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Nyheder2022juni13

The Transcripts of an AI That a Google Engineer Claims Is Sentient Are Pretty Wild
Google suspended software engineer Blake Lemoine this week after he made an eyebrow-raising claim: that one of the company's experimental artificial intelligences had gained sentience. The story drew widespread media attention , stoking the fires of a familiar debate. Are contemporary language models really capable of gaining consciousness — or did Lemoine just see the image of his own humanity r
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Twin photons from different quantum dots
Identical light particles (photons) are important for many technologies that are based on quantum physics. A team of researchers from Basel and Bochum has now produced identical photons with different quantum dots—an important step toward applications such as tap-proof communications and the quantum internet.
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Don't be complacent, another Covid wave is coming. Here's how we can manage it | Devi Sridhar
A spike in infections every three months seems to be the pattern, but the UK has the power to beat this if we act wisely As we move into summer, more than two years since the outbreak of the Covid-19 pandemic, the words "new wave" are probably the last thing anyone wants to hear. Yet it is true that recent UK data (as well as data from Florida and other places) indicates that sublineages of the O
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Firefighters Struggle as Junkyard Tesla Bursts Into Flames Weeks After Crash
Putting out a Tesla fire once is one thing. Putting out a Tesla fire that kept reigniting three weeks after it was taken to the junkyard is another entirely. As Sacramento's KCRA reports , the Tesla blaze was a first for the city's firefighting department, and a confusing first at that — both because water alone wouldn't put out the battery fire, and because the car had been sitting in a junkyard
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Best Monitors for PS5 in 2022
If you're already enjoying your PlayStation 5 (PS5), chances are you're on the hunt for a high-quality monitor to take advantage of everything this system offers. The best monitors for PS5 have the refresh rates and resolution to make it feel like you're part of the game (and give you an advantage over your competitors). These monitors can come with a high price, as in almost as high as the cost
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New yeast model can improve protein production
Microorganisms, such as baker's yeast, can be used as cell factories to produce different chemicals and proteins, such as commonly used pharmaceuticals as insulin. By modifying the cell factories researchers are trying to increase the yield and speed of the production processes. In a new study published in Nature Communications, researchers in systems biology at Chalmers provide us with a new yeas
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Researchers discover mechanism linking mutations in the 'dark matter' of the genome to cancer
Many sections of the non-coding region of the human genome play a key role in regulating gene activity. But the relationship between non-coding mutations and cancer risk has been a mystery. New research sheds light on that mystery, providing clues that may link mutations to epigenetic changes, and may point to potential drug targets to reduce risk for people born with certain genetic mutations.
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New yeast model can improve protein production
Microorganisms, such as baker's yeast, can be used as cell factories to produce different chemicals and proteins, such as commonly used pharmaceuticals as insulin. By modifying the cell factories researchers are trying to increase the yield and speed of the production processes. In a new study published in Nature Communications, researchers in systems biology at Chalmers provide us with a new yeas
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10 Reader Views on Crime in Their Neighborhoods
This is an edition of Up for Debate, a newsletter by Conor Friedersdorf. On Wednesdays, he rounds up timely conversations and solicits reader responses to one thought-provoking question. Later, he publishes some thoughtful replies. Sign up for the newsletter here. Last week I asked, "How do you perceive crime in your neighborhood? How about homelessness? Disorder? What's your relationship to thes
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Bear Grylls Searches a Whole Island for Food | Man vs Wild
Stream Man vs. Wild on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/man-vs-wild #ManVsWild #BearGrylls #Survival Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery From: Disco
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Tracing the remnants of Andromeda's violent history
A detailed analysis of the composition and motion of more than 500 stars has revealed conclusive evidence of an ancient collision between Andromeda and a neighboring galaxy. The findings, which improve our understanding of the events that shape galaxy evolution, were presented by Carnegie's Ivanna Escala Monday at the meeting of the American Astronomical Society.
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Sanctuary practices lower counties' crime rates, study finds
Counties that don't cooperate with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE)—also known as "sanctuary counties"—have seen their crime rates decrease after implementing sanctuary policies, according to a new study from a researcher at The University of Texas at Austin.
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Older adults today are more likely to have multiple health conditions
Later-born generations of older adults in the United States are more likely to have a greater number of chronic health conditions than the generations that preceded them, according to a new study. The increasing frequency of reporting multiple chronic health conditions—or multimorbidity—represents a substantial threat to the health of aging populations, the researchers say. This may place increas
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Team uses hot water to form photocatalyst
The production of chemical substances normally requires environmentally harmful solvents. After the research group of Miriam Unterlass, professor of solid state chemistry at the University of Konstanz, produced organic substances without harmful substances for the first time by heating them in hot water, the researchers can now chalk up another success: Through hydrothermal synthesis, they succeed
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Shorter, wider flowers may transmit more parasites to bees
North Carolina State University researchers show that the shape of flowers has the biggest effect on how parasites are transmitted to bees, an important consideration for declining populations of our prodigious pollinators. The findings could help stakeholders plant flowers that are less likely to spread parasites in pollinator habitats.
