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Nyheder2022juli27

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Why Do We Get Old, and Can Aging Be Reversed?
Everybody gets older, although not everyone ages in the same way. For many people, late life includes a deterioration of health brought on by age-related disease. Yet there are also people who retain a more youthful vigor, and around the world, women typically live longer than men. Why is that? In this episode, Steven Strogatz speaks with Judith Campisi and Dena Dubal… Source
7min
Magnetic quantum material broadens platform for probing next-gen information technologies
Scientists at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory used neutron scattering to determine whether a specific material's atomic structure could host a novel state of matter called a spiral spin liquid. By tracking tiny magnetic moments known as "spins" on the honeycomb lattice of a layered iron trichloride magnet, the team found the first 2D system to host a spiral spin liquid.
21min
Eating more ultra-processed foods associated with increased risk of dementia
People who eat the highest amounts of ultra-processed foods like soft drinks, chips and cookies may have a higher risk of developing dementia than those who eat the lowest amounts, according to a new study. Researchers also found that replacing ultra-processed foods in a person's diet with unprocessed or minimally processed foods was associated with a lower risk. The study does not prove that ultr
36min
Scientists use copper nanowires to combat the spread of diseases
An ancient metal used for its microbial properties is the basis for a materials-based solution to disinfection. A team of scientists from Ames National Laboratory, Iowa State University, and University at Buffalo developed an antimicrobial spray that deposits a layer of copper nanowires onto high-touch surfaces in public spaces. The spray contains copper nanowires (CuNWs) or copper-zinc nanowires
41min
Best 3D Printers Under $500 in 2022
Just a few years ago, finding a 3D printer under $500 would have been almost impossible. Now there are dozens to choose from. This brings 3D printing within the reach of modelers, hobbyists, and small businesses. Of course not every cheap 3D printer has the same capabilities. They produce different-sized models with varying levels of detail. Many are filament models, but several resin printers al
44min
Cash transfers more effective than workforce training in improving lives of Rwandans
In the head-to-head comparison of a workforce-training program and direct cash transfers for Rwandans, cash proves superior in improving economic outcomes of unemployed youths, while training outperforms cash only in the production of business knowledge, according to a new University of California San Diego study. The findings revealed both programs improved ownership of assets used for business p
1h
Look before you leap: Study provides safety guidelines for diving
New research in biomechanics measures the impact of head-first, hand-first and feet-first diving and the likelihood of injury at different diving heights, providing data-driven recommendations for safe diving and a model for measuring the impact of different shapes as they plunge into water.
1h
Ancient herpes simplex 1 genomes reveal recent viral structure in Eurasia
Abstract Human herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), a life-long infection spread by oral contact, infects a majority of adults globally. Phylogeographic clustering of sampled diversity into European, pan-Eurasian, and African groups has suggested the virus codiverged with human migrations out of Africa, although a much younger origin has also been proposed. We present three full ancient European HSV-1
2h
Performing calculus with epsilon-near-zero metamaterials
Abstract Calculus is a fundamental subject in mathematics and extensively used in physics and astronomy. Performing calculus operations by analog computing has received much recent research interest because of its high speed and large data throughput; however, current analog calculus frameworks suffer from bulky sizes and relatively low integration densities. In this work, we introduce the concep
2h
Design of a lithiophilic and electron-blocking interlayer for dendrite-free lithium-metal solid-state batteries
Abstract All-solid-state batteries are a potential game changer in the energy storage market; however, their practical employment has been hampered by premature short circuits caused by the lithium dendritic growth through the solid electrolyte. Here, we demonstrate that a rational layer-by-layer strategy using a lithiophilic and electron-blocking multilayer can substantially enhance the performa
2h
Highly efficient and nearly roll-off–free electrofluorescent devices via multiple sensitizations
Abstract The efficiency roll-off at high luminance has hindered the wide application of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) for decades. To circumvent this issue, both high exciton utilization and short exciton residence should be satisfied, which, however, faces formidable challenges. Here, we propose an advanced approach of phosphor-assisted thermally activated delayed fluorophor (TADF)–sensi
2h
Alkali metal halide–coated perovskite redox catalysts for anaerobic oxidative dehydrogenation of n-butane
Abstract Oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of n -butane has the potential to efficiently produce butadiene without equilibrium limitation or coke formation. Despite extensive research efforts, single-pass butadiene yields are limited to 2 . This article reports molten LiBr as an effective promoter to modify a redox-active perovskite oxide, i.e., La 0.8 Sr 0.2 FeO 3 (LSF), for chemical looping–oxida
2h
Meta-optic accelerators for object classifiers
Abstract Rapid advances in deep learning have led to paradigm shifts in a number of fields, from medical image analysis to autonomous systems. These advances, however, have resulted in digital neural networks with large computational requirements, resulting in high energy consumption and limitations in real-time decision-making when computation resources are limited. Here, we demonstrate a meta-o
2h
Slamming dynamics of diving and its implications for diving-related injuries
Abstract In nature, many animals dive into water at high speeds, e.g., humans dive from cliffs, birds plunge, and aquatic animals porpoise and breach. Diving provides opportunities for animals to find prey and escape from predators and is a source of great excitement for humans. However, diving from high platforms can cause severe injuries to a diver. In this study, we demonstrate how similarity
2h
Mapping pure plastic strains against locally applied stress: Revealing toughening plasticity
Abstract The deformation of all materials can be separated into elastic and plastic parts. Measuring the purely plastic component is complex but crucial to fully characterize, understand, and engineer structural materials to "bend, not break." Our approach has mapped this to answer the long-standing riddle in materials mechanics: The low toughness of body-centered cubic metals, where we advance a
2h
SMAD4, activated by the TCR-triggered MEK/ERK signaling pathway, critically regulates CD8+ T cell cytotoxic function
Abstract Transforming growth factor–β is well known to restrain cytotoxic T cell responses to maintain self-tolerance and to promote tumor immune evasion. In this study, we have investigated the role of SMAD4, a core component in the TGF-β signaling pathway, in CD8 + T cells. Unexpectedly, we found that SMAD4 was critical in promoting CD8 + T cell function in both tumor and infection models. SMAD
2h
Nonrandom sister chromatid segregation mediates rDNA copy number maintenance in Drosophila
Abstract Although considered to be exact copies of each other, sister chromatids can segregate nonrandomly in some cases. For example, sister chromatids of the X and Y chromosomes segregate nonrandomly during asymmetric division of male germline stem cells (GSCs) in Drosophila melanogaster . Here, we demonstrate that the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) loci, which are located on the X and Y chromosomes, and
2h
Through-skull brain imaging in vivo at visible wavelengths via dimensionality reduction adaptive-optical microscopy
Abstract Compensation of sample-induced optical aberrations is crucial for visualizing microscopic structures deep within biological tissues. However, strong multiple scattering poses a fundamental limitation for identifying and correcting the tissue-induced aberrations. Here, we introduce a label-free deep-tissue imaging technique termed dimensionality reduction adaptive-optical microscopy (DReA
2h
Enhanced simulated early 21st century Arctic sea ice loss due to CMIP6 biomass burning emissions
Abstract The mechanisms underlying decadal variability in Arctic sea ice remain actively debated. Here, we show that variability in boreal biomass burning (BB) emissions strongly influences simulated Arctic sea ice on multidecadal time scales. In particular, we find that a strong acceleration in sea ice decline in the early 21st century in the Community Earth System Model version 2 (CESM2) is rel
2h
Ultrasensitive point-of-care biochemical sensor based on metal-AIEgen frameworks
Abstract Point-of-care (POC) biochemical sensors have found broad applications in areas ranging from clinical diagnosis to environmental monitoring. However, POC sensors often suffer from poor sensitivity. Here, we synthesized a metal-organic framework, where the ligand is the aggregation-induced emission luminogen (AIEgen), which we call metal-AIEgen frameworks (MAFs), for use in the ultrasensit
2h
Switch of serotonergic descending inhibition into facilitation by a spinal chloride imbalance in neuropathic pain
Abstract Descending control from the brain to the spinal cord shapes our pain experience, ranging from powerful analgesia to extreme sensitivity. Increasing evidence from both preclinical and clinical studies points to an imbalance toward descending facilitation as a substrate of pathological pain, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. We used an optogenetic approach to manipulate seroton
2h
Chaperoning of the histone octamer by the acidic domain of DNA repair factor APLF
Abstract Nucleosome assembly requires the coordinated deposition of histone complexes H3-H4 and H2A-H2B to form a histone octamer on DNA. In the current paradigm, specific histone chaperones guide the deposition of first H3-H4 and then H2A-H2B. Here, we show that the acidic domain of DNA repair factor APLF (APLF AD ) can assemble the histone octamer in a single step and deposit it on DNA to form
2h
Mitochondrial proteostasis stress in muscle drives a long-range protective response to alleviate dietary obesity independently of ATF4
Abstract Mitochondrial quality in skeletal muscle is crucial for maintaining energy homeostasis during metabolic stresses. However, how muscle mitochondrial quality is controlled and its physiological impacts remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that mitoprotease LONP1 is essential for preserving muscle mitochondrial proteostasis and systemic metabolic homeostasis. Skeletal muscle–specific deleti
2h
Arctic Ocean Amplification in a warming climate in CMIP6 models
Abstract Arctic near-surface air temperature warms much faster than the global average, a phenomenon known as Arctic Amplification. The change of the underlying Arctic Ocean could influence climate through its interaction with sea ice, atmosphere, and the global ocean, but it is less well understood. Here, we show that the upper 2000 m of the Arctic Ocean warms at 2.3 times the global mean rate w
2h
Rapid discovery of stable materials by coordinate-free coarse graining
Abstract A fundamental challenge in materials science pertains to elucidating the relationship between stoichiometry, stability, structure, and property. Recent advances have shown that machine learning can be used to learn such relationships, allowing the stability and functional properties of materials to be accurately predicted. However, most of these approaches use atomic coordinates as input
2h
CMOS electrochemical pH localizer-imager
Abstract pH controls a large repertoire of chemical and biochemical processes in water. Densely arrayed pH microenvironments would parallelize these processes, enabling their high-throughput studies and applications. However, pH localization, let alone its arrayed realization, remains challenging because of fast diffusion of protons in water. Here, we demonstrate arrayed localizations of picolite
2h
A quantitative biology approach correlates neuronal toxicity with the largest inclusions of TDP-43
Abstract A number of neurodegenerative conditions are associated with the formation of cytosolic inclusions of TDP-43 within neurons. We expressed full-length TDP-43 in a motoneuron/neuroblastoma hybrid cell line (NSC-34) and exploited the high-resolution power of stimulated emission depletion microscopy to monitor the changes of nuclear and cytoplasmic TDP-43 levels and the formation of various
2h
High-resolution imaging and manipulation of endogenous AMPA receptor surface mobility during synaptic plasticity and learning
Abstract Regulation of synaptic neurotransmitter receptor content is a fundamental mechanism for tuning synaptic efficacy during experience-dependent plasticity and behavioral adaptation. However, experimental approaches to track and modify receptor movements in integrated experimental systems are limited. Exploiting AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) as a model, we generated a knock-in mouse
2h
Presynaptic supervision of cortical spine dynamics in motor learning
Abstract In mammalian neocortex, learning triggers the formation and turnover of new postsynaptic spines on pyramidal cell dendrites. However, the biological principles of spine reorganization during learning remain elusive because the identity of their presynaptic neuronal partners is unknown. Here, we show that two presynaptic neural circuits supervise distinct programs of spine dynamics to exe
2h
Is It Worse to Ban a Book, or Never Publish It?
