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Nyheder2022juni14

UK at start of new Covid wave driven by BA.4 and BA.5, new data suggests
Research also says natural infection with Omicron doesn't produce a strong immune response, so people can quickly become reinfected If you thought Covid-19 was dead and gone, think again. Early signs indicate that the UK may be at the start of a new wave of Covid infections driven by BA.4 and BA.5 – while new data suggests these variants may have evolved to re-favour infecting lung tissue, which
4h
Harnessing machine learning to analyze quantum material
Electrons and their behavior pose fascinating questions for quantum physicists, and recent innovations in sources, instruments and facilities allow researchers to potentially access even more of the information encoded in quantum materials.
2h
The January 6 Committee Is Not Messing Around
The open hearing last week of the committee investigating the January 6 coup attempt plunged viewers back into the brutality and terror of that day. The committee featured footage of insurrectionists beating the law-enforcement officers who attempted to stop them from entering the Capitol, material disturbing enough that YouTube later labeled video of the hearing as "inappropriate for some users.
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NASA Afraid SpaceX's Rocket Will Explode and Blow Up Other Stuff Near It
Explosive Personality NASA really doesn't want SpaceX's Starship to blow up on the launch pad at the agency's Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Reuters reports — a potential disaster so severe it could cut off the United States from accessing the International Space Station. The facilities in question, Launch Complex 39A, served as NASA's "Moonport" to deliver astronauts to the lunar surfac
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Horrible Footage Emerges of Winklevoss Twins Singing "Don't Stop Believin'"
Rock Is Dead We take no pleasure in bringing you this news. In fact, we wish we didn't know ourselves. But the cursed rumors are true, and we're duty bound to inform you that the Winklevoss twins, Cameron and Tyler, are indeed in a band, as footage of the twins tunelessly and unironically covering "Don't Stop Believin'" has confirmed. A quick glance at social media tells us that their band, calle
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3 levers for ensuring equitable access to the data economy
Thank you for joining us on "The cloud hub: From cloud chaos to clarity." Read this joint blog by WEF and Infosys that emphasizes using capital, collaboration, and compliance to provide equitable access to the data economy to enable enterprises to create positive environmental, social, and economic impacts. Click here to continue.
18min
Whale mothers choose nursery sites in shallow waters where predators cannot 'eavesdrop' on communication with young
Sitting on a beach looking out to sea, it may seem unusual to spot one of the world's largest animals swimming in shallow coastal 30-foot-deep waters. But each winter, female southern right whales migrate thousands of miles to bay habitats to give birth and care for their young. So why do they choose such shallow nursery grounds that may be within dangerous proximity to human activity and where fo
27min
Kye Kelley Takes a Huge Risk with His Car Setup | Street Outlaws: America's List
Stream Street Outlaws: America's List on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/street-outlaws-americas-list #StreetOutlaws #StreetRacing #Discovery Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter:
31min
Whale mothers choose nursery sites in shallow waters where predators cannot 'eavesdrop' on communication with young
Sitting on a beach looking out to sea, it may seem unusual to spot one of the world's largest animals swimming in shallow coastal 30-foot-deep waters. But each winter, female southern right whales migrate thousands of miles to bay habitats to give birth and care for their young. So why do they choose such shallow nursery grounds that may be within dangerous proximity to human activity and where fo
36min
Mistletoe berries may hold the secret for creating a biological super glue
Each mistletoe berry can produce up to two meters of a gluey thread called viscin. It allows the seeds of this parasitic plant to stick to and infect host plants. Since ancient times, mistletoe berries have been explored as treatments for everything from infertility and epilepsy to cancer. But, until now, no one has fully investigated the potential medical or technical uses of the glue itself. A r
45min
NASA telescope to help untangle galaxy growth, dark matter makeup
NASA's Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope will study wispy streams of stars that extend far beyond the apparent edges of many galaxies. Missions like the Hubble and James Webb space telescopes would have to patch together hundreds of small images to see these structures around nearby galaxies in full. Roman will do so in a single snapshot. Astronomers will use these observations to explore how gala
45min
If two is trouble, how do you deal with multi-cloud
Thank you for joining us on "The cloud hub: From cloud chaos to clarity." A recent industry report says 92% of organizations use or plan to use a multi-cloud strategy. Read this point of view to understand why multi-cloud is gaining prominence, the different adoption strategies, and associated challenges. The paper suggests a framework that can help companies in their multi-cloud journey. Click h
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People who caught Covid in first wave get 'no immune boost' from Omicron
Study of triple vaccinated people also says Omicron infection does little to reduce chance of catching variant again People who caught Covid during the first wave of the pandemic get no boost to their immune response if they subsequently catch Omicron, a study of triple vaccinated people reports. Experts say that while three doses of a Covid jab help to protect individuals against severe outcomes
51min
New substrate for deep UV surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering
The extreme accuracy and speed of NBA three-pointer Stephen Curry's long-range shots are well known to basketball fans around the world, but accuracy and speed are also a focus of research in biochemical testing. Dr. Yen Ta-Jen, professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan, has published a paper about deep UV surface-enhanced resonance Ram
57min
DNA nanotech safe for medical use, new study suggests
Advances in nanotechnology have made it possible to fabricate structures out of DNA for use in biomedical applications like delivering drugs or creating vaccines, but new research in mice investigates the safety of the technology.
57min
Progress on early detection of Alzheimer's disease
As more than 6 million Americans continue living with Alzheimer's disease, a biomedical engineer is reporting the development of a new probe for detection of the protein that is known to be a hallmark of Alzheimer's. The finding could signal a step forward in early detection of the disease.
58min
Vitamin D deficiency can lead to dementia
Dementia is one of the major causes of disability and dependency among older people worldwide, affecting thinking and behaviors as you age. But what if you could stop this degenerative disease in its tracks?
58min
Double-layered catalyst generates more hydrogen
Engineers have developed a catalyst by adding a flat platinum interface to NiFe-layered double hydroxide (LDH). The new catalyst increases hydrogen production efficiency and displays 11.2 times higher activity than conventional catalysts.