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Artificial intelligence may have unearthed one of the world's oldest campfires
Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. It's not always easy to find clues to ancient campfires. Bits of charcoal, cracked bones, and discolored rocks often give a prehistoric blaze away. But not every blaze leaves such obvious traces, especially after hundreds of thousands of years. Now, using artificial intelligence
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Arati Prabhakar set to become Biden's science adviser and his pick to lead science office
Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. In 1993, then-President Bill Clinton picked a 34-year-old applied physicist named Arati Prabhakar to lead the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Two decades later, former President Barack Obama chose her to lead the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (
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Mice of the sea: Watch elephant seals use whiskers to find food
Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. Female elephant seals spend most of their lives fishing in complete darkness. Now, by strapping infrared cameras to their heads, scientists have figured out how these sleek swimmers locate their prey: They move their whiskers like satellite antennas to sense water movement. "Thi
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Creating a better wig with chemistry
For some people, wigs are a fun and colorful fashion accessory, but for those with hair loss from alopecia or other conditions, they can provide a real sense of normalcy and boost self-confidence. Whether made from human or synthetic strands, however, most hairpieces lose their luster after being worn day after day. Now, researchers in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces report a new way to make wi
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Bioengineering team develops a remote lab to teach enzyme kinetics
The COVID-19 pandemic forced teachers across the globe to embrace remote learning. Although adapting existing materials was relatively easy for lecture-based courses that revolved around theory, teaching laboratory classes remotely presented a formidable challenge. In a new paper published in the Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education, researchers from the Department of Bioengineering at the
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New inherited retroviruses identified in the koala genome
Historic virus infections can be traced in vertebrate genomes. For millions of years, these genomes have been repositories for retroviruses that incorporated their code into germline cells and were inherited as endogenous retroviruses (ERVs). Researchers from Uppsala University now provide new findings about retroviral establishment in the koala genome. The findings are being published in the jour
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Nanoparticle sensor can distinguish between viral and bacterial pneumonia
Many different types of bacteria and viruses can cause pneumonia, but there is no easy way to determine which microbe is causing a particular patient's illness. This uncertainty makes it harder for doctors to choose effective treatments because the antibiotics commonly used to treat bacterial pneumonia won't help patients with viral pneumonia. In addition, limiting the use of antibiotics is an imp
2h
New inherited retroviruses identified in the koala genome
Historic virus infections can be traced in vertebrate genomes. For millions of years, these genomes have been repositories for retroviruses that incorporated their code into germline cells and were inherited as endogenous retroviruses (ERVs). Researchers from Uppsala University now provide new findings about retroviral establishment in the koala genome. The findings are being published in the jour
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Seal whiskers, the secret weapon for hunting
The deep ocean is a dark place, yet deep-diving seals can easily locate their prey in that darkness. A multi-national research team has used field-based studies to better understand how seals use their whiskers in their search for prey.
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A better wig — with chemistry
For some people, wigs are a fun and colorful fashion accessory, but for those with hair loss from alopecia or other conditions, they can provide a real sense of normalcy and boost self-confidence. Whether made from human or synthetic strands, however, most hairpieces lose their luster after being worn day after day. Now, researchers report a new way to make wigs more durable and long lasting.
2h
Catalyst from hot water
The production of chemical substances normally requires environmentally harmful solvents. After researchers had produced organic substances without harmful substances by heating them in hot water, they can now chalk up another success: Through hydrothermal synthesis, they succeeded in jointly forming and combining organic and inorganic substances in the same reaction vessel. Specifically: an inorg
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Seals use whiskers to track prey in deep ocean, study shows
Scientists analysed footage from small video cameras with infrared night-vision attached to the animals When they are in the deep, dark ocean, seals use their whiskers to track down their prey, a study has confirmed after observing the sea mammals in their natural habitat. It's hard for light to penetrate the gloom of the ocean's depths, and animals have come up with a variety of adaptations in o
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Nanoparticle sensor can distinguish between viral and bacterial pneumonia
Many different types of bacteria and viruses can cause pneumonia, but there is no easy way to determine which microbe is causing a particular patient's illness. This uncertainty makes it harder for doctors to choose effective treatments because the antibiotics commonly used to treat bacterial pneumonia won't help patients with viral pneumonia. In addition, limiting the use of antibiotics is an imp
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How death is changing in the United States
From green burials to DIY funerals, death in America is changing, says Shannon Lee Dawdy. What does our relationship with the dead tell us about the living? Anthropologists learn about ancient cultures by studying their burial sites , but could we do the same with contemporary America? Those are the questions that Shannon Lee Dawdy , an anthropologist and historian at the University of Chicago, s
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The Health Effects of Extreme Heat
Researchers are drilling down into the ways life on a hotter planet will tax our bodies, and looking for protections that, unlike air-conditioning, don't make the problem worse.
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New way of generating insulin-producing cells
Researchers show how a molecule that they have identified stimulates the formation of new insulin-producing cells in zebrafish and mammalian tissue, through a newly described mechanism for regulating protein synthesis.
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RNA exosome key for B cell development
New research suggests that RNA exosomes — the cellular machines that degrade old molecules of RNA — play a key role in the development of B cells, which are critical to the immune system's ability to protect against infection. The findings explain why patients with rare mutations in a gene that codes for this machinery are often immunodeficient and could offer new approaches to treat autoimmune
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Closed-loop additive manufacturing fueled by upcycled plastic
Researchers have developed an upcycling approach that adds value to discarded plastics for reuse in additive manufacturing, or 3D printing. The readily adoptable, scalable method introduces a closed-loop strategy that could globally reduce plastic waste and cut carbon emissions tied to plastic production.
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Simulations reveal hydrodynamics of planetary engulfment by expanding star
A new study using hydrodynamical simulations reveals the forces acting on a planet when it is swallowed by an expanding star. The results show that the interactions of a substellar body (a planet or brown dwarf) with the hot gas in the outer envelope of a sun-like star can lead to a range of outcomes depending on the size of the engulfed object and the stage of the star's evolution. The dynamics a
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Healthy human brains are hotter than previously thought, research finds
New research has shown that normal human brain temperature varies much more than we thought, and this could be a sign of healthy brain function. The new study has produced the first 4D map of healthy human brain temperature. This map overturns several previous assumptions and shows the remarkable extent to which brain temperature varies by brain region, age, sex, and time of day.
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Engineers build artificial intelligence chip
Engineers built a new artificial intelligence chip, with a view toward sustainable, modular electronics. The chip can be reconfigured, with layers that can be swapped out or stacked on, such as to add new sensors or updated processors.
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Ten years after the Higgs, physicists face the nightmare of finding nothing else
Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. A decade ago, particle physicists thrilled the world. On 4 July 2012, 6000 researchers working with the world's biggest atom smasher, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European particle physics laboratory, CERN, announced they had discovered the Higgs boson, a massive, flee
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Ukraine War's supply chain impacts bust myth of US energy independence
The global impacts of Russia's invasion of Ukraine have exposed vulnerabilities in U.S. energy security and undercut the myth that the United States, or any other major manufacturing economy, is truly energy independent yet, according to an analysis by researchers at the energy nonprofit RMI and Duke University.