This is an edition of Up for Debate, a newsletter by Conor Friedersdorf. On Wednesdays, he rounds up timely conversations and solicits reader responses to one thought-provoking question. Later, he publishes some thoughtful replies. Sign up for the newsletter here. Question of the Week Is there class prejudice in the United States? If so, describe how it works. What are some specific examples? Is
2h
Melville. Faulkner. Spider-Man.
The slow embrace of the comic-book medium by elite audiences is a history with its own particular milestones, each marking a moment of sudden approbation by previously disapproving constituencies. George McManus received a congressional dinner and warm words from Franklin D. Roosevelt in celebration of his comic strip, Bringing Up Father. Mid-century-modern artists like Roy Lichtenstein adapted (
2h
Photos: Five Months of War in Ukraine
On day 154 of the Russian invasion of Ukraine , fighting continues, most of it concentrated in the east and south. Russian forces are currently launching missile strikes near the southern cities of Odesa and Mykolaiv as part of a battle for control of crucial ports along the Black Sea. Russian air and missile attacks continued across the Kharkiv and Donetsk regions, killing and wounding many civi
2h
Lactose Tolerance Is an Evolutionary Puzzle
People like to say that you are what you eat, but the truth is more like this: In the broad course of human history, we become what we eat. The contents of our ancestors' dinner tables have slowly but surely left their signatures in the human genome. Learning to cook and soften our food was likely the major driver of our teeth shrinking during the Neolithic age. The lightening of Europeans' skin
2h
A study raises questions about using drone images for environmental monitoring
Adrián Martínez Fernández, the technician in charge of the Digital Mapping and 3D Analysis Laboratory at the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH), is the lead author of a paper published in the journal Remote Sensing on how the properties of images captured by drones influence the representation and monitoring of high-mountain environments in photogrammetric surveys.
2h
Conserving critical habitat in face of climate change in Midwestern lakes by managing watershed land use
Lakes across the Midwest are losing cold, oxygenated habitat as a result of climate change and nutrient pollution. This loss of critical habitat has negative consequences for water quality, fish, and the production of greenhouse gases. While data show that effectively managing watershed land use at a local scale can protect coldwater, oxygen-rich habitats and reduce nutrient pollution in Midwester
2h
Yoga app eases incontinence in 4 weeks
People with incontinence who used the Yoga of Immortals mobile app had significant improvement in the frequency and severity of urine leaks in four weeks, a new study shows. The globally used app combines specific yogic postures in the Sanatan tradition with breathing exercises, sound therapy, and meditation. Urinary incontinence is more common in women compared to men. An estimated 25 to 45% of
2h
Daily briefing: Why get two PhDs
Nature, Published online: 27 July 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-02081-4 'Double doctors' share what they gained — and whether it was worth it. Plus, claims of image fabrication in key Alzheimer's research papers and why 'data leakage' might threaten the reliability of machine learning.
2h
Daily briefing: Congo Basin could be auctioned off to big oil
Nature, Published online: 26 July 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-02079-y "Our priority is not to save the planet," says Democratic Republic of Congo government. Plus, monkeypox is declared a global health emergency and mystery hepatitis in UK children could be linked to a common virus.
2h
Potential Research Fabrication Bombshell Threatens Amyloid Theory of Alzheimer's Disease
Alzheimer's disease is a form of progressive dementia that we've labored to figure out for decades. Scientists made some headway with the amyloid hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease, but progress is slow, and the hypothesis is incomplete. Now, a startling report has surfaced, accusing a prestigious Alzheimer's researcher of systemic, deliberate research fraud. The results of this investigation coul
2h
Russia's New Space Station Gets Sadder the More We Hear About It
Russia announced on Tuesday that it's abandoning the International Space Station "after 2024," saying that it's looking to build its own orbiting station instead. But according to a new Roscosmos interview with Vladimir Solovyov, head of flight operations for Russian space company Energia, the country's vision for its upcoming station dubbed Russian Orbital Service Station (ROSS) isn't exactly gr
2h
New Analysis Finds That Blocky Cybertruck Has Enviable Wind Resistance
Jankless While Tesla CEO Elon Musks's oddly-shaped, historically janky Cybertruck might not look particularly efficient, a new independent analysis suggests that the much-delayed addition to the company's lineup of electric vehicles is surprisingly aerodynamic. Aleix Lázaro Prat, a computer fluid dynamics engineer for a company called Numeric System, simulated the cyberpunk pickup's wind resistan
2h
NASA Finds Holes on the Moon Where It's Always a Comfortable Temperature
A team of NASA-funded researchers have discovered mysterious "pits " in the surface of the Moon that sit, according to new computer modeling, around a comparatively balmy 63 degrees Fahrenheit. In other words, these pockets could serve as an excellent place for future astronauts to hang out in, considering temperatures on the lunar surface typically range from a blistering 260 degrees Fahrenheit
2h
Oldest DNA from domesticated American horse lends credence to shipwreck folklore
Feral horses have roamed freely across the island of Assateague off the coast of Maryland and Virginia for hundreds of years, but exactly how they got there has remained a mystery. In a new study, ancient DNA extracted from a 16th century cow tooth from one of Spain's first Caribbean colonies turns out to be from a horse. Analysis of the DNA suggest that old folk tales claiming that horses were ma
2h
Researchers 3D print sensors for satellites
Researchers demonstrated a 3D-printed plasma sensor for satellites that works just as well as the expensive semiconductor sensors that take weeks of intricate fabrication in a cleanroom. These durable, precise sensors could be used on CubeSats, which are commonly utilized for environmental monitoring or weather prediction.
2h
Harm from blue light exposure increases with age, research in flies suggests
The damaging effects of daily, lifelong exposure to the blue light emanating from phones, computers and household fixtures worsen as a person ages, new research suggests. The study involved Drosophila melanogaster, the common fruit fly, an important model organism because of the cellular and developmental mechanisms it shares with other animals and humans.
2h
Western US wildfire smoke plumes are getting taller
In recent years the plumes of smoke crawling upward from Western wildfires have trended taller, with more smoke and aerosols lofted up where they can spread farther and impact air quality over a wider area. The likely cause is climate change, with decreased precipitation and increased aridity in the Western U.S. that intensifies wildfire activity.
2h
Breakthrough quantum algorithm
Physicists are claiming significant progress in using quantum computers to study and predict how the state of a large number of interacting quantum particles evolves over time. This was done by developing a quantum algorithm that they run on an IBM quantum computer.
2h
NASA will inspire the world when it returns Mars samples to Earth in 2033
NASA has finished the system requirements review for its Mars Sample Return Program, which is nearing completion of the conceptual design phase. During this phase, the program team has evaluated and refined the architecture to return the scientifically selected samples, which are currently in the collection process by NASA's Perseverance rover in the Red Planet's Jezero Crater.
3h
High-status Danish Vikings wore exotic beaver furs
Beaver fur was a symbol of wealth and an important trade item in 10th Century Denmark, according to a study published July 27, 2022 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Luise Ørsted Brandt of the University of Copenhagen and colleagues.
3h
Exploring factors that may underlie how domestic cats can live in groups
A new analysis explores relationships between domestic cats' hormone levels, gut microbiomes, and social behaviors, shedding light on how these solitary animals live in high densities. Hikari Koyasu of Azabu University in Kanagawa, Japan, and colleagues present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on July 27, 2022.
3h
UK scientists take 'promising' step towards single Covid and cold vaccine
Francis Crick Institute in London says area of spike protein of Sars-CoV-2 could form basis of jab against variants and common cold Scientists have made a "promising" advance towards developing a universal coronavirus vaccine to tackle Covid-19 and the common cold. Researchers at the Francis Crick Institute in London have discovered that a specific area of the spike protein of Sars-CoV-2 – the vi
3h
Modern herpes variants may be linked to bronze age kissing, study finds
Virus may have received a boost from rise of kissing that came with westward migrations 4,500 years ago The herpes variants that cause modern cold sores became widespread in the wake of bronze age migrations, and may have received a boost from the practice of kissing that came with it, researchers say. Scientists in Cambridge analysed the first ancient DNA specimens of herpes simplex virus and fo
3h
Five Great White Sharks Show Off Their Attack Skills | Shark Week
Stream Jaws vs Kraken on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/jaws-vs-kraken-us #discovery #sharkweek #shark About Jaws vs Kraken: Something shocking is happening in the abyss around Guadalupe Island. Photos of great whites with strange scars believed to be from giant squids have surfaced. Dr. Tristan Guttridge leads a mission to get a glimpse into the battles between the two beasts. S
3h
Why is sand so scarce right now?
An ongoing surge in demand for sand has made it a scarce commodity. This natural resource is commonly used in computer microchips, construction, and is an active ingredient in cosmetics. But the current supply of this material has not been able to keep up with the speed of global urbanization. Now, sand is approaching a cost of $10 a ton, while it was just under $4 a ton 31 years ago. While sand
3h
In rare feat, researchers decipher how one gut bacterium influences immunity
From immunity to metabolism to mental health, it seems like the gut microbiome has been linked to every aspect of human health and disease. But with hundreds of bacterial species populating our gastrointestinal tract, it's a daunting task to pinpoint which molecules made by which bacteria affect which biological processes — and how they do so.
3h
Monkeypox: WHO chief advises at-risk men to reduce number of sexual partners
Director general calls on men who have sex with men to make 'safe choices' amid global emergency The head of the World Health Organization has advised men at risk of catching monkeypox to consider reducing how many sexual partners they have "for the moment", after the UN agency declared escalating outbreaks in multiple countries to be a global emergency . The WHO director general, Tedros Adhanom
4h
Chinese Rocket Officially Plummeting Down to Earth
Space Junkie A massive piece of Chinese space junk is slowly making its descent back down to Earth — and nobody is entirely sure where it will fall. The 25-ton Long March 5B core stage, dubbed CZ-5B R, was used to launch a rand new science laboratory module for the country's growing space station over the weekend. Now, experts are tracking the rocket stage's gradual reentry, with Aerospace Corpor
4h
A key role for quantum entanglement
A method known as quantum key distribution has long held the promise of communication security unattainable in conventional cryptography. An international team of scientists has now demonstrated experimentally, for the first time, an approach to quantum key distribution that is based on high-quality quantum entanglement — offering much broader security guarantees than previous schemes.