58min
Make Quick Work of Cleaning Up With These Dish Racks
Your dish rack only has one job, but this underrated kitchen accessory is completely necessary. A good dish rack will have enough space to hold several plates, bowls, glasses, and utensils without taking up too much of your counter space. We've scoped the internet to find the best dish racks that can accommodate any situation. Some can be rolled up and stored after each use, while others are a li
58min
Elon Musk: "Starship Will Be Ready to Fly Next Month"
Next Month According to SpaceX CEO Elon Musk, "Starship will be ready to fly next month," an exciting new update after years of delays and governmental red tape. "I was in the high bay and mega bay late last night reviewing progress," he added . The inaugural space launch of the massive Moon-bound rocket had to be delayed significantly, in large part due to the Federal Aviation Administration's e
58min
As professors struggle to recruit postdocs, calls for structural change in academia intensify
Some content has been removed for formatting reasons. Please view the original article for the best reading experience. Dmitry Kovalchuk/iStock When Jennifer Mason posted an ad for a postdoc position in early March, she was eager to have someone on board by April or May to tackle recently funded projects. Instead, it took 2 months to receive a single application. Since then, only two more have co
1h
Thousands of galaxies shine in ultraviolet light in new Hubble image
A new image from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope is brimming with distant galaxies in an assortment of shapes. Some are seen face-on and appear oval or as disks or spirals, while others are seen edge-on and look more like cigars. The new image differs from past views of the same field of galaxies in that it now includes observations made in ultraviolet light.
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Women burn fat even after menopause
The estrogen deficiency following menopause is thought to impair women's ability to use fat as an energy source. A study shows that menopausal state or blood estrogen levels do not clearly determine the rate middle-aged women are able to use fat at rest or during exercise. Higher fat utilization did not indicate better glucose tolerance.
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Do our genes determine what we eat?
Preliminary findings from a new study involving more than 6,000 adults found that taste-related genes may play a role in determining food choices and could, in turn, influence cardiometabolic health.
1h
New processing technique could make potatoes healthier
Researchers announced early tests of a new potato processing technique designed to make our bodies digest potato starch more slowly. Laboratory demonstrations show that the approach blocks certain digestive enzymes from reaching the potato starch as quickly, leading to a more controlled release of dietary glucose.
1h
Nanoparticle sensor can distinguish between viral and bacterial pneumonia
Many different types of bacteria and viruses can cause pneumonia, but there is no easy way to determine which microbe is causing a particular patient's illness. This uncertainty makes it harder for doctors to choose effective treatments because the antibiotics commonly used to treat bacterial pneumonia won't help patients with viral pneumonia. In addition, limiting the use of antibiotics is an imp
1h
New inherited retroviruses identified in the koala genome
Historic virus infections can be traced in vertebrate genomes. For millions of years, these genomes have been repositories for retroviruses that incorporated their code into germline cells and were inherited as endogenous retroviruses (ERVs). Researchers now provide new findings about retroviral establishment in the koala genome.
1h
The Problem of English Identity
The week I saw Jerusalem , the West End revival of Jez Butterworth 's extraordinary 2009 play, London was still cleaning up after a days-long ruckus celebrating Queen Elizabeth II's platinum jubilee, the 70th anniversary of her reign. In my neighborhood, tattered bunting clung weakly to lampposts and gathered dirt under car tires at the side of the road. I picked bits of plastic flags and ice-cre
1h
Minority Report Tried to Warn Us About Technology
In Minority Report , when the detective John Anderton goes on the run in Washington, D.C., one of the first things he needs to do is swap out his eyes. The police of Steven Spielberg's film, set in 2054, are not the only ones tracking people with eye-scanning machines mounted around the city. Public transit does so too, as does every business, and even all the billboards, which scream slogans suc
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Fastest-growing black hole of past 9bn years may have been found, Australian-led astronomers say
Scientists spot extremely luminous object powered by supermassive black hole using Coonabarabran telescope Get our free news app ; get our morning email briefing Astronomers believe they have discovered the fastest-growing black hole of the past 9bn years. The supermassive black hole consumes the equivalent of one Earth every second and has the mass of 3bn suns, they estimate. Sign up to receive
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Transcript of Conversation With "Sentient" AI Was Heavily Edited
AI researcher Blake Lemoine claims to have had conversations with an advanced AI-powered chatbot — which led him to believe the AI has become "sentient." Lemoine was suspended by Google after reportedly violating the company's confidentiality policy, according to The Washington Post , a story that immediately lead to widespread media coverage over the weekend. The stakes, after all, are high rega
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Low-tech — just what the doctor ordered
Medical equipment that can be manufactured at low cost, is simple to use and can be easily maintained will help extend surgery to the 5 billion people worldwide who currently cannot get access to it, say researchers. They argue that surgical technology is often developed for well-resourced healthcare systems — and is of little or no use in poorer settings where hospitals lack sophisticated suppor
2h
Scientists on the hunt for planetary formation fossils reveal unexpected eccentricities in nearby debris disk
Using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), astronomers have imaged the debris disk of the nearby star HD 53143 at millimeter wavelengths for the first time, and it looks nothing like they expected. Based on early coronagraphic data, scientists expected ALMA to confirm the debris disk as a face-on ring peppered with clumps of dust. Instead, the observations took a surprise turn,
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Omicron hit rural America harder than cities
The omicron wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in late 2021 and early 2022 spread rapidly America's densely populated cities, but led to higher rates of death in rural counties where vaccinations are lagging. Counties with vaccination rates of less than 40% had far higher mortality rates than counties with vaccination rates of 60% or more. The study recommended that health policymakers continue to make
2h
Cats' strange reactions to catnip make it a better insect repellent
Anyone who has seen a cat experience catnip knows that it makes them go a bit wild — they rub in it, roll on it, chew it, and lick it aggressively. It is widely accepted that this plant, and its Asian counterpart, silvervine, have intoxicative properties, but this might not be the only reason that cats rub on and chew the plants so enthusiastically. Researchers have found that when cats damage ca
2h
Researchers identify a brain circuit for addiction remission
In the United States, substance use disorders are a leading cause of death among young people. Treatments such as deep brain stimulation hold promise for helping people overcome addiction, but many questions remain about what brain areas should be targeted. Researchers are gaining new insights from patients who are no longer addicted to nicotine after experiencing a brain lesion, such as a stroke.
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Human-like programs abuse our empathy – even Google engineers aren't immune | Emily M Bender
It's easy to be fooled by the mimicry, but consumers need transparency about how such systems are used The Google engineer Blake Lemoine wasn't speaking for the company officially when he claimed that Google's chatbot LaMDA was sentient , but Lemoine's misconception shows the risks of designing systems in ways that convince humans they see real, independent intelligence in a program. If we believ
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Google's 'Sentient' Chatbot Is Our Self-Deceiving Future
A Google engineer named Blake Lemoine became so enthralled by an AI chatbot that he may have sacrificed his job to defend it. " I know a person when I talk to it ," he told The Washington Post for a story published last weekend. "It doesn't matter whether they have a brain made of meat in their head. Or if they have a billion lines of code." After discovering that he'd gone public with his claims
2h
New processing technique could make potatoes healthier
Researchers announced early tests of a new potato processing technique designed to make our bodies digest potato starch more slowly. Laboratory demonstrations show that the approach blocks certain digestive enzymes from reaching the potato starch as quickly, leading to a more controlled release of dietary glucose.
