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Nyheder2022juni10

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Immunotherapy may get a boost
T cells are usually very good at eliminating diseased cells. But they seem to fail when it comes to tumor cells. Researchers now describe what inhibits this immune function and how they can release the brake and boost the immune response against cancer.
33min
Proteomic study of 2,002 tumors identifies 11 pan-cancer molecular subtypes across 14 types of cancer
A large study of 2,002 tumors from 14 types of cancer revealed 11 proteomic subtypes associated with distinct pathways in the tumors. These findings reveal the molecular landscape of cancers at the proteome level, to better understand how cancers grow and spread. The pan-cancer proteomic data is integrated into a comprehensive cancer multi-omic high-throughput data analysis platform that helps eva
33min
Researchers demonstrate 40-channel optical communication link
Researchers have develop a silicon-based optical communications link that can improve data-intensive internet applications from video streaming services to high-capacity transactions for the stock market. This device could enable the next generation of optical interconnects for use in data-center networks that form the backbone of the internet.
33min
US General Says SpaceX's Starlink Satellites Have "Destroyed" Russia's Efforts to Control Info
Before War SpaceX is giving Ukrainian soldiers warding off invading Russian forces a big leg up with its Starlink satellite internet service, Politico reports , providing stable internet connectivity free from Russian interference. The Starlink terminals, powered by mobile generators, are helping artillery gunners accurately hit Russian targets, while also allowing them to send their families mes
1h
Cigarette Smoke Damages Your Skin Just by Touching It, Scientists Say
It's widely understood that inhaled cigarette smoke, whether you smoke yourself or breathe it in secondhand, is bad for your health, skin included. But the effects nicotine can have on our skin might be even worse than we thought. According to a team of biologists at UC Riverside, the carcinogenic substance doesn't have to make it into your lungs, or even in present use, to cause injury. Their re
1h
"Severe" Sriracha Shortage Threatens Spiceless Summer
Sad Sriracha If you're out of Sriracha, you might soon be out of luck — because the manufacturers of the classic rooster sauce say their already "severe" shortage might last through the summer, CBS reports . While Huy Fong Foods, the makers of Sriracha, warned us back in April that issues with the supply of chili peppers may result in a summer-long Sriracha shortage, the internet collectively did
1h
How crops can better survive floods
Researchers show which signaling pathways make plants more resistant to flooding. The molecule ethylene is a warning signal for plants that they are under water and switches on the emergency supply for survival without oxygen. A team shows that plants can survive longer without oxygen when pretreated with ethylene.
1h
Rename monkeypox to remove geographic stigma, researchers say
Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. The name "hMPXV A.1" may not roll off the tongue, but a prominent, international group of researchers contends that something like it should replace the current naming system for monkeypox and its so-called West African and Congo Basin strains. "In the context of the current glo
1h
Even Antarctica Isn't Safe From Microplastics, Researchers Confirm
Seriously? Microplastics have officially reached some of the most remote parts of Antarctica, the world's least populated continent. University of Canterbury researchers were shocked to discover that every single sample of fresh Antarctic snow they gathered from 19 locations around the South Pole back in 2019 was littered with tiny pieces of plastic. "It's incredibly sad, but finding microplastic
2h
Long Covid is a 'national crisis.' So why are grants taking so long to get?
Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. David Putrino, a neurophysiologist at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, labored through his holiday last Christmas to write a grant application for urgently needed Long Covid research. With colleagues, he hoped to tap into $1.15 billion in funding that Congress grante
2h
Words matter: How to reduce gender bias with word choice
In the workplace, even subtle differences in language choice can influence the perception of gender, for better or worse. These choices fall into two main categories: minimizing the role of gender by using gender-neutral terms or emphasizing an individual's gender through 'gender marking.' Behavioral scientists argue that by using these two approaches thoughtfully, one can promote gender equality.
2h
For communication between brain areas, milliseconds matter
Understanding how brain areas communicate is one of the oldest questions in neuroscience. Researchers used causal techniques to uncover how two neocortical areas in the brain communicate with one another and found that their influence on each other changes over much faster-timescales than previously thought.
2h
Best Retro Game Consoles in 2022
Tapping into nostalgia for gamers of all eras is possible with the influx of retro game consoles. If your formative years were in the late '80s to late '90s, the mere mention of "Friday nights" inspires unmatched levels of nostalgia. ABC's TGIF lineup was pretty solid, Pizza Hut's Bigfoot pie could feed a family for a weekend, and visiting Blockbuster Video was a rush of excitement. But none of
3h
Astronomers Discover Another Mysterious, Repeating Radio Transmission From Space
Fast Astronomers have discovered yet another mysterious, uber-powerful, repeating radio burst — which could get them one step closer to unlocking the secrets behind the strange phenomenon. A new paper by an international consortium of astrophysicists, which was published in the journal Nature this week, details the new discovery and describes how it mysteriously releases weaker signals between it
3h
Hooray! Tesla Lets Workers Leave Factory Where They've Been Trapped for Months
Home Sweet Home After being trapped in Tesla's Giga Shanghai factory for months due to COVID-19 lockdown measures, the carmaker is finally letting workers go back home today, Bloomberg reports . Workers have been sleeping in makeshift accommodations, but will finally able to leave as they clock out of their Friday shifts, according to the report, marking the end of months of less-than-ideal worki
3h
Accurate measurement of the Sagnac effect for matter waves
Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. OPEN ACCESS Research Article PHYSICS Share on Romain Gautier https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8181-932X , Mohamed Guessoum https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4165-5519 , Leonid A. Sidorenkov https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5293-2780 , Quentin Bouton https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8581-2195 , Arna
3h
Cohesin-dependent chromosome loop extrusion is limited by transcription and stalled replication forks
Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. OPEN ACCESS Research Article MOLECULAR BIOLOGY Share on Kristian Jeppsson https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4085-9771 [email protected] , Toyonori Sakata , Ryuichiro Nakato https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3019-5817 , Stefina Milanova https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9865-857X , Katsuhiko Shir
3h
Promotion of row 1–specific tip complex condensates by Gpsm2-Gαi provides insights into row identity of the tallest stereocilia
Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. OPEN ACCESS Research Article BIOCHEMISTRY Share on Yingdong Shi https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7466-780X , Lin Lin https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7145-446X , Chao Wang https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3192-2780 [email protected] , and Jinwei Zhu https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6657-0143 [emai
3h
Topological phase change transistors based on tellurium Weyl semiconductor
Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. OPEN ACCESS Research Article PHYSICAL SCIENCES Share on Jiewei Chen https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9756-742X , Ting Zhang https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7933-4940 , Jingli Wang https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6133-1212 , Lin Xu https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1781-1638 , Ziyuan Lin , Jidong
3h
Daily changes in light influence mood via inhibitory networks within the thalamic perihabenular nucleus
Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. OPEN ACCESS Research Article NEUROSCIENCE Share on Tenley Weil https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7253-6638 , K. M. Daly https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7417-6215 , Hector Yarur Castillo https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8549-3315 , Michael B. Thomsen , Huikun Wang https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8
3h
The risk variant rs11836367 contributes to breast cancer onset and metastasis by attenuating Wnt signaling via regulating NTN4 expression
Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. OPEN ACCESS Research Article HUMAN GENETICS Share on Han Yang https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9150-8146 , Xia Ting https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5187-1082 , Yue-Hang Geng , Yuntao Xie , Jovia L. Nierenberg https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2376-6714 , Yan-Fei Huo , Yan-Ting Zhou , … Show A
3h
Gatekeeping role of Nf2/Merlin in vascular tip EC induction through suppression of VEGFR2 internalization
Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. OPEN ACCESS Research Article CELL BIOLOGY Share on Gatekeeping role of Nf2 /Merlin in vascular tip EC induction through suppression of VEGFR2 internalization Jung Hyun Bae https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3181-6953 , Myung Jin Yang https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4493-9418 , Seung-hwan J
3h
Irradiation-induced grain boundary facet motion: In situ observations and atomic-scale mechanisms
Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. OPEN ACCESS Research Article MATERIALS SCIENCE Share on Christopher M. Barr https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5861-0854 , Elton Y. Chen , James E. Nathaniel II https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4365-5520 , Ping Lu https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9369-7462 , David P. Adams , Rémi Dingreville ht
3h
Seismological observation of Earth's oscillating inner core
Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. OPEN ACCESS Research Article GEOPHYSICS Share on Wei Wang https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5934-4268 [email protected] and John E. Vidale https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3658-818X Science Advances 10 Jun 2022 Vol 8 , Issue 23 DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.abm9916 PREVIOUS ARTICLE Glucose-sensing
3h
Single-cell analysis of human basal cell carcinoma reveals novel regulators of tumor growth and the tumor microenvironment
Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. OPEN ACCESS Research Article CANCER Share on Christian F. Guerrero-Juarez https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6245-6412 , Gun Ho Lee https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0041-5348 , Yingzi Liu https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8704-4756 , Shuxiong Wang , Matthew Karikomi https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5
3h
Brain injury environment critically influences the connectivity of transplanted neurons
Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. OPEN ACCESS Research Article NEUROSCIENCE Share on Sofia Grade https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1873-5550 [email protected] , Judith Thomas https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1918-9811 , Yvette Zarb https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5107-0701 , Manja Thorwirth https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7692-54
3h
Neuronal correlates of selective attention and effort in visual area V4 are invariant of motivational context
Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. OPEN ACCESS Research Article NEUROSCIENCE Share on Supriya Ghosh https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1956-1807 [email protected] and John H. R. Maunsell https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0018-4439 Science Advances 10 Jun 2022 Vol 8 , Issue 23 DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.abc8812 PREVIOUS ARTICLE Revi
3h
The January 6 Hearing Was a Warning
The House committee's televised hearings interrogate the Capitol attack with damning new evidence. Whether it's enough to prevent another one is uncertain.
3h
Expansion of cytotoxic tissue-resident CD8+ T cells and CCR6+CD161+ CD4+ T cells in the nasal mucosa following mRNA COVID-19 vaccination
Nature Communications, Published online: 10 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30913-4 Whether mRNA SARS-CoV-2 vaccines promote T cells within the nasal mucosa of vaccine recipients is not known. Here the authors show that after mRNA SARS-CoV-2 vaccination, antigen specific T cells can be measured in the nasal mucosa and that these T cells may be localised to respond to a subsequent virus infectio
3h
How mother-youth emotional climate helps adolescents cope with stress
Transition to middle school can be a stressful time for adolescents. They must adjust to a new peer group and social environment while going through the developmental changes of puberty. A recent study looks at how emotional aspects of parenting can help youth better cope with peer stressors during this transitional period.
