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Nyheder2022juni16

(Visse nyheder her blev også angivet for 15. juni 2022)

 

Dr. Fauci Catches COVID for the First Time
COVID-19 comes for us all — even for the United States' top medical expert, Dr. Anthony Fauci, who publicly announced today that he's finally contracted the novel coronavirus for the first time since the pandemic began. In a statement , the National Institutes of Health said that Fauci, who heads the agency's National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, is currently experiencing "mild s
43min
Doctors warn against over-medicalising menopause after UK criticism
Seeing natural event as hormone deficiency requiring treatment could increase women's anxiety, say medics Doctors have hit back at critics saying they are failing menopausal women, and said that treating menopause as a hormone deficiency that requires medical treatment could fuel negative expectations and make matters worse. Writing in the British Medical Journal they said there was an urgent nee
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Elon Musk's New Photo Shows Staggering Size of SpaceX's Starship
Starship Heights SpaceX CEO Elon Musk has shown off the latest view of the space company's gigantic Starship spacecraft — and it's honestly so enormous that we're struggling to wrap our heads around just how tall it is. The image taken from the top of the company's High Bay tower shows the monstrous spacecraft prototype, dubbed SN24, being worked on by teams hundreds of feet below. Just on its ow
43min
Wake Up Better Every Morning With These Alarm Clocks
When "just five more minutes" turns into you trying to make it to work on time, it might be time to take a long, hard look at your morning routine. If you're interested in a better way to wake up, you might want to start with the thing that wakes you up every morning: your alarm clock. Instead of the preset options on your phone, try one of these alarm clocks for a better way to start your day. H
43min
After Software Update, Error Warns EV Owner "Vehicle May Not Be Drivable"
Task Failed Successfully An over-the-air software update temporarily turned one Lucid Air owner's luxury EV into an expensive lump of steel and aluminum, Lucid Insider reports , forcing him to wait for a fix. Technically speaking, the vehicle was still able to be put into drive and reverse, but the owner wasn't willing to take any chances given the ominous error it gave him. A picture uploaded by
1h
Two Battles for Democracy
This is an edition of The Atlantic Daily, a newsletter that guides you through the biggest stories of the day, helps you discover new ideas, and recommends the best in culture. Sign up for it here . Democracy is under attack everywhere, and today I want us all to remember that while we're calmly peeling back the layers of the January 6 conspiracy, people are dying for their right to be free in Uk
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Barry Isn't a Comedy Anymore. But It's Become an Even Better Show.
This article contains spoilers through the finale of Barry, Season 3. The first murder on Sunday night's devastating Season 3 finale of Barry, the HBO series about a listless hitman, happens silently. Barry (played by Bill Hader) watches in horror from outside a makeshift sound stage as Sally (Sarah Goldberg), his former acting classmate and ex-girlfriend, bludgeons a man who tries to choke her a
2h
Giving metal to microbes could reduce greenhouse gas
Like you and me, microbes need some metals in their diet to stay healthy. The metals help the microbes fully "digest" food. After a good meal, the microbes that gain energy by chemically reducing nitrate release a harmless byproduct: nitrogen, the gas that makes up 78% of Earth's atmosphere.
2h
Deadly heatwaves threaten economies too
More frequent and intense heatwaves are the most deadly form of extreme weather made worse by global warming, with death tolls sometimes in the thousands, but they can also have devastating economic impacts too, experts say.
2h
Sorry, But New Signal Is Definitely Not Aliens, Says Scientist Working on Project
An international team of scientists made a big splash this week when Chinese state media reported that a SETI telescope had detected "suspicious signals," emanating from a distant star system, that could possibly point toward the existence of an extraterrestrial civilization . Using the Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Telescope (FAST), a gigantic alien-hunting radio observatory in southwest
2h
Best Headphones Under $100
Headphones under $100 offer top-quality sound for a price you can justify. These headphones balance lots of needs and wants into an affordable package. Some prioritize wireless in-ear sound and stay in place while you exercise. Others deliver flat sound signatures that are perfectly primed for the studio. Still others condense high-quality sound into an attractive set of headphones that aren't so
2h
There May Be a Blunt-Force Fix for Inflation
This is an edition of Up for Debate, a newsletter by Conor Friedersdorf. On Wednesdays, he rounds up timely conversations and solicits reader responses to one thought-provoking question. Later, he publishes some thoughtful replies. Sign up for the newsletter here. Question of the Week Pick your poison: high inflation or a recession. Which would you prefer and why? Send responses to conor@theatlan
3h
The signals that make cells self-destruct
Most human hearts look nearly identical—muscle cells in the same places, blood vessel structures in the same orientations. Organs such as hearts or stomachs look alike and function the same across individual organisms in a species because cells follow rigorous processes during development that get them precisely where they need to go.
