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Nyheder2022juni01

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Scientists developing the axolotl as a model for regeneration
Scientists are working toward establishing the Mexican salamander, or axolotl, as a laboratory model for the study of regeneration. With the ability to regenerate almost any body part, the axolotl is nature's champion of regeneration. The development of new tools to work with the axolotl is elevating it to the level of established research models and positioning the community of scientists who wor
29min
The scientist helping to develop the axolotl as a model
With its amazing capacity to regenerate tissues and organs, its ability to reproduce in a laboratory environment and the ease with which its genes can be manipulated, the Mexican salamander, or axolotl, holds enormous promise as a model for the study of regenerative medicine.
36min
Young adults turn crushes into love, study suggests
The image of young adults living in a hookup culture with emotionally meaningless relationships might be a common theme in movies and daytime talk shows. But it does not seem to be the norm in real college life, suggests a new study from University of California, Davis, researchers.
36min
Urology researcher under investigation for double-dipping has another paper retracted
A urology researcher who stepped down from his post as department chair after an institutional investigation prompted by Retraction Watch reporting has lost another paper. The article apparently was not flagged during a misconduct investigation, but a PubPeer commenter noted overlapping images in August 2021. Hari Koul had been interim chair of the department of … Continue reading
41min
Metal mayhem: New research finds toxic metals absorbed by Great Salt Lake plants and insects
Plants in Great Salt Lake wetland ecosystems are able to pull hazardous metal pollution from the lake and sometimes pass it up the food chain, according to work by a team of researchers from the Department of Watershed Sciences led by Edd Hammill. The study, coauthored by former master's student Maya Pendleton and current faculty Janice Brahney, Karin Kettenring, and Trisha Atwood, sampled three t
47min
Metal mayhem: New research finds toxic metals absorbed by Great Salt Lake plants and insects
Plants in Great Salt Lake wetland ecosystems are able to pull hazardous metal pollution from the lake and sometimes pass it up the food chain, according to work by a team of researchers from the Department of Watershed Sciences led by Edd Hammill. The study, coauthored by former master's student Maya Pendleton and current faculty Janice Brahney, Karin Kettenring, and Trisha Atwood, sampled three t
47min
Scientists Propose Turning Skyscrapers Into Massive Gravity Batteries
High Rise Battery Researchers have come up with an ingenious idea to tackle our renewable energy storage woes — effectively turning skyscrapers into massive gravity-powered batteries . A team from the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) in Austria suggest to take advantage of the vertical height of tall buildings, a system they've dubbed the Lift Energy Storage Technology
49min
Study: There May Be as Many as Four Evil Civilizations in Our Galaxy
In a mind-bending new paper, one researcher calculates that there are as many as four "malicious" alien civilizations in our home Milky Way galaxy alone. According to the yet-to-be-peer-reviewed paper , by Spanish researcher Alberto Caballero, it's not a leap to assume that if aliens are anything like humans — that is, if they're warlike and prone to invade the territory of others — there's a pre
49min
Better than CRISPR? Another way to fix gene problems may be safer and more versatile
Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. Tools such as CRISPR that snip DNA to alter its sequence are moving tantalizingly close to the clinic as treatment for some genetic diseases. But away from the limelight, researchers are increasingly excited about an alternative that leaves a DNA sequence unchanged. These molecu
50min
What Is the Langlands Program?
Not long ago, I was asked to explain the so-called Langlands program in a single tweet. Impossible, I immediately thought. It's one of the biggest, most sweeping projects in mathematics, capable of connecting distant realms of research and, naturally, fiendishly difficult to describe. But then I remembered the story of a student asking the great Talmudic sage Hillel to explain the whole Bible…
1h
Monkeypox is a new global threat. African scientists know what the world is up against
Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. As monkeypox stokes here-we-go-again fears in a pandemic-weary world, some researchers in Africa are having their own sense of déjà vu. Another neglected tropical disease of the poor gets attention only after it starts to infect people in wealthy countries. "It's as if your neig
1h
Discovery of mosquito survival tactics leaves room for new disease vector control tactics
The appendages that protrude from a mosquito's head hold the sensory systems that account for nearly all of its ability to detect and respond to a wide range of chemical signals that are critical for its reproduction and its survival. At the molecular level, these systems rely on genes that make up three families of chemosensory receptors. These genes include gustatory (taste) receptors, ionotropi
1h
How Could Life Evolve From Cyanide?
How did life begin on Earth? It's one of the greatest and most ancient mysteries in all of science — and the clues to solving it are all around us. Biologists have sometimes imagined evolutionary history as a recorded "tape of life" that might turn out differently if it were replayed again and again. In this episode, Steven Strogatz speaks with two researchers inspecting different parts of the…
1h
Discovery of mosquito survival tactics leaves room for new disease vector control tactics
The appendages that protrude from a mosquito's head hold the sensory systems that account for nearly all of its ability to detect and respond to a wide range of chemical signals that are critical for its reproduction and its survival. At the molecular level, these systems rely on genes that make up three families of chemosensory receptors. These genes include gustatory (taste) receptors, ionotropi
1h
Study finds elk hoof disease may affect antlers
A disease in elk that causes deformed hooves and eventually leads to lameness and death is also associated with abnormal, asymmetrical antlers, a Washington State University-led study of hunter reports has found.
1h
NASA Inks Deals for Moonwalking Suits for Artemis Landings
NASA has chosen Axiom Space and Collins Aerospace to develop the next generation of spacesuits, designed to protect astronauts during spacewalks outside the International Space Station and strolls across the lunar surface during the Artemis landings. Neither of the two companies had any photos or renders to share, either, making it a surprisingly understated announcement. Nonetheless, it's a land
1h
Disbanding police departments doesn't affect crime levels, says new report
Disbanding city police departments and shifting law enforcement responsibilities to county governments appears to have no effect on overall crime rates and leads to fewer police-related deaths, according to new Rice University research. But the same study indicates those communities may be less likely to report their crime statistics to the FBI.
2h
Consumers embrace milk carton QR codes, may cut food waste
The "use-by" and "best-by" dates printed on milk cartons and gallon jugs may soon become a thing of the past, giving way to more accurate and informative QR codes. A new Cornell University study finds that consumers will use the QR codes to better depict how long the milk is drinkable and create substantially less agricultural and food waste.
2h
Physicists demonstrate novel mechanism that can prevent light waves from spreading freely
In collaboration with the group of Professor Mordechai Segev (Technion, Israel Institute of Technology), physicists from the group of Professor Alexander Szameit (University of Rostock) have demonstrated a novel type of mechanism that can prevent light waves from spreading freely. So far, the underlying physical effect had been considered far too weak to fully arrest wave expansion. In their recen
2h
Consumers embrace milk carton QR codes, may cut food waste
The 'use-by' and 'best-by' dates printed on milk cartons and gallon jugs may soon become a thing of the past, giving way to more accurate and informative QR codes. A new study finds that consumers will use the QR codes — to better depict how long the milk is drinkable and create substantially less agricultural and food waste.
2h
The Potential of a 'Hot War' Between the U.S. and Russia
This is an edition of Up for Debate, a newsletter by Conor Friedersdorf. On Wednesdays, he rounds up timely conversations and solicits reader responses to one thought-provoking question. Later, he publishes some thoughtful replies. Sign up for the newsletter here. Question of the Week Russia's murderous invasion of Ukraine is ongoing. So is the oppression of Uyghur Muslims in Chinese concentratio
2h
Best Gaming Laptops Under $500 of 2022
While technology is always evolving, it can be disheartening to invest in an expensive gaming laptop, only to find a couple months later that your new computer can't keep up with the latest games. If you've felt this disappointment or simply don't have the funds to sink into a full gaming setup, then finding the best gaming laptop under $500 is a great way to enjoy your hobby without emptying you
2h
AI Expert Says Soon People Will Raise "Virtual Children" That Cost Less, Are Less Messy
Catriona Campbell, a UK-based artificial intelligence expert, argues we could soon be raising artificially intelligence virtual children inside the metaverse. She dubs these hypothetical offspring "Tamagotchi children," in a reference to the popular virtual pets from the 1990s. In her new book " AI by Design: A Plan For Living With Artificial Intelligence ," The Telegraph reports , Campbell argue
2h
The Books That Taught a Debate Champion How to Argue
Less than a year after I read my first book in English, The Magic Finger by Roald Dahl, I joined my elementary school's debate team. I was a fifth grader and a recent immigrant to Australia, and the two milestones were closely related. As the language and culture of my new home became legible to me, I began to desire more than comprehension. I wanted to talk back and, in turn, be heard. I soon le
2h
Visible light triggers molecular machines to treat infections
Chemists have created light-activated molecular machines and shown they can drill holes through the membranes of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, killing them in as little as two minutes. Their study offers a potential new strategy for fighting antibiotic-resistant bacteria, which have no natural defenses against the mechanical invaders.
2h
Research shows how Gulf of Mexico escaped ancient mass extinction
An ancient bout of global warming 56 million years ago that acidified oceans and wiped-out marine life had a milder effect in the Gulf of Mexico, where life was sheltered by the basin's unique geology. The findings could help scientists determine how current climate change will affect marine life and aid in efforts to find deposits of oil and gas.
2h
The persistent effects of colonialism in Caribbean science
A new study shows how the legacy of colonialism is still deeply entrenched within scientific practice across the Caribbean archipelago. Rather than solely critiquing these practices, however, the authors hope the study serves as a map to help researchers avoid the pitfalls of extractive science.
2h
Blood oxygen tools don't work as well for patients who aren't white
Pulse oximeter devices—tools that measure blood oxygen levels that are used in virtually every US hospital—overestimate blood oxygen levels in non-white patients, according to a new study. The retrospective analysis of over 7,000 patients with COVID-19 shows that the inaccuracy made these patients appear healthier than they were and delayed recognition of their eligibility for specific COVID-19 m
2h
The Kind of Prayer That Could Make a Difference
An exhausting routine has developed in the aftermath of mass shootings: Politicians offer "thoughts and prayers" and gun-control proponents respond with justified outrage, pointing out that only political action—the kind that those politicians are blocking—can stem such tragedies. Of course we need real policy change to end gun violence. After the tragedy in Uvalde, Texas, last week that killed 1
3h
Lifting weights to look buff may lead to 'reverse anorexia'
People who lift weights for aesthetic reasons run the risk of developing muscle dysmorphia, also called "reverse anorexia," according to a new study. The condition, also known as "bigorexia," is characterized by obsessive thoughts, compulsive behaviors, and body image distortion. People with the condition see themselves as smaller than they are. Muscle dysmorphia was first identified in bodybuild
3h
'Singing' lava lakes could help predict when volcanoes will blow
Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. In 2007, lava began to pool inside one of the craters atop Hawaii's Kilauea volcano, a gentle eruption that would culminate more than a decade later in a spectacular display of spewed ash and massive lava flows . Until that final outburst, the lava lake was a tourist spectacle,
3h
Mega-model predicts US opioid deaths will soon peak
Nature, Published online: 01 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01519-z The crisis is projected to claim more than half a million more lives from 2020 to 2032, although yearly deaths are on course to start falling before 2025.
