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Novel method to accelerate neutron transport calculations
Dr. Zheng Yu from the Hefei Institutes of Physical Science of Chinese Academy of Sciences, in cooperation with researchers from the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology of Germany, has proposed a new method to accelerate the Monte Carlo large-scale shielding simulation.
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Paper wasps are surprisingly good at learning and remembering
Paper wasps, despite their tiny brains, have an impressive capacity to learn, remember, and make social distinctions about others, researchers report. Elizabeth Tibbetts, evolutionary biologist at the University of Michigan, and colleagues showed that paper wasps recognize individuals of their species by variations in their facial markings and that they behave more aggressively toward wasps with
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New device design brings unparalleled confidence to cell measurements
Measuring the numbers and properties of cells moving in a stream—a process called flow cytometry—is critically important to diagnostic medicine, pharmaceutical research and biomedical science. Now researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have devised a way to make unprecedented improvements in the technique.
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New device design brings unparalleled confidence to cell measurements
Measuring the numbers and properties of cells moving in a stream—a process called flow cytometry—is critically important to diagnostic medicine, pharmaceutical research and biomedical science. Now researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have devised a way to make unprecedented improvements in the technique.
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Physiological features of Japanese black cattle with high methane production
Japan's agricultural sector produced 32.3 million tons of greenhouse gas emissions in 2022, accounting for 2.8% of the country's total emissions. Nearly a quarter of that stems from enteric fermentation within livestock. Ruminants—grazing animals such as cattle, sheep and goats that acquire nutrients from plant-based diets—give off enteric methane as they decompose and ferment plant materials.
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Physiological features of Japanese black cattle with high methane production
Japan's agricultural sector produced 32.3 million tons of greenhouse gas emissions in 2022, accounting for 2.8% of the country's total emissions. Nearly a quarter of that stems from enteric fermentation within livestock. Ruminants—grazing animals such as cattle, sheep and goats that acquire nutrients from plant-based diets—give off enteric methane as they decompose and ferment plant materials.
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16th Fenix Infrastructure Webinar: "Simulating cellular models with NEURON and CoreNEURON"
This webinar presented developing cellular level simulation models using NEURON and leveraging optimizations via the CoreNEURON solver. More information can be found at: https://bit.ly/2nZ3XdR Useful links ICEI project website: https://fenix-ri.eu/ Fenix Infrastructure: https://fenix-ri.eu/infrastructure ICEI services: https://fenix-ri.eu/infrastructure/se… ICEI resources: https://fenix-ri.eu/i
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Vaccinate to combat COVID-19 in China
As W. C. Kirby argues in his Editorial "Zeroing out on zero-COVID" (3 June, p. 1026), the cost of China's strict zero-COVID policy is enormous. From local to regional to international impacts, this policy is likely to increase unemployment and poverty while further disrupting global supply, communication, and cooperation. China should replace its zero-COVID strategy with a plan to increase vaccina
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Zero-COVID Editorial lacks balance
It is one thing to hope for an end to China's zero-COVID policy. It is quite another to critique it without sensitivity to the issues. In his Editorial "Zeroing out on zero-COVID" (3 June, p. 1026), W. C. Kirby ostensibly pleads for better conditions to reopen scholarly exchange but seems more interested in accusing China of supposed failures.
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