3h
Diffuse optics for medical diagnostics: Progress toward standardization
Among the various optics-based tools used in diagnostics, diffuse optics (DO) is rapidly emerging as one of the most attractive technologies. The technique is based on analyzing how light is absorbed and scattered by biological tissues, which relates to the tissue chemical composition and structure. One of the key advantages of DO is that it is non-invasive (it uses low-power near-infrared light).
3h
Astronaut Speculates That UFOs Are Time Travelers From the Future
Doc Brown It's a bird! It's a plane! It's… a human time traveler from the future? That's the theory, at least, that British astronaut Tim Peake says he's heard from pilots who've encountered what the US government calls "unexplained aerial phenomena," or UAPs. In an interview with "Good Morning Britain," Peake diplomatically responded to questions about UAPs — better known as unidentified flyin
3h
Bill Gates Ruthlessly Mocks NFTs as Crypto Market Collapses
Bill Apes Bill Gates can't stand cryptocurrency. The billionaire Microsoft founder hasn't been shy about his stance on blockchain tech in the past, arguing with Dogecoin-pushing rival Elon Musk over the currencies' viability, and calling out Bitcoin mining operations for their destructive environmental impact . Now, in the wake of the sudden — and extreme — crypto crash, Gates has once again fire
3h
What Is Life?
Scientists don't really agree on a definition for life. We may recognize life instinctively most of the time, but any time we try to nail it down with set criteria, some stubborn counterexample spoils the effort. Still, can we really search for life on other worlds, or understand the earliest stages of life on this planet, if we don't know what to look for? On this episode… Source
3h
Trade the chair for fresh air: Sitting time and cardio health
New research is adding further weight to the argument that prolonged sitting may be hazardous to your health. An international study surveying more than 100,000 individuals in 21 countries found that people who sat for six to eight hours a day had a 12-13 per cent increased risk for early death and heart disease, while those who sat for more than eight hours daily increased that to a sobering 20 p
3h
Co-existing mangrove-coral habitats have a new global classification system
On any given day between 2016 and 2019, Heather Stewart could be found snorkeling in between mangroves in the Bocas del Toro archipelago along Panama's Caribbean coast. For years she visited these forests at the interface between land and sea, trying to understand what drove corals to grow inside them. Corals and mangroves often grow near each other in tropical coastal environments, but finding th
3h
Co-existing mangrove-coral habitats have a new global classification system
On any given day between 2016 and 2019, Heather Stewart could be found snorkeling in between mangroves in the Bocas del Toro archipelago along Panama's Caribbean coast. For years she visited these forests at the interface between land and sea, trying to understand what drove corals to grow inside them. Corals and mangroves often grow near each other in tropical coastal environments, but finding th
4h
A Hotter, Poorer, and Less Free America
For the past 18 months, Senate Democrats have been trying to find a climate deal acceptable to all 50 of their members. The main obstacles, so far, have been Senator Joe Manchin of West Virginia, the owner of a coal-trading company , who wants any deal to reduce the federal budget deficit, and Senator Kyrsten Sinema of Arizona, who refuses to increase tax rates, the easiest way to satisfy Manchin
4h
The Triumph of a Sometimes-Trump Republican
The video was the very definition of cringe . One day after Donald Trump endorsed her Republican primary opponent, freshman Representative Nancy Mace filmed a two-minute clip of herself outside the shiny black facade of Trump Tower in Manhattan—approximately 800 miles from her South Carolina district—to remind her followers that she was still loyal to the former president. "America was stronger a
4h
Quantum electrodynamics tested 100 times more accurately than ever
Using a newly developed technique, scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics (MPIK) in Heidelberg have measured the very small difference in the magnetic properties of two isotopes of highly charged neon in an ion trap with previously inaccessible accuracy. Comparison with equally extremely precise theoretical calculations of this difference allows a record-level test of quantum e
4h
Many Crypto Startups Are Firing People Right Now, But This One Is Hiring 2,000 New Employees
Why Not? Amid an industry collapse and a class-action lawsuit, the crypto exchange Binance is looking to bring on 2,000 new employees. In a braggadocious Wednesday tweet announcing the new hires, Binance CEO Changpeng Zhao made tongue-in-cheek references to his company's poorly-faring competitors, many of which are currently laying off workers en masse . "It was not easy saying no to Super bowl a
4h
To capture racism's impact on health, one epidemiologist suggests going beyond conventional methods
The COVID-19 pandemic has exposed many vulnerabilities in health care, including how structural racism created the pandemic's outsize impact on marginalized groups. Age-adjusted infection, hospitalization, and death rates for people of color in the United States were higher than those of white Americans, for example. One big question for health researchers is how to measure structural racism—the
4h
How worried should you be about monkeypox?