4h
Quantum cryptography: Hacking is futile
An international team has successfully implemented an advanced form of quantum cryptography for the first time. Moreover, encryption is independent of the quantum device used and therefore even more secure against hacking attempts.
4h
Western wildfire smoke plumes are getting taller
In recent years the plumes of smoke crawling upward from Western wildfires have trended taller, with more smoke and aerosols lofted up where they can spread farther and impact air quality over a wider area. The likely cause is climate change, with decreased precipitation and increased aridity in the Western U.S. that intensifies wildfire activity.
4h
Researchers give 2D electronics a performance boost
Two dimensional (2D) semiconductors have a unique property that allows their thickness to be reduced to one or few atoms—and this property could potentially minimize the short channel effects that remain an issue in advanced silicon-based transistors, for example, turning on a transistor prematurely.
4h
Small molecule prevents tumour cells from spreading
Leiden chemists, together with colleagues at the University of York (UK) and Technion (Israel) have discovered a small, sugar-like molecule that maintains the integrity of tissue around a tumor during cancer. This molecule prevents tumor cells from spreading from the primary cancer site to colonize other sites in the body. The multidisciplinary international team published their research in Procee
4h
Small molecule prevents tumour cells from spreading
Leiden chemists, together with colleagues at the University of York (UK) and Technion (Israel) have discovered a small, sugar-like molecule that maintains the integrity of tissue around a tumor during cancer. This molecule prevents tumor cells from spreading from the primary cancer site to colonize other sites in the body. The multidisciplinary international team published their research in Procee
4h
New model developed to predict landslides along wildfire burn scars
Researchers have augmented a physics-based numerical model to investigate and predict areas susceptible to debris flows. This augmented model eventually could be used in an early warning system for people living in high-risk areas, enabling them to evacuate before it's too late. Information from model simulations also could be used to design new infrastructure — such as diversion bars that deflec
4h
Advanced pure copper 3D printing with sub-micron resolution
High-quality data transmission, high-precision information sensing, and high-sensitivity signal detection are important means to achieve precise perception and effective identification. High-performance chips, terahertz transmission T/R components, and extreme environment sensor manufacturing technologies have become key frontier research hotspots. Its effective implementation strongly depends on
4h
Complex modeling by researchers predicts wildfires may decline, eventually
Researchers attempting to help predict how the wildfire hazard will change due to various factors over the next several decades have some good news, and some bad news. Good news is, wildfire occurrence and intensity will likely decrease in several locations in the future. The bad news: decreases may not occur for another 50 years, and wildfire hazard will likely get worse before it gets better.
4h
Researchers develop new method for analysing genetic admixture of populations
Researchers of the HSE International Laboratory of Statistical and Computational Genomics together with their international colleagues have proposed a new statistical method for analyzing population admixture that makes it possible to determine the time and number of migration waves more accurately. The history of Colombians and Mexicans (descendants of Native Americans, Spaniards and Africans) fe
4h
Researchers develop new method for analysing genetic admixture of populations
Researchers of the HSE International Laboratory of Statistical and Computational Genomics together with their international colleagues have proposed a new statistical method for analyzing population admixture that makes it possible to determine the time and number of migration waves more accurately. The history of Colombians and Mexicans (descendants of Native Americans, Spaniards and Africans) fe
4h
People tend to see high self-control as robotic
People tend to view others who they perceive as high or very high in self-control as more robotic than those with less self-control, according to new research. This robotic dehumanization was linked to perceptions that these people are less warm and sociable than others, the researchers report. "How do we make sure that we see everyone as human?" The authors, Franki Yk Hei Kung, assistant profess
5h
Best 9V Batteries of 2022
9 V batteries may not be as top of mind as your phone's battery — until they run out of power. They're one of the most common sources of power for critical household, health, and work-related electronics, including smoke detectors, personal blood pressure monitors, and job site walkie-talkies. While all 9V batteries are the same size, and thus completely interchangeable, there can be considerable
5h
Physicists Create New Phase of Matter With "Extra" Time Dimension
New Dimension Physicists say they've created a new phase of matter with an "extra" time dimension, according to a recently published study in the journal Nature . The researchers didn't set out with the goal of opening a "portal to an extra time dimension," as Scientific American described the experiment . They simply sought to create a new topological phase of quantum matter, which is essentiall
5h
A Plan to Lower Gas Prices—and (Maybe) Help the Climate
Sign up for The Weekly Planet, Robinson Meyer's newsletter about living through climate change, here. If you drive along the Gulf of Mexico from Corpus Christi, Texas, to Baton Rouge, Louisiana, you will pass four U.S. government sites that look like nothing special—a bland patch of concrete, a few office buildings, some oil silos huddled together. These facilities conceal something extraordinary
5h
Trump Just Told Us His Master Plan
Yesterday, an ex-president who had tried to overturn a democratic election by violence returned to Washington, D.C., to call for law and order . Again and again, the speech reversed reality. The ex-president who had spread an actual big lie against the legitimacy of the 2020 election tried to appropriate the phrase big lie to use against his opponents. The ex-president who had fired an acting FBI
5h
The US can move past immigration prisons — and towards justice | César Cuauhtémoc García Hernández
Imagine seeking safety abroad and instead being detained and forced to defend yourself in a high-stakes legal battle — alone. Law professor César Cuauhtémoc García Hernández explains how the asylum process in the US became warped into what we know today and poses a question that could lead the country out of its labyrinthian policies: In place of investing in more steel doors and barbed wire, what
5h
Our social interactions begin at a young age
Children demonstrate early in life social skills and a strong desire to interact with their peers. They engage in social interactions more often than our closest relatives, the great apes, a new study finds. This social and natural predisposition of humans for interaction appears to be a key element in understanding the evolution of language.
5h
Eerie Deepfake Tech Turns Random Guy Into Angelina Jolie
Deeper Fakes Right when you think deepfakes can't get any creepier — or more technically impressive — a new demo comes along to raise the bar. A group of researchers working at the Samsung AI Center in Moscow recently unveiled their latest work on one-shot "neural head avatar technology," in a project they've dubbed "MegaPortraits," or megapixel portraits (note that they avoid the much-stigmatize
5h
Family alcohol history may put you at risk of junk food addiction
People with a parent with a history of alcohol problems are at greater risk for showing signs of addiction to highly processed foods, according to a new study. These foods, such as ice cream, chocolate, pizza, and fries, contain unnaturally high amounts of refined carbohydrates and fats that may trigger an addictive response in some people. The researchers wanted to know if a major risk factor fo
6h
Dual action of ketamine confines addiction liability
Nature, Published online: 27 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04993-7 Experiments in mice show that although ketamine has positive reinforcement properties, which are driven by its action on the dopamine system, it does not induce the synaptic plasticity that is typically observed with addiction.
6h
Dairying, diseases and the evolution of lactase persistence in Europe
Nature, Published online: 27 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-05010-7 Examination of archaeological pottery residues and modern genes suggest that environmental conditions, subsistence economics and pathogen exposure may explain selection for lactase persistence better than prehistoric consumption of milk.
6h
PI3K drives the de novo synthesis of coenzyme A from vitamin B5
Nature, Published online: 27 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04984-8 The PI3K–PANK4 axis regulates coenzyme A synthesis, the abundance of acetyl-CoA, and CoA-dependent processes such as lipid metabolism, and these regulatory mechanisms coordinate cellular CoA supplies with the demands of hormone and growth-factor-driven or oncogene-driven metabolism and growth.
6h
Magnetic memory and spontaneous vortices in a van der Waals superconductor
Nature, Published online: 27 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04855-2 An alternating stack of a candidate spin liquid and a superconductor shows a spontaneous vortex phase in the superconducting state without magnetism in the normal state. This indicates the presence of unconventional magnetic ordering independent of the superconductor.
6h
Practical quantum advantage in quantum simulation
Nature, Published online: 27 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04940-6 The current status and future perspectives for quantum simulation are overviewed, and the potential for practical quantum computational advantage is analysed by comparing classical numerical methods with analogue and digital quantum simulators.
6h
Threshold response to melt drives large-scale bed weakening in Greenland
Nature, Published online: 27 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04927-3 An analysis of basal-friction variability across western Greenland shows melt forcing influences bed strength in opposite ways in northern and southern Greenland, establishing melt has an important role in ice-sheet evolution that is mainly dictated by whether a region is land or marine terminating.
6h
Molecular interplay of an assembly machinery for nitrous oxide reductase
Nature, Published online: 27 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-05015-2 Cryo-electron microscopy structures of the bacterial protein machinery that is involved in the production and function of nitrous oxide provide insight into the assembly pathway of this enzyme and the mechanisms of copper transport.
6h
Experimental quantum key distribution certified by Bell's theorem
Nature, Published online: 27 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04941-5 This study demonstrates the experimental realization of a complete protocol for quantum key distribution using entangled trapped strontium ions with device-independent quantum security guarantees.
6h
Quantum entanglement provides a key to improved security
Nature, Published online: 27 July 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01987-3 A cryptographic scheme offers a secure way of exchanging data using a phenomenon called quantum entanglement. The approach relies on special quantum correlations between particles that help to prevent tampering.
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Akt protein boosts cancer metabolism through a two-pronged attack
Nature, Published online: 27 July 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01603-4 Mutated forms of the protein Akt can be central drivers of cancer metabolism. A mechanism by which Akt promotes synthesis of the metabolic molecule coenzyme A broadens our understanding of the protein's activity.
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A short burst of reward curbs the addictiveness of ketamine
Nature, Published online: 27 July 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01948-w An analysis of ketamine and cocaine use in mice reveals that the drugs trigger release of the neurotransmitter dopamine through different mechanisms, and indicates that the risk of addiction to ketamine is low.
6h
Molecules cooled in a microwave freezer
Nature, Published online: 27 July 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01752-6 Cooling molecular gases to nanokelvin temperatures is challenging because the molecules start to stick together when they reach the microkelvin range. Using a strong, rotating microwave field, a gas of sodium–potassium polar molecules has been stabilized and cooled to 21 nanokelvins — opening up many possibilities to explore e
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Trapped meltwater affects mass loss of Greenland ice sheet
Nature, Published online: 27 July 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01986-4 An analysis suggests that ice geometry and flow speeds control how meltwater affects the slipperiness of the bed beneath the Greenland ice sheet. Changes in these conditions could therefore influence future ice-mass loss.