3h
Just anticipating election stress can affect your well-being
Anticipating future stress related to political elections can affect people's emotional well-being before anything has even happened, according to a new study. But education can help protect people against those stresses—even for people who are actively engaged in the political process, a related study shows. "We know people can feel stress in anticipation of an event, and we know elections can b
3h
Combination anti-HIV antibody infusions suppress virus for prolonged period
Individuals with HIV who began taking antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the early stages of infection achieved a lengthy period of HIV suppression without ART after receiving two broadly neutralizing anti-HIV antibodies (bNAbs), according to a small study. The findings suggest that combination bNAb therapy might offer a future alternative to daily ART for people living with HIV.
3h
Forests: Spatial aspects of biodiversity, homogenization threat to forest ecosystems
A study highlights the importance of spatial aspects of biodiversity for healthy functioning of naturally occurring forests. Biologists determined that tree beta diversity — a measure of site-to-site variation in the composition of species present within a given area — matters more for ecosystem functioning than other components of biodiversity at larger scales. The research also shows that the
3h
Don't give your baby homemade formula
Experts are warning families about misinformation circulating online and on social media claiming it is safe to use homemade baby formula recipes. The number for poison control is (800) 222-1222. "Even the best intentions can have devastating results," says Diane Calello , executive and medical director of the New Jersey Poison Control Center based at Rutgers University. "Although it may seem saf
3h
'This Is the Price We Pay to Live in This Kind of Society'
The sites of mass shootings have become instantly recognizable markers of tragedy in the geography of recent American history: There's Columbine, Parkland, Aurora, the Pulse nightclub in Orlando, Sandy Hook, and Virginia Tech, among many others. And now there's the Tops market in Buffalo, and Uvalde. Each of these events has its own particulars—and many shootings, like the (at least) 14 over Memo
3h
It's decided: decisive people no more accurate than self-doubters
Research finds only difference between so-called action-oriented and state-oriented people is confidence It's a trait best seen in the eager pub quizzer – a tendency to leap to an answer without a shadow of a doubt. Now researchers have suggested that while people who have little difficulty making decisions are more confident in their choices, they are no more accurate than those who feel more to
3h
Sonos Ray Review: Ray-zing the Bar for Compact Soundbars
The Ray is the latest smart soundbar from Sonos; it officially launches on June 7 for $279 , and its design challenges everything we've come to expect from this type of speaker. Soundbars have become popular because flat-screen TVs have gotten so thin that it's become hard — if not impossible — to fit a decent-sounding speaker system inside the set itself. In audio, bigger is almost always better
3h
Scientists Discover World's Largest Organism, Chilling Out Under Ocean
Large, in Charge Scientists at the University of Western Australia (UWA) got a fascinating surprise when, while attempting to study genetic differences between plants in a massive undersea meadow, their samples revealed that the "meadow" was in fact just one very old — and very large — organism. According to The Guardian , this single Posidonia australis plant, more commonly known as ribbon weed,
3h
Genetic sex affects how muscles 'talk' to other tissues
A new study identifies sex-specific circuits of muscle signaling to other tissues. This new discovery provides insight into how muscle functions, such as exercise, promote healthy longevity, metabolism, and cognition. The study in eLife is the first to evaluate how genetic architecture influences muscle signaling to other tissues, highlighting that sex and estrogens are critical determinants of t
3h
How electric fish were able to evolve electric organs
Electric organs help electric fish, such as the electric eel, do all sorts of amazing things: They send and receive signals that are akin to bird songs, helping them to recognize other electric fish by species, sex and even individual. A new study in Science Advances explains how small genetic changes enabled electric fish to evolve electric organs. The finding might also help scientists pinpoint
3h
Less air pollution leads to higher crop yields, study shows
Usually, increasing agricultural productivity depends on adding something, such as fertilizer or water. A new Stanford University-led study reveals that removing one thing in particular—a common air pollutant—could lead to dramatic gains in crop yields. The analysis, published June 1 in Science Advances, uses satellite images to reveal for the first time how nitrogen oxides—gases found in car exha
3h
How electric fish were able to evolve electric organs
Electric organs help electric fish, such as the electric eel, do all sorts of amazing things: They send and receive signals that are akin to bird songs, helping them to recognize other electric fish by species, sex and even individual. A new study in Science Advances explains how small genetic changes enabled electric fish to evolve electric organs. The finding might also help scientists pinpoint
4h
Less air pollution leads to higher crop yields, study shows
Usually, increasing agricultural productivity depends on adding something, such as fertilizer or water. A new Stanford University-led study reveals that removing one thing in particular—a common air pollutant—could lead to dramatic gains in crop yields. The analysis, published June 1 in Science Advances, uses satellite images to reveal for the first time how nitrogen oxides—gases found in car exha
4h
Western Support for Ukraine Has Peaked
We've likely reached the high-water mark of the grand alliance to defeat Russia in Ukraine. In the coming months, relations between the Ukrainian leadership and its external supporters will grow strained, and the culprit will be economic pain exacerbated by the war. When our children and grandchildren study this conflict, they will marvel at the speed and audacity with which the Western powers—Eu
4h
Upheaval in Norwegian science funding threatens grants
Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. Norwegian researchers are facing dramatic budget cuts after the government abruptly took control of its research funding agency board and said it must curtail its spending. On 12 May, the Norwegian Ministry of Education and Research announced it had fired the entire board of the
4h
New virus variant threatens the health of bees worldwide
A dangerous variant of the deformed wing virus is on the rise worldwide. The virus infects honeybees, causing their wings to atrophy and the animals to die. The new variant, which has already replaced the original strain of the virus in Europe, is spreading to other regions of the world and causing entire bee colonies to collapse.
4h
Rare 'orchid of the falls' species declared extinct in the wild
A team of botanists from Guinea and the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew in the UK have sounded the death knell for a plant in the Saxicolella genus that is endemic to a single location in Guinea. The sad discovery was made by Kew botanist Dr. Martin Cheek who investigated the plant's last-known co-ordinates using Google Earth satellite scans, following a taxonomic review of the Saxicolella genus publis
4h
Rare 'orchid of the falls' species declared extinct in the wild
A team of botanists from Guinea and the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew in the UK have sounded the death knell for a plant in the Saxicolella genus that is endemic to a single location in Guinea. The sad discovery was made by Kew botanist Dr. Martin Cheek who investigated the plant's last-known co-ordinates using Google Earth satellite scans, following a taxonomic review of the Saxicolella genus publis
4h
The persistent effects of colonialism in Caribbean science
Prior to the First World War, sprawling European empires collectively controlled roughly 80% of Earth's landmass. Following WWII, that percentage drastically shrank, as colonies and occupied territories successfully vied for their independence, leading many to assume that the colonial mindset of taking from smaller countries to support large nations had been relegated to the past.
4h
The persistent effects of colonialism in Caribbean science
Prior to the First World War, sprawling European empires collectively controlled roughly 80% of Earth's landmass. Following WWII, that percentage drastically shrank, as colonies and occupied territories successfully vied for their independence, leading many to assume that the colonial mindset of taking from smaller countries to support large nations had been relegated to the past.
4h
Tired mosquitoes would rather catch up on sleep than bite you
Turns out you're not the only one who needs a good night's rest to function well the next day. Researchers found that mosquitoes whose slumber is disrupted are more interested in catching up on their sleep than looking for food the next day. The research demonstrates how vital this biological function is even among insects.
4h
Widespread futile care could contribute to veterinary burnout
More than 99% of veterinarians surveyed said they'd encountered useless or non-beneficial veterinary care in their careers, according to a new Cornell-led study that documents the prevalence of futile care for the first time. The authors use a working definition of futile care as continuing treatment when relevant goals can no longer be reached.
4h
Researchers design a method to pinpoint the origin of illegally traded chimpanzees
Researchers have produced the first catalog of genomic diversity for endangered chimpanzees in the wild. The catalog, which includes 828 chimp samples from across their range, offers a detailed reconstruction of chimp population structure and fine-scale patterns of isolation, migration, and connection. The researchers use this information to design a method to link confiscated chimpanzees to their
4h
SpaceX-Affiliated Group Giving Out Funding for Warp Drive Research
Limitless Space Covering interstellar distances rapidly may still be a distant dream, but it's now getting unprecedented financial support. A nonprofit called the Limitless Space Institute, co-founded by former NASA warp drive researcher Harold "Sonny" White and retired astronaut Brian Kelly in 2020, is generating enough excitement — and funding — for the concept that it's started giving out educ
4h
New type of triterpenes discovered
A remarkable discovery and collaborative effort have revealed a new type of triterpenes, a group of organic compounds which are an important source of many medicines. Until now, all triterpenes were believed to be derived from squalene, itself a type of triterpene. However, for the very first time, researchers witnessed biosynthesis, the formation of complex compounds from simple ones in living or
5h
Malnutrition links kidney disease, weaker muscles
Scientists have utilized an objective and simple nutritional indicator called the Nutrition Risk Index (NRI) to unveil a long-suspected yet unverified relationship between sarcopenia and malnutrition in end-stage kidney disease patients. Their findings confirmed that malnutrition contributes to sarcopenia, which can be detected through NRI.
5h
Finding the biological roots for pathological social withdrawal, Hikikomori
Researchers analyzed the blood of Hikikomori patients and found key biomarkers for the condition included higher ornithine and long-chain acylcarnitine levels and lower levels of bilirubin and arginine. Further analysis was able to distinguish between hikikomori and healthy volunteers and even predict with high accuracy the severity of the condition. The team hopes their findings can lead to bette
5h
A biomarker that can diagnose Parkinson's disease
Researchers have successfully developed a biomarker that will enable Parkinson's disease to be rapidly and inexpensively diagnosed from blood serum samples. Being able to diagnose the disease faster will hopefully lead to the development of new treatment methods, which will have great benefit, especially for aging societies.
5h
Wind turbines operating without curtailment claim many victims among protected bat species in Germany
Protected and rare bats regularly die at wind turbines (WT). This is why the operation of new wind turbines is temporarily curtailed during periods of high bat activity. Old wind turbines run without curtailment, however. A scientific team has now produced an exemplary estimate of bat fatality rates at such old turbines by systematically recording bat carcasses in the vicinity of the turbines. Dur
5h
Breakthrough artificial photosynthesis comes closer
Imagine we could do what green plants can do: photosynthesis. Then we could satisfy our enormous energy needs with deep-green hydrogen and climate-neutral biodiesel. Scientists have been working on this for decades. Chemist Chengyu Liu will receive his doctorate on 8 June for yet another step that brings artificial photosynthesis closer. He expects it to be commonplace in fifty years.