Monkeypox, endemic to Africa, has started appearing in several countries, including the United States. In the face of a global COVID-19 pandemic , it would be easy to view this development with anxiety. But the monkeypox virus differs in several ways from the virus that causes COVID-19, limiting its ability to cause similar chaos and loss of life. Here, experts explain what monkeypox is, how it's
4h
Helping middle school students achieve more
A new study of intermediate school students in urban California and New York shows promise for underachievers. Researchers found that early intervention with teachers, training students that achievement is malleable and achievable, caused struggling students to flourish and improve their grades.
5h
Views of the Strawberry Supermoon
Yesterday, sky watchers around the world were treated to views of the so-called strawberry supermoon. June's full moon is called the strawberry moon because it coincides with strawberry-harvesting season in parts of North America. It is also one of the two largest full moons of 2022, when the moon appears about 10 percent larger than average, as it approaches its closest point in orbit—the next s
5h
Research shows that weekly markets in Catalonia are a space for creativity and diversity
As part of the European project Moving Marketplaces, the postdoctoral researcher Maria Lindmäe, a member of the Culture and Socio-Ecological Dynamics Research Group (CaSEs) of the Universitat Pompeu Fabra—Barcelona (UPF) Department of Humanities, is the author of an article that investigates the soundscape of different weekly markets in Catalonia. In the study, the author examines the acoustic tac
5h
Depletion of oocyte dynamin-related protein 1 shows maternal-effect abnormalities in embryonic development
Abstract Eggs contain about 200,000 mitochondria that generate adenosine triphosphate and metabolites essential for oocyte development. Mitochondria also integrate metabolism and transcription via metabolites that regulate epigenetic modifiers, but there is no direct evidence linking oocyte mitochondrial function to the maternal epigenome and subsequent embryo development. Here, we have disrupted
5h
Wide-range robust wireless power transfer using heterogeneously coupled and flippable neutrals in parity-time symmetry
Abstract Recently, stationary wireless power transfer (WPT) has been widely adopted in commercial devices. However, the current WPT configuration is limited in its operational area and susceptible to operating condition changes, impeding its applications for dynamic environments. To overcome the limitations, we propose a WPT system with laterally aligned neutral elements in parity-time (PT) symme
5h
Enantiosensitive steering of free-induction decay
Abstract Chiral discrimination, a problem of vital importance, has recently become an emerging frontier in ultrafast physics, with remarkable progress achieved in multiphoton and strong-field regimes. Rydberg excitations, unavoidable in the strong-field regime and intentional for few-photon processes, arise in all these approaches. Here, we show how to harness this ubiquitous feature by introduci
5h
Setting of the magnetic structure of chiral kagome antiferromagnets by a seeded spin-orbit torque
Abstract The current-induced spin-orbit torque switching of ferromagnets has had huge impact in spintronics. However, short spin-diffusion lengths limit the thickness of switchable ferromagnetic layers, thereby limiting their thermal stability. Here, we report a previously unobserved seeded spin-orbit torque (SSOT) by which current can set the magnetic states of even thick layers of the chiral ka
5h
CD38 reduces mitochondrial fitness and cytotoxic T cell response against viral infection in lupus patients by suppressing mitophagy
Abstract Infection is one of the major causes of mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We previously found that CD38, an ectoenzyme that regulates the production of NAD + , is up-regulated in CD8 + T cells of SLE patients and correlates with the risk of infection. Here, we report that CD38 reduces CD8 + T cell function by negatively affecting mitochondrial fitness through
5h
Neuroligin-3 confines AMPA receptors into nanoclusters, thereby controlling synaptic strength at the calyx of Held synapses
Abstract The subsynaptic organization of postsynaptic neurotransmitter receptors into nanoclusters that are aligned with presynaptic release sites is essential for the high fidelity of synaptic transmission. However, the mechanisms controlling the nanoscale organization of neurotransmitter receptors in vivo remain incompletely understood. Here, we deconstructed the role of neuroligin-3 (Nlgn3), a
5h
The intersectional privilege of white able-bodied heterosexual men in STEM
Abstract A foundational assumption of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) inequality research is that members of the most well represented demographic group—white able-bodied heterosexual men (WAHM)—are uniquely privileged in STEM. But is this really the case? Using survey data of U.S. STEM professionals ( N = 25,324), this study examines whether WAHM experience better treatment and
5h
Polarization-selective reconfigurability in hybridized-active-dielectric nanowires
Abstract Wavelength and polarization are two fundamental properties of light within which information can be encoded and (de)multiplexed. While wavelength-selective systems have widely proliferated, polarization-addressable active photonics has not seen notable progress, primarily because tunable and polarization-selective nanostructures have been elusive. Here, we introduce hybridized-active-die
5h
EagleC: A deep-learning framework for detecting a full range of structural variations from bulk and single-cell contact maps
Abstract The Hi-C technique has been shown to be a promising method to detect structural variations (SVs) in human genomes. However, algorithms that can use Hi-C data for a full-range SV detection have been severely lacking. Current methods can only identify interchromosomal translocations and long-range intrachromosomal SVs (>1 Mb) at less-than-optimal resolution. Therefore, we develop EagleC, a