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Cosmic 'dust' from supernovae hints at how stars are born
New research detected strong polarization from a young supernova remnant. It provided independent and solid evidence that the cosmic dust in the early universe was formed in supernovae. While it's true that supernovae eject and destroy cosmic dust, infrared observations now suggest that the dust formed at an early stage of a supernova. SOFIA HAWC+ (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy
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Cryptocurrency Lender Celsius Pauses Trading Activity, Bloodbath Ensues
It looks like it's going to be a long week for those holding crypto. On Sunday evening crypto lending firm Celsius announced it was suspending all activity due to "extreme market conditions." The move prevented anyone with assets in Celsius from making withdrawals, transfers between accounts, or swaps. The company said the move was necessary to put it in a "better position to honor, over time, it
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As Bitcoin Crashes, Binance Halts Withdrawals
Falling Fast The world's largest crypto exchange had to pause Bitcoin withdrawals as the currency drops precipitously for the second time in 2022 — mirroring, of course, runs on banks in which consumers try to withdraw money in the face of institutional insolvency or economical collapse. On Twitter, Binance CEO Changpeng Zhao announced Monday morning that Bitcoin withdrawals were on a "temporary
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Molecule in the nervous system may hold key to treating chronic pain
Researchers reveal a potential new way to treat chronic pain using anti-cancer drugs rather than opioid-based pain medication. Researchers identified the existence of a molecule in the nervous system that enhances sensitivity to pain. This molecule had previously been thought to play a role in cancer growth but had never been reported in the nervous system. By targeting this molecule it may now be
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NDEs and van Lommel
Hello, I come with a question regarding near death experiences, consciousness and, especially, van Lommel research. If someone isn't familiar with the topic – the guy is a cardiologist who claims that near death experiences cannot be explained with purely physiological factors. In various works he proposes that consciousness may not be fully attached to the biological body and in certains conditi
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Hydrogenated Cs2AgBiBr6 for significantly improved efficiency of lead-free inorganic double perovskite solar cell
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31016-w Though inorganic perovskites are an attractive, non-toxic and stable alternative to organic-inorganic halide perovskite solar cells, realizing efficient devices remains a challenge. Here, the authors report hydrogenated lead-free inorganic perovskite solar cells with enhanced power conversion efficiency.
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Study describes new way of generating insulin-producing cells
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden show how a molecule that they have identified stimulates the formation of new insulin-producing cells in zebrafish and mammalian tissue, through a newly described mechanism for regulating protein synthesis. The results are published in Nature Chemical Biology.
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Rubbery camouflage skin exhibits smart and stretchy behaviors
The skin of cephalopods, such as octopuses, squids and cuttlefish, is stretchy and smart, contributing to these creatures' ability to sense and respond to their surroundings. Scientists have harnessed these properties to create an artificial skin that mimics both the elasticity and the neurologic functions of cephalopod skin, with potential applications for neurorobotics, skin prosthetics, artific
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Forever chemicals linked to hypertension in middle-aged women
In a large, prospective study, the levels of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), which are common human-made chemicals found in water, soil, air and food, were associated with an increased risk of high blood pressure among middle-aged women. The study found women in the highest one-third concentrations of all seven PFAS examined had a 71% increased risk of developing high blood pressure.
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Bowflex C7 Bike review
A more affordable exercise bike that can stream Peloton workouts and more, we found out if the Bowflex C7 Bike is too good to be true.
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Rubbery camouflage skin exhibits smart and stretchy behaviors
The skin of cephalopods, such as octopuses, squids and cuttlefish, is stretchy and smart, contributing to these creatures' ability to sense and respond to their surroundings. Scientists have harnessed these properties to create an artificial skin that mimics both the elasticity and the neurologic functions of cephalopod skin, with potential applications for neurorobotics, skin prosthetics, artific
3h
Bacteria triggers material to release infection-fighting drugs
A new material could lead to wound dressings that respond quickly to burgeoning infections, but only deliver medications on demand. The material is able to release encapsulated cargo only when pathogenic bacteria are present. The development is particularly important in the face of the global antibiotic resistance crisis, the researchers say, as the material could help to fight infections while a
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How much spring nitrogen to apply? Pre-planting weather may provide a clue
With the rising cost of nitrogen fertilizer and its impacts on air and water quality, University of Illinois researchers want to help farmers make more informed fertilizer rate decisions. Their latest modeling effort aims to do that by examining the role of pre-growing season weather on soil nitrogen dynamics and end-of-season corn yield.
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How much spring nitrogen to apply? Pre-planting weather may provide a clue
With the rising cost of nitrogen fertilizer and its impacts on air and water quality, University of Illinois researchers want to help farmers make more informed fertilizer rate decisions. Their latest modeling effort aims to do that by examining the role of pre-growing season weather on soil nitrogen dynamics and end-of-season corn yield.
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Best iPad Keyboards in 2022
When it comes to actually getting work done on your Apple-powered tablet, you'll definitely need one of the best iPad keyboards. iPads, especially the newer models, pack a surprising amount of power in a very small space. They offer speed, strong graphics, and some seriously solid performance. And while they're good for streaming YouTube, gaming, and reading novels, news, and magazines, they're p
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Best Keyboards for Programming in 2022
Most people type away at their keyboard, thinking little about the efficiency of individual keystrokes. Programmers have a different mindset because each of those keystrokes gets them closer to a final product (and paycheck). The comfort and efficiency of the keyboard can enhance your work experience and help you code better and faster. A keyboard that lets you program macros, swap switches, or f
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Are we born with a moral compass?