5h
Wind turbines operating without curtailment claim many victims among protected bat species in Germany
Protected and rare bats regularly die at wind turbines (WT). This is why the operation of new wind turbines is temporarily curtailed during periods of high bat activity. Old wind turbines run without curtailment, however. A scientific team has now produced an exemplary estimate of bat fatality rates at such old turbines by systematically recording bat carcasses in the vicinity of the turbines. Dur
5h
Controlling the nuclear receptors of proteins associated with diseases
Proteins are like machines. For some diseases, it can be useful to turn these machine off or on when they are too active or not active enough. One way to control switching in a protein, such as a nuclear receptor, is to put a drug "in the pocket" of the drug. For her Ph.D. research, Iris van de Gevel looked at controlling two receptors: RORγt, a receptor that is overactive in autoimmune diseases l
5h
Breakthrough artificial photosynthesis comes closer
Imagine we could do what green plants can do: photosynthesis. Then we could satisfy our enormous energy needs with deep-green hydrogen and climate-neutral biodiesel. Scientists have been working on this for decades. Chemist Chengyu Liu will receive his doctorate on 8 June for yet another step that brings artificial photosynthesis closer. He expects it to be commonplace in fifty years.
5h
A new duality solves a physics mystery
In conventional wisdom, producing a curved space requires distortions, such as bending or stretching a flat space. A team of researchers at Purdue University have discovered a new method to create curved spaces that also solves a mystery in physics. Without any physical distortions of physical systems, the team has designed a scheme using non-Hermiticity, which exists in any systems coupled to env
5h
Controlling the nuclear receptors of proteins associated with diseases
Proteins are like machines. For some diseases, it can be useful to turn these machine off or on when they are too active or not active enough. One way to control switching in a protein, such as a nuclear receptor, is to put a drug "in the pocket" of the drug. For her Ph.D. research, Iris van de Gevel looked at controlling two receptors: RORγt, a receptor that is overactive in autoimmune diseases l
5h
Scientists call for decision-making to be transformed to tackle the climate and biodiversity crises together
The global scientific community has issued another warning that increasing climate change and biodiversity loss will together reinforce negative impacts on people around the world, including food insecurity, health risks and disrupted livelihoods, as well as involuntary displacements leading to social unrest. The latest assessment reports by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and
5h
About 3 grams a day of omega-3 fatty acids may lower blood pressure, more research needed
While there is some evidence that consuming omega-3 fatty acids in food or dietary supplements may reduce the risk of high blood pressure, the optimal amount to consume for this benefit is unclear. A review of dozens of studies suggests that the optimal amount of omega-3 fatty acids to consume to lower blood pressure is likely about 3 grams daily. Consuming higher amounts of omega-3 fatty acids ma
5h
Research paves the way for stronger alloys
Scientists have described how microscopic crystals grow and change shape in molten metals as they cool, in research that is breaking new ground in alloy research and paves the way for improving the tensile strength of alloys used in casting and welding.
5h
How structural changes affect the superconducting properties of a metal oxide
Researchers have discovered how subtle structural changes in strontium titanate, a metal oxide semiconductor, can alter the material's electrical resistance and affect its superconducting properties. The research can help guide future experiments and materials design related to superconductivity and the creation of more efficient semiconductors for various electronic device applications.
5h
Zapping orange peel oil into new, pleasant aroma compounds
As oranges are peeled, they spray a tangy, citrus scented oil into the air. The main compound in the fragrant mist is limonene, which can be collected from discarded peels and used in flavorings, perfumes and all-purpose cleaners. Now, researchers have treated limonene with electricity and ethanol, transforming it into a mixture of pleasant-smelling aroma compounds, some of which haven't been iden
5h
More and more people are becoming aware of the dangers posed by invasive hornets
Wasps and hornets have a remarkable capacity of surviving transportation and establishing invasive populations in new areas. In some cases, this can generate massive environmental and socio-economic impacts. Such is the case of the Asian yellow-legged hornet (Vespa velutina), which has been spreading throughout Europe and worldwide, threatening to seriously impact beekeeping.
6h
More and more people are becoming aware of the dangers posed by invasive hornets
Wasps and hornets have a remarkable capacity of surviving transportation and establishing invasive populations in new areas. In some cases, this can generate massive environmental and socio-economic impacts. Such is the case of the Asian yellow-legged hornet (Vespa velutina), which has been spreading throughout Europe and worldwide, threatening to seriously impact beekeeping.
6h
Zapping orange peel oil into new, pleasant aroma compounds
As oranges are peeled, they spray a tangy, citrus scented oil into the air. The main compound in the fragrant mist is limonene, which can be collected from discarded peels and used in flavorings, perfumes and all-purpose cleaners. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have treated limonene with electricity and ethanol, transforming it into a mixture of pleas
6h
Zapping orange peel oil into new, pleasant aroma compounds
As oranges are peeled, they spray a tangy, citrus scented oil into the air. The main compound in the fragrant mist is limonene, which can be collected from discarded peels and used in flavorings, perfumes and all-purpose cleaners. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have treated limonene with electricity and ethanol, transforming it into a mixture of pleas
6h
Unprecedented level of insight into plasma edge phenomena
Producing energy and heat using plasma fusion is one of the promising technologies for the transition to sustainable energy sources. One of the challenges is managing the temperatures in the plasma edge. Ph.D. researcher Artur Perek has built an imaging system known as MANTIS to image and monitor temperature in the plasma edge, and he has improved the software performance to enhance control of pla
6h
Zapping orange peel oil into new, pleasant aroma compounds
As oranges are peeled, they spray a tangy, citrus scented oil into the air. The main compound in the fragrant mist is limonene, which can be collected from discarded peels and used in flavorings, perfumes and all-purpose cleaners. Now, researchers have treated limonene with electricity and ethanol, transforming it into a mixture of pleasant-smelling aroma compounds, some of which haven't been iden
6h
How diabetes may promote tooth decay
A new study of mice clarifies why people with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are prone to tooth decay. The findings point to reduced strength and durability of enamel and dentin, the hard substance under enamel that gives structure to teeth. For the study in Archives of Oral Biology , researchers induced type 1 diabetes in 35 mice and used a Vickers microhardness tester to compare their teeth wi
6h
AMD-Powered Supercomputer is The First to Break The Exascale Barrier
(Photo: ORNL) The Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has finally fired up its Frontier supercomputer. The AMD-powered system has been under construction for over three years, and just had its first test results submitted to the Top500 list of the world's fastest supercomputers. Frontier took the number one spot in the newest rankings, and became the first supercomputer to
6h
Why confronting invasive species is one of the best ways to prepare for climate change
New research, recently published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and led by the University of Massachusetts Amherst, finds that the ecological effect of invasive species alone is comparable to the combined effects of invasives plus warming temperatures, drought or nitrogen deposition. This suggests that a critical preparation for climate change is to manage invasive species
6h
Long-banned toxic chemicals remain a global threat
A new analysis by researchers at Masaryk University, the University of Toronto, and NRDC (Natural Resources Defense Council) has found most countries are not on track to remove their stocks of highly hazardous polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) by the 2028 deadline set forth in the Stockholm Convention, the global chemicals management treaty. The report found more than 10 million tons of PCB-contain
6h
Why confronting invasive species is one of the best ways to prepare for climate change
New research, recently published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and led by the University of Massachusetts Amherst, finds that the ecological effect of invasive species alone is comparable to the combined effects of invasives plus warming temperatures, drought or nitrogen deposition. This suggests that a critical preparation for climate change is to manage invasive species
6h
Astronomy team finds evidence of galactic metal shrouded in dust
A thorough understanding of galaxy evolution depends in part on an accurate measurement of the abundance of metals in the intergalactic medium—the space between stars—but dust can impede observations in optical wavelengths. An international team of astronomers at the University of California, Irvine, Oxford University in England, and other institutions uncovered evidence of heavier elements in loc
6h
Unnecessary antibiotics do kids more harm than good
In a new study, researchers found that children who got unneeded or unsuitable antibiotics were up to eight times more likely to develop complications such as diarrhea and skin rashes than other kids. Antibiotics inappropriately prescribed to non-hospitalized children resulted in at least $74 million in excess health care costs in the US in 2017, according to the study. The findings in JAMA Netwo
6h
The road to fully programmable protein catalysis
Nature, Published online: 01 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04456-z Recent progress in computational enzyme design, active site engineering and directed evolution are reviewed, highlighting methodological innovations needed to deliver improved designer biocatalysts.
6h
Clonal dynamics of haematopoiesis across the human lifespan
Nature, Published online: 01 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04786-y Haematopoiesis has high clonal diversity up to about 65 years of age, after which diversity drops precipitously owing to positive selection acting on a handful of clones that expand exponentially throughout adulthood.
6h
Intermittent lab earthquakes in dynamically weakening fault gouge
Nature, Published online: 01 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04749-3 Lab experiments show that spontaneously propagating ruptures navigate fault regions through intermittent slip with dramatic friction evolution, providing support that weakening mechanisms may allow ruptures to break through stable faults.
6h
Molecularly defined circuits for cardiovascular and cardiopulmonary control
Nature, Published online: 01 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04760-8 In mouse, two distinct types of neurons from the brainstem nucleus ambiguus, one that innervates the heart and another that innervates both the heart and lung, collectively control cardiac function and coordinate cardiac and pulmonary function.
6h
An on-chip photonic deep neural network for image classification
Nature, Published online: 01 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04714-0 Using a three-layer opto-electronic neural network, direct, clock-less sub-nanosecond image classification on a silicon photonics chip is demonstrated, achieving a classification time comparable with a single clock cycle of state-of-the-art digital implementations.
6h
A tissue-like neurotransmitter sensor for the brain and gut
Nature, Published online: 01 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04615-2 NeuroString, a tissue-like biological interface created by laser patterning of polyimide into a graphene/nanoparticle network embedded in an elastomer, is introduced, allowing in vivo real-time detection of neurotransmitters in the brain and gut.
6h
Discovery of non-squalene triterpenes
Nature, Published online: 01 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04773-3 Chimeric triterpene synthases are identified that catalyse non-squalene-dependent triterpene biosynthesis.
6h
An oxygen-sensing mechanism for angiosperm adaptation to altitude
Nature, Published online: 01 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04740-y Plants have adapted to grow at specific altitudes by regulating chlorophyll synthesis in response to ambient oxygen concentration, calibrated by altitude-dependent activity of GROUP VII ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR.
6h
A chromosome predisposed for sex
Nature, Published online: 01 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01129-9 A genome sequence for the flatworm Schmidtea mediterranea reveals a chromosome that might be primed to become a sex chromosome. The finding offers a remarkable chance to study the evolution of sex determination.
6h
Multilayer 2D insulator shows promise for post-silicon electronics
Nature, Published online: 01 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01476-7 A method has been developed for fabricating thin films of the 2D insulator hexagonal boron nitride with a uniform crystal orientation. The advance makes this material a key contender for replacing silica substrates in future electronics.
6h
Blood's life history traced through genomic scars
Nature, Published online: 01 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01304-y Two studies of the mutations acquired by blood-forming cells over time provide insights into the dynamics of blood production in humans and its relationship to ageing.