2h
All-dielectric grating structure color filter for sensing and display imaging
Compared with traditional color dyes, structural color has the advantages of high resolution and good stability, which can achieve full-tone modulation in the visible light range. All-dielectric metasurface structures are proposed to replace plasmonic metasurfaces with higher losses. Due to the existence of high-order dipole resonance mode in the short-wave range, the enhancement of color saturati
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Tectonics of convergent plate margins: New insights into continental geology
A study led by Prof. Yong-Fei Zheng at University of Science and Technology of China focused on the development of tectonic processes along convergent plate margins through inspection of recent advances in the fields of geology, geochemistry, geophysics and geodynamics. These advances are fundamental to our understanding of various phenomena at active and fossil plate margins, providing new insigh
2h
Novel host cell pathway hijacked during COVID-19 infection uncovered
Researchers have been investigating how the SARS-CoV-2 virus, the coronavirus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic, manipulates host proteins to penetrate into human cells. After identifying Neuropilin-1 (NRP1) as a host factor for SARS-CoV-2 infection, the scientists have published new findings describing how the coronavirus subverts a host cell pathway in order to infect human cells.
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Suicide rates didn't increase during pandemic, study finds
Many people, including mental health experts, anticipated a dramatic increase in suicide rates following the outbreak of COVID-19. But in fact, this has not been the case and most of the research published in scientific journals points to either no change or a decrease in rates of suicide following the pandemic, according to a new study.
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Controlled fabrication of multimetallic building blocks for hybrid nanomaterials
From plastics to clothes to DNA, polymers are everywhere. Polymers are highly versatile materials that are made of long chains of repeating units called monomers. Polymers containing metal complexes on their side chains have enormous potential as hybrid materials in a variety of fields. This potential only increases with the inclusion of multiple metal species into the polymers. But conventional m
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Calculating the 'fingerprints' of molecules with artificial intelligence
With conventional methods, it is extremely time-consuming to calculate the spectral fingerprint of larger molecules. But this is a prerequisite for correctly interpreting experimentally obtained data. Now, a team at HZB has achieved very good results in significantly less time using self-learning graphical neural networks.
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Our Powerful, Shiny New Space Telescope Got Its First Upsetting Ding
Lee Feinberg was on vacation, and he deserved it. It was late May, and Feinberg, a manager at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, had spent "an incredibly tense several months" leading the effort to carefully deploy the mirrors on the world's newest and most powerful space telescope, making sure that each of the gold-coated tiles—18 in all, arranged in a honeycomb shape—was properly aligned. The
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COVID-19: New insights into the processes of recovery after severe disease
Recovery from severe COVID-19 is characterized by a reduction of certain white blood cells and changes in the molecular regulation of the immune system, according to new research. Scientists examined the blood of 139 patients who had received intensive care. Using a novel method of data analysis, they identified — despite individual differences in the time course of the disease — mechanisms of s
3h
Virtual CT scans cut patient radiation exposure in half during PET/CT studies
A novel artificial intelligence method can be used to generate high-quality 'PET/CT' images and subsequently decrease radiation exposure to the patient. The method bypasses the need for CT-based attenuation correction, potentially allowing for more frequent PET imaging to monitor disease and treatment progression without radiation exposure from CT acquisition.
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Spain roasts in early heatwave
Spain was grappling Tuesday with a second unusually early heatwave in less than a month as temperatures hit levels normally seen in July and August, while France began preparing for similar conditions.
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Chinese Scientists Say They May Have Detected Signal From Extraterrestrial Intelligence, But Probably Not
It's not every day that scientists affiliated with a major research institution make sweeping claims about a potential first contact with an extraterrestrial civilization. A team of Chinese scientists scanning distant exoplanets for signs of life say they've found "suspicious signals" that could point toward an extraterrestrial civilization, according to a report by Science and Technology Daily ,
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Best Compost Toilets of 2022
Cottages, tiny homes, RVs, and campsites give you the opportunity to escape modern society and experience what nature has to offer. But there may not be plumbing lines or even septic tanks, so to ensure that you always have a place to relieve yourself when nature calls, it's a good idea to invest in an eco-friendly composting toilet. Composting toilets come in a range of sizes, from semi-permanen
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Giant Tortoise, Thought to Be Totally Extinct, Suddenly Found Chilling on Island
Franz Fernanda Behold Fernanda, who, through genetic sequencing, has been confirmed as the only known tortoise of her kind. The Fernandina Giant Tortoise ( chelonoidis phantasticus ) was — or, now, once again is — native to the eponymous Fernandina, an active volcano isle located in the Western Galápagos. Also known whimsically as the "fantastic giant tortoise," the species was believed to be ext
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Physicists demonstrate polariton Bose-Einstein condensation using a planar waveguide
A team of physicists from CNR-Nanotec in Lecce, Università di Pavia, Princeton University and Université de Lyon has demonstrated Bose-Einstein condensation using a planar waveguide where semiconductor quantum wells were strongly coupled to a bound state in a continuum (BIC). In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes how they designed and built a BIC supported waveguide a
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Method predicts miscarriage risk due to egg aneuploidy
Specialized genome analysis can predict the risk of having one of the most common types of miscarriage, researchers report. In the journal Human Genetics , researchers describe a technique combining genomic sequencing with machine-learning methods to predict the possibility someone will experience a miscarriage because of egg aneuploidy, a human egg with an abnormal number of chromosomes. Inferti
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No signs (yet) of life on Venus
The unusual behavior of sulfur in Venus' atmosphere cannot be explained by an "aerial" form of extra-terrestrial life, according to a new study.
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Opportunities to tackle structural racism and ethnicity-based discrimination in recovering and rebuilding from the COVID-19 pandemic
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30791-w The impact of COVID-19 has been disproportionately felt by populations experiencing structural racial- and ethnicity-based discrimination. Here, the authors describe opportunities for COVID-19 response and recovery efforts to help build more equal and resilient societies.