4h
Lawsuit Claims That 3D Printer Caught Fire and Killed a Man
3D Printer Fire Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba is being sued by the parents of a young man who reportedly died during a fire caused by a 3D printer sold by the company. In their lawsuit , the parents of the late Calvin Yu are suing Alibaba and Tronxy, the Chinese company that made the defective 3D printer, for putting the faulty goods up for sale and failing to warn consumers about the dangers
4h
Neurophilosophy – or the brain's lack of discipline – 3. Discipline "What can you do with #neurophilosophy? "
#Neurophilosophy – or the #brain's lack of discipline ##3. Discipline: "What can you do with #neurophilosophy? " ##Application of the neurophilosophy methodology to a specific example from neurosciences research: Models for the #emergence of #consciousness In the following I would like to illustrate the non-reductive, bi-directional neurophilosophy methodology using a classic example of the philo
4h
Newly discovered Fast Radio Burst 190520 prompts more questions due to strange behavior
Newly discovered fast radio burst (FRB) 190520 shows unique behavior compared to other FRBs discovered so far. This deviant cosmic burst was observed by an international team, co-led by researchers at West Virginia University and the Center for Gravitational Waves and Cosmology. Just when you think you understand the pattern, a strange outlier comes along and forces you to re-evaluate all that you
4h
Built-up memories help babies connect words to objects
A new study offers a fresh perspective on how babies connect name words with objects, a critical skill for later language development. Before they can speak, babies between the ages of 7 and 11 months begin to pair the words they hear with the everyday objects in their surroundings. To explain this phenomenon, researchers have focused on "naming moments," when the names and objects are presented
4h
Existing cancer therapy in narrow use shows significant activity against other cancers
A drug currently used in just 1% of cancers has significant potential against the remaining 99%, according to a new study. Ivosidenib, or AG-120, is currently used against cancers that have a mutation in the IDH1 gene. However, study results show that Ivosidenib is also effective against unmutated, or 'wild-type' IDH1. The protein coded by the IDH1 gene in cancers helps cancer cells survive in a s
4h
Public school parents had a harder time with home learning during COVID
Parents accustomed to home schooling felt more resilient during the COVID-19 pandemic than those whose public-school children were suddenly housebound, according to a new study. The finding was particularly true for home-schooling parents who stayed physically active. But those who experienced increased stress because students were at home—and whose workout regimens suffered—likely had a differen
4h
Proposed Hypersonic Passenger Plane Will Travel to the Edge of Space at Mach 9
Supersonic travel hasn't been a reality for even the most well-off individuals since the Concorde was retired almost 20 years ago, but a company called Venus Aerospace wants to make super-fast passenger planes a reality again. Its proposed Stargazer aircraft will blow right past supersonic into the realm of hypersonic travel, reaching speeds up to Mach 9 at the edge of space. If it comes to fruit
4h
The Moral Desolation of the GOP
Yesterday evening, the leaders of the House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the United States Capitol opened their public hearings—hearings that will show, in the words of vice chair Liz Cheney, that "Donald Trump oversaw a sophisticated seven-part plan to overturn the presidential election and prevent the transfer of presidential power." Or, as committee chair Bennie Th
4h
What Chesa Boudin Revealed About an Undemocratic Election System
This week, San Francisco voters recalled Chesa Boudin, the city's district attorney and the face of the nationwide progressive-prosecutors movement. The election, widely described as a referendum on crime and disorder and a backlash against the Democratic Party's leftmost edge, was a caustic local fight played out on a national stage. It was democracy at work, with the public ousting a leader the
4h
Despite dire warnings, monarch butterfly numbers are solid
Scientists have been warning for quite some time that monarch butterflies were slated for extinction due to diminishing winter colonies. But a new study found that warming temperatures and growth in the summer population of monarchs has compensated for losses during the winter. Researchers did preach continued caution, as the study did show continuing declines in other species of butterflies.
5h
Scientists release first analysis of rocks plucked from speeding asteroid
Scientists have now begun to announce the first results from the analysis of a handful of dirt that Hayabusa2 managed to scoop off the surface of a speeding asteroid. What they found suggests that this asteroid is a piece of the same stuff that coalesced into our sun four-and-a-half billion years ago.
5h
Wreck of 340-year-old sunken Royal Navy warship discovered off Norfolk coast – video
The wreck of a Royal Navy warship that sank in 1682 while carrying the future King James Stuart has been identified off the coast of Norfolk . The wreckage of HMS Gloucester was actually found in 2007 by two brothers, Julian and Lincoln Barnwell, following a four-year search that covered an area of more than 5,000 nautical miles. It is only now that its discovery can be made public. The HMS Glouc
5h
Japanese Scientists: This Asteroid's Samples Contain "Clues to the Origin of Life"
Space Rock of Life After analyzing asteroid dust collected by Japan's Hayabusa2 spacecraft, scientists found something incredible: the presence of 23 different amino acids. And why's it incredible? It supports the theory that space rocks just like it brought life to Earth during the early days of the Solar System. In their new paper , the scientists from Okayama University in Japan claim they fou
5h
Liquid mirror telescope opens in India
Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. A unique telescope that focuses light with a slowly spinning bowl of liquid mercury instead of a solid mirror has opened its eye to the skies above India. Such telescopes have been built before, but the 4-meter-wide International Liquid Mirror Telescope (ILMT) is the first large
5h
Tesla Now At Risk of Massive Recall Over Autopilot Crashes
DOT Worry About It The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) is significantly widening its investigation into Tesla Autopilot crashes to include almost every car the company has sold in the United States — and it may ultimately result in a major safety recall. Since August 2021, the agency has been investigating Tesla crashes involving the driving-assistance software, and is awar
6h
The secret carbon decisions plants are making about our future
New research from The University of Western Australia has revealed that plants make their own "secret" decisions about how much carbon to release back into the atmosphere via a previously unknown process, a discovery with "profound implications" for the use of plants as carbon stores.
6h
How 'green islands' help forests regenerate after fire
A new study characterizes the role of fire refugia — the green islands of live trees that remain after forest fires — in forest regeneration following large and severe fires in the High Cascade mountains of Oregon and Washington. The results of this study can help determine when human intervention in the form of tree replanting is warranted, when it isn't, where replanting efforts should be targ
6h
Maintaining the right niche for blood cell development
Researchers have identified the role of transcription factors Runx1 and Runx2 in the inhibition of fibrosis, the abnormal build-up of connective tissue with severe hematopoietic defects, in the bone marrow. Mice lacking both Runx1 and Runx2 in CAR cells, a major component of the hematopoietic stem cell niche, demonstrated severe myelofibrosis and defects in the production of blood cells. Runx1 and
6h
Impostor Phenomenon: When self-doubt gets the upper hand
People who systematically underestimate themselves and their own performance suffer from so-called Impostor Phenomenon. They think that any success is due to external circumstances or just luck and chance. Those people live in constant fear that their 'deception' will be exposed. Psychologists now show that even under real-life conditions the phenomenon can appear regardless of age, gender, and in
6h
Women in simulated space missions demonstrate more sustainable leadership
A new study based on Mars Desert Research Station commanders' reports reveals differences in female and male leadership behavior. Although both genders are task-focused, women tend to be more positive. The genders also differ in their approach toward their team—while men focus on accomplishments, women emphasize mutual support. According to the author of the study, Inga Popovaitė, a sociologist at
6h
Parallel ventral hippocampus-lateral septum pathways differentially regulate approach-avoidance conflict
Nature Communications, Published online: 10 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31082-0 The ventral hippocampal CA3 and CA1 subfields play a critical role in the resolution of approach-avoidance conflict. Here the authors show that the subfields contribute to the regulation of this behavior through topographically distinct projections to the lateral septum.
6h
Bull shark 'baby food' under extreme threat
Juvenile bull sharks generally remain inside rivers, sheltered by mangroves while they are young and more vulnerable to predators, before moving out into coastal habitats. Until now, scientists assumed they relied on these mangrove habitats, rather than saltmarsh, to derive their nutritional needs via the crustaceans and fish that feed off mangrove.
6h
Aging dams could soon benefit from $7B federal loan program
Eight years after Congress created the program, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is taking a first step toward offering more than $7 billion of federally backed loans to repair aging dams owned by states, local governments and private entities across the U.S.
6h
Hierarchically porous carbon networks embedded with single iron sites for efficient oxygen reduction
Currently, oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) suffers from sluggish kinetics and high overpotential, which usually requires costly platinum (Pt)-based materials. Transition metal single-atom catalysts (M–N–C), such as Fe–N4 and Co–N4 with high ORR activity have been explored and considered to be the most promising catalysts for replacing precious metals. However, the low active site density and the t
6h
Mechanotransduction: Using nuclear mechanics to understand health and diseases
The application of mechanic forces to the cell nucleus affects the transport of proteins through the nuclear membrane, an action that controls cellular processes and could play a key role in several diseases such as cancer. These findings draw a new scenario for understanding how the mechanic forces drive the progression of cancer and open the doors to the design of potential innovative techniques
6h
Mechanotransduction: Using nuclear mechanics to understand health and diseases
The application of mechanic forces to the cell nucleus affects the transport of proteins through the nuclear membrane, an action that controls cellular processes and could play a key role in several diseases such as cancer. These findings draw a new scenario for understanding how the mechanic forces drive the progression of cancer and open the doors to the design of potential innovative techniques
6h
Researcher attacks journal for retracting his paper on COVID-19 drug
A journal has retracted a paper reporting the results of a clinical trial in which a drug cut COVID-19 hospitalization for men by 90%. The research group's other work has attracted a lot of attention in Brazil – including praise from president Jair Bolsonaro and criticism from research regulators – for their dramatic results. In … Continue reading
6h
Dirt scooped from asteroid Ryugu yields first discoveries
Samples from the asteroid Ryugu suggest it's leftover from formation of the sun billions of years ago. After a six-year journey, a plucky spacecraft called Hayabusa2 zinged back into Earth's atmosphere in late 2020 and landed deep in the Australian outback. When researchers from the Japanese space agency JAXA opened it, they found its precious payload sealed and intact: a handful of dirt that Hay
7h
'Superworms' that gobble plastics are like tiny recycling plants
A species of worm with an appetite for polystyrene could be the key to plastic recycling on a mass scale. Researchers discovered the common Zophobas morio "superworm" can eat through polystyrene, thanks to a bacterial enzyme in their gut. For the study, the researchers fed superworms different diets over a three-week period, with some given polystyrene foam , some bran, and others put on a fastin
7h
Why Does This New Moon Rover Look Vaguely Terrifying
Space Centaur If you've ever eyed a Moon rover and thought, "that thing should look more like a four-legged humanoid spider crab," you're in luck. A new lunar robot prototype, created by Japanese robotics maker GITAI in collaboration with the country's space agency JAXA, is just that type of nightmare creation. Called R1, the claw-handed Moon Centaur was revealed in an equally endearing and bone-
7h
Best Places to Buy A Laptop
A laptop computer is an essential tool for students and workers to get their work done, but figuring out the best place to get one can feel daunting. Every electronics retailer offers an entire slate of laptops, so it can be difficult to assess whether you're getting a good deal or choosing the right model. If you're stuck trying to figure which machine to get, Futurism has dedicated buyer's guid
7h
High-Tech Skincare Gadgets to Trick Out Your Routine
I love trying new skincare products. For the most part, I'm not really a 20-step routine kind of person. I just cleanse, put on a serum, and moisturize, and then I'm good to head out the door. Sometimes, though, it's fun to experiment, especially as innovations in tech become applied to skincare — for example, we started using LED lights in electrical equipment in the 1960s, and they became integ
7h
In Hilarious Typo, New York Times Complains of "Crytpo" Miners
Ink Bot The New York Times invented a fun new word this week, accidentally calling crypto miners "crytpo" miners. It's unclear whether the new phrase should be pronounced "krit-po" or "crite-po," but social media users are having a blast cracking wise at the Gray Lady . "When your copyeditor is just an NFT of a copyeditor," quipped one netizen . Clever Code The proof is in the pudding, or in this
7h
Hydrodynamic model of fish orientation in a channel flow
For over a century, scientists have sought to understand how fish orient against an incoming flow, even without visual and flow cues. In a study published in eLife, researchers explore a potential hydrodynamic mechanism of fish rheotaxis—movement away or toward water currents—through the study of the bidirectional coupling between fish and the surrounding fluid.