6h
A radical way to forge carbon–carbon bonds
Nature, Published online: 01 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-00908-8 Carbon–carbon single bonds are found in most organic molecules. A new electrocatalytic method can create such bonds by uniting different alkyl carboxylic acids, substantially shortening synthetic routes to useful molecules. The reaction uses inexpensive reagents in a simple and scalable set-up, and allows the inclusion of many
6h
Soft sensor tracks the neurochemical messengers dopamine and serotonin
Nature, Published online: 01 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01170-8 Neurotransmitters have key roles in regulating the nervous system. To better understand these processes, researchers need tools to analyse neurotransmitter signalling in the organs of living animals. We have invented NeuroString, a soft sensor for monoamine neurotransmitters, which can be fitted to the brain or gut of animals
6h
Give physicians' views to improve COVID vaccine uptake
Nature, Published online: 01 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01305-x Informing people once about physicians' views on COVID-19 vaccination improves vaccination rates by 4 percentage points after 9 months. This finding suggests that light-touch educative nudges can have lasting positive effects.
6h
Loops simplify a set-up to boost quantum computational advantage
Nature, Published online: 01 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01402-x An optical device uses fibre loops to improve an experiment designed to show that quantum systems have the edge on classical computers. The innovative scheme offers impressive control and potential for scaling.
6h
Lake Michigan water level rise affects inland waterways
2020 marked Lake Michigan's highest water level in 120 years, experts said, and climate variance makes future water levels challenging to predict. Coastal impacts are well-documented, but the effect of lake level rise on the area's inland waterways is poorly understood. A University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign study examined how Lake Michigan's rising levels affect water quality, flood control an
6h
Hair and fingernail examination suggests Inca children were drugged to keep them calm before being sacrificed
A team of researchers from Poland, the U.S. and Peru has found evidence that suggests Inca children selected for sacrifice were given drugs to keep them calm prior to their deaths. In their paper published in Journal of Archaeological Science, the group describes their analysis of hair and fingernail samples from two small Incan children who had been sacrificed on Peru's Ampato volcano.
6h
New type of triterpenes discovered
A collaborative effort has revealed a new type of triterpene, a group of organic compounds which are an important source of many medicines. Until now, all triterpenes were believed to be derived from squalene, itself a type of triterpene. However, for the first time, researchers witnessed biosynthesis of triterpenes in fungi without the use of squalene. This important discovery opens up a whole ne
6h
New virus variant threatens the health of bees worldwide
A dangerous variant of the deformed wing virus is on the rise worldwide. The virus infects honeybees, causing their wings to atrophy and the animals to die. The new variant, which has already replaced the original strain of the virus in Europe, is spreading to other regions of the world and causing entire bee colonies to collapse. This has been shown in a study by an international research team le
6h
New method to pinpoint the origin of illegally traded chimpanzees
Researchers reporting in the journal Cell Genomics on June 1 have produced the first catalog of genomic diversity for endangered chimpanzees in the wild. The catalog, which includes 828 chimp samples from across their range, offers a detailed reconstruction of chimp population structure and fine-scale patterns of isolation, migration, and connection. The researchers use this information to design
6h
Best USB Flash Drives in 2022
The best USB flash drives are a great way to store oodles of data and take them with you. Whereas primitive floppy disks could barely store a single Elton John song, USB flash drives are large enough to store entire computers on them, with every drive holding at least a few gigabytes on them. Best of all, every "thumb drive" is small enough to throw in a backpack, desk drawer, or even your pocket
6h
Scientist Proposes Using Entire Planet as Spaceship to Different Star System
Even at the speed of light, it would take over four years to get to the nearest star system. Needless to say, escaping a solar system is much easier said than done. But according to a new paper published in the International Journal of Astrobiology and spotted by Universe Today , an advanced civilization could do exactly that — by using an entire planet as a giant spacecraft. In other words, acco
6h
Virus puts koalas at greater risk of chlamydia
An AIDS-like virus plaguing Australia's koala population is leaving them more vulnerable to chlamydia and other threatening health conditions, a new study shows. According to the findings, the chlamydia epidemic plaguing endangered koala populations is linked to a common virus that likely suppresses their immune systems. Researchers made the discovery after studying more than 150 koalas admitted
6h
New type of triterpenes discovered
A collaborative effort has revealed a new type of triterpene, a group of organic compounds which are an important source of many medicines. Until now, all triterpenes were believed to be derived from squalene, itself a type of triterpene. However, for the first time, researchers witnessed biosynthesis of triterpenes in fungi without the use of squalene. This important discovery opens up a whole ne
6h
Research may reveal why people can suddenly become frail in their 70s
Scientists discover 'catastrophic' change in blood cell composition, raising prospect of new therapies to slow ageing process A groundbreaking theory of ageing that explains why people can suddenly become frail after reaching their 70s has raised the prospect of new therapies for the decline and diseases of old age. Researchers in Cambridge discovered a process that drives a "catastrophic" change
6h
Study suggests that most of our evolutionary trees could be wrong
New research led by scientists at the Milner Centre for Evolution at the University of Bath suggests that determining evolutionary trees of organisms by comparing anatomy rather than gene sequences is misleading. The study, published in Communications Biology, shows that we often need to overturn centuries of scholarly work that classified living things according to how they look.
6h
New virus variant threatens the health of bees worldwide
A dangerous variant of the deformed wing virus is on the rise worldwide. The virus infects honeybees, causing their wings to atrophy and the animals to die. The new variant, which has already replaced the original strain of the virus in Europe, is spreading to other regions of the world and causing entire bee colonies to collapse. This has been shown in a study by an international research team le
6h
New method to pinpoint the origin of illegally traded chimpanzees
Researchers reporting in the journal Cell Genomics on June 1 have produced the first catalog of genomic diversity for endangered chimpanzees in the wild. The catalog, which includes 828 chimp samples from across their range, offers a detailed reconstruction of chimp population structure and fine-scale patterns of isolation, migration, and connection. The researchers use this information to design
6h
Study suggests that most of our evolutionary trees could be wrong
New research led by scientists at the Milner Centre for Evolution at the University of Bath suggests that determining evolutionary trees of organisms by comparing anatomy rather than gene sequences is misleading. The study, published in Communications Biology, shows that we often need to overturn centuries of scholarly work that classified living things according to how they look.
6h
Musk Details Upcoming Starlink 2.0 Satellites
SpaceX CEO Elon Musk recently took a break from all of his Twitter negging to talk about the upcoming deployment of Starlink 2.0. On an episode of the YouTube series "Everyday Astronaut," Musk confirms that the company has built the first Starlink 2.0 satellite, which is much larger and more powerful than the originals. In fact, the Starship mega-rocket (above) is the only way SpaceX will be able
7h
Discovery of new mechanisms to control the flow of sound
Using a network of vibrating nano-strings controlled with light, researchers from AMOLF have made sound waves move in a specific irreversible direction and attenuated or amplified the waves in a controlled manner for the first time. This gives rise to a lasing effect for sound. To their surprise, they discovered new mechanisms, so-called "geometric phases," with which they can manipulate and trans
7h
A brain implant that turns your thoughts into text | Tom Oxley
What if you could control digital devices using just the power of thought? That's the incredible promise behind the Stentrode — an implantable brain-computer interface that collects and wirelessly transmits information directly from the brain, without the need for open surgery. Neurotech entrepreneur Tom Oxley describes the intricacies of this breakthrough technology, which is currently enrolling
7h
A Force of Nature: Hurricanes in a Changing Climate
In Brief: Due to global warming, global climate models predict hurricanes will likely cause more intense rainfall and have an increased coastal flood risk due to higher storm surge caused by rising seas. Additionally, the global frequency of storms may decrease or remain unchanged, but hurricanes that form are more likely to become intense. From June 1 to November 30, many Americans turn their ey
7h
Temporary employment may consolidate labor market inequality
A new study in European Sociological Review from Umeå University shows that temporary workers receive less employer-paid training than permanent workers. However, having a union representative present at the workplace can be beneficial for all workers that want to develop their competences.
7h
Unforced variations: June 2022
This month's open thread. New commenting rules (as described last month ) remain in effect. Basically, be substantive, one comment a day, remain polite. The post first appeared on RealClimate .
7h
Cats Memorize Their Friends' Names, Study Reveals
(Photo: Nathalie Jolie/Unsplash) Domesticated cats are often assumed to be independent creatures with a general disregard for others. While this may be the case for some, most do enjoy some level of social interaction while forming a few special bonds. They even appear to learn their friends' names. A team of researchers at Kyoto University in Japan recently investigated whether non-human animals
7h
Why we're searching England for new dialects
When you meet someone new in person, one of the first things you notice is how they speak—if they speak the same language as you or have a different accent. You'll also notice if they use different dialect words or phrases to describe things.
7h
Newly discovered lipid prevents cell death
Programmed cell death is an important tool that an organism uses to keep itself healthy. When a cell does not function as it should, various stress reactions are activated. The goal of these reactions is to restore the original cell function.
7h
Capturing carbon with crops, trees and bioenergy
An integrated approach to land management practices in the U.S. can reduce carbon dioxide in the atmosphere far more than earlier estimates based on separate approaches, Michigan State University researchers say. Their research was published May 31 in the journal Global Change Biology.
7h
The World's Biggest Cultured Meat Factory Will Soon Be Built in the US
Just under a year ago, one of the biggest production facilities for cultured meat opened in Israel. Future Meat Technologies ' Rehovot plant produces 500 kilograms of lab-grown meat per day (that's equivalent to about 5,000 burger patties). Last week, plans for an even bigger facility were revealed , this one in the US. Its specific location has yet to be finalized, but the project will bring cul
7h
The Time Bandit Finds a Rainbow (and a Big Score!) | Deadliest Catch
Stream Deadliest Catch on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/deadliest-catch #DeadliestCatch #Discovery #DiscoveryPlus Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Disco
8h
Hawaii Startup Launches World's First Ocean-Assisted Carbon Removal Plant
(Photo: Sarah Lee/Unsplash) A Hawaii-based company has opened the world's first ocean-assisted carbon removal plant, offering a glimpse at a second chance for marine life and our atmosphere. While most are aware that the ocean has borne the brunt of our climate crisis, few know how greenhouse gasses specifically pose a danger to marine life. The ocean—specifically a layer of the ocean called the
8h
Ensuring cash supplies in crisis and emergency situations
The demand for cash increases in times of crisis since many people consider banknotes and coins to be a particularly safe way to keep money. Moreover, cash is the only instrument of payment that is largely independent of a technical infrastructure. It is therefore essential that, during a crisis, people can access cash, particularly when other—electronic—means of payment might not be available or
8h
Why we think that demography is a slow thing, and why we are wrong
Scientific literature has considered human population trends as "slow," with fertility and mortality driving long term changes that are fully appreciable in generation-long periods, but the current exodus from war-ridden Ukraine to the rest of Europe or the acceptance of more than 1 million Syrian asylum-seekers in Germany in 2015 and 2016 show that our view of population change needs some updatin
8h
Could we detect dark matter's annihilation within globular clusters?
A team of astronomers studied two nearby globular clusters, 47 Tucanae and Omega Centauri, searching for signals produced by annihilating dark matter. Though the searches turned up empty, they weren't a failure. The lack of a detection placed strict upper limits on the mass of the hypothetical dark matter particle.