Researchers found that preverbal infants can make and act on moral judgments about antisocial behavior in a third party. Using a new cognitive paradigm with gaze tracking, researchers were able to show that 8-month-old infants can engage in third-party punishment. This indicates that humans may have acquired morality through evolution, and opens the door for future experiments to investigate unexp
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A glimpse into the dog's mind: A new study reveals how dogs think of their toys
Many dog lovers want to know what goes on in their furry friends' minds. Now scientists are finally getting closer to the answer. In a new study just published in the journal Animal Cognition, researchers from the Family Dog Project (Eötvös Loránd University University, Budapest) found that dogs have a multi-modal mental image of their familiar objects. This means that when thinking about an objec
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The black box behind embryonic development
DNA regulation is a critical process in a cell that allows it to fulfill its function. This process is key during pregnancy, when embryonic cells must develop into all cell types needed to form an embryo. An international team of researchers from KU Leuven, Babraham Institute, Radboud University, Ghent University and IMBA, have discovered that the first cell fate decision of embryonic development
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A glimpse into the dog's mind: A new study reveals how dogs think of their toys
Many dog lovers want to know what goes on in their furry friends' minds. Now scientists are finally getting closer to the answer. In a new study just published in the journal Animal Cognition, researchers from the Family Dog Project (Eötvös Loránd University University, Budapest) found that dogs have a multi-modal mental image of their familiar objects. This means that when thinking about an objec
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Small materials may be key to reducing cardiovascular disease deaths
Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death across the globe, responsible for about 17.9 million (32%) of all deaths worldwide every year. Monitoring and treatment may reduce the incidence of death, but the health care options are limited by the rigidity and biological incompatibility of conventional devices, such as blood pressure sensors. There may be an answer in nanomaterials, accor
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Could used beer yeast be the solution to heavy metal contamination in water?
A new analysis by researchers at MIT's Center for Bits and Atoms (CBA) has found that inactive yeast could be effective as an inexpensive, abundant, and simple material for removing lead contamination from drinking water supplies. The study shows that this approach can be efficient and economic, even down to part-per-billion levels of contamination. Serious damage to human health is known to occur
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The black box behind embryonic development
DNA regulation is a critical process in a cell that allows it to fulfill its function. This process is key during pregnancy, when embryonic cells must develop into all cell types needed to form an embryo. An international team of researchers from KU Leuven, Babraham Institute, Radboud University, Ghent University and IMBA, have discovered that the first cell fate decision of embryonic development
4h
Making hybrid work
Organizations struggle to find a rhythm in the new hybrid world. The shift from enabling hybrid work to optimizing it to deliver exceptional employee experiences is well underway. Join this session, designed for CIOs and supporting teams, for steps to improve the hybrid work experience for employees through an equitable, collaborative, and inclusive strategy. Recent research cites that 92% of emp
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Winners of the 2022 BigPicture Natural World Photography Competition
Entrants in this year's contest were invited to submit images showcasing life on Earth, and illustrating some of the many threats that our planet faces. Images from this gallery were originally published in bioGraphic , an independent magazine about nature and conservation powered by the California Academy of Sciences, and media partner of the BigPicture Photography Competition. The organizers ha
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Improved disease control in public buildings 'could save UK billions a year'
Measures such as improved ventilation would boost economy by helping prevent ill health, says report Mandating improved ventilation and other forms of disease control in public buildings could save the UK economy billions of pounds each year through the prevention of ill health and its societal impacts, according to a report. It is the first study to comprehensively evaluate the health, social an
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Bear Grylls Searches a Whole Island for Food | Man vs Wild
Stream Man vs. Wild on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/man-vs-wild #ManVsWild #BearGrylls #Survival Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery From: Disco
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Google Suspends Engineer Who Claims the Company's Experimental AI Has Become Sentient
Google has suspended ones of its engineers after he claimed that one of the company's experimental artificial intelligences has gained sentience. "If I didn't know exactly what it was, which is this computer program we built recently, I'd think it was a seven-year-old, eight-year-old kid that happens to know physics," the engineer, Blake Lemoine, told the Washington Post . WaPo 's story immediate
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Industrialization may rob babies of bacteria that digest breast milk
Bacteria efficient at digesting breast milk are being lost as nations industrialize, a new study finds. Because no other bacteria are as adept at digesting milk, researchers are concerned this bacterial exodus could mean rising cases of conditions common in the industrialized world, such as chronic inflammation. The guts of infants are nearly sterile at birth, but they become a community of trill
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Real age versus biological age: the startups revealing how old we really are
Mail-order tests promise an estimate of how well you're ageing but the results can be just one more thing to worry about At the end of last year, Jay Chan, a 30-year-old marine engineer, bought his mother a biological age test from Elysium, a New York-based biotech and health supplements start-up founded in 2014. The test was simple – it required only a saliva sample – and it helped that it was b
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Collapsing a leading theory for the quantum origin of consciousness
The origin of consciousness is one of the greatest mysteries of science. One proposed solution, first suggested by Nobel Laureate and Oxford mathematician Roger Penrose and anesthesiologist Stuart Hammeroff, at Arizona State University, in Tucson, attributes consciousness to quantum computations in the brain. This in turn hinges on the notion that gravity could play a role in how quantum effects d
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Team develops a rapid test to measure immunity to SARS-CoV-2
Mount Sinai researchers have developed a rapid blood assay that measures the magnitude and duration of someone's immunity to SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. This test will allow large-scale monitoring of the population's immunity and the effectiveness of current vaccines to help design revaccination strategies for vulnerable immunosuppressed individuals, according to a study published
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New research questions hypotheses about climate-controlled ecosystem change during the origin of dinosaurs in Argentina
A group of researchers from CONICET and the University of Utah demonstrated that during the time of the first dinosaurs, variations in the diversity and abundance of the plant and vertebrate animal species cannot be related to the climatic changes recorded throughout its deposition, in contrast with previous hypotheses.