7h
How Black girls can reclaim their voice in music | Kyra Gaunt
How does music shape us? Digital ethnomusicologist and TED Fellow Kyra Gaunt studies how Black girls can preserve the integrity of their own voices while listening, dancing and singing to pop songs largely engineered by men, often with lyrics that express anti-Black, patriarchal sentiments. In a quick, incisive talk, she shows how Black girls can disrupt the stereotypes and stigmas buried within t
7h
Hydrodynamic model of fish orientation in a channel flow
For over a century, scientists have sought to understand how fish orient against an incoming flow, even without visual and flow cues. In a study published in eLife, researchers explore a potential hydrodynamic mechanism of fish rheotaxis—movement away or toward water currents—through the study of the bidirectional coupling between fish and the surrounding fluid.
7h
Anti-aging clues lurk in lysosomes, the recycling centers of the cell
Scientists at Baylor College of Medicine, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) and collaborating institutions report in the journal Nature Cell Biology that lysosomes in roundworms produce molecules that allow cells to 'talk' to one another about aging, coordinating the process across the entire organism.
7h
Hydrogen peroxide from tea and coffee residue: New pathway to sustainability
Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is an important chemical, with a wide variety of applications. However, the current method used to manufacture H2O2 is expensive and generates a considerable amount of waste, making it an unsustainable approach. In this study, a group of researchers produced H2O2 from waste coffee grounds and tea leaves, and then demonstrated its industrial use. Their novel method proved t
7h
Words matter: How to reduce gender bias with word choice
In the workplace, even subtle differences in language choice can influence the perception of gender for better or worse. These choices fall into two main categories: minimizing the role of gender by using gender-neutral terms or emphasizing an individual's gender through "gender marking." In a commentary in the journal Trends in Cognitive Sciences, behavioral scientist Stav Atir argues that by usi
7h
Covid infections on the rise in England and Northern Ireland
UK could be entering third Covid wave this year but trend represents 'small increase' in positive tests The UK may be entering its third wave of coronavirus this year, researchers warn, as official figures show infections are on the rise again in England and Northern Ireland. The Office for National Statistics said its latest analysis of swabs from households across Britain revealed a mixed pictu
7h
Moving furniture in the micro-world
When moving furniture, heavy objects are easier to move if you rotate them while pushing. Many people intuitively do this. An international research team from Konstanz (Germany), Trieste and Milan (Italy) has now investigated on the microscopic scale the reduction in static friction caused by simultaneous rotation.
7h
Tyrosine chassis for sustainable, high-yield production of useful compounds in yeast smart cells
Kobe University researchers have successfully developed a tyrosine chassis (a strain of microorganism with high tyrosine productivity) in the yeast Pichia pastoris through rational engineering. In addition they used this tyrosine chassis to develop smart cells that can produce the plant-derived compounds resveratrol, naringenin, norcoclaurine, and reticuline respectively. These compounds have a wi
7h
Tyrosine chassis for sustainable, high-yield production of useful compounds in yeast smart cells
Kobe University researchers have successfully developed a tyrosine chassis (a strain of microorganism with high tyrosine productivity) in the yeast Pichia pastoris through rational engineering. In addition they used this tyrosine chassis to develop smart cells that can produce the plant-derived compounds resveratrol, naringenin, norcoclaurine, and reticuline respectively. These compounds have a wi
7h
Dams are supposed to prevent floods. Some may make them worse
Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. Dams are often built to control floods, but on certain kinds of rivers they may make big deluges worse, a new study finds. The finding suggests river managers might need to rethink their flood control strategies on silty and sandy lowland rivers. "It's a counterintuitive finding
7h
Hydrogen peroxide from tea and coffee residue: New pathway to sustainability
Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is an important chemical, with a wide variety of applications. However, the current method used to manufacture H2O2 is expensive and generates a considerable amount of waste, making it an unsustainable approach. In this study, a group of researchers produced H2O2 from waste coffee grounds and tea leaves, and then demonstrated its industrial use. Their novel method proved t
7h
'Good' bacteria to tackle depression
Intestinal flora plays an important role in health — including mental health. Researchers have shown that probiotics can support the effect of antidepressants and help to alleviate depression.
7h
Climate economics: Policies change people
The makers of climate policy should rethink how people think: Researchers show that abiding by climate-friendly policies actually changes the way people think about what they do. People's preferences are more dynamic than textbook economics often assumes. The researchers' advice to policy makers is to take changing preferences into account when tailoring policies like carbon taxes or building low-
7h
China calls theory that Covid originated in Chinese lab 'politically motivated lie'
WHO report has said origins of virus are still unknown and recommended further investigation China has repeated its assertion the theory that the Covid-19 pandemic began with a leak from a Chinese laboratory is "a politically motivated lie", after the World Health Organization (WHO) recommended continued investigations this week. "The lab leak theory is totally a lie concocted by anti-China force
8h
'Silent' gene mutations may be harmful, not neutral
Most "silent" genetic mutations are strongly harmful, not neutral, according to new research with yeast in the laboratory. In the early 1960s, Marshall Nirenberg and several other scientists deciphered the genetic code of life, determining the rules by which information in DNA molecules is translated into proteins, the working parts of living cells. They identified three-letter units in DNA seque
8h
Targeted wastewater surveillance has a history of social and ethical concerns
Wastewater surveillance involves testing sewage to obtain data about a population's health. While the technique is decades old, it has gained recent international prominence for its ability to predict pandemic surges, detect new SARS-CoV-2 variants and provide useful data when traditional testing methods reach capacity. With its success, the field is expanding.
8h
Water repellency as the first step to life on land one billion years ago
Plants use the "lotus effect" to self-clean—water droplets simply roll off and clean the surface to reduce infestation with fungal spores, for example, as Professor Wilhelm Barthlott of the University of Bonn discovered four decades ago. But it's not just plants that use the lotus effect—land living cyanobacteria (Hassallia byssoidea) also use extreme water repellency to protect themselves from wa
8h
Water repellency as the first step to life on land one billion years ago
Plants use the "lotus effect" to self-clean—water droplets simply roll off and clean the surface to reduce infestation with fungal spores, for example, as Professor Wilhelm Barthlott of the University of Bonn discovered four decades ago. But it's not just plants that use the lotus effect—land living cyanobacteria (Hassallia byssoidea) also use extreme water repellency to protect themselves from wa
8h
Improving ocean general circulation models
Ocean general circulation models (OGCMs) have become increasingly important for understanding oceanic dynamic processes and ocean environment forecasting. In recent decades, OGCMs have been developed with finer resolution (10km for eddy-resolving OGCMs) given the large computational resources.
8h
Novel fluorescent organohydrogel proposed to achieve dual information encryption
The Smart Polymer Materials Group led by Prof. Chen Tao at the Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering (NIMTE) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) has developed a novel fluorescent organohydrogel with shape-memory ability, which could achieve photo-writing/photo-erasing and dual encryption of fluorescent information. This study was published in Advanced Optical Materials.
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Unique molecular CODE: Paramagnetic encoding of molecules
Today we commonly encounter contactless RFID chips in a number of products, but can similar technology be implemented at the molecular level? The answer is yes. The principle of molecular encoding conceived by Miloslav Polášek and his team at IOCB Prague represents a novel method on the frontier of chemistry and modern technologies. Their paper on paramagnetic encoding of molecules was recently pu
8h
Lab earthquake study justifies pumping CO2 underground to avert climate warming
A Skoltech professor and his colleagues from the Norwegian Seismic Array and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, U.S., have run an experiment that reproduces the injection of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide underground for semi-permanent storage to prevent global climate warming. They have found that despite some fears, this process does not cause earthquakes if CO2 is injected at th
8h
New eco-friendly synthesis method uses alumina as a recyclable catalyst
An international research collaboration between Kobe University and Inner Mongolia Medical University has developed a simple, low cost and comparatively environmentally friendly method of synthesizing diphenylmethanol derivatives using alumina from China. Diphenylmethanol derivatives are used as raw materials in the manufacture of perfumes and pharmaceuticals, among others.
8h
Unique molecular CODE: Paramagnetic encoding of molecules
Today we commonly encounter contactless RFID chips in a number of products, but can similar technology be implemented at the molecular level? The answer is yes. The principle of molecular encoding conceived by Miloslav Polášek and his team at IOCB Prague represents a novel method on the frontier of chemistry and modern technologies. Their paper on paramagnetic encoding of molecules was recently pu
8h
Researchers observe continuous time crystal
Researchers from the Institute of Laser Physics at Universität Hamburg have succeeded for the first time in realizing a time crystal that spontaneously breaks continuous time translation symmetry. They report their observation in a study published online by the journal Science on Thursday, 9 June, 2022.
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Scientists observe large-scale, ordered and tunable Majorana-zero-mode lattice
In a study published in Nature on June 8, a joint research team led by Prof. Gao Hongjun from the Institute of Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) has reported observation of a large-scale, ordered and tunable Majorana-zero-mode (MZM) lattice in the iron-based superconductor LiFeAs, providing a new pathway toward future topological quantum computation.
8h
China Publishes the Most Detailed Map of the Moon Ever Made
Singular Focus There's now a map of the Moon's surface more detailed than any that came before it. Published in the journal Science Bulletin , researchers from the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the country's Institute of Geochemistry, and other organizations compiled known information about the Moon's surface in a recent study that includes this wildly-detailed map of the lunar terrain. As the stu
8h
Why do I forget the books I've read? We ask an expert
Dr Sean Kang, a cognitive psychologist, says the information is still there, but it's tucked away in long-term memory Ever thought about a book you've read, and had no recollection of the plot? Or followed a recommendation to watch a TV show, only to find you've already seen it? We live in an age of mass content, with TV , books and films consumed at some of the highest levels in recent years. Co
8h
Theory suggests quantum computers should be exponentially faster on some learning tasks than classical machines
A team of researchers affiliated with multiple institutions in the U.S., including Google Quantum AI, and a colleague in Australia, has developed a theory suggesting that quantum computers should be exponentially faster on some learning tasks than classical machines. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their theory and results when tested on Google's Sycamore quant
8h
Life, Literature, This Moment of June
In Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway , as Clarissa Dalloway runs errands throughout London, the narration takes note of the sensory feast that she encounters: "the swing, tramp, and trudge" of urban life; "the bellow and the uproar" of music, yelling, cars, buses, and an airplane overhead. Clarissa famously revels in "life; London; this moment of June." In the novel, "the city is full of people movi
8h
Do AI Systems Really Have Their Own Secret Language?