8h
Researchers find citation bias in published papers and evidence that the problem is getting worse
A trio of researchers from Queens College, City University of New York, the University of California, Los Angeles, and Stanford University has found that a citation bias exists in research papers and the problem is growing worse. In their paper published in the journal Nature Human Behavior, Charles Gomez, Andrew Herman and Paolo Parigi describe their analysis of millions of research papers and wh
8h
Topologically tuned terahertz on a nonlinear photonic chip
Compact terahertz functional devices are highly useful for high-speed wireless communication, biochemical sensing and non-destructive inspection. However, controlled terahertz generation, alongside transport and detection is challenging for chip-scale devices, due to low coupling efficiency and absorption losses. In a new report now published in Nature: Light Science & Applications, Jiayi Wang, Sh
8h
Strutsens äggklocka kräver stabila temperaturer
Strutsen har genetiska förutsättningar att anpassa sig till stigande eller sjunkande temperaturer. Men för att vilja lägga ägg ska temperaturen helst vara jämn. Klimatförändringarna väcker därför oro för bamsefågelns framtid. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
8h
Vad gjorde Cajsa Warg så populär?
Cajsa Wargs kokbok gjorde succé på 1700-talet. Men vad berodde framgången på? Ulrica Söderlind, lektor i måltids- och restaurangvetenskap, har studerat Cajsa Wargs kokbok och tre andra kokböcker från samma tid. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
8h
Nervstimulering kan snabba på läkning av inflammation
Nervsystemet hjälper till vid läkning av inflammation i kroppen – och nu vet forskare mer om hur processen går till på molekylär nivå. Genom att stimulera vagusnerven frigörs ämnen som medverkar till att läka akut inflammation snabbare. Fynden kan bana väg för nya behandlingsmetoder. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
8h
New method to enrich uranium in seawater
Researchers at the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) have developed an innovative method of pre-enriching uranium in seawater by membrane filtration.
8h
JUUL Got a Million American Kids Hooked on Nicotine, Researchers Say
Despite decades of legislative action and campaigns against the substance in the US, it seems that nicotine use by American teens has soared to astonishing new levels since JUUL's fashionable, USB-drive-shaped vapes exploded in popularity over the mid-to-late 2010s. JUUL has fought back against allegations of intentionally marketing to kids for years, despite some pretty damning evidence involvin
8h
A lizard that can switch from female to male before birth
A team of researchers at the University of Tasmania working with a colleague from the University of Canberra has found that a species of lizard can switch from female to male prior to birth. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes experiments they conducted with snow skinks in Tasmania and what they learned from them.
8h
A lizard that can switch from female to male before birth
A team of researchers at the University of Tasmania working with a colleague from the University of Canberra has found that a species of lizard can switch from female to male prior to birth. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes experiments they conducted with snow skinks in Tasmania and what they learned from them.
9h
Two million people in UK living with long Covid, find studies
ONS figures show that one in five people with long Covid had the infection two years ago Two million people in the UK are thought to be living with long Covid, data has revealed, the highest figure since official surveys began. While Covid can cause a period of acute illness, some people continue to experience symptoms, such as breathlessness, muscle aches and fatigue, for months or even years –
9h
Wind turbines operating without curtailment kill protected bat species in Germany
Protected and rare bats regularly die at wind turbines (WT). This is why the operation of new wind turbines is temporarily curtailed during periods of high bat activity. Old wind turbines run without curtailment, however. A scientific team led by the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) has now produced an exemplary estimate of bat fatality rates at such old turbines by sy
9h
High cost of US cancer care doesn't lower death rates
The United States spends twice as much on cancer care as the average high-income country, but its cancer mortality rates are only slightly better than average, according to a new analysis. "There is a common perception that the US offers the most advanced cancer care in the world," says lead author Ryan Chow, an MD/PhD student at Yale University. "Our system is touted for developing new treatment
9h
Wind turbines operating without curtailment kill protected bat species in Germany
Protected and rare bats regularly die at wind turbines (WT). This is why the operation of new wind turbines is temporarily curtailed during periods of high bat activity. Old wind turbines run without curtailment, however. A scientific team led by the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) has now produced an exemplary estimate of bat fatality rates at such old turbines by sy
9h
Survey: Many young people don't know what they're vaping
Americans are vaping substances never meant to be inhaled, including melatonin, essential oils, tea, vitamins, caffeine, and other non-nicotine substances, according to a nationwide survey. The survey, which asked more than 6,000 teens, young adults, and adults ages 13-40 about their vaping habits, is the first to examine non-nicotine vaping in a national sample. Although some of these non-nicoti
9h
Standing Now Counts as Exercise
Of all the relationships that have been totally upended since the beginning of the pandemic, the most surprising one might be our relationship with our own physical body. The majority of people who can do their job remotely have done so for the better part of the past two years, and Americans' average daily steps dropped by 20 percent, according to one observational study from 2020. This was like
9h
NASA eyes November for launch of NOAA's JPSS-2
NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) are now targeting Nov. 1, 2022, as the new launch date for NOAA's Joint Polar Satellite System-2 (JPSS-2) satellite mission. During recent tests of a key instrument designed to collect visible and infrared images, the team found and corrected an issue, which resulted in additional time needed to complete thermal vacuum testing.
9h
The Download: Liver transplant success, and lifting Shanghai's lockdown
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. A new storage technique could vastly expand the number of livers available for transplant A patient who received a donated liver that had been stored for three days in a new type of machine that mimics the human body is healthy one year on from surgery, accord
9h
Krisesamtaler i Region Syddanmark er populære blandt praksislæger
Siden 2019 har praktiserende læger i Region Syddanmark haft mulighed for at tage et særskilt honorar for krisesamtaler med deres patienter, som de eneste i landet. Det har været populært blandt lægerne, som ønsker ordningen udbredt til resten af landet. En manøvre der, ifølge PLO, vil koste regionerne ca. 36 mio. kr. årligt.
10h
Daily briefing: The great resignation has hit academia
Nature, Published online: 31 May 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01564-8 Why the pandemic has encouraged some researchers to quit academia. Plus, a guide to Omicron's many subvariants and a new way to check whether a journal has been hijacked.
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I'm a Coastal Grandmother. Stop Appropriating Our Culture.
This article was featured in One Story to Read Today, a newsletter in which our editors recommend a single must-read from The Atlantic , Monday through Friday. Sign up for it here. TikTok and I have been getting to know each other. For my part, I've been trying to learn how to save funny videos. For its part, it's been sucking the soul out of my body and feeding it back to me bit by bit so I don'
10h
Cold War Catastrophes the U.S. Can Avoid This Time
Whatever happens in Ukraine, America and Russia are now set for a lengthy period of intense confrontation. U.S. support for Ukraine against Russia's invasion was entirely justified. But as the fighting goes on, America's growing involvement in Ukraine's war effort—including huge financial and economic aid as well as heavier and more sophisticated weapons—could evolve into a wider, direct conflict
10h
The Race to Hide Your Voice
Voice recognition—and data collection—have boomed in recent years. Researchers are figuring out how to protect your privacy.
11h
'Everything Is Terrible, but I'm Fine'
Sign up for Derek's newsletter here . In May, the Federal Reserve published a report on the economic well-being of American households in 2021. This survey is infamous for revealing, in 2013, that half of Americans couldn't cover a $400 emergency with spare cash. An Atlantic magazine cover story called it " The Secret Shame of the Middle Class ." In 2021 , the findings were surprisingly positive,
11h
We Have No Nuclear Strategy
Americans have had a long respite from thinking about nuclear war. The Cold War ended more than 30 years ago, when the Soviet Union was dismantled and replaced by the Russian Federation and more than a dozen other countries. China at the time was not yet a significant nuclear power. A North Korean bomb was purely a notional threat. The fear of a large war in Europe escalating into a nuclear confl
11h
Microbes in the built environment
Scientific Reports, Published online: 01 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41598-022-12254-w The COVID-19 pandemic has encouraged scientists and the general population to think more than ever before about how we interact with microbes in our indoor spaces. Research investigating transmission of SARS-CoV-2 has advanced our knowledge significantly in the last two years. However, indoor and built environment
11h
Droplets in underlying chemical communication recreate cell interaction behaviors
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30834-2 While a hallmark of living systems, developing sensory-motor interactions in inanimate systems remains challenging. Here, authors show that nanoporous surfaces can be used to create stimuli-responsive droplet interplay with shape transformation and complex behaviours reminiscent of living cell actions.
12h
Characterisation of a nucleo-adhesome
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30556-5 Cell adhesion proteins have been described at sites away from the cell surface, including in the nucleus. Here, the authors report the scale of nuclear localisation of adhesion proteins, establishing a nucleo-adhesome and showing that nuclear adhesion proteins can cooperate to control transcription.
12h
From subcritical behavior to a correlation-induced transition in rumor models
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30683-z Rumors and information spreading emerge naturally from human-to-human interaction and have a growing impact on people's lives due to increasing and faster access to information, whether trustworthy or not. The authors study the Maki–Thompson rumor model and its variation, revealing a phase transition and providi
12h
Cryo-EM structures of Gid12-bound GID E3 reveal steric blockade as a mechanism inhibiting substrate ubiquitylation
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30803-9 The GID E3 ligase regulates glucose-induced degradation in yeast, and key physiology. This study unveils E3 ligase regulation by reshaping the substrate binding site, blocking substrate access to ubiquitination active sites, and a Cage-like assembly.
12h
Wafer-scale solution-processed 2D material analog resistive memory array for memory-based computing
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30519-w Neuromorphic computing requires the realization of high-density and reliable random-access memories. Here, Thean et al. demonstrate wafer-scale integration of solution-processed 2D MoS2 memristor arrays which show long endurance, long memory retention, low device variations, and high on/off ratio.
12h
Research paves the way for stronger alloys
Scientists from the University of Birmingham have described how microscopic crystals grow and change shape in molten metals as they cool, in research that is breaking new ground in alloy research and paves the way for improving the tensile strength of alloys used in casting and welding.
12h
THIS device may not nudge your brain into deep sleep
The Washington Post used this picture of a saline-filled 280-channel Geodesic Head Web 1 to illustrate a new wearable device that aims to enhance slow wave sleep (SWS). The device delivers low-level current (0.5 mA) at 0.5 Hz to mimic the frequency of EEG naturally recorded during SWS (0.5-1 Hz). However, this is impossible with saline sensors, which would also dry out well before the night is ov
12h
ESA conducts first tests of exoplanet hunter Plato in space-like conditions
The ESA is working on a new exoplanet hunter mission called Plato, to be launched in 2026. Astronomers expect to discover Earth-sized planets within the habitable zone thanks to Plato's ability to spot smaller planets in larger orbits than current telescopes. SRON Netherlands Institute of Space Research is contributing to the project by testing Plato's cameras in a custom built space simulator. SR
12h
The Challenges of Calculating a Lab Leak Risk
The odds of a dangerous pathogen escaping a lab are uncertain. And some analysts say attempts to evaluate such risks highlight the large unknowns that remain about laboratory safety — and the challenges of using specific risk estimates to make sense of the complexities of human error and system failures.
12h
Science in Africa: Diaspora perspectives
Nature, Published online: 01 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01152-w Two scientists whose careers took them away from Africa share thoughts on how to support colleagues back home.