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Team finds key clue to longer lifespans
New research on the genetics of lifespan suggests new targets to combat aging and age-related diseases. Natural selection has produced mammals that age at dramatically different rates. Take, for example, naked mole rats and mice. The former can live up to 41 years, nearly ten times as long as similar-size rodents such as mice. What accounts for longer lifespan? According to the new research from
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Team develops a rapid test to measure immunity to SARS-CoV-2
Mount Sinai researchers have developed a rapid blood assay that measures the magnitude and duration of someone's immunity to SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. This test will allow large-scale monitoring of the population's immunity and the effectiveness of current vaccines to help design revaccination strategies for vulnerable immunosuppressed individuals, according to a study published
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Bacterial intimacy insights could help tackle antimicrobial resistance
One of the primary ways harmful bacteria acquire resistance to antibiotics is by receiving DNA from other bacteria that are already resistant. This DNA exchange is made via a process called conjugation, akin to bacterial sex, whereby two bacteria form an intimate attachment, and one transfers a packet of DNA to the other.
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Studying E.coli demonstrates how mutualism and cooperative behavior shape species
Bacteria, not unlike humans, can take up more resources than necessary. When this happens, synthesized byproducts can leak into the environment, which allows other nearby bacteria to evolve cooperative behaviors—such as using the byproducts as nutrients. Cooperation in bacterial communities has also been observed to facilitate behaviors like altering the environment or forming new structures like
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Studying E.coli demonstrates how mutualism and cooperative behavior shape species
Bacteria, not unlike humans, can take up more resources than necessary. When this happens, synthesized byproducts can leak into the environment, which allows other nearby bacteria to evolve cooperative behaviors—such as using the byproducts as nutrients. Cooperation in bacterial communities has also been observed to facilitate behaviors like altering the environment or forming new structures like
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The Computer Scientist Who Parlays Failures Into Breakthroughs
Nestled among the impressive domes and spires of Yale University is the simple office of Daniel Spielman. His shelves are lined with tall black notebooks, containing decades of handwritten notes, and against a wall sits a large, comfortable couch that looks particularly well used. "I'm sort of built for sitting still and thinking," he admitted. What he thinks about, amid the gothic grandeur of th
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Developing a degradation-triggerable plastic made of vanillin
From inexpensive mass products to tailored high-tech materials, our modern world without plastics is unimaginable. The major downside to this is the use of fossil fuels and the growing quantities of waste. A new approach could be the production of high-grade plastics made from biomass that could be made to fall apart into recyclable components. The "destruct command" would be given with light of a
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Army Vets' Brain Scans Help Scientists Understand Trauma and Chronic Pain Management
(Photo: National Cancer Institute/Unsplash) MRI scans of US Army veterans' brains have offered scientists a new way to understand both trauma and chronic pain. Researchers at the Universities of California at San Diego and San Francisco conducted a study involving 57 veterans who each experienced chronic back pain and the effects of trauma. They conducted MRI scans of each participant's brain to
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Small catchments sustain silicon signatures following storms
The outer skin of our planet—the critical zone—stretches from treetops to the lower limits of groundwater. In this layer, interactions between rock, soil, water, air, and living organisms shape Earth's surface and sustain life. Silicate weathering, for example, influences global climate by removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and contributes nutrients to diverse ecosystems.
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Cats that are allowed to roam can spread diseases to humans and wildlife
For decades, scientists have warned that ecologically destructive activities increase the risk of diseases spilling over between wildlife and human populations. Examples of these drivers include climate change, habitat loss, wildlife trafficking, environmental contamination, expansion of anthropocentric activities and invasive species introduction.
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What's up with the American economy right now?
A strange confluence of factors—a prolonged labor shortage, supply chain disruptions, and chaos in the energy market—makes it hard to predict where the US economy is heading. On one hand, unemployment is at near historic lows, job growth is strong, and consumer spending robust. Viewed through these lenses alone, the future looks bright. But alas, there's a pernicious visitor back from the 1970s a
6h
Cats that are allowed to roam can spread diseases to humans and wildlife
For decades, scientists have warned that ecologically destructive activities increase the risk of diseases spilling over between wildlife and human populations. Examples of these drivers include climate change, habitat loss, wildlife trafficking, environmental contamination, expansion of anthropocentric activities and invasive species introduction.
6h
Retail food prices rose with COVID-19 worldwide
By now, most Americans have felt the effects of global crises on their grocery bills. Recent research published in the journal Nature Food has found this to be a worldwide phenomenon. As part of a project called Food Prices for Nutrition, professor William Masters at the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University and a group of graduate students gathered data on retail pri
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Video: Gaia data release 3: exploring our multidimensional Milky Way
Since its launch in 2013 ESA's Gaia observatory has been mapping our galaxy from Lagrange point 2, creating the most accurate and complete multi-dimensional map of the Milky Way. By now two full sets of data have been released, the first set in 2016 and a second one in 2018. These data releases contained stellar positions, distances, motions across the sky, and colour information, among others. No
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Study: World's protected natural areas are too small and isolated to benefit wildlife
The world's governments will this year negotiate a series of targets in response to the global biodiversity crisis that has already led to a massive loss of the planet's wildlife. While none of the previous round of targets agreed in 2010 have been met, the one that gained the most publicity, and arguably the one we got closest to achieving was target 11. Its aim was that: "By 2020, at least 17% o
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Cannabis tourism: How a new travel trend is taking off
Legal cannabis consumption rose in the U.S. and Europe during the COVID pandemic, with some people turning to marijuana to help them cope with lockdowns and broken routines. Meanwhile, fewer people today view the drug as harmful compared to previous decades.