A new generation of artificial intelligence models can produce "creative" images on-demand based on a text prompt. The likes of Imagen , MidJourney , and DALL-E 2 are beginning to change the way creative content is made with implications for copyright and intellectual property. While the output of these models is often striking, it's hard to know exactly how they produce their results. Last week,
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Studying grassland from space
Extensively used grassland is host to a high degree of biodiversity, and performs an important climate protection function as a carbon sink and also serves for fodder and food production. However, these ecosystem services are jeopardized if productivity on these lands is maximized and their use therefore intensified. Researchers have now described how satellite data and machine learning methods en
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Wild Bill's Boat Gets Stuck Near Jagged Rocks! | Deadliest Catch
Stream Deadliest Catch on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/deadliest-catch #DeadliestCatch #Discovery #DiscoveryPlus Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Disco
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Brexit row could prompt exodus of senior scientists from UK
At least 16 recipients of prestigious ERC grants making plans to reject UK offer and move their labs abroad The UK is facing an exodus of star scientists, with at least 16 recipients of prestigious European grants making plans to move their labs abroad as the UK remains frozen out of the EU's flagship science programme. Britain's participation in Horizon Europe has been caught in the crosshairs o
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Upptäckta spökstjärnor från slukad galax
Astronomer i Lund har hittat en grupp stjärnor i Vintergatans disk som kan komma från en hittills okänd bebisgalax. Sådana stjärnor har aldrig tidigare påträffats i galaxdisken. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
8h
Demokratin mår bra av public service
Public service-medier bidrar till kunniga och informerade medborgare. De åtnjuter dessutom ett jämförelsevis stort medborgerligt förtroende och kan inte anses vara partipolitiskt partiska. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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Aspirin slows down evolution of colorectal cancer cells
Aspirin changes the way colorectal cancer cell populations evolve over time, making them less able to survive and proliferate, according to a new study. Cancer starts when cells start dividing uncontrollably. Scientists have known that taking aspirin can help protect against the development of colorectal cancer—cancer that afflicts the colon or rectum—but the exact reason aspirin has this effect
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The diet that is right for you: putting a personalised nutrition app to the test
A gadget-rich programme says it will find out how you react to foods and teach you to eat the best ones For decades, dietary advice has been notoriously faddy, swinging from the low-fat, high-carb guidance of the 1980s and 1990s to the low-carb or intermittent fasting diets recommended in more recent years. But one programme claims to be different: it promises to test how your individual body res
8h
Now Even NASA Wants to Talk About UFOs
UFOs? After years of avoiding any serious discussion of such things, NASA is on it. The space agency announced yesterday that it will form a team dedicated to studying unidentified aerial phenomena "that cannot be identified as aircraft or known natural phenomena." Starting this fall, the team will examine existing data on these objects and brainstorm new ways to collect future data. All the work
8h
One in 500 men carry extra sex chromosome, research suggests
Prevalence in UK study twice as high as thought, putting them at higher risk of health issues Twice as many men carry an extra sex chromosome as previously thought, according to researchers who called for more genetic testing to identify people at greater risk of related medical problems. Research on more than 200,000 men enrolled with the UK Biobank suggests that about one in 500 in the general
9h
Magnetizing laser-driven inertial fusion implosions
Nuclear fusion is a widely studied process through which atomic nuclei of a low atomic number fuse together to form a heavier nucleus, while releasing a large amount of energy. Nuclear fusion reactions can be produced using a method known as inertial confinement fusion, which entails the use of powerful lasers to implode a fuel capsule and produce plasma.
9h
Phage therapy shows promise for Mycobacterium infection
Researchers report 20 new case studies on the use phage therapy to treat deadly Mycobacterium infections, showing the therapy's success in more than half of the patients. It's the largest-ever set of published case studies for therapy using bacteria-killing viruses known as bacteriophages , providing unprecedented detail on their use to treat dire infections while laying the groundwork for a futu
9h
Since I moved in, my boyfriend will only sleep in our bed twice a week | Ask Annalisa Barbieri
Something about this has triggered past feelings for both of you. The key is to unlock the roots of these feelings I recently moved in with my boyfriend of just over a year. We were both clear from the outset we really value our personal space, and needed a bedroom each. Since we moved in together, it's become clear that we have very different feelings about spending the night together. My boyfri
9h
For Many Rural Americans, Covid Highlights a Dearth of Doctors
In New York State, as well as across the U.S., medical personnel have quit in record numbers during the pandemic. Turnover rates were four times higher for lower-paid health aides and nursing assistants than physicians. The problems are most acute in rural areas that were already chronically understaffed.
9h
How Did They Get Inflation So Wrong?
Last week, Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen did something unusual for a Washington policy maker: She admitted that she'd made a mistake. In an interview with CNN's Wolf Blitzer about the U.S.'s persistently high inflation rate , Yellen said , of her predictions last year that prices would stay under control, "I was wrong then about the path that inflation would take." That she was. In March 2021,
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Iridium-catalyzed direct asymmetric reductive amination utilizing primary alkyl amines as the N-sources
Nature Communications, Published online: 10 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31045-5 Direct asymmetric reductive amination is one of the most efficient methods for obtaining chiral amines. Here the authors show how primary alkyl amines can undergo this transformation in the presence of an iridium catalyst with sterically tuneable chiral phosphoramidite ligands, achieving the synthesis of pharmac
10h
The Download: China's influencer crackdown, and covid's origins
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. How China's biggest online influencers fell from their thrones No one had foreseen just how fast three of China's most powerful influencers would fall. On June 3, Austin Li, a 30-year-old live-streamer with over 60 million followers, abruptly cut off a live st
10h
Living Skin for Robots
In the original Terminator movie, the killer robot played by Arnold Schwarzenegger was covered in living human skin. In the context of the storyline, this was necessary for the terminator to travel back in time because only living matter could go through, no technology. As a movie device this accomplished two things. It allowed the robot to be portrayed throughout most of the film with a living a
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An Ode to My Thesaurus
They've got you all wrong. They think you're a trick, a cheat sheet for fancy words, a way of counterfeiting cleverness. (And Americans are fatally awed by cleverness. This acclaimed young author/tweeter/whatever is always "whip smart." That drunk guy is always shouting "Think you're smarter than me? HUH?") Or they'll treat you as a mere lexical resource. A vocabulary expander. A ThighMaster for
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This Week in Space: Pet Rocks, Russia Squeaks, and Cargo Dragon's Fuel Line Leaks
The SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launches with the Double Asteroid Redirection Test, or DART, spacecraft onboard, Tuesday, Nov. 23, 2021, Pacific time (Nov. 24 Eastern time) from Space Launch Complex 4E at Vandenberg Space Force Base in California. DART is the world's first full-scale planetary defense test, demonstrating one method of asteroid deflection technology. The mission was built and is manage
10h
Imaging translational control by Argonaute with single-molecule resolution in live cells
Nature Communications, Published online: 10 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30976-3 Guided by miRNA, Argonaute proteins silence mRNA in multiple ways that are not well understood. Here, the authors develop live-cell biosensors to image the impact tethered regulatory factors, such as Argonaute, have on single-mRNA translation dynamics.
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Daily briefing: App turns research ethics into a game
Nature, Published online: 09 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01645-8 Dice with pretend ethical dilemmas, go under the ice of the world's largest freshwater lake with the Baikal seal and hear that the James Webb Space Telescope has been dinged by a tiny micrometeoroid (but it's OK).
10h
Decoding a key part of the cell, atom by atom
Whatever you are doing, whether it is driving a car, going for a jog, or even at your laziest, eating chips and watching TV on the couch, there is an entire suite of molecular machinery inside each of your cells hard at work. That machinery, far too small to see with the naked eye or even with many microscopes, creates energy for the cell, manufactures its proteins, makes copies of its DNA, and mu
10h
Decoding a key part of the cell, atom by atom
Whatever you are doing, whether it is driving a car, going for a jog, or even at your laziest, eating chips and watching TV on the couch, there is an entire suite of molecular machinery inside each of your cells hard at work. That machinery, far too small to see with the naked eye or even with many microscopes, creates energy for the cell, manufactures its proteins, makes copies of its DNA, and mu
11h
PODCAST: Derfor skal vi alle køre i elbiler om 13 år
Alle nyproducerede biler skal være emissionsfri i 2035, har EU-parlamentet netop besluttet. I ugens Transformator spørger vi, hvorfor EU ikke bare kan lade markedet bestemme, og fortæller også historien om telegrafonen og de utallige fejlslagne danske it-projekter.
11h
The Six Forces That Fuel Friendship
" The Friendship Files ," my series of interviews with friends about their friendships, began with an idle thought. Having written a lot about both friendship and dating apps , I was curious about Bumble BFF. Did it work? Did it feel like dating? What do you do on a friend date anyway? So I interviewed two young women who became best friends after using the app. It was intended as a onetime artic
11h
A Negative COVID Test Has Never Been So Meaningless
In early May, 27-year-old Hayley Furmaniuk felt tired and a bit congested, but after rapid-testing negative for the coronavirus two days in a row, she dined indoors with friends. The next morning, her symptoms worsened. Knowing her parents were driving in for Mother's Day, she tested again—and saw a very bright positive. Which meant three not-so-great things: She needed to cancel with her parents
11h
She Wouldn't Exist if Not for Her Friend's Family
Each installment of " The Friendship Files " features a conversation between The Atlantic 's Julie Beck and two or more friends, exploring the history and significance of their relationship. This is the 100th and final installment of the series. This week she talks with two women who were brought together by an extraordinary act of courage: During World War II, Clémentine Lestang's great-grandfat
11h
White Author, Black Paragons
I t's 2019 in Washington, D.C. , and Theo is changing his art-history dissertation after finding a painting of a horse in his neighbor's giveaway pile. He is 26 years old, a Black Londoner (his mother is Yoruba, his father Californian) and a former star polo player. He left the sport for academia because of relentless racist harassment, and now studies stereotypes of Africans in British painting.
11h
The Other Cause of January 6
John Eastman. Rudy Giuliani. Donald Trump himself. These people all bear some responsibility for the events of January 6, 2021. But there is another contributing factor—an institution, not a person—whose role is regularly overlooked, and that deserves a focus in the ongoing January 6 committee hearings : the Electoral College. The Electoral College isn't responsible for President Trump's efforts
11h
In Ukraine, Youth Has Ended
I f not for the war, Ira Lyubarskaya told me, she would probably have spent the spring walking the streets of her hometown, her earphones playing music by her favorite band, Imagine Dragons, or sitting on the rooftop of her apartment building, rereading Truman Capote's In Cold Blood for the umpteenth time. And perhaps, had she been from Kyiv, or Lviv, or other parts of Ukraine that have suffered
12h
How China's biggest online influencers fell from their thrones
No one had foreseen just how fast three of China's most powerful influencers would fall. On June 3, Austin Li, a 30-year-old livestreamer with over 60 million followers on the Alibaba-owned e-commerce platform Taobao, abruptly cut off a stream after a tank-shaped ice cream dessert appeared on the screen. While he later posted that it was due to "technical difficulties," most people understand it
12h
Nickel catalyzed multicomponent stereodivergent synthesis of olefins enabled by electrochemistry, photocatalysis and photo-electrochemistry
Nature Communications, Published online: 10 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30985-2 The construction of trisubstituted alkenes with high stereoselectivity is challenging. Here, the authors realize the stereodivergent synthesis of such compounds via switching between electrochemistry, photochemistry and photoelectrochemistry.
12h
Epitaxial growth of inch-scale single-crystal transition metal dichalcogenides through the patching of unidirectionally orientated ribbons
Nature Communications, Published online: 10 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30900-9 Here, the authors report the direct growth of periodic arrays of 2D semiconductor ribbons by exploiting the step edges of high-miller-index Au facets, showing potential for 2D electronic devices. The synthesized ribbons could also be merged to obtain wafer-scale single-crystal monolayers.
12h
Cis- and trans-resveratrol have opposite effects on histone serine-ADP-ribosylation and tyrosine induced neurodegeneration
Nature Communications, Published online: 10 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30785-8 Here, the authors show that histone serine-ADP-ribosylation is decreased in Alzheimer's disease brains and increased tyrosine levels deplete tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase levels and cause neuronal damage. Cis-resveratrol was shown to facilitate histone serine-ADP-ribosylation-dependent DNA repair and provides neuropro
12h
Evolution of sexual systems, sex chromosomes and sex-linked gene transcription in flatworms and roundworms
Nature Communications, Published online: 10 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30578-z Transitions between hermaphroditic and separate sexes are relatively understudied in animals compared to pants. Here, Wang et al. reconstruct the evolution of separate sexes in the flatworms and complex changes of sex chromosomes in the roundworms.