13h
Microgravity analog culture profoundly affects microbial infection process in 3-D human tissue models, a new study finds
Infectious microbes have evolved sophisticated means to invade host cells, outwit the body's defenses and cause disease. While researchers have tried to puzzle out the complicated interactions between microorganisms and the host cells they infect, one facet of the disease process has often been overlooked—the physical forces that impact host-pathogen interactions and disease outcomes.
13h
Microgravity analog culture profoundly affects microbial infection process in 3-D human tissue models, a new study finds
Infectious microbes have evolved sophisticated means to invade host cells, outwit the body's defenses and cause disease. While researchers have tried to puzzle out the complicated interactions between microorganisms and the host cells they infect, one facet of the disease process has often been overlooked—the physical forces that impact host-pathogen interactions and disease outcomes.
13h
Nya matvanor kräver självinsikt
Alla som har försökt ändra sina mat- eller träningsvanor vet hur svårt det är och hur lätt man faller tillbaka i gamla mönster. För den som fått diagnosen typ 2-diabetes är livsstilsförändringar absolut nödvändiga för att få kontroll över sitt blodsocker. Men det finns knep för att hitta motivationen till förändring.
13h
När barn har svårt att äta
– En del barn kan helt enkelt inte äta, säger Kajsa Lamm som forskar om barn med ätsvårigheter. Att kalla det för ätovilja eller matvägran menar hon är fel. Det antyder att barnet inte vill och att det är fel på barnets beteende vilket kan leda till att barnet inte får rätt hjälp.
14h
Nordisk kost för bättre hälsa
På 1990-talet blev det känt att Medelhavskost, som är rik på bland annat fisk, olivolja och grönsaker, sänkte blodfetter och minskade risken för hjärtproblem. Ny forskning tyder på att nordisk kost fungerar likadant.
14h
Antiinflammatorisk kost – vad vet vi?
Gurkmeja, bär och mörk choklad dyker upp om man googlar på antiinflammatorisk kost. Men det har varit svårt att visa att enskilda livsmedel har effekt mot inflammation i våra kroppar. Däremot kan sunda matmönster fungera.
14h
Jakten på mat som gör oss friska
Vilken mat ska vi äta för att hålla oss friska? Forskningsfrågan är enkel – men vägen till svaret är lång och komplicerad för nutritionsepidemiologen Emily Sonestedt. Fokus ligger inte bara på enskilda livsmedel och näringsämnen, utan också på matmönster.
14h
Så funkar minnet
Våra långtidsminnen är ristade i hjärnbarken. Varje gång vi återvänder till ett minne så blir kopplingarna till minnet allt fler, samtidigt som vi ändrar lite på det. Så våra starkaste minnen riskerar att bli mer och mer osanna.
14h
Den sociala måltiden
Ur ett näringsperspektiv uppfattas många av oss som irrationella konsumenter som äter ohälsosamt för att vi inte förstår bättre och därför behöver utbildas. Men matetnologen Håkan Jönsson motsätter sig detta och menar att måltiden har flera andra minst lika viktiga funktioner.
14h
Alzheimer eller bara normalt dåligt minne?
De flesta av oss glömmer iblandar vi lagt mobilen eller nycklarna, eller något vi skulle handla i affären. Att glömma emellanåt är normalt och det finns många anledningar till ett tillfälligt sämre minne – sömnbrist och stress är två av dem. Men vad är skillnaden mellan att vara normalt glömsk och symtom på Alzheimers sjukdom, den vanligaste demenssjukdomen?
14h
Is the Covid pandemic finally nearing its end? | Aris Katzourakis
The virus's behaviour in highly vaccinated countries may offer clues to our future with the disease Aris Katzourakis is a professor in viral evolution at Oxford University More than two years on from the realisation that we are dealing with a novel pandemic, we are still nervously wondering what comes next. In the UK, Covid infection rates appear to have fallen to their lowest level since the sum
14h
Motion syresätter minnet
Fysisk aktivitet är bra för minnet. Det är hjärnforskarna Tomas Deierborg och Tomas Roos eniga om. Både deras egen och andras forskning tyder på det. Och de lever så klart som de lär.
15h
Hopp om mediciner mot alzheimer
Alzheimers sjukdom blir allt vanligare i en åldrande befolkning. Förutom det personliga lidandet innebär det även stora kostnader för samhället. Därför läggs omfattande resurser på att hitta läkemedel som kan bromsa sjukdomen. Och det finns lovande resultat.
15h
Ny syn på livets goda gav färre kilon
Trots en livslång kärlek till god mat, choklad och semlor har Kabuki Iwanaga klarat att lägga om sin kost. Kroppen har tackat för tappade kilon med bättre blodsocker, kolesterol och blodtryck. Själv tackar han det forskningsbaserade Livsstilsverktyget som i flera år inspirerat honom att hålla fast vid sina nya goda vanor.
15h
Blodprovet som hittar alzheimer
Med ett enkelt blodprov och några snabba minnestester kan Alzheimers sjukdom diagnostiseras – med samma träffsäkerhet som mer avancerade metoder. Nu ser forskarna bakom det diagnostiska verktyget fram emot att det börjar användas på vårdcentralerna.
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Luktsinnet och minnet hänger ihop
Det finns en stark koppling mellan dofter och minnen. Samtidigt försämras luktsinnet med åldern och äldre kan därför behöva luktträna. Det gäller även de som lider av postcovid. Genom en ny doftträningsapparat som är kopplad till ett datorspel kan användaren träna och samla poäng genom att identifiera dofter.
15h
Varierad mat ger rikare tarmflora
I tjocktarmen har vi mellan ett och två kilo bakterier. På senare år har forskning visat att tarmfloran bidrar till vårt välbefinnande på en mängd olika sätt, och när balansen rubbas kan vi bli sjuka. Fast än saknas mycket kunskap på området.
15h
Infektion kan få minnet att svikta
Vi är nog flera som känt oss grötiga i hjärnan i samband med att vi haft covid-19-infektion. För de flesta av oss var dessa svårigheter med minne och koncentration övergående. Men vad hände i hjärnan som gjorde att den inte fungerade lika bra som vanligt?
15h
Läkemedel som förvärrar vid demens
Överanvändningen av läkemedel som kan vara skadliga för äldre har minskat. Men fortfarande skrivs medicin med kognitiv påverkan ut för ofta till personer med demens. Det visar en studie av läkemedelsanvändning på demensboenden.
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I thought having a baby might turn me into an 'elite sleeper'. I was wrong | Arwa Mahdawi
Scientists have found 3% of the population need less shut-eye than the rest of us. Could I train myself to be one of them? I don't want to boast or anything, but I have always considered myself something of an elite sleeper. I love sleeping more than just about anything. Given the opportunity, I will sleep for marathon stretches and can snooze through even the most extreme situations. On one very
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Shanghai's subway and shops reopen and streets fill up after two-month lockdown
Residents in areas deemed low-risk for Covid are allowed to move around the city freely again Shanghai has eased a range of Covid-19 restrictions in a step towards returning to normal after a two-month lockdown that confined residents of the megacity to their homes and battered China's economy. The commercial hub of 25 million people was closed down in sections from late March, when the Omicron v
17h
Kraftigt ökad avfallsmängd från ny kärnkraft
Det är stor skillnad på vilka mekanismer som sker i en liten kärnreaktor jämfört med en stor. Därför kan små reaktorer generera upp till 30 gånger mer avfall, beroende på vilken typ av avfall man tittar på, enligt en ny studie. – Det är viktig grundinformation när tekniken fortsätter att utvecklas, säger huvudförfattare Lindsay Krall.
19h
Wild parrot chicks babble like human infants
Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. Babies don't babble to sound cute—they're taking their first steps on the path to learning language. Now, a study shows parrot chicks do the same. Although the behavior has been seen in songbirds and two mammalian species, finding it in these birds is important, experts say, as
22h
World's largest organism found in Australia
Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. It sounds like the stuff of science fiction: Two closely related species hybridize and create a superorganism whose growth and expansion seems unstoppable. That's what's happened in Western Australia's Shark Bay, researchers say, where a seagrass meadow (see above) stemming from
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'Where Are Vaccines for Little Kids?' and the Latest on Long COVID
Today we bring you a new episode in our podcast series COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks, Scientific American 's senior health editors Tanya Lewis and Josh Fischman catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between. You can listen to all past episodes here .
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Three jabs best for preventing Covid infections, global analysis finds
Number of doses, not vaccine combinations, key to boosting immunity, according to largest study of its kind Three doses of the same Covid-19 vaccine or a combination of jabs work equally well in preventing infections, according to the largest study of its kind. While the effectiveness of individual coronavirus vaccines is well known, the evidence around combinations of jabs has been less clear, e
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Skip the Reservations With This Rad Kitchenware
Home cooking has been on the rise, as the Covid-19 pandemic forced even the most fanatical foodies to become home chefs . While we wholeheartedly recommend continuing to support your local restaurants, it can be nice to test a new recipe in the kitchen. If you're continuing to use the battered kitchen gear you bought in college, it might be time for an upgrade. Below are the kitchen tools that ca
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Netflix's Password Sharing Ban Already Sounds Like an Absolute Disaster
Get it Together Netflix has already tried to ban password sharing in three Latin American countries, in a preview of what's likely to soon become a worldwide strategy — but apparently it can't even get its own policies straight. More than a dozen Peruvian Netflix subscribers, told Rest of World wildly differing and confusing experiences with enforcement of the company's anti-password sharing expe
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How intricate patterns arise in developing tissues
Early development is like a carefully choreographed dance, with uniform swaths of cells arranging themselves into elaborate patterns—a first step toward the formation of functional organs. A flat layer of skin cells, for instance, must transition into one studded with neat arrays of hair cells and sweat glands.