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The mystery of early milk consumption in Europe
Nature, Published online: 27 July 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-02041-y What underpins how humans evolved the capacity to consume milk during adulthood? A look at the connection between health and the genetic changes needed to break down milk offers a surprising new perspective.
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Is there a difference between paradigmatic conceptual analyses and simple conceptual analyses ?
I'm reading the SEP article about concepts and they're talking about paradigmatic conceptual analyses. Paradigmatic conceptual analyses offer definitions of concepts that are to be tested against potential counterexamples that are identified via thought experiments. Conceptual analysis is supposed to be a distinctively a priori activity that many take to be the essence of philosophy. Does "paradi
6h
Training Specific Cognitive Functions
Hi, Tldr; Are there specific resources for training specific cognitive abilities that you would point to? Along the years I have read a few books on training memory (learning associations, connecting ideas to make the memories stronger), puzzles of different kind, etc. Those were actually useful and interesting, as it was learning about Deep Learning / ML, psychology and neurosc. But finding prac
6h
Artificial skin sweats on command
Following the breakthrough with their first sweating artificial skin two years ago, Danqing Liu's multidisciplinary team hasn't been sitting still. Their goal: an artificial skin that sweats as naturally as possible. They have succeeded in this, as can be read in their article in Angewandte Chemie. There, they explain how they managed to be the first team in the world to be able to accurately cont
6h
Famine and disease drove the evolution of lactose tolerance in Europe
Prehistoric people in Europe were consuming milk thousands of years before humans evolved the genetic trait allowing us to digest the milk sugar lactose as adults, finds a new study. The research, published in Nature, mapped pre-historic patterns of milk use over the last 9,000 years, offering new insights into milk consumption and the evolution of lactose tolerance.
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Quantum cryptography: Making hacking futile
The Internet is teeming with highly sensitive information. Sophisticated encryption techniques generally ensure that such content cannot be intercepted and read. But in the future high-performance quantum computers could crack these keys in a matter of seconds. It is just as well, then, that quantum mechanical techniques not only enable new, much faster algorithms, but also exceedingly effective c
6h
Quantum key distribution based on high-quality quantum entanglement
A method known as quantum key distribution has long held the promise of communication security unattainable in conventional cryptography. An international team of scientists has now demonstrated experimentally, for the first time, an approach to quantum key distribution that is based on high-quality quantum entanglement—offering much broader security guarantees than previous schemes.
6h
Exploring how our social interactions begin at a young age
What do building pyramids, going to the moon, paddling a two-person canoe or dancing a waltz have in common? All these actions are the result of a common goal between multiple partners and lead to a mutual sense of obligation, known as "joint commitment." This ability to cooperate is universal in humans and certain species of animals, like the great apes.
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China, Vietnam, and Indonesia among fastest-growing countries for coming decade
China, Vietnam, Uganda, Indonesia, and India are projected to be among the fastest-growing economies to 2030. That is the conclusion of researchers at the Growth Lab at Harvard University who presented new growth projections in The Atlas of Economic Complexity. The release provides the first detailed look at 2020 trade data, including major disruptions to tourism and transport vehicle exports from
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Notch, RORC and IL-23 signals cooperate to promote multi-lineage human innate lymphoid cell differentiation
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-32089-3 Innate lymphoid cells (ILC) are effector cells that rapidly respond to immune evading stimuli, and despite their functional diversity arise from common precursors. Authors here show how the Notch signalling pathway orchestrates ILC development from circulating human ILC precursors via RORC and its target IL-23R.
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Targeting transcription in heart failure via CDK7/12/13 inhibition
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31541-8 In this study, Hsu et al. show that inhibition of CDK7/12/13 attenuates maladaptive transcriptional activation in cultured cardiomyocytes and a mouse model of heart failure, suggesting that targeting the transcription machinery might be a therapeutic approach to treat heart failure with reduced ejection fraction
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Lactational delivery of Triclosan promotes non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in newborn mice
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31947-4 Triclosan is an antimicrobial additive in consumer products that has been detected in human breast milk. Here the authors report that exposure of pregnant mice to triclosan leads to lactational exposure to newborns and the development of liver steatosis.
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Tree's stinging needles may hold clues to pain
A stinging tree from New Zealand produces toxins that could hold clues for future pain medication, say researchers. In a quest to find new molecules that affect pain pathways, Thomas Durek, Sam Robinson, and a team from the University of Queensland's Institute for Molecular Bioscience studied toxins from the tree nettle known as ongaonga, one of New Zealand's most poisonous plants. It can cause p
6h
Team makes COVID antibodies in eggs
Researchers have been able to produce antibodies to the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein in hen eggs. Antibodies harvested from eggs might be used to treat COVID-19 or as a preventative measure for people exposed to the disease. "The beauty of the system is that you can produce a lot of antibodies in birds," says Rodrigo Gallardo, a professor in poultry medicine in the population health and reproduction
6h
New Teslas To Require Paid Navigation Subscription After Eight Years
(Photo: Bram Van Oost/Unsplash) In a major blow to anyone who wants their car to actually have its advertised features, all new Teslas will require a paid subscription to access navigation and other features after the first eight years. Up until this summer, all Teslas came with Standard Connectivity, which drivers could enjoy throughout the lifetime of their vehicle. Standard Connectivity is the
6h
Team scripts breakthrough quantum algorithm
City College of New York physicist Pouyan Ghaemi and his research team are claiming significant progress in using quantum computers to study and predict how the state of a large number of interacting quantum particles evolves over time. This was done by developing a quantum algorithm that they run on an IBM quantum computer. "To the best of our knowledge, such particular quantum algorithm which ca
7h
Hidden Chaos Found to Lurk in Ecosystems
Physical scientists seem to find the phenomenon of chaos everywhere: in the orbits of planets, in weather systems, in a river's swirling eddies. For nearly three decades, ecologists considered chaos in the living world to be surprisingly rare by comparison. A new analysis, however, reveals that chaos is far more prevalent in ecosystems than researchers thought. Tanya Rogers was looking back… So
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Impractical Jokers Dump Chum on Sal While He's in a Shark Cage! | Shark Week
Stream Impractical Jokers: Shark Week Spectacular on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/impractical-jokers-shark-week-spectacular-us #discovery #sharkweek #impracticaljokers About Impractical Jokers: Shark Week Spectacular: The Impractical Jokers are the kings of hijinx and fearlessness in the face of public humiliation, but see what happens when they set out to dispel the myth that
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Femtosecond laser bionic fabrication enabling bubble manipulation
The manipulation and use of gas in water have broad applications in energy utilization, chemical manufacturing, environmental protection, agricultural breeding, microfluidic chips, and health care. The possibility of driving underwater bubbles to move directionally and continuously over a given distance via unique gradient geometries has been successfully archived, opening room for more research o
7h
China spacecraft returns amid booster rocket concerns
A Chinese cargo spacecraft that serviced the country's permanent orbiting space station has largely burned up on reentering the atmosphere, amid separate concerns over China's decision to allow a massive booster rocket to fall to Earth uncontrolled.
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James Lovelock, creator of Gaia hypothesis, dies on 103rd birthday
The scientist was best known for his theory that the Earth is a self-regulating community of organisms James Lovelock, the creator of the Gaia hypothesis , has died on his 103rd birthday. The climate scientist died at home on Tuesday surrounded by loved ones, his family said. Lovelock, who was one of the UK's most respected independent scientists, had been in good health until six months ago, whe
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A Startup Is 3D Printing Bionic Arms for Ukrainians Injured in Conflict
Two years ago, prosthetics startup Unlimited Tomorrow launched TrueLimb, its next-generation bionic arm. Six years of research and development went into TrueLimb, and the technology has given hundreds of people in the US an affordable, non-invasive way to replace lost limbs. Now, a new initiative is taking TrueLimb to a part of the world where many people need it: Ukraine. We've all seen the foot
7h
Human lung proteins can advance or thwart SARS-CoV-2 infections
In a new study, researchers used CRISPR technology to test the impact of every human gene on SARS-CoV-2 infections in human lung cells. Their findings revealed new pathways that the virus relies on to infect cells, as well as the antiviral pathways that protect against viral infection. Notably, they showed that mucins — the main component of mucus found in the lungs — seem to help block the SARS
7h
Rise of biting led to reef fish diversity
Research shows that coral reefs' diversity of fish results from a relatively recent innovation among bony fish: biting prey from surfaces. Although jawed fish appear in the fossil record almost 500 million years ago, feeding by grazing, nibbling, or gnawing food off rocks and corals didn't appear among the teleosts (the group that includes most bony fish) until after the dinosaur-killing mass ext
7h
Early work experiences are important for subsequent employment for youth with disabilities
A primary purpose of special education is to equip students with disabilities for a flourishing future after graduation. Yet, the employment outcomes of youth with disabilities have continued to lag far behind their peers without disabilities. In an exhaustive review of the literature, researchers found that in most studies, youth with disabilities were much more likely to obtain work after partic
7h
Climate model predicts more heavy rainfall events over active volcanoes as planet warms
A pair of researchers at the University of Miami has found evidence that suggests global warming could lead to more heavy rain events over volcanoes around the world leading to more eruptions and mudslides. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, Falk Amelung and Jamie Farquharson, describe how they used climate models run under various scenarios to learn more about the
7h
There is a lot of antisemitic hate speech on social media, and algorithms are partly to blame
Antisemitic incidents have shown a sharp rise in the United States. The Anti-Defamation League, a New York-based Jewish civil rights group that has been tracking cases since 1979, found that there were 2,717 incidents in 2021. This represents an increase of 34% over 2020. In Europe, the European Commission found a sevenfold increase in antisemitic postings across French language accounts, and an o
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Moths are major pollinators for clover
A team of researchers from Aarhus University and the Institute for Integrative Biology, ETH Zürich, has found that moths are major clover pollinators. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the group describes how they studied imagery from time-lapse cameras they set up in the Swiss Alps and what they learned by studying images captured by the cameras at night.
7h
Why cycling lanes should be on the fast track for cities
You might've noticed more cycleways rolling out around town recently. Whether it's a designated path alongside a main street or spray-on white lines and traffic cones cordoning off a portion of a back street, these car-free paths for cycling fans are becoming fixtures of street design.
7h
Viruses help combat antibiotic-resistant bacteria
More and more bacteria are becoming resistant to antibiotics. Bacteriophages are one alternative in the fight against bacteria. These viruses attack very particular bacteria in a highly specific way. Now a Munich research team has developed a new way to produce bacteriophages efficiently and without risk.
7h
Automatic recognition of jellyfish with artificial intelligence
The jellyfish sighting app, MedusApp, recently incorporated artificial intelligence (AI) to automatically recognize different species of jellyfish. Until now, this app only required users to select the species of jellyfish from a catalog provided; now the user can upload photos and have the species automatically identified before uploading them to the app for publication.