12h
Intel Freezes All PC Hiring For at Least Two Weeks
(Photo: Christian Wiediger/Unsplash) In an attempt to cut costs, Intel is pausing all hiring for its client computing group. The freeze will last at least two weeks, according to an internal memo obtained by Reuters. It's currently set to affect only the portion of the company that deals with non-Apple desktop and laptop chips. "All hiring and all job requisitions" will be on hold as division lea
13h
Monarch butterfly populations are thriving in North America
For years, scientists have warned that monarch butterflies are dying off in droves because of diminishing winter colonies. But new research from the University of Georgia shows that the summer population of monarchs has remained relatively stable over the past 25 years.
13h
Wreck of Royal Navy warship sunk in 1682 identified off Norfolk coast
HMS Gloucester could be the 'most historic maritime discovery since the raising of the Marie Rose' The wreck of a Royal Navy warship which sank in 1682 while carrying the future king James Stuart has been identified off the coast of Norfolk. The wreckage of HMS Gloucester was actually found in 2007 by two brothers, Julian and Lincoln Barnwell, alongside their late father and two friends, followin
13h
Converting waste PET plastics into automobile fuels and antifreeze components
Nature Communications, Published online: 10 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31078-w To solve the serious problem of white plastic pollution many degradation routes are being investigated. Here the authors show a H2-free low-cost Cu/SiO2 catalyzed process to quantitatively convert polyethylene terephthalate into p-xylene and ethylene glycol in one pot with methanol as both the solvent and hydrog
14h
Pharma Nord trak egen licens efter graverende fejl
Lægemiddelstyrelsens GCP-inspektører fandt så mange problematiske forhold på deres inspektion af Pharma Nords studie af naturlægemidlet Q10, at inspektørerne så sig nødsaget til at alarmere tidskriftet, der havde viderebragt studiets resultater. Inspektionen var dyre lærepenge for det danske firma, der i dag har omskrevet deres manual for kliniske forsøg.
14h
N-Aminopyridinium reagents as traceless activating groups in the synthesis of N-Aryl aziridines
Nature Communications, Published online: 10 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31032-w Aziridines are useful intermediates, present in important synthetic targets. Here, the authors show a strategy for the synthesis of N-aryl aziridines based on N-aminopyridinium reagents followed by Ni-catalyzed C–N cross-coupling of N-pyridinium aziridines with aryl boronic acids.
15h
Podd: Maten och hälsan, del 2
Att äta varierad hälsosam mat är bra både för oss och våra tarmbakterier. Men vad är bra mat, hur ändrar man sina kostvanor och vad säger forskningen om antiinflammatorisk kost? I den här podden pratar Jenny Loftrup och Eva Bartonek, redaktörer för Vetenskap och hälsa, om forskning om kosten med utgångspunkt i artiklar från senaste tidningen från Vetenskap och hälsa "Minnet, maten och vår hälsa".
15h
All in My Head by Jessica Morris review – an attempt to make the incurable treatable
Faced with a devastating diagnosis, Morris responds by doing all she can to improve the odds of survival for her, and others In 2016 Jessica Morris was on an annual hiking weekend with friends in upstate New York when she started to feel all wrong. Being out of breath was nothing new since she was in her mid-50s, and exercise had never been her thing. What was her thing, though, was talking – and
15h
In your own time: how to live for today the philosophical way
What's gone is gone, but don't waste time worrying about that. Or on what comes next. The ideal way to age is to be in the moment Arguably the most useless observation ever made by an ancient Greek philosopher – putting aside, for now, Pythagoras's theory that fava beans contained the souls of the dead – was Epicurus's argument that we shouldn't fear death, because we won't be around when it happ
16h
Xi Jinping says 'persistence is victory' as Covid restrictions return to Shanghai and Beijing
Both cities back on high alert, with new lockdowns in Shanghai , and the shutdown of entertainment venues in Beijing See all our coronavirus coverage Xi Jinping has reiterated China's commitment to zero-Covid, declaring "persistence is victory", as Shanghai and Beijing were hit with new lockdowns, shutdowns, and mass testing drives just a week after the cities celebrated the easing of restriction
16h
Schneider Shorts 10.06.2022 – Quackery to kill for
Schneider Shorts of 10.06.2022 – why eugenics science is innocent, with a job opening for a medical school dean, a Turkish biomedical con artist charged with murder, a Herbalife shill whitewashed, a supplement scammer celebrated by CNN, plus a proxalutamide retraction, German Alzheimer's cure, and Peter Wilmshurst vs Big Pharma to reassure you that science is first and foremost a business.
17h
Cocktail of chemical pollutants linked to falling sperm quality in research
Exclusive: Study finds people have 'astonishing' levels of compounds thought to disrupt hormones A cocktail of chemical pollutants measured in people's bodies has been linked to falling semen quality by new research. Chemicals such as bisphenols and dioxins are thought to interfere with hormones and damage sperm quality, and the study found combinations of these compounds are present at "astonish
17h
Trump Gets the January 6 Trial He Long Dodged
Tonight Congress began its second prosecution of former President Donald Trump for his role in the events of the January 6, 2021, insurrection. The first occurred barely a month after the Capitol siege, when the Senate held an abbreviated impeachment trial that resulted in his acquittal. Last year, the Democrats leading the prosecution chose not to call witnesses. "People want to get home for Val
18h
The One Witness at the January 6 Hearing Who Matters Most
The congressional hearing into the events of January 6 on Thursday night focused attention on a single decisive person. Not the hearing's powerful chair or the meticulous vice chair. Not the former U.S. president who tried to overthrow the government. Not the former vice president whom the former president said deserved hanging. Not the lawless insurrectionists, not the heroic police officers, no
19h
What happened before, during and after solar system formation? A recent study of the Asteroid Ryugu holds the answers
The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Hayabusa2 mission returned uncontaminated primitive asteroid samples to Earth. A comprehensive analysis of 16 particles from the asteroid Ryugu revealed many insights into the processes that operated before, during and after the formation of the solar system, with some still shaping the surface of the present-day asteroid. Elemental and isotopic data reveal
19h
Photosynthesis-inspired process makes commodity chemicals
A team used light and water to convert acetylene into ethylene, a widely used, highly valuable chemical that is a key ingredient in plastics. While this conversion typically requires high temperatures and pressures, flammable hydrogen and expensive metals to drive the reaction, a photosynthesis-like process is much less expensive and less energy intensive. Not only is the new process environmental
20h
Wreck of historic royal ship discovered off the English coast
A royal shipwreck has been discovered off the English coast. The wreck is of one of the most famous ships of the 17th century — The Gloucester — which sank 340 years ago while carrying the future King of England, James Stuart. Since running aground on a sandbank on May 6, 1682, the wreck has lain half-buried on the seabed, its exact whereabouts unknown. It has now been found.
21h
Nasa forms independent team to study unexplained UFO sightings
The space agency's mission chief said scientific community may see it as 'selling out' with study expected to begin this fall Nasa is launching a study of UFOs as part of a new push toward high-risk, high-impact science. The space agency announced on Thursday that it was setting up an independent team to see how much information is publicly available on the matter and how much more is needed to u
21h
Why people don't view the world the same way others do
Why are we so sure that the way we see people, situations and politics is accurate, and the way other people see them is foolishly wrong? The answer, according to new research lies in a region of the brain he calls the 'gestalt cortex,' which helps people make sense of information that is ambiguous or incomplete — and dismiss alternative interpretations.
21h
In some places, humans and wildlife are 'business partners.' The relationships may not last
Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. Many of us grow attached to animals, whether it's by raising a puppy or regularly feeding a crow on the porch. But for millennia, certain communities around the world have formed a different sort of bond—one where animals are more like business partners than pets. Dolphins herd
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Learning and remembering movement
Researchers examining the brain at a single-neuron level found that computation happens not just in the interaction between neurons, but within each individual neuron. Each of these cells, it turns out, is not a simple switch, but a complicated calculating machine. This discovery promises changes not only to our understanding of how the brain works, but better understanding of conditions ranging f
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Congress Moves to Regulate Crypto After Meltdown Wipes Out Investments
Heads Up The latest crypto implosion was so big that even politicians in Washington are starting to consider the best way to regulate blockchain markets. PBS reports this week that the about-face comes after last month's crypto bust, with a particular focus on the so-called "stablecoin" Terra, which tanked and lost investors an estimated $40 billion. Although crypto overall has persisted through
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As the ocean heats up hungrier predators take control
A hotter ocean is a hungrier ocean — at least as far as fish predators are concerned. Scientists have discovered predator impacts in the Atlantic and Pacific peak at higher temperatures. The effects cascade down to transform other life in the ocean, potentially disrupting balances that have existed for millennia.
1d
Ground-breaking number of brown dwarfs discovered
Brown dwarfs, mysterious objects that straddle the line between stars and planets, are essential to our understanding of both stellar and planetary populations. However, only 40 brown dwarfs could be imaged around stars in almost three decades of searches. An international team has directly imaged a remarkable four new brown dwarfs thanks to a new innovative search method.
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From 'open-minded' to 'underwhelming,' mixed reactions greet latest COVID-19 origin report
Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. "Further studies needed." That's the main message in a preliminary report released today by a scientific advisory group convened by the World Health Organization (WHO) to clarify the cloudy origin of COVID-19. But in stark distinction to a report from an earlier WHO committee, w
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Yellowstone's history of hydrothermal explosions over the past 14,000 years
While much of public attention on Yellowstone focuses on its potential to produce large supereruptions, the hazards that are much more likely to occur are smaller, violent hydrothermal explosions. Hydrothermal explosions occur when near-boiling water suddenly flashes into steam, releasing large amounts of energy. The energy release fractures the rock downward, often leaving behind a crater. The sa
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Study finds evidence of bovine TB in 15% of rhinos at South African national park
The largest study ever conducted on a free-ranging population of rhinoceroses reveals that about one in every seven rhinos in a key South African national park has been infected with Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis), the pathogen that causes bovine tuberculosis (bTB). The finding shines new light on the potential for diseases to disrupt global conservation efforts, and potentially increase risk to h
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Study finds evidence of bovine TB in 15% of rhinos at South African national park
The largest study ever conducted on a free-ranging population of rhinoceroses reveals that about one in every seven rhinos in a key South African national park has been infected with Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis), the pathogen that causes bovine tuberculosis (bTB). The finding shines new light on the potential for diseases to disrupt global conservation efforts, and potentially increase risk to h
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Family Guy Actor Pays Huge Ransom for Stolen Bored Ape
Reunited Actor Seth Green has been reunited with his Bored Ape NFT less than a month after losing it to an anonymous scammer, BuzzFeed News reports . The NFT, Bored Ape #9398, was meant to star in a TV show created by Green, but the theft threw the project into chaos. The ape was purchased from Green's scammer for around $200,000 by a collector who goes by both "Mr Cheese" and "DarkWing87." Now,
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Tesla Reportedly Giving Full Self-Driving Beta to Basically Anybody Now
Tesla has slowly been rolling out the beta to its advanced — albeit misleadingly named — Full Self-Driving assistance software, giving select motorists a taste of what might be the future of driving. So far, the Elon Musk-led company has been relying on " safety scores " to decide who gets the upgrade, based on driving behavior including the number of forward collision warnings per 600 miles, har
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Pre-historic Wallacea: A melting pot of human genetic ancestries
The Wallacean islands of present-day Eastern Indonesia have a long history of occupation by modern humans. Notably, the maritime expansion of Austronesian speakers into Wallacea left archaeological traces of a Neolithic lifestyle and a genetic imprint still detectable in Eastern Indonesians today. To gain further insights into Wallacea's settlement history, scientists sequenced and analyzed sixtee
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NASA to launch six small satellites to monitor and study tropical cyclones
NASA is launching the first two of six small satellites no earlier than June 12, to study the formation and development of tropical cyclones almost every hour—about four to six times more often than is possible with current satellites. This is the first of three CubeSat launches for NASA's Time-Resolved Observations of Precipitation structure and storm Intensity with a Constellation of Smallsats (
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New study shows how 'green islands' help forests regenerate after fire
Thanks to climate change, high-elevation forests in the Central Cascade mountains of the Pacific Northwest are burning more frequently and expansively than in the recent past, prompting researchers and fire managers to question whether forests will be able to recover from these emerging fire patterns and whether they will require human assistance to do so.