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Study: World's protected natural areas are too small and isolated to benefit wildlife
The world's governments will this year negotiate a series of targets in response to the global biodiversity crisis that has already led to a massive loss of the planet's wildlife. While none of the previous round of targets agreed in 2010 have been met, the one that gained the most publicity, and arguably the one we got closest to achieving was target 11. Its aim was that: "By 2020, at least 17% o
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Scientists Used Human Cells to Make Self-Healing 'Living Skin' for Robots
Androids that are part human, part robot are a staple of science fiction . But they're now a step closer to reality after researchers crafted a living skin for robots out of human cells. Today's robots , even if humanoid in form, tend to feature rigid parts and hard plastic or metal exteriors. While some now come with silicon rubber coatings that mimic the appearance of skin, it's still far from
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Researchers work to create a sense of touch in prosthetic limbs
A team at the University of Pittsburgh is equipping artificial hands and feet with sensors that are linked to a person's own nervous system. Preliminary results, though limited, are promising. (Image credit: T. Betler/UPMC/Pitt Health Sciences)
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New research reveals unexpected function for basic DNA-based processes during chromosome folding
New findings reveal an advanced, unexpected two-way communication between the function and organization of chromosomes in the cell nucleus. Previous research shows that the organization of chromosomal DNA into loops regulate gene reading (transcription) and chromosome copying (replication). The new results show that, in turn, transcription and replication control chromosome looping, thus revealing
7h
Online misunderstandings arise from an excess of clarity
An increasing proportion of our everyday conversations take place in online environments, but these conversations do not always end well when they involve controversial topics. It is often thought that this is because people express themselves less clearly or more ambiguously online due to missing nonverbal cues, or that people become disinhibited online because they feel like they are anonymous.
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Potential roadmap to removing mosquitos' ability to transmit malaria
Researchers in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Virginia Tech have found unique interactions in the cells of five mosquito species that could be a roadmap to removing the ability to transmit malaria and other diseases in the future. The findings were recently published in Nature Communications.
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New research reveals unexpected function for basic DNA-based processes during chromosome folding
New findings reveal an advanced, unexpected two-way communication between the function and organization of chromosomes in the cell nucleus. Previous research shows that the organization of chromosomal DNA into loops regulate gene reading (transcription) and chromosome copying (replication). The new results show that, in turn, transcription and replication control chromosome looping, thus revealing
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Information energy accounts for dark energy, resolves Hubble tension, avoids the 'big chill,' and is falsifiable
Stellar heated gas and dust has an entropy, or information content, with an equivalent energy of 1070 joules, directly comparable to the mc2 equivalent energy of the universe baryon mass. In a study published in Entropy, Professor Paul Gough at the University of Sussex shows that this information energy can account for the dark energy causing the accelerating universe expansion.
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New 'decision aid' for CRISPR immune responses
Friend or foe? Immune systems constantly face this question. They must recognize and clear foreign invaders without eliciting autoimmunity. Prokaryotic CRISPR-Cas systems recognize invaders based on genetic sequence. But what happens if the host genome shares the same sequences? A research team from the Helmholtz Institute in Würzburg in cooperation with the North Carolina State University (U.S.)
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Clouds played an important role in the history of climate
Were Earth's oceans completely covered by ice during the Cryogenian period, about 700 million years ago, or was there an ice-free belt of open water around the equator where sponges and other forms of life could survive? Using global climate models, a team of researchers from Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and the University of Vienna has shown that a climate allowing a waterbelt is unlik
7h
New 'decision aid' for CRISPR immune responses
Friend or foe? Immune systems constantly face this question. They must recognize and clear foreign invaders without eliciting autoimmunity. Prokaryotic CRISPR-Cas systems recognize invaders based on genetic sequence. But what happens if the host genome shares the same sequences? A research team from the Helmholtz Institute in Würzburg in cooperation with the North Carolina State University (U.S.)
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The ocean is not a quiet place
For a long time, the great ocean explorers used sight to reveal the secrets of the marine environment, downplaying its acoustic aspects. Indeed, the ocean has long been considered a place devoid of any sound.
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When Partnership Is Not the Destination
Listen and subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Googl e | Pocket Casts In a society dominated by romantic couples, it can be hard to accept your unpartnered state for what it is. But for the "single at heart," the desire for partnership is nonexistent—replaced with a sense of self-sufficiency, satisfaction, and robust friendships. In this episode of How to Start Over, we explore misco
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Sniffing out forest fungi
Nature, Published online: 13 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01619-w Field mycologist Željko Zgrablić works with his dog to track how climate change affects truffles.
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Research examines X-ray intraday variability of blazar Markarian 421
By analyzing the data from ESA's XMM-Newton satellite, astronomers from the Astronomical Observatory of the Jagiellonian University in Kraków, Poland, and elsewhere, have investigated X-ray intraday variability of a nearby blazar known as Markarian 421. Results of the study, published June 5 on arXiv.org, could help us better understand the nature of high-energy X-ray sources.
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Scientist Synthesizes New Molecule That Kills Hard-To-Treat Breast Cancer
(Photo: Amanda Siegfried, UT Dallas) A biochemist at the University of Texas at Dallas has synthesized a molecule capable of killing treatment-resistant breast cancer. Dr. Jung-Mo Ahn led a team of researchers in the creation of ERX-41, a new compound that uses breast cancer cells' own weaknesses to "wipe out" tumor cells. Most existing breast cancer treatments require the presence of estrogen re
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The Atlantic's July/August Cover Story: "Our Blinding, Blaring World"
Bright lamps can fatally attract nocturnal insects, street noise drowns out the alarm calls of songbirds, and artificial lights divert sea turtle hatchlings away from the water. These are just some of the examples that The Atlantic 's staff writer and Pulitzer Prize winner Ed Yong describes in a new cover story, " Our Blinding, Blaring World ," which looks at how, by flooding the environment with
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Delivery method could mean fewer peptide drug injections
A new delivery method allows for the slow-release of peptide drugs in the body, report researchers. Microencapsulation in biodegradable polymers allows drugs such as peptide therapeutics to be released over time in the body. Peptides are molecules in the body that are composed of short chains of amino acids, and include messengers, growth factors, and well-known hormones such as insulin. Because
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Plastic from old trucks becomes graphene for new cars
The Flash Joule heating process recycles plastic from end-of-life Ford F-150 trucks into high-value graphene for new vehicles, say researchers. The average SUV contains up to 350 kilograms (771 pounds) of plastic that could sit in a landfill for centuries but for the recycling process reported in the journal Communications Engineering . The goal of the project was to reuse that graphene to make e
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The Download: Marseille's surveillance fightback, and the endless AI sentience debate
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. Marseille's battle against the surveillance state Across the world, video cameras have become an accepted feature of urban life. Many cities in China now have dense networks of them, and London and New Delhi aren't far behind. Now France is playing catch-up. S
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Is LaMDA Sentient?