7h
Moths are major pollinators for clover
A team of researchers from Aarhus University and the Institute for Integrative Biology, ETH Zürich, has found that moths are major clover pollinators. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the group describes how they studied imagery from time-lapse cameras they set up in the Swiss Alps and what they learned by studying images captured by the cameras at night.
7h
Automatic recognition of jellyfish with artificial intelligence
The jellyfish sighting app, MedusApp, recently incorporated artificial intelligence (AI) to automatically recognize different species of jellyfish. Until now, this app only required users to select the species of jellyfish from a catalog provided; now the user can upload photos and have the species automatically identified before uploading them to the app for publication.
7h
Losing spouse to COVID may be worse for mental health than other deaths
Losing a spouse can be a devastating experience for anyone, but the death of a spouse from COVID-19 may be worse for mental health than deaths from other causes, a new study shows. While there were strong associations between the recent death of a spouse and poorer mental health both before and during the pandemic, people who lost a spouse to COVID-19 were more likely to report symptoms of depres
7h
ESA makes ground motion data freely accessible
Any movement beneath our feet—from barely perceptible subsidence to the sudden appearance of a sinkhole or a crashing landslide—spells big trouble. Even relatively modest subsidence can weaken buildings and infrastructure and lead to issues such as flooding, and at worst the abrupt disappearance of sections of land brings immediate threat to life. Monitoring and predicting our shifting land is cle
8h
How some cassava plants evade mosaic virus
Researchers have identified the gene responsible for resistance in certain cassava cultivars against the devastating cassava mosaic disease. The finding is an important step for breeding virus-resistant cassava varieties. Cassava, also known as manioc, is a staple food for nearly one billion people and an important source of raw materials. It secures an income for smallholder farmers, especially
8h
Is Russia killing off the International Space Station?
Analysis: Fractures in the partnership have appeared before, but if Moscow exits, keeping the station in orbit would not be easy The International Space Station, which circles the planet from 250 miles up, is often considered to be above the earthly conflicts that play out beneath. The orbiting outpost has weathered its share of political turmoil in more than two decades of hosting humans. As a s
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The Download: Chinese robotaxi drivers, and AI gun detection
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. A day in the life of a Chinese robotaxi driver When Liu Yang started his current job, he found it hard to go back to driving his own car: "I instinctively went for the passenger seat. Or when I was driving, I would expect the car to brake by itself," says the
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Does the Covid vaccine really affect your period? Here's what our study found | Viki Male
The results are reassuring: the changes are small and short-lived, and other studies show the jab does not affect fertility Viki Male is a lecturer in reproductive immunology at Imperial College London In January 2021, my colleagues at the hospital were among the first to receive the Covid-19 vaccine. Comparing the side-effects afterwards, most of us had a sore arm, some of us felt feverish and g
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In the dark
Nature, Published online: 27 July 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-02045-8 Ground truth.
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New class of nanoparticle-based vaccines could help immunize against cancer
A vaccination as tumor therapy—with a vaccine individually created from a patient's tissue sample that "attaches" the body's own immune system to cancer cells. The basis for this long-term vision has now been achieved by a team of researchers from the MPI for Polymer Research and the University Medical Center Mainz, in particular from the Departments of Immunology and Dermatology. Their results we
9h
Switch to a circular economy could protect the environment while generating more value
In 1924, a cartel of lightbulb manufacturers including General Electric and Philips agreed to artificially limit the lifespan of their products to about 1,000 hours, down from 2,500. The scandal, revealed decades later, came to epitomize the linear consumption model of making, consuming, and then discarding products that took hold during the Industrial Revolution and has been dominant ever since.
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Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria re-launches VicFlora database to help identify plants
Today, Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria re-launched its plant biodiversity website, VicFlora. The new portal features upgrades that allow users to identify Victoria's plants more easily. It is based on a new, open-source core that allows Gardens botanists to easily add new usability and accessibility features to continually improve the user experience.
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New insights into the regulation of intuitive and reflexive body perception in insects
A new study shows how movement-induced postural reflexes in stick insects are modified under different loading conditions. A team of scientists from the University of Cologne (Germany) and Ohio University (U.S.) traced the load and movement signals from the sensory organs in the insect's leg through the neuronal network to the motor neurons and muscles that generate the reflex. This allowed them t
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What Donald Trump Got Out of His Divorce From Ivana
The funeral for the first wife of former President Donald Trump , Ivana, took place on a hot July day at St. Vincent Ferrer Roman Catholic Church on Manhattan's Upper East Side, not far from the townhouse where she died at the age of 73. Her golden casket sat next to a large poster board of her 1992 Vanity Fair cover, which read Ivana Be a Star! The story, by Bob Colacello, chronicled the junketi
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The British Right Doesn't Want to Hear Doubts
This is a long, hot summer in Britain, and 150,000 people are choosing our next prime minister. One candidate is charmlessly patrician, full to bursting with clever, informed answers. The other talks about "challenging the orthodoxy"—a fancier version of "draining the swamp"—and is accused of denying reality. Care to make a bet on who will win? Last week, the race to succeed Boris Johnson narrowe
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What Nancy Pelosi's Taiwan Trip Says About China
Imagine, for a moment, that Nancy Pelosi, en route to Taiwan, is confronted by Chinese fighter jets in the skies near the island. Taiwan scrambles its own planes to her defense. A game of chicken ensues. Who blinks first? This scenario would be a Cuban-missile-crisis moment, with the United States and China staring at a potential conflagration. And based on Beijing's strident reaction to the Hous
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Fossil discovery complicates placenta vs. pouch
An extinct group of mammals, the multituberculates, challenge assumptions about the evolution of mammal and marsupial reproduction. Based on how they reproduce, nearly all mammals alive today fall into one of two categories: placental mammals and marsupials. Placentals, including humans, whales, and rodents, have long gestation periods. They give birth to well-developed young—with all major organ
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New insights into the regulation of intuitive and reflexive body perception in insects
A new study shows how movement-induced postural reflexes in stick insects are modified under different loading conditions. A team of scientists from the University of Cologne (Germany) and Ohio University (U.S.) traced the load and movement signals from the sensory organs in the insect's leg through the neuronal network to the motor neurons and muscles that generate the reflex. This allowed them t
9h
Hawaiʻi telescopes help uncover origins of castaway gamma-ray bursts
An international team of astronomers has found that certain short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) did not originate as castaways in the vastness of intergalactic space as they initially appeared. A deeper multi-observatory study instead found that these seemingly isolated GRBs actually occurred in remarkably distant—and therefore faint—galaxies up to 10 billion light-years away.
9h
Study: Londoners at increased risk of dying from heat stress
As much of Europe and the United States continue to deal with extreme heat, and cities like London break all-time high temperature records, an economist at the University of Missouri predicts Londoners in particular are at an increased risk of dying from heat stress. Based on current trends, J. Isaac "Zack" Miller said a heat event that raises the risk of death as much as 9.4% in any given year wi
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LifeGate: New interactive map shows the full diversity of life
Researchers from Leipzig published a gigantic digital map displaying the full diversity of life through thousands of photos. The so-called LifeGate encompasses all 2.6 million known species of this planet and shows their relationship to one another. The interactive map can now be accessed free of charge at lifegate.idiv.de.
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Some don't like it hot: Thermal conductivity-switching bottleneck resolved
Mobile phones from a few decades ago look like antiquated plastic toys today. That's an example of the dramatic miniaturization of modern electronics, as well as added functionality. Unfortunately, this miniaturization comes with a problem: the challenge of dissipating heat. This challenge limits the functionality of ultra-small electronic devices. For practical applications, the solution to heat
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Impact of climate on river chemistry across the United States
Rivers flow across many kinds of terrain, interacting with soil, rocks, microbes, and roots. River water therefore carries signatures of everything it interacts with, and its chemistry reflects the response of the critical zone—the region of the planet stretching from the tops of trees to the bottom of groundwater—to changing climate. River chemistry is likely to change with a warming climate, yet
9h
New model developed to predict landslides along wildfire burn scars
A wildfire followed by an intense rainstorm is often a recipe for disaster. Without vegetation to cushion rainfall, water runoff can turn into a fast-moving, highly destructive landslide, called a "debris flow," which often has the power to wipe out cars, homes and highways—sometimes resulting in casualties.
10h
Against 'Public Health'
Everything is supposedly a "public health" issue in the US, but this buzzword does little to address real challenges.
10h
Structural network alterations in focal and generalized epilepsy assessed in a worldwide ENIGMA study follow axes of epilepsy risk gene expression
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31730-5 Epilepsy is a brain network disorder with associated genetic risk factors. Here, the authors show that spatial patterns of transcriptomic vulnerability co-vary with structural brain network alterations in focal and generalized epilepsy.
11h
Genome-wide association study identifies Sjögren's risk loci with functional implications in immune and glandular cells
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30773-y The genetic architecture underlying Sjögren's syndrome is not fully understood. Here, the authors perform a genome-wide association study to identify 10 new genetic risk regions, implicating genes involved in immune and salivary gland function.
11h
Bayesian tomography of high-dimensional on-chip biphoton frequency combs with randomized measurements
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31639-z Full tomography of biphoton frequency comb states requires frequency mixing operations which are hard to scale. Here, the authors propose and demonstrate a protocol exploiting advanced Bayesian statistical methods and randomized measurements coming from complex mode mixing in electro-optic phase modulators.
11h
Man Who Lost Crypto Fortune in Landfill Wants to Use Robots to Find It
Imagine realizing that you accidentally threw away a winning lottery ticket. You'd probably be digging through the trash, and if the jackpot was high enough, you might even toy with paying a visit to your local landfill. This has been a reality for a UK man named James Howells for the past decade, only instead of a lottery ticket, he's looking for a hard drive containing the keys to millions of d
11h
Do two PhDs make twice the researcher?
Nature, Published online: 27 July 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-02042-x Some scientists earn two PhD degrees to expand their skills, cross fields or create a niche research programme.