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Monkeypox Could Be Nothing—Or It Could Be the Next Syphilis
The first reports of monkeypox cases in Europe began to surface in mid-May. A week later, there were 92 confirmed cases outside the Central and West African countries where the disease usually circulates; now there are 1,200 . By the end of this month, who knows? "If you'd asked me two weeks ago, I would have anticipated that there might be a few thousand cases globally related to this current ou
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Fasting has pros and cons for muscle repair in mice
Fasting sends muscle stem cells into a deep resting state that slows muscle repair but also makes them more resistant to stress, according to a study of laboratory mice. The protective effect can also be achieved by feeding the mice high-fat, low-carbohydrate food—also known as a ketogenic diet—that mimics how the body responds to fasting, or by giving the animals ketone bodies, the byproducts th
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Guy Trains Particularly Horrible AI Bot Using Millions of 4Chan Posts
Bad Seed VICE reported this week that the worst has come to pass : a guy trained an artificial intelligence using millions of 4chan posts, and then turned the resulting monstrosity loose on the web, letting it post directly to the cursed messageboard. They weren't any old 4chan posts, either. The outlet reported that Yannic Kilcher, an AI researcher and YouTuber, used more than three million 4cha
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Best Gaming Headsets Under $100
The best gaming headsets under $100 prove you don't have to spend big for great, immersive sound. While gamers may be more obsessed with fast keyboards, ergonomic gamepads, and big curved OLED screens, nothing beats a good headset when it comes to really getting your head in the game. Great audio can be just as immersive as great graphics, and luckily, you don't have to break the bank to tap into
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Scientists release first analysis of rocks plucked from speeding asteroid
After a six-year journey, a plucky spacecraft called Hayabusa2 zinged back into Earth's atmosphere in late 2020 and landed deep in the Australian outback. When researchers from the Japanese space agency JAXA opened it, they found its precious payload sealed and intact: a handful of dirt that Hayabusa2 managed to scoop off the surface of a speeding asteroid.
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A Micrometeoroid Hit The James Webb Space Telescope's Primary Mirror
NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is on the verge of beginning its science operations, so the recent news that it has suffered a micrometeoroid impact is concerning. The space observatory is the long-awaited successor to Hubble, and it could serve as our window to the wider universe for the next 20 years, provided it doesn't get pelted by too many space rocks. Thankfully, NASA says the imp
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Sloshing lava lake offers 'new view' of Kilauea volcano
A lava lake in Hawaii's Kilauea caldera spent 10 years sloshing and churning before the volcano gave a bigger belch, researchers report. Kilauea erupted dramatically in 2018. Earthquakes, ash plumes, and lava flows destroyed more than 700 homes on Hawaii's Big Island and changed the volcano's topography. But Kilauea was more gently erupting for a decade before its big blowout. One prominent featu
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New clues about how hot Jupiters form
Since the first hot Jupiter was discovered in 1995, astronomers have been trying to figure out how the searing-hot exoplanets formed and arrived in their extreme orbits. Johns Hopkins University astronomers have found a way to determine the relative age of hot Jupiters using new measurements from the Gaia spacecraft, which is tracking over a billion stars.
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bit.bio's new Huntington's disease human cell model, for in vitro research and drug discovery
bit.bio's new ioGlutamatergic Neurons HTT50CAG/WT provide a human, cell-based, in vitro model of Huntington's Disease (HD) that accurately reflects the disease genotype. Offering industry-leading consistency and scalability, this first product from the new ioDisease Model portfolio has been developed to support key applications within drug discovery including target identification and high-through
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Scathing Report Admits NASA Is Years Behind Moon Landing Schedule
NASA's Office of Inspector General (OIG) has released the final audit of the agency's efforts to build the Mobile Launcher 2 (ML-2), a massive tower meant to facilitate the launch of crewed missions to the lunar surface — and it spells bad news for the space agency. According to the scathing report — which many at the agency have been bracing themselves for — NASA's contract with tower builder Be
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News at a glance: African swine fever vaccine, low-dose radiation, and bees as 'fish'
Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. Table of contents A version of this story appeared in Science, Vol 376, Issue 6598. Download PDF AGRICULTURE Vaccine targets African swine fever Vietnam's agriculture ministry last week gave limited authorization to a vaccine hailed as an important tool to control one of the mos
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Two decades after it vanished, the stunning Spix's macaw returns to its forest home
Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. Table of contents A version of this story appeared in Science, Vol 376, Issue 6598. Download PDF .news-article__hero–featured .parallax__element{ object-position: 55% 25%; -o-object-position: 55% 25%; } Curaçá, Brazil— In 1995, conservationists and scientists embarked on a desp
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The link between wildfires and drinking water contamination
Following a devastating wildfire in 2018 that raged through Paradise, California, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were found to be contaminating the town's water—and scientists suggest this problem may be widespread in other fire-prone areas. A feature article in Chemical & Engineering News, an independent news outlet of the American Chemical Society, examines how plastic pipes may be a key sour
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Eating fish linked to higher skin cancer risk
Eating higher amounts of fish, including tuna and non-fried fish, appears to be associated with a greater risk of malignant melanoma, according to a large study of US adults. "This study is important because it's very large and it's prospective by design, meaning that fish intake was assessed before the development of cancer," says author Eunyoung Cho, an associate professor of dermatology and ep
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Scheduling NASA's Webb telescope's science
In the lead-up to the release of Webb's first full-color images and spectroscopic data on July 12, the Webb team is now in the last phase of commissioning the science instruments. The first two instrument modes, NIRCam imaging and NIRISS imaging, have been declared ready for science; watch the "Where is Webb" page as the team works their way through the other 15 instrument modes.
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Yellowstone's history of hydrothermal explosions over the past 14,000 years
While much of public attention on Yellowstone focuses on its potential to produce large supereruptions, the hazards that are much more likely to occur are smaller, violent hydrothermal explosions. Hydrothermal explosions occur when near-boiling water suddenly flashes into steam, releasing large amounts of energy. The energy release fractures the rock downward, often leaving behind a crater. The sa
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Chemistry group at Hokkaido up to three retractions
A group of researchers in Japan who lost a paper earlier this spring in Science for misconduct have notched two more retractions, bringing their total to three. As we reported in April, Science pulled a 2020 article led by Masaya Sawamura, of Hokkaido University, in Sapporo, saying the authors discovered: that the reported enantioselective gamma-selective … Continue reading
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Scientists Create Robot "Finger" With Living Skin That Looks Like, Um
Sweaty Finger Scientists at the University of Tokyo have created a fleshy and "slightly sweaty" robotic finger , covered in a pink layer of living skin, grown from human skin cells. The rather phallic looking result is, well, pretty horrifying to look at. Nonetheless, it's an impressive demonstration of synthetic skin, tech that could pave the way to ultrarealistic humanoid robots or even incredi
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'Fantastic giant tortoise,' believed extinct, confirmed alive in the Galápagos
A tortoise from a Galápagos species long believed extinct has been found alive. Fernanda, named after her Fernandina Island home, is the first of her species identified in more than a century. Geneticist successfully extracted DNA from a specimen collected from the same island more than a century ago and confirmed that Fernanda and the museum specimen are members of the same species and geneticall
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Scientists offer solutions to global phosphorus crisis that threatens food and water security
Phosphorus is an essential but often overlooked resource, which is vital for life on Earth and is extracted from phosphate rock for use in crop fertilizers, livestock feeds and food additives. A major new report by scientists warns that global mismanagement of this finite nutrient is causing twin crises, brought into sharp focus with fertilizer prices skyrocketing in recent months.
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Marine predation intensifies in warmer waters; could reshape ocean communities as climate changes
A hotter ocean is a hungrier ocean—at least as far as fish predators are concerned. In a new field study published online June 9 in Science, Smithsonian scientists discovered predator impacts in the Atlantic and Pacific peak at higher temperatures. The effects cascade down to transform other life in the ocean, potentially disrupting balances that have existed for millennia.
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The Delightful Pretentiousness of Irma Vep
HBO's Irma Vep , perhaps the most meta show currently on TV, has the kind of high-concept premise that would confuse even its own characters. They're members of a TV production themselves, but they can't agree on the nature of what they're making. One character suggests that they're creating a long movie broken up into parts—like the way novels used to be published. Another character argues that
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Foaming at the mouth: the superworms making a meal of polystyrene waste
New research shows the gut of the Zophobas morio beetle larvae contains enzymes capable of breaking down the plastic, which is difficult to recycle Beetle larvae that can shred and eat polystyrene may provide alternative methods of breaking down and upcycling plastic waste, new research suggests. The larvae of Zophobas morio , a species of beetle, are commonly known as superworms and contain seve
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Scientists craft living human skin for robots
From action heroes to villainous assassins, biohybrid robots made of both living and artificial materials have been at the center of many sci-fi fantasies, inspiring today's robotic innovations. It's still a long way until human-like robots walk among us in our daily lives, but scientists are bringing us one step closer by crafting living human skin on robots. The new method not only gave a roboti
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New species of alga named for poet Amanda Gorman
Researchers discovered a new species of alga in central New York and named it Gormaniella terricola, with the genus named after poet Amanda Gorman. The new species is quite interesting in that its chloroplast genome is highly repetitive and contains quite a bit of DNA from fungi and bacteria, meaning it was likely invaded multiple times from other species through a process called horizontal transf
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A new method for the fast detection of a key antiviral
Interferons are proteins that constitute an important part of our natural defense systems. These proteins also exhibit a remarkable antiviral activity. The recombinant human interferon α2b (rhIFNα2b) was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 1986. It has been used ever since as an antiviral agent for the treatment of hepatitis B and hepatitis C. Despite its widespread applications,
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Yellow peas show promising results as the basis for tomorrow's cheese
Humans have used milk to make cheese for millennia. However, climate change and sustainability concerns are prompting us to look towards the plant kingdom for the cheeses of the future. New research from the University of Copenhagen points to the modest yellow pea, which with its high nutritional content and sustainable cultivation attributes, could become tomorrow's plant-based cheese of choice.
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Yellow peas show promising results as the basis for tomorrow's cheese
Humans have used milk to make cheese for millennia. However, climate change and sustainability concerns are prompting us to look towards the plant kingdom for the cheeses of the future. New research from the University of Copenhagen points to the modest yellow pea, which with its high nutritional content and sustainable cultivation attributes, could become tomorrow's plant-based cheese of choice.
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There's an Interesting Theory About Why Anthony Hopkins Is Suddenly Shilling NFTs
Apethony Hopkins Elder statesman of the silver screen Anthony Hopkins appears to be getting into crypto and NFTs — but there may be a deeper reason the actor has taken on his cringiest role yet. In a widely dunked-on tweet, the "Hannibal" star tagged three of his fellow A-listers — Snoop Dogg, Reese Witherspoon, and Jimmy Fallon — to ask them where he should start on his NFT-buying journey. "I'm
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NASA Says It's Officially Investigating UFO Reports
UFO Study NASA announced today that it's commissioning a study to examine reports of unidentified aerial phenomena (UAPs), events in the sky that cannot be explained by conventional aircraft or other known phenomena, from a scientific perspective. It's an interesting new development given the fact that the US military has become increasingly open about studying these phenomena for several years.