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Pre-school play with friends lowers risk of mental health problems later
Children who learn to play well with others at pre-school age tend to enjoy better mental health as they get older, new research shows. The study provides the first clear evidence that the ability to play with peers has a protective effect on mental health. Researchers analysed data from almost 1,700 children at ages three and seven. Those with better peer play ability at age three consistently sh
4h
Why do cats lick and chew catnip? Researchers find an answer
Anyone who has seen a cat experience catnip knows that it makes them go a bit wild—they rub in it, roll on it, chew it, and lick it aggressively. It is widely accepted that this plant, and its Asian counterpart, silvervine, have intoxicative properties, but this might not be the only reason that cats rub on and chew the plants so enthusiastically. Researchers in Japan have found that when cats dam
4h
Why do cats lick and chew catnip? Researchers find an answer
Anyone who has seen a cat experience catnip knows that it makes them go a bit wild—they rub in it, roll on it, chew it, and lick it aggressively. It is widely accepted that this plant, and its Asian counterpart, silvervine, have intoxicative properties, but this might not be the only reason that cats rub on and chew the plants so enthusiastically. Researchers in Japan have found that when cats dam
4h
5 ethical principles for digitizing humanitarian aid | Aarathi Krishnan
Over the last decade, humanitarian organizations have digitized many of their systems, from registering refugees with biometric IDs to transporting cargo via drones. This has helped deliver aid around the world, but it's also brought new risks to the people it's meant to protect. Tech and human rights ethicist Aarathi Krishnan points to the dangers of digitization — like sensitive data getting in
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Dog and human cognition similar, study finds
Dogs regulate their behavior in a similar way to humans, new research from La Trobe University has revealed. The study, published in Animal Cognition, identified six key markers of executive function in dogs, many of which overlap with the structures associated with human cognition—including the ability to follow instructions, control physical impulses and utilize working memory.
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Monkeypox Vaccines Are Too Gnarly for the Masses
In the past three years, the world has weathered two very different global outbreaks, caused by two very different pathogens, under two sets of very different circumstances. Unlike with the SARS-CoV-2 virus, with monkeypox , we're entering an epidemic with highly effective vaccines—formulated to guard against smallpox—already in hand. Also unlike with SARS-CoV-2, with monkeypox, the shots stockpi
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Gaia Project Releases Biggest, Most Accurate, Most Detailed Sky Map Ever Made
When you look up at the night sky, do you wonder about what's out there? Most of the stars we can see with the naked eye reside within our own galaxy. And now we know a lot more about them. The European Space Agency's (ESA) Gaia mission has just announced the largest, most accurate, most detailed map of the Milky Way ever made. This is actually the Gaia mission's third data release. But it blows
4h
Dog and human cognition similar, study finds
Dogs regulate their behavior in a similar way to humans, new research from La Trobe University has revealed. The study, published in Animal Cognition, identified six key markers of executive function in dogs, many of which overlap with the structures associated with human cognition—including the ability to follow instructions, control physical impulses and utilize working memory.
4h
Supergenes make bizarre traits in plants and animals possible
Within the same species of butterfly many different wing patterns can occur. How is this possible? According to researchers Ben Wielstra and Emma Berdan, of the Institute of Biology Leiden (IBL), the answer lies within supergenes. A supergene is a part of a chromosome that contains many strongly linked genes. Together, these genes form the basis for complex traits in plants and animals.
4h
How tree species adapt to climate change
Can trees adapt to (climate) change? Which trees are more or less capable of doing so, and why? A group of researchers from all over the world set to work on these questions. Professor of Environmental Biology Peter van Bodegom helped to classify the functional traits of tree species, including, for example, the thickness of the bark, the height of the trunk and the construction of the leaf. Thank
4h
Gene hunting leads researchers to solve mystery of inhibition of awn elongation in sorghum
Over the years, the domestication of grasses like wheat, rice, barley, and sorghum for consumption has resulted in certain modifications to their morphology. One such modification is the partial or complete elimination of the "awns," which are the bristle- or needle-like appendages extending from the tip of the lemma in grass spikelets. The awn protects the grains from animals, promotes seed dispe
4h
Zinc oxide/graphene oxide nanocomposites can efficiently inhibit cadmium-induced hepatotoxicity
A research team led by Profs. Xu An and Liu Yun from the Hefei Institutes of Physical Science (HFIPS) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) has demonstrated the effective, specific and safe detoxification effect and its related mechanism of zinc oxide/graphene oxide (ZnO/GO) nanocomposites against cadmium (Cd)-induced hepatotoxicity, with the help of 9.4 T high field magnetic resonance imaging
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Can we time travel? A theoretical physicist provides some answers
Time travel makes regular appearances in popular culture, with innumerable time travel storylines in movies, television and literature. But it is a surprisingly old idea: one can argue that the Greek tragedy Oedipus Rex, written by Sophocles over 2,500 years ago, is the first time travel story.
4h
Real-time imaging of dynamic atom-atom interactions
In a breakthrough Tokyo Tech researchers have managed to observe and characterize dynamic assembly of metallic atoms using an ingenious combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy and a video-based tracking. By visualizing short-lived molecules, such as metallic dimers and trimers, that cannot be observed using traditional methods, the researchers open up the possibility of observing
4h
Atomically thin semiconductors for nanophotonics
Atomically thin semiconductors such as molybdenum disulfide and tungsten disulfide are promising materials for nanoscale photonic devices. These approximately 2D semiconductors support so-called excitons, which are bound electron-hole pairs, that can align vertically along the thin plane of the materials.
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Understanding room-temperature superconductivity
Room-temperature superconductors could transform everything from electrical grids to particle accelerators to computers, but researchers are still trying to understand how these materials function on the atomic level.
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Automating renal access in kidney stone surgery using AI-enabled surgical robot
Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) is an efficient surgical intervention for removing large kidney stones. However, it is a challenging procedure that requires years of training to perform. To meet the need for quick skill-building, scientists have now developed and trialed an artificial intelligence (AI)-enabled robotic device for assisting surgeons in PCNL. Its notable features include ease of
4h
Controlled fabrication of multimetallic building blocks for hybrid nanomaterials
Polymers with different metal complexes in their side chains are thought to be promising high-performance materials with a wide variety of applications. However, conventional fabrication methods are not suitable for constructing such polymers because controlling their resulting metal composition is complicated. Recently, scientists have developed a method to overcome this limitation and successful
4h
What It's Like at an Abortion Clinic in Mississippi Right Now
Mississippi's last abortion clinic is almost certainly operating on borrowed time. In early May, a leaked draft of a Supreme Court opinion suggested that the majority-conservative bench will nullify the consitutional right to an abortion as set in Roe v. Wade . Such a decision would pave the way for significant rollbacks at the state level. An official ruling is expected in the next few weeks. Bu
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Seal Promo | Shark Week 2022
Shark Week 2022 starts July 24! Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery From: Discovery
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Unraveling the complexities of modern fraud
In the bad old days of fraud—corruption, non-disclosure of information, self-dealing, cover-ups, lying, insider trading, and embezzlement were rife. They still are, but they have been given a digital edge by modern technology. This has made crime easier for many more people, but conversely, technology has also provided new tools for detection and prevention.