5h
Universal optothermal micro/nanoscale rotors
Abstract Rotation of micro/nano-objects is important for micro/nanorobotics, three-dimensional imaging, and lab-on-a-chip systems. Optical rotation techniques are especially attractive because of their fuel-free and remote operation. However, current techniques require laser beams with designed intensity profile and polarization or objects with sophisticated shapes or optical birefringence. These
5h
Biophysical aspects underlying the swarm to biofilm transition
Abstract Bacteria organize in a variety of collective states, from swarming—rapid surface exploration, to biofilms—highly dense immobile communities attributed to stress resistance. It has been suggested that biofilm and swarming are oppositely controlled, making this transition particularly interesting for understanding the ability of bacterial colonies to adapt to challenging environments. Here
5h
Steroid nuclear receptor coactivator 2 controls immune tolerance by promoting induced Treg differentiation via up-regulating Nr4a2
Abstract Steroid nuclear receptor coactivator 2 (SRC2) is a member of a family of transcription coactivators. While SRC1 inhibits the differentiation of regulatory T cells (T regs ) critical for establishing immune tolerance, we show here that SRC2 stimulates T reg differentiation. SRC2 is dispensable for the development of thymic T regs , whereas naive CD4 + T cells from mice deficient of SRC2 s
5h
All-optical graph representation learning using integrated diffractive photonic computing units
Abstract Photonic neural networks perform brain-inspired computations using photons instead of electrons to achieve substantially improved computing performance. However, existing architectures can only handle data with regular structures but fail to generalize to graph-structured data beyond Euclidean space. Here, we propose the diffractive graph neural network (DGNN), an all-optical graph repre
5h
HYPK promotes the activity of the Nα-acetyltransferase A complex to determine proteostasis of nonAc-X2/N-degron–containing proteins
Abstract In humans, the Huntingtin yeast partner K (HYPK) binds to the ribosome-associated N α -acetyltransferase A (NatA) complex that acetylates ~40% of the proteome in humans and Arabidopsis thaliana . However, the relevance of Hs HYPK for determining the human N-acetylome is unclear. Here, we identify the At HYPK protein as the first in vivo regulator of NatA activity in plants . At HYPK phys
5h
A long noncoding RNA promotes parasite differentiation in African trypanosomes
Abstract The parasite Trypanosoma brucei causes African sleeping sickness that is fatal to patients if untreated. Parasite differentiation from a replicative slender form into a quiescent stumpy form promotes host survival and parasite transmission. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are known to regulate cell differentiation in other eukaryotes. To determine whether lncRNAs are also involved in paras
5h
Semicircular canal size constrains vestibular function in miniaturized frogs
Abstract Miniaturization has evolved repeatedly in frogs in the moist leaf litter environments of rainforests worldwide. Miniaturized frogs are among the world's smallest vertebrates and exhibit an array of enigmatic features. One area where miniaturization has predictable consequences is the vestibular system, which acts as a gyroscope, providing sensory information about movement and orientatio
5h
Volatility in coral cover erodes niche structure, but not diversity, in reef fish assemblages
Abstract The world's coral reefs are experiencing increasing volatility in coral cover, largely because of anthropogenic environmental change, highlighting the need to understand how such volatility will influence the structure and dynamics of reef assemblages. These changes may influence not only richness or evenness but also the temporal stability of species' relative abundances (temporal beta-
5h
Boundary domain genes were recruited to suppress bract growth and promote branching in maize
Abstract Grass inflorescence development is diverse and complex and involves sophisticated but poorly understood interactions of genes regulating branch determinacy and leaf growth. Here, we use a combination of transcript profiling and genetic and phylogenetic analyses to investigate tasselsheath1 ( tsh1 ) and tsh4 , two maize genes that simultaneously suppress inflorescence leaf growth and prom
5h
Tet2 coordinates with Foxo1 and Runx1 to balance T follicular helper cell and T helper 1 cell differentiation
Abstract In response to various types of infection, naïve CD4 + T cells differentiate into diverse helper T cell subsets; however, the epigenetic programs that regulate differentiation in response to viral infection remain poorly understood. Demethylation of CpG dinucleotides by Tet methylcytosine dioxygenases is a key component of epigenetic programing that promotes specific gene expression, cel
5h
Autonomous push button–controlled rapid insulin release from a piezoelectrically activated subcutaneous cell implant
Abstract Traceless physical cues are desirable for remote control of the in situ production and real-time dosing of biopharmaceuticals in cell-based therapies. However, current optogenetic, magnetogenetic, or electrogenetic devices require sophisticated electronics, complex artificial intelligence–assisted software, and external energy supplies for power and control. Here, we describe a self-suff
5h
GPR15L is an epithelial inflammation-derived pruritogen
Abstract Itch is an unpleasant sensation that often accompanies chronic dermatological conditions. Although many of the itch receptors and the neural pathways underlying this sensation are known, the identity of endogenous ligands is still not fully appreciated. Using an unbiased bioinformatic approach, we identified GPR15L as a candidate pruritogen whose expression is robustly up-regulated in ps