12h
A day in the life of a Chinese robotaxi driver
When Liu Yang started his current job, he found it hard to go back to driving his own car: "I instinctively went for the passenger seat. Or when I was driving, I would expect the car to brake by itself," says the 33-year-old Beijing native, who joined the Chinese tech giant Baidu in January 2021 as a robotaxi driver. If you live in a place like San Francisco, Phoenix , or Shenzhen, you are probab
12h
Buzz Aldrin Apollo 11 jacket sold at auction for record $2.7m
White inflight jacket worn on mission to the moon fetches record price for a US space artefact The jacket worn by Buzz Aldrin on his first mission to the moon has become the most valuable American space artefact ever sold at auction, fetching $2.77m (£2.3m). The article was sold by Sotheby's in New York on Tuesday as part of the most valuable single sale of space exploration items ever staged, wh
12h
Reef fish evolution driven by biting
Coral reefs are home to a spectacular variety of fish. A new study by biologists at the University of California, Davis shows that much of this diversity is driven by a relatively recent innovation among bony fish—feeding by biting prey from surfaces. The work is published the week of July 25 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
13h
Demystifying DNA hybridization kinetics
Nanoscientists and theoretical physicists at UNSW Medicine & Health's EMBL Australia Node in Single Molecule Science joined forces to demystify the complicated mechanisms governing how quickly two matching strands of DNA can fully come together—or hybridize—to form double stranded DNA. Their findings are published in the journal Nucleic Acids Research.
13h
The U.K. Advises Coming off Antidepressants Very, Very Slowly
Antidepressants can help alleviate anxiety and depression, but some people experience debilitating symptoms when trying to come off these medications. Researchers are learning more about how to minimize withdrawal symptoms as mounting evidence shows severe side effects are more common than previously thought.
14h
A reconfigurable and magnetically responsive assembly for dynamic solar steam generation
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-32051-3 Despite a promising water harvesting approach solar steam generation low efficiency remains a challenging obstacle. Here, authors present a macro- and microscopically reconfigurable and magnetically responsive assembly towards a dynamic evaporation system with improved performance and salt resistance.
14h
Dietary protein increases T-cell-independent sIgA production through changes in gut microbiota-derived extracellular vesicles
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31761-y Secretory IgA plays vital roles interfacing between the host immune system and the resident microbiota at the mucosal surface. Here the authors explore the effect of dietary protein on the production of secretory IgA, driven by the production of extracellular vesicles by the intestinal microbiota.
14h
Drones could deliver COVID-19 tests to homes
Researchers have developed a new COVID-19 test distribution method that uses drones to quickly deliver at-home diagnostic tests to people who suspect they have COVID-19. The coronavirus pandemic showed that a key part of controlling the spread of a contagious disease is to quickly and accurately identify who has been infected. This allows for distancing and quarantining of infectious people to re
15h
Kew Gardens secures a multimillion-pound climate change investment
Greensphere Capital aims to invest up to £100m in research into some of world's most pressing challenges The Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew has secured a multimillion-pound investment to help commercialise its research into climate change-resistant crops, zero-carbon fertiliser and plant- and cell-based meat and dairy products. Greensphere Capital, a sustainability-focused fund, is aiming to invest
16h
Terrawatch: how mass extinctions can spur on evolution
Evidence from 252m years ago shows surviving animals bounced back stronger, fitter, faster and smarter Mass extinctions are not all bad news: survivors bounce back stronger, fitter, faster and smarter than before. Palaeontologists studying the most deadly mass extinction of all time – the end-Permian, 252m years ago – have shown that predators rapidly became swifter and more deadly, while prey an
16h
The volcanic eruption in Alaska that rocked ancient Egypt
This is a re-post from Yale Climate Connections by Jennifer Marlon and Joseph Manning Cleopatra wouldn't have seen the clouds of ash darken the sky from her throne in Alexandria, but the effects of the eruption of an Alaskan volcano rippled through Egypt and the rest of the ancient world in 43 BCE. We are part of an interdisciplinary research team that is detailing the fingerprints of that erupti
16h
Specific brain responses to traumatic stress linked to PTSD risk
Results from the largest prospective study of its kind indicate that in the initial days and weeks after experiencing trauma, individuals facing potentially threatening situations who had less activity in their hippocampus developed more severe posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms.
19h
Improving image sensors for machine vision
Researchers highlight the latest nanostructured components integrated on image sensor chips that are most likely to make the biggest impact in multimodal imaging and detailed a promising approach to detect multiple-band spectra by fabricating an on-chip spectrometer. The developments could enable autonomous vehicles to see around corners instead of just a straight line, biomedical imaging to detec
19h
Bioinspired protein creates stretchable 2D layered materials
Nature creates layered materials like bone and mother-of-pearl that become less sensitive to defects as they grow. Now researchers have created, using biomimetic proteins patterned on squid ring teeth, composite layered 2D materials that are resistant to breaking and extremely stretchable.
19h
Trump's 2024 Soft Launch
The idea of a Donald Trump–oriented think tank is inherently absurd. Whatever your views on the former president, there's no question that wonkish attention to policy was never the point or the focus of his administration—which might explain the strangeness of his speech today at the America First Agenda Summit, where a blood-soaked philippic on crime became a cringey laugh-fest of transphobic jo
20h
Scientists discover places on the moon where it's always 'sweater weather'
A team led by planetary scientists has discovered shady locations within pits on the moon that always hover around a comfortable 63 degrees Fahrenheit. The pits, and caves to which they may lead, would make safer, more thermally stable base camps for lunar exploration and long-term habitation than the rest of the moon's surface, which heats up to 260 degrees during the day and drops to 280 degrees
20h
Long Covid costing UK workers up to £1.5bn yearly in lost income, says IFS
Researchers say impact of rise to 2 million cases meant it was 'a significant part of pandemic's legacy' Long Covid is costing the UK up to £1.5bn a year in lost earnings, researchers say, after the number of people suffering persistent symptoms of the virus doubled over the last 12 months. The Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) said the impact of a rise in long Covid cases from 1 to 2 million sh
22h
The Pop Star We Need Right Now
This is an edition of The Atlantic Daily, a newsletter that guides you through the biggest stories of the day, helps you discover new ideas, and recommends the best in culture. Sign up for it here . Are you ready to "release the wiggle"? Beyoncé's new album will soon test America's appetite for dancing—and her ability to adapt to the times. But first, here are three new stories from The Atlantic
22h
Molecular mechanism of toxin neutralization in the HipBST toxin-antitoxin system of Legionella pneumophila
Nature Communications, Published online: 26 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-32049-x Here, the authors demonstrate that the Legionella pneumophila T4SS effector protein Lpg2370 is a Ser/Thr kinase and a toxin of a tripartite HipBST toxin-antitoxin (TA) system. Structural data and biochemical analysis provide detailed insights into the toxin neutralization mechanism in the HipBST TA.
23h
Researchers identify how cells move faster through mucus than blood
Researchers have discovered that certain cells move surprisingly faster in thicker fluid because their ruffled edges sense the viscosity of their environment and adapt to increase their speed. Their combined results in cancer and fibroblast cells suggest that the viscosity of a cell's surrounding environment is an important contributor to disease, and may help explain tumor progression, scarring i
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Tesla Cuts Car's Range By 30%, Demands $4,500 to Get It Back
Buying a used Tesla comes with some inherent risks. A major one is that you can't count on being able to access all of the features the car was originally sold with, in an unfortunate side effect of the increasingly internet-connected vehicles that Tesla itself pioneered. In the latest example, a motorist who bought a used 2013 Model S is now being forced to pay $4,500 to unlock the full range of
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Decades of Alzheimer's Research Allegedly Based on Fabricated Data
Alzheimer's disease is one of humanity's greatest medical enemies. It's a disease of mental deterioration, gradually stripping away a person's cognition, their recognition of loved ones, their memories, and eventually, their life. Scientists have endeavored for years to find a definitive cause and cure. But now, serious allegations claim that the past 20 years of research has been based on a stud
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China Attaches New Section Onto Its Brand New Space Station
New Addition China has added a new science laboratory module to its growing space station this week, an impressive feat shows the outpost is quickly turning into a worthy alternative to the aging International Space Station, even as the ISS descends into international drama . It's also happening at a breakneck speed. The construction of the ISS took around 12 years. China wants to build its own —
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Best AA Batteries in 2022
Most of us come into contact with gadgets that use AA batteries every day. They keep clocks, flashlights, smoke alarms, cameras, toys, and more running. It's also likely that when they eventually go flat, you simply swap them out for whatever you have stashed in a drawer. But although all AA batteries are the same physical size, they don't all deliver power in the same way. So just grabbing what'
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Researchers identify how cells move faster through mucus than blood
Researchers have discovered that certain cells move surprisingly faster in thicker fluid because their ruffled edges sense the viscosity of their environment and adapt to increase their speed. Their combined results in cancer and fibroblast cells suggest that the viscosity of a cell's surrounding environment is an important contributor to disease, and may help explain tumor progression, scarring i
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CRISPR therapeutics can damage the genome, researchers warn
A new study identifies risks in the use of CRISPR therapeutics — an innovative, Nobel-prize-winning method that involves cleaving and editing DNA, already employed for the treatment of conditions like cancer, liver and intestinal diseases, and genetic syndromes.
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Rare plants attract rare bees and birds in urban gardens
Urban gardens can be hotspots for biodiversity in cities, but little is known about what drives the biodiversity of species existing at the smallest frequencies, or rare biodiversity. Rare plant species in urban gardens attract rare bee and bird species, according to a Dartmouth-led study examining urban garden sites in northern California. The results, published in Ecological Applications, show t
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Novel method examines the gas-liquid interface in new detail
The interface between gases and liquids is found throughout nature. It is also important to many industrial processes. To improve understanding of the gas-liquid interface, researchers have developed an apparatus to study reactions between gas molecules and highly volatile liquids with new levels of detail. It uses a molecular beam that is directed onto a flat liquid surface. When the beam scatter
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Rare plants attract rare bees and birds in urban gardens
Urban gardens can be hotspots for biodiversity in cities, but little is known about what drives the biodiversity of species existing at the smallest frequencies, or rare biodiversity. Rare plant species in urban gardens attract rare bee and bird species, according to a Dartmouth-led study examining urban garden sites in northern California. The results, published in Ecological Applications, show t
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Roboticists discover alternative physics
Energy, mass, velocity. These three variables make up Einstein's iconic equation E=MC2. But how did Einstein know about these concepts in the first place? A precursor step to understanding physics is identifying relevant variables. Without the concept of energy, mass, and velocity, not even Einstein could discover relativity. But can such variables be discovered automatically? Doing so could great
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Videos Show Meteor So Bright It Lit the Entire Sky
Fire in the Sky In the earliest hours of Saturday morning, residents of Indiana and several surrounding states — or at least their video-enabled doorbells — were treated to an awe-inspiring surprise: a massive meteor, hurtling through the atmosphere and so spectacularly bright that it lit the night sky. According to an American Meteor Society (AMS) report by fireball report coordinator Robert Lun
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Get $140 Off Razer Anzu Smart Glasses and Other Wearable Tech Deals
Google Glass didn't take off, but the concept is sound — pun intended. Smart glasses not only filter out harmful light indoors and out but pack some innovative features into lenses including speakers and cameras. If James Bond were real, this was how he would accessorize when taking a beach trip or simply having a Friday night in, playing "Fortnite" for hours on end. And just in time for the heig
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Bored Apes Creators Facing Class Action Lawsuit
BAYCused Yuga Labs — the company behind the high-value, celeb-beloved NFT collection Bored Ape Yacht Club (BAYC) — may soon find itself on the other end of a serious lawsuit . Decrypt reports that a New York law firm is organizing a class-action lawsuit against the cryptosphere leader, accusing it of falsely fluffing the worth of both BAYC NFTs and the company's crypto token, ApeCoin , by promoti
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Cocaine preference and neuroadaptations are maintained by astrocytic NMDA receptors in the nucleus accumbens
Abstract Cocaine-associated memories induce cravings and interfere with the ability of users to cease cocaine use. Reducing the strength of cue-drug memories by facilitating extinction may have therapeutic value for the treatment of cocaine addiction. Here, we demonstrate the expression of GluN1/2A/2C NMDA receptor currents in astrocytes in the nucleus accumbens core. Selective ablation of GluN1
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Microchips headed to space on NASA's Artemis I moon mission
On July 20, 53 years after Neil Armstrong took one small step for man and one giant leap for mankind, NASA announced target launch dates for the Artemis I mission, the agency's long-awaited first step to returning astronauts to the moon and eventually Mars. Even though there won't be people onboard the Orion spacecraft when it blasts off later this summer, it will carry dozens of tiny tributes to
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Firms time announcements of data breaches to bury the bad news
New research in the INFORMS journal Management Science finds that firms that have experienced data breaches intentionally stage the timing of such announcements around other significant breaking news as a means of reducing media coverage and minimizing public attention.