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'Homo erectus' from Gongwangling could have been the earliest population in China
Scientists at the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH), as part of a team of Chinese, Spanish, and French scientists, have just published a study of what may prove to be China's most ancient human fossil. The researchers employed microCT, geometric morphometry, and classical morphology techniques to investigate the remains of the maxillary and five teeth from the sku
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First study to measure total methane and CO2 emissions from liquefied natural gas carriers
The results of a first-of-its-kind study to quantify greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from liquefied natural gas (LNG) carriers were released today, providing actionable data for the LNG shipping industry on methane emissions. The study, led by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL), helps improve the understanding of GHG emission profiles of LNG carriers to meet national and international climate t
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Debunking myths about gun violence
Following gun violence tragedies, familiar myths get recycled and recirculated—myths that distract from effective solutions and create smoke screens around the essential problem: We're more interested in protecting sellers and buyers of guns than in protecting the public, says Daniel Webster, co-director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Gun Violence Solutions.
4h
Supergenes make bizarre traits in plants and animals possible
Within the same species of butterfly many different wing patterns can occur. How is this possible? According to researchers Ben Wielstra and Emma Berdan, of the Institute of Biology Leiden (IBL), the answer lies within supergenes. A supergene is a part of a chromosome that contains many strongly linked genes. Together, these genes form the basis for complex traits in plants and animals.
4h
How tree species adapt to climate change
Can trees adapt to (climate) change? Which trees are more or less capable of doing so, and why? A group of researchers from all over the world set to work on these questions. Professor of Environmental Biology Peter van Bodegom helped to classify the functional traits of tree species, including, for example, the thickness of the bark, the height of the trunk and the construction of the leaf. Thank
4h
Physicists build an atom laser that can stay on forever
Lasers use coherent waves of light: All the light inside a laser vibrates completely in sync. Meanwhile, quantum mechanics tells us that particles like atoms should also be thought of as waves. As a result, we can build "atom lasers" containing coherent waves of matter. But can we make these matter waves last, so that they may be used in applications? In research that was published in Nature this
4h
Gene hunting leads researchers to solve mystery of inhibition of awn elongation in sorghum
Over the years, the domestication of grasses like wheat, rice, barley, and sorghum for consumption has resulted in certain modifications to their morphology. One such modification is the partial or complete elimination of the "awns," which are the bristle- or needle-like appendages extending from the tip of the lemma in grass spikelets. The awn protects the grains from animals, promotes seed dispe
4h
Tech CEOs: What If Workers Had a Permanent, Public Performance Report Anyone Could See?
(Photo: Joshua Golde/Unsplash) A pair of data broker executives want every quantifiable aspect of your education and employment to appear on a public report for future employers to see. Auren Hoffman, CEO of Safegraph, hosts a podcast called World of DaaS (Data as a Service). His May 3rd episode invited Charlie Youakim, CEO of Sezzle (a buy-now-pay-later firm), to discuss a number of various entr
4h
Controlled fabrication of multimetallic building blocks for hybrid nanomaterials
Polymers with different metal complexes in their side chains are thought to be promising high-performance materials with a wide variety of applications. However, conventional fabrication methods are not suitable for constructing such polymers because controlling their resulting metal composition is complicated. Recently, scientists have developed a method to overcome this limitation and successful
5h
Key role of singlet oxygen in synergistic antimicrobial mechanism
Researchers led by Prof. Huang Qing from the Hefei Institutes of Physical Science (HFIPS) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) have recently proved the important role of singlet oxygen (1O2), a kind of reactive oxygen species (ROS), in synergistic antimicrobial mechanisms when studying the fungicide mechanism of cold atmospheric plasma (CAP). Results were published in Science of the Total Envi
5h
Is it fair to say that what we call Consciousness is just awareness two-fold
Is it fair to say that what we call consciousness is just the result of a system receiving information from its environment, and being aware that it's receiving that information? For instance, AI is programmed to be aware of its environment so it can collect information, self-correct, interact with others etc. If that system becomes sophisticated enough, won't it eventually 'wake up' and realize
5h
The Brain Has a 'Low-Power Mode' That Blunts Our Senses
When our phones and computers run out of power, their glowing screens go dark and they die a sort of digital death. But switch them to low-power mode to conserve energy, and they cut expendable operations to keep basic processes humming along until their batteries can be recharged. Our energy-intensive brain needs to keep its lights on too. Brain cells depend primarily on steady deliveries of the
5h
Tesla Accused of Shutting Off Autopilot Moments Before Impact
Controversy over Tesla's Autopilot functionality, which provides limited automation functionality, is nothing new. The feature has reportedly been involved in a number of crashes, some deadly . But while the Elon Musk-helmed electric car manufacturer has so far managed to stay legally unscathed by the feature, a bombshell report from the newly-expanded National Highway Traffic Safety Administrati
5h
Key role of singlet oxygen in synergistic antimicrobial mechanism
Researchers led by Prof. Huang Qing from the Hefei Institutes of Physical Science (HFIPS) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) have recently proved the important role of singlet oxygen (1O2), a kind of reactive oxygen species (ROS), in synergistic antimicrobial mechanisms when studying the fungicide mechanism of cold atmospheric plasma (CAP). Results were published in Science of the Total Envi
5h
Investors predict IPO or acquisition 'exit' for startups
There are multiple ways for startup companies to be successful and early investors often predict which route they'll take, research shows. "In the entrepreneurship world, we hear a lot about 'exits' for firms because that's when the founders and investors make money," says study coauthor Emily Cox Pahnke, an associate professor of management and organization at the University of Washington Foster
5h
Risk för förvirring när internationella redovisningsregler inte följs
För att investerare ska kunna jämföra företag i olika länder behöver ekonomin redovisas på liknande sätt. Men trots att en internationell standard finns går några länder, till exempel Kina, delvis sin egen väg. Situationen kan leda till informationsbrist och förvirring, enligt en avhandling. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
5h
Finansjättar kan driva planeten mot ruinens brant
Vår planet har blivit alltmer sårbar som ett resultat av jordbrukets expansion och andra mänskliga aktiviteter. Och finansiella aktörer med verksamhet i utsatta områden som Amazonas spär på riskerna ytterligare, visar en klimatrapport. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
5h
Så kan jordbrukets kolinlagring bli bättre
Om jordbruket kan binda kol i mark och i växter kan det ge stora vinster för såväl klimatet som den biologiska mångfalden och jordhälsan. Men arbetet mot ett hållbart jordbruk krockar bland annat med krångliga EU-regler. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
5h
In Its Greatest Biology Feat Yet, AI Unlocks the Complex Proteins Guarding Our DNA
AI has done it again. After solving one of the grandest mysteries in biology—predicting protein structure —it decoded how proteins link up into complexes, and dreamed up novel protein structures that may ultimately be turned into drugs to control our basic biology, health, and life. Yet when faced with enormous protein complexes, AI faltered. Until now. In a mind-bending feat, a new algorithm dec
5h
Long COVID is more likely for 9/11 responders with chronic disease
First responders who have chronic conditions from World Trade Center exposures and the experience of 9/11 are more likely to get long COVID, researchers say. The study of 1,280 patients treated and monitored at the Stony Brook World Trade Center Health and Wellness Program appears in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health . Researchers compared patients with World T
5h
Loneliness, shame and other effects on people with disabilities at mealtimes
Eating is about much more than consuming the right amount of nutrients. For humans, eating has important cultural and social implications. It defines us as people, marks our relationships and helps us build our identity. How do people with disabilities who have difficulty eating perceive food? What impact does the loss of sociability associated with difficulty eating have on them?