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Neuroscientists expand CRISPR toolkit with new, compact Cas7-11 enzyme
Last year, researchers at MIT's McGovern Institute for Brain Research discovered and characterized Cas7-11, the first CRISPR enzyme capable of making precise, guided cuts to strands of RNA without harming cells in the process. Now, working with collaborators at the University of Tokyo, the same team has revealed that Cas7-11 can be shrunk to a more compact version, making it an even more viable op
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Neuroscientists expand CRISPR toolkit with new, compact Cas7-11 enzyme
Last year, researchers at MIT's McGovern Institute for Brain Research discovered and characterized Cas7-11, the first CRISPR enzyme capable of making precise, guided cuts to strands of RNA without harming cells in the process. Now, working with collaborators at the University of Tokyo, the same team has revealed that Cas7-11 can be shrunk to a more compact version, making it an even more viable op
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How to Make the Universe Think for Us
Inside a soundproofed crate sits one of the world's worst neural networks. After being presented with an image of the number 6, it pauses for a moment before identifying the digit: zero. Peter McMahon, the physicist-engineer at Cornell University who led the development of the network, defends it with a sheepish smile, pointing out that the handwritten number looks sloppy. Logan Wright… Source
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Bad News! The Plants Grown in Moon Soil Turned Out Wretched
Moon Unit Remember when scientists grew seedlings in actual Moon soil , collected by Apollo astronauts? Well, don't get too psyched for delicious lunar salad just yet. In a new interview with Astronomy Magazine , University of Florida horticultural scientist Rob Ferl — the author of a recent Communications Biology study detailing the experiment — brought us down to Earth with a description of jus
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Dogecoin Cocreator Slams Elon Musk as a "Grifter"
Outspoken cocreator of Dogecoin Jackson Palmer has slammed Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk — a longtime Dogecoin supporter — as a "grifter." "About a year ago when Musk was saying something about crypto, I said Elon Musk was and always will be a grifter but the world loves grifters," Palmer said in a new interview with Australian news outlet Crikey . "They love the idea that they may also be a bil
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Transparency on demand: A novel process can render artificial materials transparent or even entirely invisible
Space, the final frontier. The starship Enterprise pursues its mission to explore the galaxy, when all communication channels are suddenly cut off by an impenetrable nebula. In many episodes of the iconic TV series, the valiant crew must "tech the tech" and "science the science" within just 45 minutes of airtime in order to facilitate their escape from this or a similar predicament before the end
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Researchers develop new method for the technological use of 2D nanomaterials
Nanosheets are finely structured two-dimensional materials and have great potential for innovation. They are fixed on top of each other in layered crystals, and must first be separated from each other so that they can be used, for example, to filter gas mixtures or for efficient gas barriers. A research team at the University of Bayreuth has now developed a gentle, environmentally-friendly process
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Researchers identify novel cellular process that help us understand the mechanisms of aging-related diseases
A team of researchers has identified the molecular and cellular mechanisms that regulate selective autophagy in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. While the function of these processes is increasingly understood in mammals this is one of the first studies in insects. The study of autophagy — the recycling and repair process within cells — has huge potential to aid in fighting the ageing proc
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Urban magnetic fields reveal clues about energy efficiency, pollution
Researchers present a comparative analysis of urban magnetic fields between two U.S. cities: Berkeley, California, and the Brooklyn borough of New York City. They explore what kinds of information can be extracted using data from magnetic field sensors to understand the working of cities and provide insights that may be crucial for preventative studies.
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Solar-biomass hybrid system satisfies home heating requirements in winter
Researchers outline a computer simulation model addressing the challenge of solar power's inherent intermittency by adding biomass as another renewable energy source to advance a reliable, affordable heating solution while reducing carbon dioxide emissions. The proposed solar-biomass hybrid system is based on distributed multi-generation technology that integrates photovoltaic-thermal and biomass
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The history of Lake Cahuilla before the Salton Sea
Lake Cahuilla went through many cycles of filling and drying out over thousands of years. A new study by a San Diego State University researcher and colleagues used radiocarbon dating to determine the timing of the last seven periods of filling during the Late Holocene. The research sheds light on both the history of human occupation in the area and its seismic past.
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Engineers boost signals from fluorescent sensors
Engineers have found a way to dramatically improve the signal emitted by fluorescing nanosenors. The researchers showed they could implant sensors as deep as 5.5 centimeters in tissue and still get a strong signal. The advance allows the particles to be placed deeper within biological tissue, which could aid with cancer diagnosis or monitoring.
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14 Reader Views on Guns
This is an edition of Up for Debate, a newsletter by Conor Friedersdorf. On Wednesdays, he rounds up timely conversations and solicits reader responses to one thought-provoking question. Later, he publishes some thoughtful replies. Sign up for the newsletter here. Last week I asked readers for their thoughts on guns. Mark laments changes in American gun culture: To compare my experience as a litt
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Pregnant moms and depression: Study links rising symptoms to kids' behavioral issues
Children whose mothers experience rising levels of depression from prepregnancy until the months just after giving birth are at greater risk of developing emotional, social and academic problems, psychology researchers report. Their seven-year study, which tracked mothers and their offspring from preconception until the children were 5 years old, is the first to demonstrate how changes in mothers'
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What guppy guts can teach us about evolution
Thanks to a unique combination of biology and ecology, the guppies have provided researchers with insights into evolution for decades. Evans and Fitzpatrick have pushed those insights a step further, showing the guppies' potential to help probe big questions about how microbes living in host organisms contribute to health, survival and quality of life.
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New study indicates how deep learning can improve gene therapies and antiviral drugs
The nuclease Cas13b associated with CRISPR defense systems—also known as genetic scissors—has the potential to be used in the future in hereditary diseases to silence adverse genes. In the fight against infections, it is also being researched as an antiviral agent, as Cas13b can target the genome of viruses and render them harmless. Despite these promising features, researchers are looking for nuc
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New study indicates how deep learning can improve gene therapies and antiviral drugs
The nuclease Cas13b associated with CRISPR defense systems—also known as genetic scissors—has the potential to be used in the future in hereditary diseases to silence adverse genes. In the fight against infections, it is also being researched as an antiviral agent, as Cas13b can target the genome of viruses and render them harmless. Despite these promising features, researchers are looking for nuc
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Surprising new research finds women supporting women in business may backfire
Contrary to popular belief, well-intentioned calls for women to invest in women-owned businesses might be doing more harm than good in resolving the gender gap in venture financing. New research found in the INFORMS journal Organization Science finds that female-owned startups that get funding from female venture capitalists are two times less likely to get additional financing compared to those w
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Scientists Eliminate Chronic Pain in Mice and Primates Using Gene Therapy
Using a new gene therapy technique, researchers at the University of California San Diego reduced neuropathic pain resulting from spinal cord or other nerve injuries in mice — and with no detectable side effects. The research is highly intriguing because it could lead to new treatment options for the untold numbers of patients who experience chronic pain, numbness or weak muscles as a result of s
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Where rivers jump course
Large floods will sometimes force a river to jump course and forge a new path across the landscape, in rare and catastrophic events known as river avulsions. Scientists have now published a global compilation of river avulsions. The study corroborates roughly a decade of theoretical and experimental work by the group, which fleshed out avulsions from what had been an understudied curiosity.
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Electrochemical synthesis now possible without electric power source
Synthesis of organic compounds and polymers is at the core of many manufacturing industries. The new "electrifying synthesis" methods that can combine conventional synthetic chemistry with electrochemistry are a step closer to a sustainable tomorrow. These reactions don't require potentially harmful chemical reagents. They achieve organic synthesis by simply using electrons from an electric power
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The Ideology of the Bicycle
Back in the late 2000s, Williamsburg, Brooklyn, was the world's coolest neighborhood. And if lifestyle blogs were to be believed, everyone in Williamsburg rode a bike. But not everyone in New York did, and then-Mayor Michael Bloomberg wanted to change that. He installed hundreds of miles of bike lanes throughout the city, which had the potential to cut both pollution and traffic deaths. In the Ha
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Awesome Woman Destroys "Predatory" Crypto Scams by Shaming Them to Death
Crypto Cop Web3 sure is going great — just ask Molly White, a researcher who's putting the worst of crypto on blast for the whole world to see. In a new interview with the Washington Post , White, an avid Wikipedia editor in her spare time, said that although she'd been critical of cryptocurrencies for years, a recent shift resulted in her confronting the "predatory" industry head on. "People are
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Planetary defense exercise uses asteroid Apophis as hazardous asteroid stand-in
Watching the skies for large asteroids that could pose a hazard to Earth is a global endeavor. So, to test their operational readiness, the international planetary defense community will sometimes use a real asteroid's close approach as a mock encounter with a "new" potentially hazardous asteroid. The lessons learned could limit, or even prevent, global devastation should the scenario play out for
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The End of Shanghai's Two-Month COVID Lockdown
Near the end of March, in the face of a growing COVID-19 outbreak, officials in Shanghai instituted strict lockdown controls, the start of what would become two months of tight restrictions imposed on 25 million residents. Now, following a decline in COVID-19 cases, those same authorities say they are taking steps toward reopening China's largest city. Barriers that fenced in neighborhoods are co
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Direct sound printing is a potential game-changer in 3D printing
Researchers describe a new platform technology called direct sound printing (DSP), which uses soundwaves to produce new objects. The paper explains show how focused ultrasound waves can be used to create sonochemical reactions in minuscule cavitation regions. Extremes of temperature and pressure lasting trillionths of a second can generate pre-designed complex geometries that cannot be made with e
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Why Uranus and Neptune are different colors
Astronomers may now understand why the similar planets Uranus and Neptune are different colors. Researchers have now developed a single atmospheric model that matches observations of both planets. The model reveals that excess haze on Uranus builds up in the planet's stagnant, sluggish atmosphere and makes it appear a lighter tone than Neptune.
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A cloudless future? The mystery at the heart of climate forecasts
Analyses of global climate models consistently show that clouds constitute the biggest source of uncertainty and instability in predictions. New research on the Frontera supercomputer seeks to better incorporate clouds into global models by breaking models into two parts: a coarse-grained, lower-resolution (100km) planetary model and many small patches with 100 to 200 meter resolution. These simul
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New insights into the movement of pine cone scales
Pine cones open when dry and close when wet. In this way, pine seeds are released only under advantageous conditions, namely when it is dry and the seeds can be carried far by wind. Opening and closing is of particular interest to researchers because the actuation is passive, that is, it does not consume metabolic energy. This is why the pine cone has already served as a model for biomimetic flap
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Your liver is just under three years old
The liver has a unique ability to regenerate after damage. However, it was unknown whether this ability decreases as we age. Scientists have now used a technique known as retrospective radiocarbon birth dating to determine the age of the human liver. They showed that no matter the person's age, the liver is always on average less than three years old. The results demonstrate that aging does not in
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Video Shows Jetpack Inventor Crash Into a Lake
Losing Control French Jetpack inventor Franky Zapata, who made history in 2019 by becoming the first person to cross the English channel on a jet-powered hoverboard, lost control over his device during a recent flight demonstration and fell roughly 50 feet into Lake Biscarosse near the west coast of France. Fortunately, Zapata is recovering well at a nearby hospital, the BBC reports . Footage sha
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Chinese Researchers Reportedly Found Possible Sabotage Attempt Near Astronaut Launch Site
Ground Control Somebody may have tried to jam communications signals at a Chinese space launch center — and it's raising some major red flags. As spotted by the South China Morning Post , a Chinese newspaper called Beijing Daily is reporting that researchers from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in China's Gansu province discovered the signal jammer on Sunday after weeks of "abnormal" interfer
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America's Need for Speed Never Ends Well
Last month, I was savagely attacked by The Onion : "Package That Arrived in 24 Hours Sits Unopened on Table for Week," read the headline . The reality was even worse than the satire. A package delivered in just two days had been sitting on the desk in front of me since January. I still haven't opened it. With more than half of U.S. adults wielding Amazon Prime memberships , I'm clearly not alone
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Injured human liver treated for 3 days in a machine and then successfully transplanted
A multidisciplinary research team has succeeded in doing something during a treatment attempt that had never been achieved in the history of medicine until now: it treated an originally damaged human liver in a machine for three days outside of a body and then implanted the recovered organ into a cancer patient. One year later, the patient is doing well.