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'ZIP' codes tell RNA molecules how to get to their designated locations
They say that life comes without an instruction manual, but that's not entirely true. Each cell in our bodies lives according to instructions issued by its DNA in the form of RNA molecules. RNA was recently thrust into the limelight as the basis of innovative COVID-19 vaccines, but much fundamental knowledge about this vital molecule—for example, how it manages to make its way in the cell to a des
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New glass-ceramic emits light when under mechanical stress
Researchers have created a new glass-ceramic that emits light in response to mechanical stress, a property known as mechanoluminescence. With further development, the new material could be used to create a light source that is switched on by mechanical stress.
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Researchers confirm brain region's role in mind-body communication
Researchers have produced definitive evidence that a specific region in the brain, called the subthalamic nucleus, is critical to governing the mind's communication with the body's motor control system. The findings, stemming from innovative experiments with humans, could yield advances in treatment for Parkinson's disease.
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'ZIP' codes tell RNA molecules how to get to their designated locations
They say that life comes without an instruction manual, but that's not entirely true. Each cell in our bodies lives according to instructions issued by its DNA in the form of RNA molecules. RNA was recently thrust into the limelight as the basis of innovative COVID-19 vaccines, but much fundamental knowledge about this vital molecule—for example, how it manages to make its way in the cell to a des
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Hot on trail of causes of rapid ice sheet instabilities in climate history
Extreme cooling events during the last glacial period, known as Heinrich events in the North Atlantic, are a good example of how local processes change the global climate. While the impacts of Heinrich events on the global glacial environment are well-documented in the scientific literature, their causes are still unclear. In a new study, researchers from Bremen, Kiel, Köln and São Paulo (Brazil)
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For the first time, scientists have systematized all the halos discovered over thousands of years of observations
For the first time in the history of observations, scientists from the Helsinki and Ural Federal Universities, Jarmo Moilanen and Maria Gritsevich, have systematized information about all forms of atmospheric halos recorded by mankind at the end of 2021. From numerous sources of data on observations, the history of which includes 4-5 millennia, 119 different forms of atmospheric halo are known tod
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Wood heating pollutes the air in mountain areas more than previously assumed
Around 30 million people in Europe live in mountain valleys. A large part of this population is more affected by air pollution than previously assumed. This is the conclusion of a Slovenian-German research team from measurements in the Northern Dinaric Alps. Due to temperature inversions in winter, pollutants are trapped in the valleys to such an extent that soot and fine dust could reach alarming
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Dirac-source diode with sub-unity ideality factor
Nature Communications, Published online: 26 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31849-5 While different types of low-power transistors have been investigated, low voltage rectifiers able to overcome the thermionic limit have not been proposed yet. Here, the authors report the realization of Dirac-source diodes based on graphene/MoS2/graphite heterostructures, showing ideality factors <1and rectifyi
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Paeniclostridium sordellii hemorrhagic toxin targets TMPRSS2 to induce colonic epithelial lesions
Nature Communications, Published online: 26 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31994-x Paeniclostridium sordellii is an opportunistic pathogen that can occur and be fatal in women undergoing abortion or childbirth. The pathogenesis of a hemorrhagic toxin, TcsH, produced by this bacteria, remains unknown. Here, authors carry out genome-wide screens to identify pathologically relevant host factors o
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Hot on the trail of the causes of rapid ice sheet instabilities in climate history
Extreme cooling events during the last glacial, known as Heinrich Events in the North Atlantic, are a good example of how local processes change the global climate. While the impacts of Heinrich Events on the global glacial environment are well-documented in the scientific literature, their causes are still unclear. In a new study, researchers have now shown that an accumulation of heat in the dee
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1 in 2 Black teens faced online racism in 2020
One in two Black adolescents faced online racial discrimination during 2020, according to a new study. 2020 was a year of unrest: The COVID-19 pandemic disrupted society while the killings of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and other Black people in America sparked a wave of global protests. Ming-Te Wang and Juan Del Toro conducted a longitudinal study collecting 18,454 daily assessments of 602 Bla
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Exposure to 'forever chemicals' costs US billions in health costs
Daily exposure to a class of chemicals used in the production of many household items may lead to cancer, thyroid disease, and childhood obesity, a new study shows. The resulting economic burden is estimated to cost Americans a minimum of $5.5 billion and as much as $63 billion over the lifetime of the current population.
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Monster Hammerhead Swims Right Up to Divers in Dark Water! | Shark Week
Stream Rise of the Monster Hammerheads on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/rise-of-the-monster-hammerheads-us #discovery #sharkweek #shark About Rise of the Monster Hammerheads: Reports of two legendary, very large great hammerheads, Big Moe in the Florida Keys and Sunken in Andros, Bahamas, have Dr. Tristan Guttridge and Andy Casagrande wondering if there is a clan of monster hamm
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Coolest Back-to-School Gear for Elementary School Kids
Just like they have for decades, right now elementary schools are sending parents a list of demands, supply lists populated with the usual suspects of pencils, erasers, spiral notebooks, and so on. Move beyond the basics with our new and improved back to school list. Here's all the stuff we wished existed back when we went to school (when we had to walk there, in the snow, uphill, both ways). Raz
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Russia Says It's Definitely Quitting the ISS But Doesn't Say When Exactly
Russian space corporation Roscosmos has finally formally announced that it's abandoning the International Space Station — but it's keeping details extraordinarily vague, simply saying it'll leave at some point "after 2024." That's at least in part because Russia is planning to build its own space station . The country's invasion of Ukraine has also only served to accelerate the severing of its ti
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The Work of Giants Crumbles
Barely a month ago, Northern Ireland's former first minister David Trimble and his old partner in peace, the Republic of Ireland's Bertie Ahern, were sitting together in Belfast reminiscing about what they had built. With John Hume's death in 2020, Trimble and Ahern were among the last of the island's old giants. And now Trimble has gone too. Trimble, the joint architect of the 1998 Good Friday A
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What Putin's Treatment of Jews Reveals About Russia
Last week came news that Russian President Vladimir Putin was threatening to shut down the offices of the Jewish Agency for Israel in Russia. For those unfamiliar with it, the agency is a nonprofit that for nearly a century has been tasked with figuring out the nuts and bolts of Zionism—that is, how to get Jews to a Jewish state. It was banned from the Soviet Union, but began operating in the reg
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Meteor shower 2022: Piscis Austrinids first in trio of showers to dazzle Australia – how to see and best time to view
New moon will provide ideal viewing conditions for the Piscis Austrinids, Southern Delta Aquariids and Alpha Capricornids meteor showers this week as cosmic debris from comets enters Earth's atmosphere, before the Perseids peak in August Get our free news app , morning email briefing and daily news podcast The night sky is set to be illuminated by a trio of meteor showers – the Piscis Austrinids,
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Almost 50% of Australians had been infected with Covid as of mid-June, blood survey shows
Evidence of past infection was detected in 46% of samples, compared with 17% in February Follow the latest updates in our liveblog Get our free news app , morning email briefing and daily news podcast Almost half of all Australian adults had been infected with the Covid-19 virus between January and June this year, with many of those infected in the last three months, according to a national repor
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Researchers develop novel 3D atomic force microscopy probes
A team of researchers from NYU Abu Dhabi's Advanced Microfluidics and Microdevices Laboratory (AMMLab) have developed new kind of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) probes in true three-dimensional shapes they call 3DTIPs. AFM technology allows scientists to observe, measure, and manipulate samples and micro and nanoscale entities with unprecedented precision. The new 3DTIPs, which are manufactured usi
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Scientists Turn Dead Spiders Into "Necrobotic" Arachnoborgs
Spider-Bot If you really hate spiders, you might want to stay away from this one. Mechanical engineers at Rice University have figured out a way to turn dead spiders into "necrobotic" grippers. Yep, you heard that one right. It's a recent development in the field of soft robotics , which researches robots made from nontraditional, soft materials. And flesh, even from spiders, is pretty soft. Let'
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Dead wolf spider legs become handy grippers
Mechanical engineers are repurposing deceased spiders as mechanical grippers that can blend into natural environments while picking up objects, like other insects, that outweigh them. Why? "It happens to be the case that the spider, after it's deceased, is the perfect architecture for small scale, naturally derived grippers ," says Daniel Preston, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering
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Tracing the origin of lithium in Li-ion batteries using lithium isotopes
Nature Communications, Published online: 26 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31850-y Rechargeable Li-ion batteries play a key role in the energy transition towards clean energy. It is challenging for end users to ensure that Li comes from environmentally and responsible sources. Here the authors show that Li isotope 'fingerprints' are a useful tool for determining the origin of Li in battery.
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Reduction of primary graft dysfunction using cytokine adsorption during organ preservation and after lung transplantation
Nature Communications, Published online: 26 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31811-5 Lung transplantation is hindered by the scarcity of organs and by mortality following primary graft dysfunction. Here, the authors show that cytokine absorption can be used in donor lungs during ex vivo lung perfusion and post-transplant, and leads to restored lung function and reduced primary graft dysfunction
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Win-win opportunities combining high yields with high multi-taxa biodiversity in tropical agroforestry
Nature Communications, Published online: 26 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30866-8 Resolving ecological-economic trade-offs is a challenge in agriculture. Here, Wurz et al. find that in Malagasy vanilla agroforests, vanilla yield is generally not related to tree, herbaceous plant, bird, amphibian, reptile and ant biodiversity, creating opportunities for conservation outside protected areas.