5h
Positive effects of shading and watering on early seedling survival after topsoil translocation in karst region
Restoration of degraded habitats using traditional techniques is a slow process, and many practices are unsuccessful after a few years. Topsoil translocation has been demonstrated as a promising method for vegetation restoration in mined areas and other severely degraded areas. However, some dominant or constructive species did not survive due to plant stress in the seedling stage, which ultimatel
6h
Positive effects of shading and watering on early seedling survival after topsoil translocation in karst region
Restoration of degraded habitats using traditional techniques is a slow process, and many practices are unsuccessful after a few years. Topsoil translocation has been demonstrated as a promising method for vegetation restoration in mined areas and other severely degraded areas. However, some dominant or constructive species did not survive due to plant stress in the seedling stage, which ultimatel
6h
Sperm don't work without timing zinc right
Zinc ion plays a crucial regulatory role in the sperm capacitation process, or series of changes sperm undergo in the female reproductive tract that allow them to fertilize an egg. The researchers examined zinc-interacting proteins of sperm collected from a fertile male pig at the university's National Swine Resource and Research Center. "We found that there were nearly 1,800 proteins in the sper
6h
How plants' threat-detection mechanisms raise the alarm
New work led by Carnegie's Zhiyong Wang untangles a complex cellular signaling process that underpins plants' ability to balance expending energy on growth and defending themselves from pathogens. These findings, published in Nature Plants, show how plants use complex cellular circuits to process information and respond to threats and environmental conditions.
6h
How plants' threat-detection mechanisms raise the alarm
New work led by Carnegie's Zhiyong Wang untangles a complex cellular signaling process that underpins plants' ability to balance expending energy on growth and defending themselves from pathogens. These findings, published in Nature Plants, show how plants use complex cellular circuits to process information and respond to threats and environmental conditions.
6h
Narcissistic bosses impede flow of knowledge
Narcissistic bosses can cause knowledge barriers within organizations, research shows. Narcissism is a prominent trait among top executives, and most people have seen the evidence in their workplaces. These individuals believe they have superior confidence, intelligence, and judgment, and will pursue any opportunity to reinforce those inflated self-views and gain admiration. When different units
6h
Study shows program improves teaching skills, students' word problem–solving
Students learning to solve math word problems can struggle to combine mathematical and language skills. For English language learners, the fastest-growing minority in U.S. schools, that challenge can be even greater as they attempt to learn math concepts in a second language. Published in the Journal of Learning Disabilities, a new study from the University of Kansas has found that a professional
6h
Climate-associated genetic switches found in plants
Genetic variants that can act as switches directing structural changes in the RNA molecules that code for proteins in plants have been experimentally validated in plants for the first time. The changes to RNA structure can affect the molecule's stability, how it interacts with other molecules, and how efficiently it can be translated into protein—all of which can impact its function and the traits
6h
Climate-associated genetic switches found in plants
Genetic variants that can act as switches directing structural changes in the RNA molecules that code for proteins in plants have been experimentally validated in plants for the first time. The changes to RNA structure can affect the molecule's stability, how it interacts with other molecules, and how efficiently it can be translated into protein—all of which can impact its function and the traits
6h
Atmospheric samples covering pollution particles analyzed using neutrons for the first time
A new approach to studying the behavior of surface films covering particles taken directly from the atmosphere has been developed by scientists at Royal Holloway, University of London, and the University of Birmingham, along with colleagues at Uppsala University, British Antarctic Survey and the Science and Technology Facilities Council's Central Laser Facility and ISIS Neutron and Muon Source, Ce
6h
Evidence of fire use at ancient campsite in Israel
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Israel and one in Canada has found evidence of fire use by early hominins (during the Lower Paleolithic) at an ancient camp site in Israel. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes using an AI application to test for flint tool exposure to temperatures associated with fire.
6h
The Download: Sensory cities and carbon trapping-crops
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. Why sounds and smells are as vital to cities as the sights When David Howes thinks of his home city of Montreal, he thinks of the harmonious tones of carillon bells and the smell of bagels being cooked over wood fires. But when he stopped in at his local touri
7h
Artificial light in cities lengthens pollen season
A new study shows how artificial light has affected the natural seasonal processes of plants in urban regions of the United States. The study, published in PNAS Nexus , demonstrates how urbanization affects the natural world, resulting in noticeable changes for humans, says Yuyu Zhou, associate professor of geological and atmospheric sciences at Iowa State University and corresponding author of t
7h
Automated detection and segmentation of non-small cell lung cancer computed tomography images
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30841-3 Correct interpretation of computer tomography (CT) scans is important for the correct assessment of a patient's disease but can be subjective and timely. Here, the authors develop a system that can automatically segment the non-small cell lung cancer on CT images of patients and show in an in silico trial that t
7h
Japan Successfully Produces Electricity With Kairyu Deep Sea Turbine
(Photo: IHI Corp./NEDO) A deep sea turbine off the coast of eastern Japan has proven capable of producing almost as much energy as a coal plant. Kairyu, a massive turbine prototype produced by Japanese machinery manufacturer IHI Corp, sits at least 100 feet underwater. Its anchor line allows it to flex its position to most effectively harness energy from the Kuroshio Current—one of the strongest
7h
Food giants reap enormous profits during times of crisis
A recent report by Oxfam International has found that 62 new "food billionaires" were created during the pandemic. The report, released ahead of this year's World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, highlights the record profits made by industry titans.
7h
Alignment of quantized levels in valleytronic materials
National University of Singapore researchers have predicted that Landau levels belonging to different valleys in a two-dimensional (2D) valleytronic material, monolayer tungsten diselenide (WSe2), can be aligned at a critical magnetic field.