5h
Projections of future forest degradation and CO2 emissions for the Brazilian Amazon
Abstract In recent years, the area affected by forest degradation in the Brazilian Amazon has frequently been higher than deforestation. From August 2006 to July 2019, the degraded area totaled 194,058 km 2 , representing almost two times the 99,630 km 2 deforested in the same period. The impacts of degradation include biodiversity loss and changes in the carbon stocks, affecting the CO 2 balance
5h
Some countries still struggle to win EU funding despite programs to give them a leg up
The European Union has had some success leveling the playing field for countries that struggle to attract research funding, but certain countries still lag behind, according to an EU auditing body's assessment. The "widening measures" aimed at giving stragglers a leg up can only go so far without matching efforts from those countries, says the report from the European Court of Auditors, which exa
5h
VoxLens makes interactive data more accessible for screen readers
VoxLens is a JavaScript plugin that, with one additional line of code, allows people who use screen readers to interact with visualizations. Interactive visualizations have changed the way we understand our lives. For example, they can showcase the number of coronavirus infections in each state. But these graphics often are not accessible to people who use screen readers, software programs that s
5h
Dog-owner relationship appears similar for dogs born in Canada versus imported there
Contrary to some beliefs about internationally sourced dogs, a new survey analysis has found no evidence for a poorer relationship between Canadian dog owners and dogs born outside of Canada versus in Canada. Kai von Rentzell of the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada, and colleagues present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on June 15, 2022.
5h
Did democracy have a separate origin in the Americas?
Democracy is widely understood to have arisen in the Mediterranean world about 2,500 years ago before spreading through cultural contact to other parts of the globe. But new research from the University of Georgia Laboratory of Archaeology, together with its partners in the Muscogee Nation, indicates that inhabitants of the Americas may have been practicing democratic-style collective governance a
5h
2010 Deepwater Horizon accident did not harm BP's long-term stock market returns
A new analysis of the aftermath of the deadly 2010 Deepwater Horizon accident suggests that, while the reputation of BP—the oil and gas company responsible for the event—declined through 2017, its stock market returns were not significantly affected in the mid- to long-term. William McGuire of the University of Washington in Tacoma and colleagues present these findings in the open-access journal P
5h
Dog-owner relationship appears similar for dogs born in Canada versus imported there
Contrary to some beliefs about internationally sourced dogs, a new survey analysis has found no evidence for a poorer relationship between Canadian dog owners and dogs born outside of Canada versus in Canada. Kai von Rentzell of the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada, and colleagues present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on June 15, 2022.
5h
A Frog So Small, It Could Not Frog
The leap of a frog is a quintessential evolutionary feat. The critter's girthy gams thrust from behind to springboard the body up and out; a pair of acrobatic arms stretch forward to seamlessly break the fall. The landing is "very precise, very controlled," says Richard Essner, a biologist at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville. One might expect that any frog worth its salt should be able t
5h
Tesla Fan Appalled at Wretched Condition of Tesla He Just Bought
Quality Control It's no secret that Tesla can be lacking in the quality assurance department — and there are no signs of that changing any time soon. For Dylan Hong, who recently ordered a brand new 2022 Tesla Model Y, the state of the vehicle just wasn't even close to being acceptable. Hong shared a YouTube video about the new $65,000 car, which he received after trading in his previous 2021 ver
5h
All-optical switching on a nanometer scale
Ultrafast light-driven control of magnetization on the nanometer length scale is key to achieve competitive bit sizes in next generation data storage technology. Researchers at Max Born Institute in Berlin and of the large scale facility Elettra in Trieste, Italy, have successfully demonstrated the ultrafast emergence of all-optical switching by generating a nanometer scale grating by interference
5h
Force multipliers: accelerating developers through platform software
When a matter of seconds or even milliseconds makes the difference between a positive or negative customer experience, you can't afford to leave the performance of business critical software and artificial intelligence up to chance. Join a discussion on how some of the biggest names in the business accelerate the most challenging workloads on their platforms to solve a range of challenges, includ
5h
Orchestrating workforce ecosystems
Leaders and managers agree that effective management of external contributors, such as freelancers, contract workers, and app developers, is critical to their organization's success, but not all believe their organization is sufficiently prepared to manage a workforce that will rely more on external workers. The question now is: How can organizations orchestrate this extended workforce? Join MIT
5h
AI reveals scale of eelgrass vulnerability to warming, disease
A combination of ecological field methods and cutting-edge artificial intelligence has helped an interdisciplinary research group detect eelgrass wasting disease at nearly three dozen sites along a 1,700-mile stretch of the West Coast, from San Diego to southern Alaska.