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Palms at the poles: Fossil plants reveal lush southern hemisphere forests in ancient hothouse climate
Plant fossils dating back 55 to 40 million years ago, during the Eocene epoch reveal details about the warmer and wetter climate. These conditions meant there were palms at the North and South Pole and predominantly arid landmasses like Australia were lush and green. By focusing on the morphology and taxonomic features of 12 different floras, the researchers developed a more detailed view of what
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The secret to a longer lifespan? Gene regulation holds a clue
Researchers investigated genes connected to lifespan. Their research uncovered specific characteristics of these genes and revealed that two regulatory systems controlling gene expression — circadian and pluripotency networks — are critical to longevity. The findings have implications both in understanding how longevity evolves and in providing new targets to combat aging and age-related disease
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Electrical pulses to the back of the neck found to restore breathing after opioid drug use
Breathing difficulties are the main cause of death following opioid use. In the UK, the number of adults entering treatment for opioid use was 140,863 in 2020/211 and opioid use remains a significant cause of premature death, contributing to 3,726 drug-related deaths last year. Opioid misuse causes death by supressing respiratory activity. New research points to a novel treatment for respiratory d
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Research confirms effectiveness of oil dispersants
Marine oil spills are one of the most direct, and harmful, examples of the toll that the extraction of fossil fuels can take on the environment. One of the few tools to mitigate that damage are chemical dispersants that break down oil in the water. However, scientists do not fully understand how well they work. A new study led by Bigelow Laboratory validated their efficacy under real-world conditi
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A new storage technique could vastly expand the number of livers available for transplant
A patient who received a donated liver that had been stored for three days in a new type of machine that mimics the human body is healthy one year on from surgery, according to a study in Nature Biotechnology . The technology could significantly increase the number of livers suitable for transplant, the authors claim, both by enabling donor livers to be preserved for longer than the current stand
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Unique cremation site of the Late Bronze Age was left to the elements
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Italy and one in the U.S. has found that a unique Bronze Age cremation site in modern Italy holds the remains of up to 172 people who were left to the elements. In their paper published on the open-access site PLOS ONE, the group describes their study of the bones and teeth they found at the cremation site and what they learned from the
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Study uncovers how China's dams are operated along the Lancang-Mekong river
China's dams along the Upper Mekong, or Lancang, are often blamed as the main cause of recent droughts in the downstream regions. Yet, it is challenging to corroborate these claims, since China has not been releasing detailed data on how its big dams in the Lancang are operated. Using data from satellite images and high-resolution hydrological models, researchers have finally solved the enigma.
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Science academies publish statements on primary concerns for international action ahead of the G7 summit
The science academies of the G7 states are calling for urgent international action to protect the ocean and polar regions and to accelerate decarbonization. In the healthcare sector, scientists demand increased global pandemic preparedness and the implementation of a One Health approach, which considers the health of humans, animals, plants and the wider environment as closely linked and interdepe
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Great white sharks may have contributed to megalodon extinction
The diet of fossil extinct animals can hold clues to their lifestyle, behavior, evolution and ultimately extinction. However, studying an animal's diet after millions of years is difficult due to the poor preservation of chemical dietary indicators in organic material on these timescales. An international team of scientists has applied a new method to investigate the diet of the largest shark to h
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New Video Shows Mars Helicopter Screaming Across Alien Landscape
Faster, Longer It's no secret that NASA's Ingenuity Mars helicopter has gone far and beyond its original task of flying just five times above the Martian surface to prove that electric helicopters like it could give us a valuable new tool in exploring the surface of distant planets. But it's vastly overperformed, already carrying out many times that number of flights. During its 25th flight on Ap
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Super-Absorbent Gel Extracts Water From Desert Air
(Photo: Anderson Rian/Unsplash) A large portion of the earth's population lacks access to clean drinking water. That problem is expected to compound in the coming years thanks to climate change, which is rapidly warming—and therefore drying out swaths of—the planet. It's crucial, then, that researchers find and develop ways to bring drinking water to more communities, as well as maintain access i
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Researchers investigate the links between facial recognition and Alzheimer's disease
In recent years Alzheimer's disease has been on the rise throughout the world and is rarely diagnosed at an early stage when it can still be effectively controlled. Using artificial intelligence, researchers conducted a study to identify whether human-computer interfaces could be adapted for people with memory impairments to recognize a visible object in front of them.
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Healthy development thanks to older siblings
During the first years of their lives, children develop the cognitive, social and emotional skills that will provide the foundations for their lifelong health and achievements. However, exposure to environmental stressors during critical periods of life can have negative long-term consequences for their development. One of the most critical stressors for children is maternal stress, which is known
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Researchers investigate the links between facial recognition and Alzheimer's disease
In recent years Alzheimer's disease has been on the rise throughout the world and is rarely diagnosed at an early stage when it can still be effectively controlled. Using artificial intelligence, researchers conducted a study to identify whether human-computer interfaces could be adapted for people with memory impairments to recognize a visible object in front of them.
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Discovery of a tripole winter precipitation change pattern around the Tibetan Plateau in the late 1990s
The Tibetan Plateau (TP) is referred to as the "water tower" of Asia for being home to the headwaters of many major rivers in Asia, including the Yangtze, Yellow, Ganges, and Indus. Therefore, TP precipitation is important for not only local, but regional water resources too. On the other hand, the TP can strongly modulate the Asian climate through dynamic and thermal processes. Previous studies h
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Is technology spying on you? New AI could prevent eavesdropping
Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. Big Brother is listening. Companies use "bossware" to listen to their employees when they're near their computers. Multiple "spyware" apps can record phone calls. And home devices such as Amazon's Echo can record everyday conversations. A new technology, called Neural Voice Camo
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Ep. 61: When Accents Speak Louder Than Words
This month: For scientists who come from abroad to live and work in America, accents can be personal. It's discouraging to be misunderstood, even when they think they're speaking clearly. Sometimes, it could even be a career liability. Is the problem the accent, or those on the receiving end?
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Decoding how a protein on the move keeps cells healthy
Cells rely on a process known as RNA interference (RNAi) to control protein production. The centerpiece of that process is the protein Argonaute, which seeks out and destroys mRNA molecules. Scientists have now discovered how Argonaute efficiently jumps from one target to the next. Their work may help improve current RNAi-based therapies and develop better ones in the future.
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Cuttlefish camouflage may be more complex than previously thought
A new study suggests that the European cuttlefish (sepia officinalis) may combine, as necessary, two distinct neural systems that process specific visual features from its local environment, and visual cues relating to its overall background environment to create the body patterns it uses to camouflage itself on the sea floor.
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Multi-spin flips and a pathway to efficient ising machines
Combinatorial optimization problems are at the root of many industrial processes and solving them is key to a more sustainable and efficient future. Ising machines can solve certain combinatorial optimization problems, but their efficiency could be improved with multi-spin flips. Researchers have now tackled this difficult problem by developing a merge algorithm that disguises a multi-spin flip as
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Best Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs of 2022
Energy costs keep on rising, so any way we can reduce the impact is welcomed. Energy-efficient light bulbs use anywhere from 70 percent to 90 percent less electricity than standard incandescent bulbs. While the purchase price may be a little higher, they are invariably cheaper over their lifespan. That lifespan is also 10 to 25 times longer, so they are both more convenient and better for the env
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Ultrafine atmospheric dust from exhaust gases of fossil fuels might cause weather extremes
Strong precipitation or extreme drought—the frequency of extreme weather events is increasing worldwide. Existing climate models, however, do not adequately show their dynamics. Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) assume that ultrafine particles in the atmosphere have a significant impact on cloud physics and, hence, on weather. Their aircraft measurements confirm an increase in
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Decoding how a protein on the move keeps cells healthy
Cells produce proteins like little factories. But if they make too much at the wrong times it can lead to diseases like cancer, so they control production with a process called RNA interference (RNAi). As of July 2021, several drugs already take advantage of RNAi to treat painful kidney and liver diseases—with another seven in clinical trials. There is a lot of potential for RNAi therapeutics, and
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Decoding how a protein on the move keeps cells healthy
Cells produce proteins like little factories. But if they make too much at the wrong times it can lead to diseases like cancer, so they control production with a process called RNA interference (RNAi). As of July 2021, several drugs already take advantage of RNAi to treat painful kidney and liver diseases—with another seven in clinical trials. There is a lot of potential for RNAi therapeutics, and
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How diverse microbial communities remain stable
Government coalitions often dissolve when too many parties disagree on too many issues. Even if a coalition seems stable for some time, a small crisis can cause a chain reaction that eventually causes the system to collapse. A study conducted in the Department of Physics at Bar-Ilan University demonstrates that this principle also holds true for ecosystems, particularly bacterial ecosystems.
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How diverse microbial communities remain stable
Government coalitions often dissolve when too many parties disagree on too many issues. Even if a coalition seems stable for some time, a small crisis can cause a chain reaction that eventually causes the system to collapse. A study conducted in the Department of Physics at Bar-Ilan University demonstrates that this principle also holds true for ecosystems, particularly bacterial ecosystems.
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The history of Lake Cahuilla before the Salton Sea
Today, the Salton Sea is an eerie place. Its mirror-like surface belies the toxic stew within. Fish skeletons line its shores and the ruins of a once thriving vacation playground is a reminder of better days. But long before agricultural runoff spoiled the Salton Sea, the lakebed it now occupies was home to a much larger body of water known as Lake Cahuilla. The lake was six times the area of the
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She experimented on primates for decades. Now she wants to shut down the labs
Lisa Jones-Engel quit her work as a lab researcher when she began to see how 'like us' monkeys are "Right here! Beneath our feet! Are 300 monkeys! They haven't seen sunshine! In years!" Lisa Jones-Engel stands outside the entrance to the Washington National Primate Research Center along with two dozen other protesters – most 30 years younger than she. Her long gray-blond ponytail tucked over one
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Great white sharks may have contributed to megalodon extinction
The diet of fossil extinct animals can hold clues to their lifestyle, behavior, evolution and ultimately extinction. However, studying an animal's diet after millions of years is difficult due to the poor preservation of chemical dietary indicators in organic material on these timescales. An international team of scientists led by the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig,
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Great white sharks may have contributed to megalodon extinction
The diet of fossil extinct animals can hold clues to their lifestyle, behavior, evolution and ultimately extinction. However, studying an animal's diet after millions of years is difficult due to the poor preservation of chemical dietary indicators in organic material on these timescales. An international team of scientists led by the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig,
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Cuttlefish camouflage may be more complex than previously thought
A new study published in Current Biology suggests that the European cuttlefish (sepia officinalis) may combine, as necessary, two distinct neural systems that process specific visual features from its local environment and visual cues relating to its overall background environment to create the body patterns it uses to camouflage itself on the sea floor. This is in contrast to previous research su
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Cuttlefish camouflage may be more complex than previously thought
A new study published in Current Biology suggests that the European cuttlefish (sepia officinalis) may combine, as necessary, two distinct neural systems that process specific visual features from its local environment and visual cues relating to its overall background environment to create the body patterns it uses to camouflage itself on the sea floor. This is in contrast to previous research su
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How innovation and technology can fight global hunger | Bernhard Kowatsch
Social entrepreneur Bernhard Kowatsch shares real-life examples of how a business approach focused on accelerating tech (like a blockchain-supported way to bring food to refugees or a machine that fortifies flour at small mills in Africa) can help make an impact on big, seemingly intractable problems. "Innovation and technology can create so much good in the world, and together we can solve the wo
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