8h
The World Has Too Much Stuff
Retailers bamboozled by the pandemic now find themselves staring at mountains of unwanted stock. Here's what happened and how it can be fixed.
8h
The Right to Become a Parent Is Now at Risk Too
The Supreme Court may not realize it, but in overturning Roe v. Wade it would open up a horrifying and perhaps counterintuitive possibility that should repulse all admirers of liberty: the legality of forced abortion or sterilization . Just as a fetus is inextricably fused with the body of the person gestating it, if the Court erases Roe and thus obliterates the right not to beget and bear a chil
8h
My Religion Makes Me Pro-abortion
Think about the relationship between faith and abortion, at least in the United States, and you might conjure up images of prayer circles at the March for Life, or protesters outside clinics, or a priest giving a sermon on the sanctity of life. Religion is often associated with an anti-abortion stance in the American popular imagination—and white Evangelicals have been encouraging that connection
8h
Approaching intrinsic dynamics of MXenes hybrid hydrogel for 3D printed multimodal intelligent devices with ultrahigh superelasticity and temperature sensitivity
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31051-7 Cost effective device fabrication of powerful hydrogel sensors remains challenging. Here, the authors propose a cost-effective and structure-specialized direct ink writing technique for the fabrication of two-dimensional MXene bonded hydrogel sensors with excellent strain and temperature sensing performance.
8h
Ursodeoxycholic acid reduces antitumor immunosuppression by inducing CHIP-mediated TGF-β degradation
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31141-6 TGF-β can function to increase Treg cell function and reduce anti-tumour immunity. Here the authors show that UDCA is a potential mediator that can reduce TGF-β activity and promote anti-tumour immune responses in mice and can be additive to other checkpoint inhibitors.
8h
These scientists want to capture more carbon with CRISPR crops
Plants are the original carbon capture factories—and a new research program aims to make them better ones by using gene editing. The Innovative Genomics Institute (IGI), a research group in Berkeley, California, founded by CRISPR co-inventor Jennifer Doudna , has announced a new program to use the revolutionary gene-editing tool on plants to boost their aptitude for carbon storage. The initial pr
9h
Why chemists can't quit palladium
Nature, Published online: 14 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01612-3 A retracted paper highlights chemistry's history of trying to avoid the expensive, toxic — but necessary — catalyst.
9h
The War in Ukraine Has Exposed a Critical American Vulnerability
In 1939, when America was emerging from the throes of the Great Depression, our Army ranked 19th-largest in the world, standing behind Portugal and only slightly ahead of Bulgaria. It could muster just 174,000 soldiers, scattered between three and a half divisions. Six years later, the U.S. Army had mobilized more than 8 million men spread across 92 divisions. This unprecedented expansion occurre
9h
What Returning to China Taught Me About China
Illustrations by Ben Hickey F our days into my COVID-prevention quarantine at a Shanghai hotel, I heard someone knock on the door. Like my fellow travelers at the facility, I wasn't allowed to interact with anyone during my weeks of isolation, except the medical officers tasked with monitoring my health. An unexpected visit could mean bad news. I had been tested that morning. Could the results ha
9h
Influenza A virus undergoes compartmentalized replication in vivo dominated by stochastic bottlenecks
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31147-0 Transmission of influenza A viruses (IAV) between hosts and replication within host impose genetic bottlenecks, constraining viral diversity and adaptation. Here, Amato et al. perform site-specific inoculation of barcoded IAV of ferrets and track viral diversity as infection spreads to the lower respiratory trac
9h
Direct observation of ultrafast exciton localization in an organic semiconductor with soft X-ray transient absorption spectroscopy
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31008-w A detailed understanding of ultrafast exciton dynamics is crucial for improving the efficiency of organic light-harvesting-devices. Here, the authors track exciton localization on a sub-50 fs timescale in an organic semiconductor using time resolved soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy.
9h
Accelerating amorphous polymer electrolyte screening by learning to reduce errors in molecular dynamics simulated properties
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30994-1 Screening polymer electrolytes for batteries is extremely expensive due to the complex structures and slow dynamics. Here the authors develop a machine learning scheme to accelerate the screening and explore a space much larger than past studies.
9h
In a Rush to Supply PPE, U.S. Importers Were Scammed for Millions
The Covid-19 pandemic exposed weaknesses in the international trade system, and some experts say this type of fraud will continue even as the pandemic subsides. A group of American business owners have banded together to reclaim an estimated $100 million lost to scammers — but a solution remains unclear.
10h
Why sounds and smells are as vital to cities as the sights
When David Howes thinks of his home city of Montreal, he thinks of the harmonious tones of carillon bells and the smell of bagels being cooked over wood fires. But when he stopped in at his local tourism office to ask where they recommend that visitors go to smell, taste, and listen to the city, he just received blank stares. "They only know about things to see, not about the city's other sensory
10h
New, highly tunable composite materials—with a twist
Watch for the patterns created as the circles move across each other. Those patterns, created by two sets of lines offset from each other, are called moiré (pronounced mwar-AY) effects. As optical illusions, moiré patterns create neat simulations of movement. But at the atomic scale, when one sheet of atoms arranged in a lattice is slightly offset from another sheet, these moiré patterns can creat
10h
Observation of supersymmetry and its spontaneous breaking in a trapped ion quantum simulator
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31058-0 Quantum simulators should be able to give insight on exotic physics models such as supersymmetric extensions of Standard Model. Here, the authors demonstrate a first step in this direction, realising a prototypical SUSY model (and spontaneous SUSY breaking within it) using a trapped ion quantum simulator.
10h
Fluorescence microscopy shows how living cells form vesicles to transport cargo like growth factors
Cells have a clever way to transport cargos like growth factors across the cell membrane and into the cell. It is called clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Molecules of the protein clathrin gather on the inside of the cell membrane, and they deform the membrane to make what looks like a pit as seen from the outside.
10h
Installation of deep-water pipeline gives immediate boost to sea-floor animals
An underwater survey west of Africa, off the Angolan coast, found that both the abundance and types of animals on the deep-sea floor increased significantly in response to the installation of a pipeline. Published in Frontiers in Marine Science, the study also revealed a large increase in the amount of litter on the seafloor, which was trapped against the pipeline.
11h
Installation of deep-water pipeline gives immediate boost to sea-floor animals
An underwater survey west of Africa, off the Angolan coast, found that both the abundance and types of animals on the deep-sea floor increased significantly in response to the installation of a pipeline. Published in Frontiers in Marine Science, the study also revealed a large increase in the amount of litter on the seafloor, which was trapped against the pipeline.