5h
Your parenting style can indicate your politics
Parenting styles are a strong indicator for how people think about a wide range of social issues, from education to elder care. The finding holds true across a wide range of social issues, including education, elder care, and medicine. "I was surprised how these results cut across political parties." "There's a new dimension of parenting philosophy that has emerged [in recent decades]—free-range
5h
A $100 genome? New DNA sequencers could be a 'game changer' for biology, medicine
For DNA sequencing, this "is the year of the big shake-up," says Michael Snyder, a systems biologist at Stanford University. Sequencing is crucial to fields from basic biology to virology to human evolution, and its importance keeps growing. Clinicians are clamoring to harness it for early detection of cancer and other diseases, and biologists are finding ever more ways to use genomics to study s
5h
New perspective on RNA function: RNA regulates proteins and thereby can control cell growth, study shows
Scientists gained new insights into RNA-mediated regulation of proteins (riboregulation) and its role in controlling cell growth, and most importantly how undifferentiated cells (embryonic stem cells) transform into specialised cells (e.g., liver cells). They discovered this while studying how mRNA molecules bind to and regulate ENO1, an enzyme involved in glucose metabolism. This contrasts to mos
6h
Nanoparticle sensor can distinguish between viral and bacterial pneumonia
Many different types of bacteria and viruses can cause pneumonia, but there is no easy way to determine which microbe is causing a particular patient's illness. This uncertainty makes it harder for doctors to choose effective treatments because the antibiotics commonly used to treat bacterial pneumonia won't help patients with viral pneumonia. In addition, limiting the use of antibiotics is an imp
6h
ALMA observes ongoing star-formation standoff in the Large Magellanic Cloud
While using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) to observe large star-forming regions in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), scientists discovered a turbulent push-and-pull dynamic in the star-forming region, 30 Doradus. Observations revealed that despite intense stellar feedback, gravity is shaping the molecular cloud, and against scientific odds, is driving the ongoing formatio
6h
The Books Swallowed by the Black Hole of the Coronavirus
There are moments when one can dive into the sustained dream of a book and stay there for hours. The spring of 2020 was not one of those times. If you weren't actively battling COVID-19 or grieving a loved one, your life was likely all of a sudden relentlessly logistical: the sudden evaporation of childcare, the Tetris of fitting multiple working adults inside one tiny apartment, the paranoid wip
6h
Chinese Scientists Might Have Detected Signals From Alien Civilizations (Updated)
Updated: The report has been removed from Science and Technology Daily. No explanation for the removal has been given. Original story below. The search for extraterrestrial intelligence has been ongoing for decades, but there's still no definitive proof that someone else is out there. That doesn't mean we are bereft of evidence, though. Astronomers occasionally spot something unusual but inconclu
6h
Potential Alien Signal Coming From Direction of Earthlike Planet, Scientists Say
A team of Chinese and US scientists have put their reputation on the line with an extraordinary claim: that, with numerous caveats, a newly identified narrowband signal could be a sign of intelligent extraterrestrial life. The unusual signal — picked up by the Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Telescope (FAST) in southwest China, the world's largest radio telescope — seems to have the team le
6h
Best Noise-Cancelling Headphones Under $100
You can't fight fire with fire, but in the case of sonic waves, you can certainly fight noise with noise. Active noise-cancelling technology (ANC) uses microphones to pick up acoustic noise and then cancels it by emitting tones that are phase-inverted to the unwanted noise. The best noise-cancelling headphones under $100 are equipped with powerful ANC tech that supplements their other quality fea
6h
Best Live TV Streaming Services in 2022
You're probably already paying for high-speed internet, and if you're also shelling out for cable, you could be spending more money than you need to — unless you decide to stream from your TV. With a streaming service that offers live TV, you can catch live games, watch those smaller "cable only" channels, and stay in the loop on what's up in your neighborhood and beyond with live local and natio
6h
This mastodon migrated each year before dying in battle
Around 13,200 years ago, a roving male mastodon died in a bloody mating-season battle with a rival in what's now northeast Indiana, nearly 100 miles from his home territory, research finds. It's the first study to document the annual migration of an individual animal from an extinct species. The eight-ton adult, known as the Buesching mastodon, died when an opponent punctured the right side of hi
6h
Steep mountain slopes have surprisingly long lifetimes
Gravity and rock physics say slopes steeper than about 30°—known as the critical threshold angle, or the angle of repose—shouldn't really exist, yet they do. These steep slopes and near-vertical cliffs can be seen in the Himalayas and in Yosemite National Park, for example. For some geologists, the question is not only how "oversteepened" slopes exist but also how long they stay that way.