It sounds like the plot of a feel-good science fiction movie – an engineer discovers that an AI program he was working on has crossed over the line to become truly sentient. He is faced with skepticism, anger, threats from the company he is working for, and widespread ridicule. But he knows in his heart the AI program is a real person. If this were a movie the protagonist would find a way to free
9h
Cloud labs: where robots do the research
Nature, Published online: 13 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01618-x A host of companies provide a remote, automated workforce for conducting experiments around the clock.
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Professors Need the Power to Fire Diversity Bureaucrats
Sign up for Conor's newsletter, Up for Debate , where he highlights timely conversations and solicits reader responses to thought-provoking questions. One of the most closely watched free-speech battles in higher education reached its denouement recently at Georgetown University's law school, where that foremost obsession of the American intelligentsia––a problematic tweet!––sparked a months-long
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Benjamin Mottelson (1926–2022)
Nature, Published online: 13 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01615-0 Physicist and Nobel prizewinner who revolutionized understanding of the atomic nucleus.
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How to Save Women's Lives After Roe
In February, NPR reported a story of a woman, Anna, who went into labor at 19 weeks, far too early for her child to survive outside the womb. This is a condition known as "preterm premature rupture of membranes" (PPROM), and in many cases the medically recommended treatment is abortion. Attempting to delay labor long enough to reach a point where the baby could survive can mean risking infection
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What's Behind American Decline: Domestic Dysfunction
A s the golden light bled from the Los Angeles sky one evening last week, a mariachi band played at a rooftop cocktail party for corporate executives and government officials from a couple dozen countries. They had gathered on the eve of the Summit of the Americas, an every-few-years meeting that would begin in the city the following day. With a flare of trumpets, the band launched into "El Rey,"
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The End of the Millennial Lifestyle Subsidy
Sign up for Derek's newsletter here . Several weeks ago, I needed a ride home after some late-night drinks about two miles from my place in Washington, D.C. I pulled up the Uber app and entered my address. When the price on the screen popped up, I assumed I'd entered the wrong street, and perhaps the wrong state. I carefully retyped. But the same price appeared on the screen: $50. That's outrageo
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How Animals Perceive the World
Photographs by Shayan Asgharnia This article was featured in One Story to Read Today, a newsletter in which our editors recommend a single must-read from The Atlantic , Monday through Friday. Sign up for it here. Within the 310,000 acres of Wyoming's Grand Teton National Park, one of the largest parking lots is in the village of Colter Bay. Beyond the lot's far edge, nestled among some trees, is
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Against Labels
Dear Reader , Sometimes I write to you about the parlous state of our democracy, other times about the travails of the pandemic. This month, I write to you about a matter of absolutely no importance to the future of the republic. My subject is peel-off magazine mailing labels. Please stay with me here. First, take a look at the cover of your magazine. You will find, in the lower right corner, a m
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Retraction leads to review change at SAGE journal
A cancer journal has retracted a 2016 paper by a group in China after deciding – more than five years after publication – it couldn't stand behind the work. The article, "The preoperative platelet–lymphocyte ratio versus neutrophil–lymphocyte ratio: which is better as a prognostic factor in oral squamous cell carcinoma?", appeared in Therapeutic Advances in … Continue reading
11h
A long-acting interleukin-7, rhIL-7-hyFc, enhances CAR T cell expansion, persistence, and anti-tumor activity
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30860-0 Chimeric antigen receptor T cells represent a breakthrough treatment in hematologic malignancies, but insufficient level of cytotoxicity and persistence of T cells might compromise success. Authors show here that a recombinant long acting form of interleukin-7 enhances proliferation, persistence and cytotoxicity
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In Economics, Grade Restrictions Weed Out Students of Color
A culture of competition in many introductory college courses, known as weed-out courses, is exacting an outsized toll on students from underrepresented racial and ethnic backgrounds. If GPA restrictions are in fact disproportionately penalizing Black and Hispanic college students, what can be done about it?
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Scientists Discover Plastic-Eating Worms That Digest Styrofoam
Humanity has left its mark on the Earth, from cities of steel to mountains of styrofoam. The latter is proving to be a problem, as many of the synthetic materials we produce don't degrade in anything approaching a human timescale. Scientists have long sought to develop better plastic recycling methods, and the answer might be crawling around in the wild. Researchers from the University of Queensl
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Marseille's battle against the surveillance state
Heading toward Marseille's central train station, Eda Nano points out what looks like a streetlamp on the Rue des Abeilles. Its long stand curves upward to a white dome shading a dark bulb. But this sleek piece of urban furniture is not a lamp. It's a video camera, with a 360-degree view of the narrow street. Nano, a 39-year-old developer, wants to make residents of Marseille more aware that they
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High throughput, label-free isolation of circulating tumor cell clusters in meshed microwells
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31009-9 Metastatic CTC clusters remain relatively unexplored due to the lack of optimized and practical technologies for their detection. Here the authors report Cluster-Wells to isolate CTC clusters in whole blood; they show this allows viable cluster retrieval for further molecular and functional analysis.
12h
Milky Way's secrets revealed by massive space probe map
The Gaia space probe unveiled its latest discoveries on Monday in its quest to map the Milky Way in unprecedented detail, surveying nearly two million stars and revealing mysterious "starquakes" which sweep across the fiery giants like vast tsunamis.
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Flood of net zero vows suffer 'credibility gap': report
While countries, cities and companies have massively ramped up net-zero emissions promises in recent months there remain "major flaws" in many plans, according to an analysis published Monday that raises fears of potential large-scale greenwashing by businesses.