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Electron-phonon coupling-assisted universal red luminescence of o-phenylenediamine-based carbon dots
Carbon dots (CDs) are new carbon-based photoluminescence (PL) nanomaterials with a core-shell motif. Due to their fascinating advantages, such as chemical inertness, high quantum yields (QYs), high water solubility, thermal stability, and excellent biocompatibility, CDs have attracted extensive attention in various research applications, such as cancer diagnosis, phototherapy, and optoelectronic d
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Want to Understand Socrates and Sartre? Talk With Your Kid.
During most of my early adulthood, philosophy had little appeal to me. I lasted no more than three weeks in a Philosophy 101 class in college, perplexed and bored by the way that far-fetched hypotheticals and abstract thinking flattened big moral questions and all their attendant emotions. I struggled to see the connection between determining how to best intervene in an utterly unrealistic trolle
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The One Group That Could Make a Difference on Gun Control
Los Angeles Police Chief Daryl Gates was begging for help. "The police of America are pleading with you," he told senators in 1989 , urging them to adopt a ban on assault weapons. "I do not want any more officers to be spray-gunned to death by street punks armed with high-tech killing machines." Gates's testimony preceded what might be considered the high-water mark of gun-control politics in Ame
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New feedback system can improve efficiency of fusion reactions
Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have refined the use of magnetic fields to improve the performance of doughnut-shaped fusion facilities known as tokamaks. The improved technique protects internal parts from damage by instabilities called "edge-localized modes" (ELMs) and allows tokamaks to operate for longer without pausing.
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Researchers demonstrate 40-channel optical communication link, capable of transmitting 400 GB of data per second
Researchers have demonstrated a silicon-based optical communication link that combines two multiplexing technologies to create 40 optical data channels that can simultaneously move data. The new chip-scale optical interconnect can transmit about 400 GB of data per second—the equivalent of about 100,000 streaming movies. This could improve data-intensive internet applications from video streaming s
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Air pollution gets worse during winter at airports
Air pollution kills approximately 7 million people every year worldwide. According to researchers from McGill University, airports are hotspots for airborne pollutants that are detrimental to human health and the Earth's climate. Studying air pollution at three major Canadian airports the researchers found that airports situated in colder climates accumulated more pollutants like PM2.5 in the fall
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Understanding the genomic modifications in transgenic papaya
The transgenic papaya "SunUp" was developed in the 1990s and was widely publicized because of its ability to resist the papaya ringspot virus. Although researchers had identified the genomic sequence of SunUp by 2008, it was unclear where the transgenic insertions were and what effect they had. A new study has identified these changes and how they influence the plants.
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New insights into how cyanobacteria regulate zinc uptake in the open ocean
Marine cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) are major contributors to the global carbon cycle and are the basis of the food web in many of the world's oceans. They only require sunlight, carbon dioxide, plus a panel of essential elements, including metals, to sustain life. However, little is known about whether and how cyanobacteria utilize or regulate zinc, an element often considered to be essential
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How clearer reporting of negative experimental results would improve reaction planning in chemistry
Databases containing huge amounts of experimental data are available to researchers across a wide variety of chemical disciplines. However, a team of researchers have discovered that the available data is unsuccessful in predicting the yields of new syntheses using artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning. Their study published in the journal Angewandte Chemie International Edition sugges
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New insights into how cyanobacteria regulate zinc uptake in the open ocean
Marine cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) are major contributors to the global carbon cycle and are the basis of the food web in many of the world's oceans. They only require sunlight, carbon dioxide, plus a panel of essential elements, including metals, to sustain life. However, little is known about whether and how cyanobacteria utilize or regulate zinc, an element often considered to be essential
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Artificial intelligence reveals a never-before described 3D structure in rotavirus spike protein
Of the three groups of rotavirus that cause gastroenteritis in people, called groups A, B and C, groups A and C affect mostly children and are the best characterized. On the other hand, of group B, which causes severe diarrhea predominantly in adults, little is known about the tip of the virus's spike protein, called VP8* domain, which mediates the infection of cells in the gut.
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Understanding the genomic modifications in transgenic papaya
The transgenic papaya "SunUp" was developed in the 1990s and was widely publicized because of its ability to resist the papaya ringspot virus. Although researchers had identified the genomic sequence of SunUp by 2008, it was unclear where the transgenic insertions were and what effect they had. A new study has identified these changes and how they influence the plants.
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Simon Cowell Shocked by Deepfake Copy of Himself
Simon Says English TV personality Simon Cowell, best known as a judge on "American Idol," was shocked to find a performer with his own face singing a musical ballad on a recent episode of "America's Got Talent." The performance was put on by a company called Metaphysic Media, which created a deepfake of Cowell's face and overlaid it on "America's Got Talent" veteran and opera singer Daniel Emmet
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Ditch the Plastic and Cotton for These Bamboo Picks
Too few of us stop to consider the environmental actions of seemingly small decisions we make throughout the day. For instance, hundreds of millions of plastic straws and billions of plastic forks, spoons, and knives end up in landfills every year, according to research conducted by Habits of Waste, a nonprofit organization focused on reducing our consumption of single-use plastic. Thankfully, th
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Can yellow peas make cheese that tastes like the real thing?
Scientists have developed a foundation for cheeses of the future based on plant proteins from yellow peas. Per capita, Danish people are the crème de la crème of Earth's cheese consumers. According to the International Dairy Federation (IDF), Danes lead consumption globally with 28 kilos (about 61 pounds) of cheese consumed per capita in 2020. At the same time, mounting pressure on Earth's natura
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Studying grassland from space
Extensively used grassland is host to a high degree of biodiversity, and performs an important climate protection function as a carbon sink and also serves for fodder and food production. However, these ecosystem services are jeopardized if productivity on these lands is maximized and their use therefore intensified. Until now, data on the condition of the meadows and pastures in Germany have been
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Studying grassland from space
Extensively used grassland is host to a high degree of biodiversity, and performs an important climate protection function as a carbon sink and also serves for fodder and food production. However, these ecosystem services are jeopardized if productivity on these lands is maximized and their use therefore intensified. Until now, data on the condition of the meadows and pastures in Germany have been
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A New Biogel Claims to Repair Heart Attack Damage
(Photo: Jesse Orrico/Unsplash) A new biodegradable gel might be the key to helping heart attack survivors avoid future major heart complications. Researchers at the University of Manchester have invented a body-safe gel that can be injected into a living heart to support the growth of new tissue. Cardiac arrest occurs about once every five minutes in the United Kingdom and once every 36 seconds h
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Esports and the new era of play | James Hodge
As the line between the physical and digital worlds blur, so does the line between real-world and virtual sports. Reframing our understanding of competition, data-driven technologist James Hodge explains how far esports (like virtual Formula 1 race car driving) have come in replicating the conditions of physical sports, making elite competition more accessible than ever before. "This really is the
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Small green spaces can help keep cities cool during heat waves
A recent World Meteorological Organization report called heat waves the "deadliest meteorological hazard" from 2015 to 2019, affecting people living on all continents, and setting new national heat records in many regions. Canada's top weather event in 2021 was British Columbia's record-breaking heat, according to Environment and Climate Change Canada. The temperature in Lytton, B.C., hit 49.6 C o
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NASA Mocked for Misspelling "New Zealand"
Typo Brahe NASA could put the first man on the Moon, but it's struggling to put the first A in "New Zealand." Twitter caught the tragic typo in a now-deleted — but quickly screenshotted — graphic celebrating the growing list of nations that have signed onto the Artemis Accords, an America-led international agreement to return the first astronauts to the Moon since the early 1970s. It happens. Bes
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Best Smart Smoke Detectors in 2022
The best smoke detectors have one (very important) job: alerting you when a fire is imminent or actually happening. The loud beeps they make may be annoying, but that's a small price to pay considering the alternative. New smoke detectors are more connected, longer lasting, and smarter than before, so you're less likely to get false-positives when you accidentally burn a bag of popcorn. A lot of
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The CEO Who Fired 900 People Over Zoom Is in Big Legal Trouble
Better Faster Lawyer One of the most notorious CEOs in the country is in legal hot water for allegedly defrauding investors. Best known for firing 900 people in a video call , Better.com CEO Vishal Garg is now, as the Wall Street Journal reports, being sued for misrepresenting his company's prospects while it attempts to go public at a onetime valuation of more than $7 billion. In the lawsuit, fi
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Extreme, severe drought impacting the upper Colorado River basin in the second century, new study finds
The Colorado River is in an extremely severe drought and has been for the last 22 years. To better understand this drought, researchers looked at the drought history within the Colorado River Basin. Previous studies have gone back 1,200 years, but this paper goes back 2,000 years. The findings, using paleo hydrology, show that there was an even more severe drought in the Colorado River Basin in th
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Researchers use biomolecule-loaded metal-organic frameworks nanopatterns to aid artificial stem cell differentiation
Stem cells are essentially our body's raw materials—cells that give rise to all other cells and tissues with specialized functions. The conversion into specific cells occurs through a process called "differentiation," in which stem cells divide to form daughter cells. This lends itself to practical applications in regenerative therapy, where functional healthy cells generated from stem cells can b
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Scientists make 'slightly sweaty' robot finger with living skin
Japanese innovation thought to have potential to 'build a new relationship between humans and robots' Japanese scientists have developed a "slightly sweaty" robotic finger covered in living skin in an advance they say brings truly human-like robots a step closer. The finger, which was shown to be able to heal itself, is seen as an impressive technical feat that blurs the line between living flesh
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Researchers use biomolecule-loaded metal-organic frameworks nanopatterns to aid artificial stem cell differentiation
Stem cells are essentially our body's raw materials—cells that give rise to all other cells and tissues with specialized functions. The conversion into specific cells occurs through a process called "differentiation," in which stem cells divide to form daughter cells. This lends itself to practical applications in regenerative therapy, where functional healthy cells generated from stem cells can b
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Ground-breaking number of brown dwarfs discovered
Brown dwarfs, mysterious objects that straddle the line between stars and planets, are essential to our understanding of both stellar and planetary populations. However, only 40 brown dwarfs could be imaged around stars in almost three decades of searches. An international team led by researchers from the Open University and the University of Bern directly imaged a remarkable four new brown dwarfs
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Researchers use CRISPR technology to create map tying every human gene to its function
The Human Genome Project was an ambitious initiative to sequence every piece of human DNA. The project drew together collaborators from research institutions around the world, including Whitehead Institute, and was finally completed in 2003. Now, over two decades later, Whitehead Institute Member Jonathan Weissman and colleagues have gone beyond the sequence to present the first comprehensive func
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Bioarchaeological evidence of very early Islamic burials in the Levant
A new study combining archaeological, historical and bioarchaeological data provides new insights into the early Islamic period in modern-day Syria. The research team was planning to focus on a much older time period but came across what they believe to be remains of early Muslims in the Syrian countryside. Their results were published in Communications Biology.
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Pre-historic Wallacea: A melting pot of human genetic ancestries
The Wallacean islands have always been separated from Asia and Oceania by deep-sea waters. Yet, these tropical islands were a corridor for modern humans migrating into the Pleistocene Australia-New Guinea landmass (Sahul) and have been home to modern human groups for at least 47,000 years. The archaeological record attests a major cultural transition across Wallacea that started around 3,500 years
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Genetic clues to how dogs became man's best friends
Two mutations in the melanocortin 2 receptor gene—which is involved in the production of the stress hormone cortisol—may have played a role in the domestication of dogs by allowing them to develop social cognitive skills in order to interact and communicate with humans. The findings are published in Scientific Reports.