7h
New work upends understanding of how blood is formed
The origins of our blood may not be quite what we thought. Using cellular "barcoding" in mice, a groundbreaking study finds that blood cells originate not from one type of mother cell, but two, with potential implications for blood cancers, bone marrow transplant, and immunology. Fernando Camargo, Ph.D., of the Stem Cell Program at Boston Children's Hospital led the study, published in Nature on J
7h
New maps of asteroid Psyche reveal an ancient world of metal and rock
Later this year, NASA is set to launch a probe the size of a tennis court to the asteroid belt, a region between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter where remnants of the early solar system circle the sun. Once inside the asteroid belt, the spacecraft will zero in on Psyche, a large, metal-rich asteroid that is thought to be the ancient core of an early planet. The probe, named after its asteroid targe
7h
New work upends understanding of how blood is formed
The origins of our blood may not be quite what we thought. Using cellular "barcoding" in mice, a groundbreaking study finds that blood cells originate not from one type of mother cell, but two, with potential implications for blood cancers, bone marrow transplant, and immunology. Fernando Camargo, Ph.D., of the Stem Cell Program at Boston Children's Hospital led the study, published in Nature on J
7h
New insights into binding configuration and mobility of molecules on nanoparticle surfaces
How molecules bind to a surface is of central importance in chemical reactions, making the possibility of studying binding configurations in isolated nanosystems of great interest. A Freiburg research team led by Dr. Lukas Bruder and Prof. Dr. Frank Stienkemeier has now succeeded in studying the binding configurations and mobility of organic molecules on ultracold noble gas particles. In doing so,
7h
New material paves the way for remote-controlled medication and electronic pills
Biomedicines are produced by living cells and are used to treat cancer and autoimmune diseases among other things. One challenge is that the medicines are very expensive to produce, something that limits global access. Now researchers have invented a material that uses electrical signals to capture and release biomolecules. The new and efficient method may have a major impact in the development of
7h
Long COVID Could Be a 'Mass Deterioration Event'
In late summer 2021, during the Delta wave of the coronavirus pandemic, the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation issued a disturbing wake-up call : According to its calculations, more than 11 million Americans were already experiencing long COVID. The academy's dashboard has been updated daily ever since, and now pegs that number at 25 million . Even this may be a major underc
7h
Astronomers image dusty disks, uncover companions to distant stars
This mosaic of dusty, swirling disks shows a sample of images captured from the International Gemini Observatory, a Program of NSF's NOIRLab, as part of an unprecedented survey of 44 young massive stars. An international team used Gemini South in Chile to investigate planet formation and uncovered a potential young Jupiter-mass planet, and confirmed the existence of two brown dwarfs. The images wi
7h
Origins of the Black Death identified
The Black Death, the biggest pandemic of our history, was caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis and lasted in Europe between the years 1346 and 1353. Despite the pandemic's immense demographic and societal impacts, its origins have long been elusive. Now, scientists have obtained and studied ancient Y. pestis genomes that trace the pandemic's origins to Central Asia.
7h
New material paves the way for remote-controlled medication and electronic pills
Biomedicines are produced by living cells and are used to treat cancer and autoimmune diseases among other things. One challenge is that the medicines are very expensive to produce, something that limits global access. Now researchers have invented a material that uses electrical signals to capture and release biomolecules. The new and efficient method may have a major impact in the development of
7h
Cancer clinical trials bounce back after significant COVID-19 disruption: Data from two large US cancer centers
Data from two large cancer centres in the United States have shown that the COVID-19 pandemic caused substantial disruption to clinical trials for cancer treatment and care. After a 46% decrease in new patient accruals, and a 24% decrease in newly activated trials between March and May 2020, a bounceback was seen in 2021. The findings suggest ways of improving the running of clinical trials and im
7h
Citizen scientists and VR software lend new insights to NASA data
Swirling disks of gas and dust, the stuff that could one day form planets, surround young stars. Through NASA's Disk Detective program, citizen scientists—volunteers from the public—collaborate with professional scientists to help search for dusty disks around nearby stars, revealing clues to the early lives of stars and the ingredients of planets.
7h
Study finds change in Niobrara's nutrients following 2019 flood
Rivers transport important nutrients across landscapes and into larger bodies of water. Among those nutrients are nitrogen and phosphorous, which stimulate the growth of crops but, when accumulating in water, may also yield "dead zones" that deprive marine animals of oxygen.