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Gaia probe reveals stellar DNA and unexpected 'starquakes'
The robotic spacecraft unravels the history of the our galaxy's evolution – and could identify habitable regions of the Milky Way Astronomers have unveiled the most detailed survey of the Milky Way, revealing thousands of "starquakes" and stellar DNA, and helping to identify the most habitable corners of our home galaxy. The observations from the European Space Agency's Gaia probe cover almost tw
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Gaia sees strange stars in most detailed Milky Way survey to date
Gaia is ESA's mission to create the most accurate and complete multi-dimensional map of the Milky Way. This allows astronomers to reconstruct our home galaxy's structure and past evolution over billions of years, and to better understand the lifecycle of stars and our place in the universe.
13h
Defect engineering of layered double hydroxide nanosheets as inorganic photosensitizers for NIR-III photodynamic cancer therapy
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31106-9 Defect engineering of 2 dimensional layered double hydroxide sheets improves their photocatalytic activity. Here, the authors etch sheets in acid and show that the etched sheets generate substantially more reactive oxygen species that untreated sheets and the treated sheets can be used to kill cancer cells in vi
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Bis-Schiff base linkage-triggered highly bright luminescence of gold nanoclusters in aqueous solution at the single-cluster level
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30760-3 Boosting the luminescence of atomically precise metal clusters is a main goal in view of applications. Here, the authors describe a strategy to increase the photoluminescence quantum yield of water-soluble gold clusters at the single-cluster level via formation of bis-Schiff base linkages, providing detailed ins
13h
Justin Bieber, Ramsay Hunt syndrome, SADS, and how to antivaxxers everything is always about vaccines
I never thought I'd be writing about Justin Bieber, but such are the strange times we live in, given how after Bieber announced that he had developed facial paralysis as a result of Ramsay Hunt syndrome antivaxxers swooped in to blame it on COVID-19 vaccines. Elsewhere, they blame every unexplained death of a young person on vaccines to the point of claiming that "they" are covering up the deaths
14h
Cellulose photonic pigments
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31079-9 Several biomaterials have been promised as suitable candidates for photonic materials and pigments, but their fabrication processes have been limited to the small to medium-scale production of films. Here, the authors demonstrate a substrate-free process to fabricate structurally coloured microparticles via the
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NUP62 localizes to ALS/FTLD pathological assemblies and contributes to TDP-43 insolubility
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31098-6 ALS and FTLD are both characterized by insoluble cytoplasmic depositions of TDP43. Here the authors show that the nucleopore protein NUP62 is mislocalized in C9orf72 and sporadic ALS/FTLD and propose that it interacts with TDP-43 to promote its insolubility.
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Topological invariant and anomalous edge modes of strongly nonlinear systems
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31084-y Topological phases are challenging to identify in systems with general, strong nonlinearities. Here, the authors establish the analytic methodology that defines the topological invariant of nonlinear normal modes. Strongly nonlinear topological boundary modes are guaranteed by the nontrivial topological index.
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Can you solve it? When Wordle curdles
New word puzzles UPDATE: You can read the answers here We all love Wordle. But don't you also crave new challenges? Today's column is a post-Wordle girdle, strapping tightly together four word-based puzzles, three of which were sent in by readers of this column. 1. Old horse Continue reading…
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Fully lignocellulose-based PET analogues for the circular economy
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30735-4 'Polyethylene terephthalate is a widely used polymer with a concerning environmental impact, and alternatives are now highly sought. In this article, the authors present a biorefinery strategy for constructing polyester analogues of polyethylene terephthalate from woody biomass, which are promising candidates fo
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Creating boundaries along a synthetic frequency dimension
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31140-7 The exploration of topological boundary effects is one of the important aspects that could foster the development of future topological photonics devices. Here the authors propose a straightforward method to construct sharp boundaries in synthetic dimensions using a modulated ring resonator strongly coupled to a
14h
Kraniosakral terapi
©Tomas Prokopic, CC 4.0 WG Sutherland Omkring sekel­skiftet 1900 be­traktade osteopaten William Garner Sutherland ett kranium och fick en idé. Påminde inte några av benen om gälarna hos en … Continued Inlägget Kraniosakral terapi dök först upp på Vetenskap och Folkbildning .
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Starwatch: cop the keystone shape of Hercules
Although not extremely bright, Hercules will cover a large area of sky this summer The Hercules constellation is well placed for viewing from the northern hemisphere at this time of year. Although it does not have any really bright stars, the central four make a keystone shape that is easy to recognise. Hercules is also easy to spot because it covers a large area of sky; it is the fifth largest o
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Det fysiske fremmøde var den ­største oplevelse på årets ADA
Forskningsleder Peter Rossing var på ADA, hvor der ikke blev præsenteret data fra mange kæmpe studier, men hvor fællesskabet igen var i fokus efter to års fravær under pandemien. Der blev også præsenteret spændende forskningsresultater og bekymrende data, der tyder på et kæmpe behandlingsgab i brugen af effektive lægemidler.
17h
Monkeys favour music over screen time, say researchers
In the study at a zoo in Helsinki, white-faced sakis could trigger audio or visual stimuli on demand Monkeys given their own "primate-focused" versions of Spotify and Netflix were more likely to choose audio stimuli over screen time, a study has found. Researchers at the University of Glasgow and Aalto University in Finland set out to explore how a group of three white-faced saki monkeys at Korke
21h
Geneticists Figure Out Why Dogs Are So Friendly to Humans
Happy Accidents This week scientists came one step closer to learning what makes a good boy a good boy. Turns out dogs may have learned some of their human social skills from a previously undiscovered genetic mutation. A group of researchers from Japan's Azabu University published a study in the journal Nature Thursday and said ancient dog breeds showed less tendency to look back at humans while
22h
Simple eye examination could predict heart attack risk, says study
Researchers find that patterns of blood vessels in the retina could help identify those likely to experience cardiac problems A simple non-invasive eye examination may be able to predict risk of heart attack when combined with other information, according to a study. Researchers found that combining information about the pattern of blood vessels in the retina with traditional clinical factors ena
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