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Are we born with a moral compass?
For millennia, philosophers have pondered the question of whether humans are inherently good. But now, researchers from Japan have found that young infants can make and act on moral judgments, shedding light on the origin of morality.
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Researchers use CRISPR technology to create map tying every human gene to its function
The Human Genome Project was an ambitious initiative to sequence every piece of human DNA. The project drew together collaborators from research institutions around the world, including Whitehead Institute, and was finally completed in 2003. Now, over two decades later, Whitehead Institute Member Jonathan Weissman and colleagues have gone beyond the sequence to present the first comprehensive func
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Chromatin found to have originated in ancient microbes one to two billion years ago
In almost every human cell, 2 meters of DNA has to fit within a nucleus that is just 8 millionths of a meter wide. Like wool around a spool, the extreme space challenge requires DNA to wrap around structural proteins called histones. This coiled genetic architecture, known as chromatin, protects DNA from damage and has a key role in gene regulation.
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Multi-scale imaging confirms protein's role in neuronal structure, dynamics
Protein structures are typically determined by studying them in their purified form, outside the busy inner workings of the cell, and because of this, their biological relevance is often called into question. In a new study by Penn State College of Medicine researchers, the long-observed protein structure cofilactin, a form of the filamentous protein actin that contains numerous connections to cof
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Create magic with this amazing stylus, Quill. It picks 16M colors from things around us! My cool find on Kickstarter today! https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/tooliqa/quill-true-color-picking-smart-stylus/
This amazing technology lets you pick colors from the objects in your surroundings. It comes with Qube, which doubles up as an Alexa smart speaker and a wireless charger for Quill, and also the Quill app which lets you create the unimaginable. The Quill bundle is here to nurture the creativity of the kids and artists. submitted by /u/MMM-fingers [link] [comments]
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New species of alga named for poet Amanda Gorman
In 2020, a group of researchers in Fay-Wei Li's lab at the Boyce Thompson Institute (BTI) had done what many scientists dream of doing: They discovered a new species. But as they discussed what to name this green alga from Central New York State, nothing seemed quite right.
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Multi-scale imaging confirms protein's role in neuronal structure, dynamics
Protein structures are typically determined by studying them in their purified form, outside the busy inner workings of the cell, and because of this, their biological relevance is often called into question. In a new study by Penn State College of Medicine researchers, the long-observed protein structure cofilactin, a form of the filamentous protein actin that contains numerous connections to cof
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Light-induced changes in shape power a pump in a marine bacterium
RIKEN biochemists have discovered how a miniscule pump in a marine microbe shuttles negative ions into the cell by changing shape when activated by light. As well as providing insights into how these ion pumps work, the findings will be useful for improving light-based tools for brain research.
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Misleading 'natural' cigar labels are on the rise
Cigar brands are using potentially misleading descriptors, such as "natural," on packaging, a new study finds "Sales of cigars with a 'natural' descriptor are both prominent and growing," says Ollie Ganz, an instructor in the department of health, behavior, society, and policy at the Rutgers University School of Public Health and lead author of a new study in Tobacco Control . "This is concerning
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How cells navigate in messy environments
Your cells need to get around. For example, immune cells must roam around your body to locate sites of infection, and neurons must migrate to specific positions in the brain during development. But cells do not have eyes to see where they are going. Instead, like a dog sniffing out the source of some delicious smells, a cell figures out how to get to some target by detecting chemicals in its envir
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Maintaining the right niche for blood cell development
In your home, storing books on a bookshelf, tools in a tool box, and a broom in a broom cupboard makes it easy to access these items whenever you need them. Within the body, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) reside in their own specialized "spots" in the bone marrow known as HSC niches. Recently, researchers in Japan have identified genes that play a key role within these niches.
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How cells navigate in messy environments
Your cells need to get around. For example, immune cells must roam around your body to locate sites of infection, and neurons must migrate to specific positions in the brain during development. But cells do not have eyes to see where they are going. Instead, like a dog sniffing out the source of some delicious smells, a cell figures out how to get to some target by detecting chemicals in its envir
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Maintaining the right niche for blood cell development
In your home, storing books on a bookshelf, tools in a tool box, and a broom in a broom cupboard makes it easy to access these items whenever you need them. Within the body, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) reside in their own specialized "spots" in the bone marrow known as HSC niches. Recently, researchers in Japan have identified genes that play a key role within these niches.
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Air lasing: A new tool for atmospheric detection
Ultrafast laser technologies provide new strategies for remote sensing of atmospheric pollutants and hazardous biochemical agents due to their unique advantages of high peak power, short pulse duration and broad spectral coverage.
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Conservation science still rests on how animals can benefit humans
The accelerating loss of other species around the globe is so extensive that many experts now refer to it as the sixth mass extinction. It's driven in large part by an unprecedented loss of vital ecosystems such as forests and wetlands, the result of social and economic systems that are focused on constant growth.
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Development of a user-friendly, hot-melt, wound-healing adhesive
Scientist have developed a hot-melt tissue adhesive (i.e., medical glue that is applied in a molten state) capable of healing operative wounds. This adhesive has excellent medical material properties in terms of its ease of use, adhesiveness to tissues, biocompatibility and ability to prevent postoperative complications.
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The formation of gap solitons in a 1D dissipative topological lattice
Topological photonics is a rapidly evolving area of research that focuses on the design of photonic lattices where the behavior of light is inspired from the physics of topological insulators. While most studies in this area presented photonic systems with linear topological properties, recent works have started paving the foundations of non-linear topological photonics.
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Digging is not just a game for children in hunter-gatherer groups
Ana Mateos and Jesús Rodríguez, scientists at the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH), have published an experimental energy study in the journal Human Nature, using volunteers of both sexes aged 8 to 14, showing that digging is an activity requiring major physical effort at these ages, although it is not excessive. This effort of digging and extracting underground
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Digging is not just a game for children in hunter-gatherer groups
Ana Mateos and Jesús Rodríguez, scientists at the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH), have published an experimental energy study in the journal Human Nature, using volunteers of both sexes aged 8 to 14, showing that digging is an activity requiring major physical effort at these ages, although it is not excessive. This effort of digging and extracting underground
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Prehistoric Swiss Army knife indicates early humans communicated
Archaeologists have found that a tool, dubbed the "stone Swiss Army knife" of prehistory, was made to look the same in enormous numbers across great distances and multiple biomes in southern Africa. This indicates early humans were sharing information and communicating with one another.
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Multiple high-quality genomes assembled from 24 wild and 20 cultivated potato varieties
A team of researchers affiliated with multiple institutions in China working with one colleague from the Netherlands and two from the U.S. has assembled 44 high-quality genomes from 24 wild and 20 cultivated potato varieties. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes their sequencing of potato varieties and subsequent analysis. Juanita Gutiérrez-Valencia and Tanja Slotte,
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Separating tiny bacteria by shape: Simple tech for E. coli sorting
Scientists at Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST) achieved shape-based separation of Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria using a viscoelastic fluid inside microfluidic channels. This "lab-on-a-chip" system has the capability to assist in making scientific experiments more reproducible, as well as provide more accurate assessments of the severity of bacterial infections based on patien
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Scientists compile an inventory of endangered microorganisms in cryospheric ecosystems
Cryospheric ecosystems are some of the oldest on the planet. EPFL scientists have found that the microorganisms living in them have a unique genetic signature. They performed an inventory of the microorganisms in these ecosystems and complied the information into a database, which will be a useful resource for future studies on climate change microbiology.
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Multiple high-quality genomes assembled from 24 wild and 20 cultivated potato varieties
A team of researchers affiliated with multiple institutions in China working with one colleague from the Netherlands and two from the U.S. has assembled 44 high-quality genomes from 24 wild and 20 cultivated potato varieties. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes their sequencing of potato varieties and subsequent analysis. Juanita Gutiérrez-Valencia and Tanja Slotte,
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Separating tiny bacteria by shape: Simple tech for E. coli sorting
Scientists at Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST) achieved shape-based separation of Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria using a viscoelastic fluid inside microfluidic channels. This "lab-on-a-chip" system has the capability to assist in making scientific experiments more reproducible, as well as provide more accurate assessments of the severity of bacterial infections based on patien
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Expert takes stock of three years of marsquake measurements
NASA's InSight lander successfully touched down on Mars on 26 November 2018. Seventy Martian days later, the seismometer—called SEIS—deployed on the surface of Mars began recording the Red Planet's tremors. It has registered more than 1,300 quakes so far. These seismic recordings have enabled the researchers to describe the interior structure of Mars more accurately than ever before.
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Challenging the whiteness of queer organizations
Pride parades were established to commemorate the strife experienced by gay men, lesbians, bisexuals and trans people at the 1969 Stonewall Riots in New York City's West Village. Parades worked their way into Canada to help celebrate queer life across two-spirit, lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, queer, intersex and asexual (2SLGBTQIA+) communities and ignite social change.
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Go the Distance With This Eco-Friendly Running Gear
Not all leisure activities can literally save your life. Running can . The right running gear keeps you comfortable while you push yourself and is made of eco-friendly materials, while the wrong gear just makes you want to pack it in and take up one of those easy indoor hobbies. Build up your running gear with our picks for shorts, leggings, top, and a no-excuses outer layer that'll inspire you t
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New Adapter Lets Electric Ford-150 Rescue Stranded Teslas With Its Mighty Battery
Built to Rescue If there's one thing truck owners love doing, it's towing other people's stuck cars out of mud, ditches, and any predicament that might require a tow strap or a winch. Ford trucks — with the company's "Built Ford Tough" motto and slew of advertisements about power — are no exception. Now, there's a way for electric Ford-150 Lightning drivers to help others in need. On Sunday, one
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Team disproves hypotheses about perovskite solar cells, enabling better approaches for targeted optimization
Many hypotheses seek to explain the particularly favorable properties of perovskite semiconductors for solar cells. Polarons or a giant Rashba effect, for example, are thought to play a major role. A team at BESSY II has now experimentally disproved these hypotheses. In doing so, they further narrow down the possible causes for the transport properties and enable better approaches for the targeted
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Perseverance Has a Pet Rock! But It's No Ordinary Rock…
Perseverance has a pet rock! The rover captured this image of its pet rock on May 26, 2022 (Sol 449), using its onboard Hazard Avoidance Camera. Image credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech Perseverance has been on Mars for more than a year, beaming back pictures from the Red Planet all the while. We've seen Jezero Crater itself, along with thousands of shots of the Martian landscape and sky. Perseverance als
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Comet Interceptor approved for construction
ESA's Comet Interceptor mission to visit a pristine comet or other interstellar object just starting its journey into the inner solar system has been "adopted" this week; the study phase is complete and, following selection of the spacecraft prime contractor, work will soon begin to build the mission.
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What ancient toilets can teach us about Maya life, and tamales
Ancient toilets and trash pits are like heaven to archaeologists. They might not have the glamor of a gleaming medieval jewel or intricate Roman mosaic, but they brim with clues about the everyday life of bygone civilizations: the detritus—and discharges—of our ancestors telling rich stories of what the past was like for those without palaces or chests of gold. From the mundane and the messy, arch
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New map shows seabed of the Southern Ocean in unprecedented detail
The features of the ocean floor help determine how water masses and ocean currents move and how they affect our climate. Biodiversity is also influenced by seafloor landforms. Accordingly, having as precise information on the seafloor topography as possible is indispensable for oceanographic and climate research. With the second version of the International Bathymetric Chart of the Southern Ocean
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