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Plastic pollution fosters more microbial growth in lakes than natural organic matter
Nature Communications, Published online: 26 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31691-9 Ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry revealed that plastic bags leach labile compounds. Bioassays performed in Scandinavian lakes indicated that these compounds are incorporated into biomass faster and more efficiently than natural organic matter.
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Few older adults talk to docs about stuff like yoga and meditation
Nearly 40% of older adults use at least one integrative medicine strategy to try to ease symptoms of a physical or mental health issue, or to help them relax, a new poll finds. Whether they chose chiropractic care, massage therapy, meditation, yoga , or another non-conventional option 38% found it very beneficial, and another 54% said it was somewhat beneficial. Women, and adults aged 50 to 64, w
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Could a DAO build the next great city? | Scott Fitsimones
Could DAOs, or "decentralized autonomous organizations," be the key to building the next great city? Experimental urbanist Scott Fitsimones shares how these mission-driven, blockchain-governed, collectively owned organizations could increase the speed and efficiency of building cities (among many other applications) — all while pooling decision-making power in a radically collaborative way. Hear
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Coinbase Reportedly Under Investigation by the SEC
The prominent cryptocurrency exchange Coinbase is under investigation by the Securities and Exchange Commission, with regulators now looking into whether cryptocurrencies should've been registered as securities, Bloomberg reports . If confirmed, the investigation could mark a watershed moment in the regulation of crypto. If the SEC does deem them as securities, the crypto landscape in the country
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Man Wakes Pregnant Wife to Tell Her He Lost $100,000 on Crypto
Rude Awakening On the long list of terrible things to wake your pregnant wife up with, the news that you've lost $100,000 to the Celsius bankruptcy is certainly up there. Sadly, this is exactly what happened to Celsius user Jack Holcomb, who explained to The Wall Street Journal that he'd taken out a home equity loan to invest $100k worth of alleged stablecoins into the now-embattled crypto lendin
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Monoclonal antibodies cut COVID patient deaths
A monoclonal antibody treatment taken by patients hospitalized with COVID-19 did not improve recovery time but did reduce deaths, according to a new study. The therapy, tixagevimab/cilgavimab, was developed and deployed quickly in response to the pandemic. "One out of every three patients who would have died without the treatment survived after receiving the monoclonal antibodies." The researcher
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New glass-ceramic emits light when under mechanical stress
Researchers have created a new glass-ceramic that emits light in response to mechanical stress, a property known as mechanoluminescence. With further development, the new material could be used to create a light source that is switched on by mechanical stress. This could be useful for monitoring stress in artificial joints in the body or providing warnings of dangerous stress or fractures in build
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Ice Age human footprints discovered in Utah desert
Human footprints believed to date from the end of the last ice age have been discovered on the salt flats of the Air Force's Utah Testing and Training Range (UTTR) by Cornell researcher Thomas Urban in forthcoming research.
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More than 1,000 monkeypox cases confirmed in New York City
City continues to be a hotspot for the virus, accounting for about a quarter of all of the confirmed cases in the US There are now more than 1,000 confirmed cases of monkeypox in New York City, which continues to be a hotspot for the virus, health officials said on Monday . New York reached 1,040 cases as of Monday, said the most recent information released by the city. That accounts for about a
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Structural and mechanistic insights into the cleavage of clustered O-glycan patches-containing glycoproteins by mucinases of the human gut
Nature Communications, Published online: 26 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-32021-9 AM0627 is a bis-O-glycan mucinase that might work in the final steps of mucus degradation, thereby providing a carbon and nitrogen source for Akkermansia muciniphila. Here, the authors provide molecular insights into AM0627 function from X-ray crystallography and computer simulations.
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NGC1818 unveils the origin of the extended main-sequence turn-off in young Magellanic Clouds clusters
Nature Communications, Published online: 26 July 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31977-y The nature of young star clusters in the Magellanic Clouds is debated. Here, the authors show an alternative approach that exploits data to exclude the presence of age differences greater than a few million years among cluster stars in a very young cluster.
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Progress in bioanalytics: Production of RNA chips significantly simplified
Biochips (microarrays) are modern analytical tools that allow thousands of individual detections to be performed simultaneously in a small amount of sample material. A team led by Mark Somoza from the Faculty of Chemistry at the University of Vienna has now presented a new method in Nature Communications. With this method, commercially available DNA chips can be quickly and easily converted into R
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A good media reputation can save your job: Study
In a democratic system, the media plays a significant role in molding political and administrative organizations. The decisions of legislative bodies, politicians, bureaucrats, and other stakeholders can be significantly influenced by the preferences and agendas set by the media. This might cause agencies to change their structures, processes, and rules and also delay or accelerate policy-making i
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Study on Sub-Saharan Africa: Lower chances of individual prosperity in regions far from the coast
The further people in Sub-Saharan Africa live from the coast, the greater the likelihood of a comparatively low standard of living. This is the conclusion reached by economists at the University of Bayreuth in a study of 17 African coastal countries published in the Review of Development Economics. Proximity to ports attracts people with higher levels of knowledge and education, promotes the growt
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Splits and mergers: Investigating the role of policy disagreements in party switching using a Japanese example
The transformation of party politics in Japan has been marked by an array of sensational events, from the dominance of the Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) to party fragmentation. Individual legislators switch parties for a number of reasons, including policy considerations. The payoffs from "party switching" are closely linked to electoral and party systems, leading to a shift in the dynamics of pa
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Progress in bioanalytics: Production of RNA chips significantly simplified
Biochips (microarrays) are modern analytical tools that allow thousands of individual detections to be performed simultaneously in a small amount of sample material. A team led by Mark Somoza from the Faculty of Chemistry at the University of Vienna has now presented a new method in Nature Communications. With this method, commercially available DNA chips can be quickly and easily converted into R
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Attosecond measurements capture electrons in water clusters
A new method allows for time-resolved measurements of electron motion in water clusters lasting only a few attoseconds. The technique can be used for more detailed studies of water as well as faster electronics. Virtually all vital chemical processes take place in aqueous solutions. In such processes, electrons are exchanged between different atoms and molecules and can create or break chemical b
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A Question About a Rotating Line Helps Reveal What Makes Real Numbers Special
The Kakeya conjecture sounds like a brain teaser. Place a needle flat on a table. How much area do you need in order to be able to turn it so that it points in all possible directions? The most obvious possible answer is a circle whose diameter is the length of the needle. But this is demonstrably wrong. And over the last century, the effort to understand the ways in which it's wrong has revealed
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Scientists find 30 potential new species at bottom of ocean
Natural History Museum scientists seek to unlock mysteries of deep sea but some fear activity will disturb diversity of the depths Newly discovered deep sea species – in pictures Scientists have found more than 30 potentially new species living at the bottom of the sea. Researchers from the UK's Natural History Museum used a remotely operated vehicle to collect specimens from the abyssal plains o
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Effect of environmental contaminants on the health of pet cats
Companion animals are in close contact with human surroundings, and there is growing concern about the effects of harmful substances on the health of pet cats. This study investigated the potential health effects of organohalogen compounds (OHCs) on thyroid hormone (TH) homeostasis and metabolomics in pet cats in Japan. There was a significant negative correlation between concentrations of several
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Heaviest neutron star to date is a 'black widow' eating its mate
Millisecond pulsars spin far more rapidly than expected for a collapsed star. The best chance to study these neutron stars is to find a black widow system where the pulsar has evaporated and eaten much of its companion star. The Keck I telescope was just able to capture spectra of one such companion, allowing astronomers to weigh its pulsar. It's the heaviest found to date, and perhaps near the up
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Effect of environmental contaminants on the health of pet cats
Companion animals are in close contact with human surroundings, and there is growing concern about the effects of harmful substances on the health of pet cats. This study investigated the potential health effects of organohalogen compounds (OHCs) on thyroid hormone (TH) homeostasis and metabolomics in pet cats in Japan. There was a significant negative correlation between concentrations of several
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Newly discovered deep sea species – in pictures
Exploration of the Pacific Ocean's Clarion-Clipperton Zone, a 5,000-metre abyssal plain that extends between Hawaii and Mexico, has brought to light megafauna previously unknown to science Photographs courtesy of DeepCCZ expedition/Gordon & Betty Moore Foundation & NOAA Scientists find 30 potential new species at bottom of ocean Continue reading…
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Protein-Designing AI Opens Door to Medicines Humans Couldn't Dream Up
Designing a protein is a bit like making a cabinet. The first step is building the backbone that holds the protein together. But then comes the hard part: figuring out where to install hinges on the scaffold—that is, finding the best "hotspots"—to put on doors, shelves, and other attachments that ultimately make the cabinet fully functional. In a way, proteins also have hotspots embedded in their
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Net-zero carbon emissions for aircraft overlooks non-CO2 climate impact
A trio of researchers, two with the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology's Department of Environmental Systems and the other with Climate Service Center Germany, Helmholtz-Zentrum Hereon, say that reducing CO2 emissions from aircraft will not fully solve the problem of their negative climate contributions. In their paper published in the journal Nature Climate Change, Nicoletta Brazzola, Anthony
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Evidence found of stingrays making noise
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Australia working with one colleague from Sweden and another from Spain, has obtained recorded evidence of rays generating sound. In their paper published in the journal Ecology, the researchers describe the noises and how the recordings were made.
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Image: Greece battles wildfires on Lesbos island
Hundreds of residents and tourists have been evacuated from the east Aegean island of Lesbos (also known as Lesvos), Greece, after a wildfire broke out on the morning of 23 July. The fire, which has been raging near the coastal area of Vatera, a popular tourist destination, has burned pine forest, shrubland and cultivated fields.
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Scientists calculate the risk of someone being killed by space junk
The chance of someone being killed by space junk falling from the sky may seem ridiculously tiny. After all, nobody has yet died from such an accident, though there have been instances of injury and damage to property. But given that we are launching an increasing number of satellites, rockets and probes into space, do we need to start taking the risk more seriously?
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Evolutionary model predicts partitioning of molecules within cells
,Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization (MPI-DS) in Göttingen, Germany, and Delft University of Technology, the Netherlands, have developed a new theoretical method to study mixtures consisting of many different molecules. They analyzed how the molecules interact to reliably form different droplets, as happens continuously in living cells. With this model, par
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Using deep-learning algorithms to create maps of ship tracks
A team of researchers affiliated with several universities in the U.S., working with the Goddard Space Flight Center, has used a deep-learning algorithm to create maps of ship tracks across the planet. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describ