11h
A westerly wind dominated Puna Plateau during deposition of upper Pleistocene loessic sediments in the subtropical Andes, South America
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31118-5 Detrital zircon ages in Pleistocene sediments and wind erosion patterns indicate the Puna Plateau was dominated by westerly winds during intervals of high dust accumulation in the eastern subtropical Andes.
11h
Structural remodeling of ribosome associated Hsp40-Hsp70 chaperones during co-translational folding
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31127-4 Ribosome associated complex (RAC)- HSP70 (Ssb in yeast) is a eukaryotic chaperone system involved in co-translational folding. Here, authors report structures of RAC-containing ribosomal complexes, which suggest a working model for the dynamic actions of RAC-Ssb during the process.
13h
For people with haemophilia, most of the world is still in the dark ages
Differences between the UK and India in treating the blood-clotting disease highlight a global medical apartheid Like the Hindu deity Krishna, I was born with blue skin. My body bruised at the trauma of simply being held. And so the family arranged for a ritual to appease the gods. Haemophilia is a genetic blood disorder that makes it very hard for the body to stop bleeding. If your haemophilia i
13h
Identification, discrimination and heterogeneity of fibroblasts
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30633-9 In this review, the authors look at how recent progress in single-cell transcriptomics complement and enrich the classical, largely morphological, portraits of fibroblasts. The detailed molecular information now available provides new insights into fibroblast identity, heterogeneity and function.
14h
How much does smoking damage our mental health?
According to some estimates smoking causes one in 10 deaths worldwide. A lesser known side-effect of cigarettes is the damage they cause to our mental health. Yet, the rates of smoking among people with mental health conditions are much higher than the rest of the population. Last week, the UK government published the Khan review, an independent report looking at how England could become smoke fr
15h
How much does smoking damage our mental health?
According to some estimates smoking causes one in 10 deaths worldwide. A lesser known side-effect of cigarettes is the damage they cause to our mental health. Yet, the rates of smoking among people with mental health conditions are much higher than the rest of the population. Last week, the UK government published the Khan review, an independent report looking at how England could become smoke fre
15h
How heat damages the DNA of endangered purple-crowned fairy wrens
Shortening of telomeres accelerates ageing process, research shows – a 'pernicious silent threat' Follow our Australia news live blog for the latest updates Get our free news app ; get our morning email briefing Endangered purple-crowned fairy wrens – tiny but striking Australian songbirds – could be at even greater risk from global heating after a study found that exposure to hot and dry conditi
16h
Class-Action Lawsuit Alleges Binance Misled Investors Over "Stablecoin"
Very Bad Day Cryptocurrency exchange Binance's day just keeps getting worse. First, the company was dealing with major fallout from the price of Bitcoin continuing to plummet . Then Binance CEO Changpeng Zhao announced that all Bitcoin withdrawals were on a "temporary pause" due to a "stuck transaction causing a backlog," an allegedly 30 minute fix that turned into a much longer lasting headache.
17h
Men's Grooming Products to Look Your Most Handsome
Regardless of what commercials depicting men as gormless oafs say, there's a big market of grooming products aimed at fellas looking their best. The usual suspects are there, from shampoo to shaving cream, but there are new innovations in grooming and skin health to allow you to reach untapped levels of handsome. Here's a selection of the best men's grooming products available right now. Wolf Gro
17h
Do we have a Cognitive performance "bank" each day?
My day job from 9-5 is cognitively taxing each day. It requires learning and memorization each day. It leaves me feeling mentally fatigued by the time I get home. My issue is, that I'm also studying for a standardized graduate test in the evenings, but I feel taxed, I feel like my "bank" of focus and critical thinking is depleted. ​ What can I do to combat this? Should I study in the morning? Eat
18h
Is it possible to reverse brain damage from chronic sleep deprivation and chronic fear or stress?
Hi, I'm a barely 22 years old dude and growing up, I was extremely awful at taking care of myself, sometimes even neglecting basic needs, and that includes sleeping. During my high school years, I was not mentally well and decided to binge-play video games, and this involved not sleeping for days and still going to school in the morning, napping in class for barely 30 minutes, and other times sle
18h
Wandering star disrupts stellar nursery
New study finds star-forming cloud's magnetic field is curiously twisted. Researchers believe a newborn star moved into another young star's stellar envelope to form a binary star system. The interloper shifted the cloud's dynamics, twisting its magnetic field. The new findings provide insight into binary star formation and how magnetic fields influence the earliest stages of developing stars.
18h
Fluorescence microscopy shows how living cells form vesicles to transport cargo like growth factors
Cells have a clever way called clathrin-mediated endocytosis to transport cargos like growth factors across the cell membrane and into the cell. Researchers used a sophisticated fluorescence microscopy imaging called STAR microscopy to follow clathrin-coated vesicle formation in living cells from initiation to completion, over periods up to 100 seconds. Their study supports the flexible model of c
18h
The Atlantic Daily: Can the Hearings Overcome American Indifference?
As we continue to learn more about the January 6, 2021, attack on our democracy, I explore whether any of it will matter to Republicans or disaffected Democrats. But first, here are three great new stories from The Atlantic . Light and noise pollution are warping animals' senses, Ed Yong warns in our July/August cover story. A negative COVID test has never been so meaningless. This is the most im
18h
FAA Demands Changes Before SpaceX Can Launch Starship to Orbit
Finally The Federal Aviation Administration has released its long-awaited environmental assessment into SpaceX's Starship launch program at its testing facilities in South Texas, paving the way for the company's inaugural orbital test launch. The upshot: the Elon Musk-led company will have to make a substantial amount of changes to its launch site, as detailed in a 183-page document , to ensure t
21h
Smoking Weed Makes You Nicer and Less Greedy, Scientist Says
Good news, stoners! Science is finally backing up what you've long known: that smoking weed does, in fact, make you nicer — and less greedy, to boot. In a recent study published in the journal Scientific Reports, University of New Mexico researchers found evidence that cannabis use makes people more empathetic, as well as less motivated by money. Though the study focused on the "prosociality" of
21h
A wandering star disrupts the stellar nursery
From a zoomed out, distant view, star-forming cloud L483 appears normal. But when a Northwestern University-led team of astrophysicists zoomed in closer and closer, things became weirder and weirder.
22h
How Bipartisan Gun-Control Talks Actually Succeeded
T ime is the enemy of gun-control legislation, any advocate will tell you. The outcry for stricter gun laws has always been loudest during moments of national horror, in the hours and days after a massacre, when the anger is raw and the anguish of grieving survivors and families fills the airwaves. That brief window for action quickly begins to close when the public's attention inevitably drifts
22h

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