7h
Extensive correction adds to five flagged papers for UPenn professor
A UPenn professor now has six papers with a correction, expression of concern, or retraction in two PLOS journals after one published an extensive correction to a 2018 paper. The correction adds to two retractions and three expressions of concern for papers in PLOS Pathogens and PLOS ONE with Erle Robertson, a microbiology professor and … Continue reading
7h
Accurate and efficient dynamic computational strategy for heterogeneous catalysis
Theoretical calculation has become an indispensable approach to reveal the thermodynamics and kinetics of catalysis. Static computational strategy is the most popular approach in theoretical catalysis, in which the reaction thermodynamics and kinetics are evaluated based on a few stationary geometries at zero temperature and some ideal statistic mechanics models.
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The new heroics of RNA in cell differentiation
Scientists are increasingly learning of new reasons to appreciate RNA, and the glycolytic enzyme ENO1 seems to have provided yet another in new research from EMBL this week, as published in Molecular Cell.
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800-year-old graves pinpoint where the Black Death began
The Syriac engraving on the medieval tombstone was tantalizing: "This is the tomb of the believer Sanmaq. [He] died of pestilence." Sanmaq, who was buried in 1338 near Lake Issyk Kul in what is now northern Kyrgyzstan, was one of many victims of the unnamed plague. By scrutinizing field notes and more photos from the Russian team that had excavated the graves in the 1880s, historian Philip Slavin
7h
All-optical switching on a nanometer scale
Ultrafast light-driven control of magnetization on the nanometer length scale is key to achieve competitive bit sizes in next generation data storage technology. Researchers have successfully demonstrated the ultrafast emergence of all-optical switching by generating a nanometer scale grating by interference of two pulses in the extreme ultraviolet spectral range.
7h
Cholesterol-lowering gene changes may increase the risk of cataracts
Researchers used large-scale genotyping and exome sequencing from the UK Biobank to gain insight into the expected effects of long-term statin use on cataract risk. The analysis found that common genetic variants in more than 402,000 people, who were not taking statins, that mimic the effects of LDL-cholesterol lowering statins are associated with a higher risk of cataracts and cataract surgery. T
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How the Black Death got its start
Nature, Published online: 15 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01674-3 How a pandemic that devastated the medieval world began, and efforts to control monkeypox.
8h
Androgen receptor blockade promotes response to BRAF/MEK-targeted therapy
Nature, Published online: 15 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04833-8 Treatment with neoadjuvant BRAF/MEK-targeted therapy results in higher rates of major pathological response in female compared with male patients with melanoma, and pharmacological inhibition of androgen receptor signalling improved the responses of male and female mice to BRAF/MEK-targeted therapy.
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A population of ultraviolet-dim protoclusters detected in absorption
Nature, Published online: 15 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04681-6 Lyman-α absorption observations from the Las Campanas Observatory are used to find a population of ultraviolet-dim protoclusters that contain few galaxies compared with their analogues in cosmological simulations.
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Caspase-7 activates ASM to repair gasdermin and perforin pores
Nature, Published online: 15 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04825-8 Caspase-7 cleaves and activates acid sphingomyelinase (ASM), which promotes the repair of gasdermin pores and thereby delays pore-driven lysis to allow other processes such as extrusion or apoptosis to occur before cell death.
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Synthesis of a monolayer fullerene network
Nature, Published online: 15 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04771-5 Using an interlayer bonding cleavage strategy, a two-dimensional monolayer fullerene network is prepared; its moderate bandgap makes it a potential candidate for use in two-dimensional electronic devices.
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Molecular soccer balls connected to make a 2D material
Nature, Published online: 15 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01568-4 Two-dimensional materials made of carbon have been limited to monolayers of atoms, such as graphene. Sheets composed of connected buckyballs — spherical clusters of atoms — have now been made by peeling layers from a crystal.
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Tiny isotopic difference tests standard model of particle physics
Nature, Published online: 15 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01569-3 A high-precision comparison of the magnetic moments of two isotopically different neon ions opens a path to the search for elusive particles that could explain the unexpectedly low observed mass of the Higgs boson.
8h
Exercise molecule burns away hunger
Nature, Published online: 15 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01321-x A metabolite called Lac-Phe is associated with exercise-induced 'muscle burn'. This molecule has now been shown to reduce food intake after exercise in mice, racehorses and humans, and to trigger weight loss in obese mice.
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Ancient DNA traces origin of Black Death
Nature, Published online: 15 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01673-4 Genomes show that plague-causing bacteria found in Kyrgyzstan graves are direct ancestors of those that triggered the medieval pandemic.
8h
TikTok Killed the Video Star
T he defining music video of the past decade is probably the one in which Beyoncé showed off her laundry pile and Lubriderm. In 2014, about a year after the pop queen popularized the term visual album by surprise-releasing 17 expensive-looking music videos all at once , she dropped a lighthearted B side: "7/11." It came with a clip of the singer shimmying in drab hotel corridors, on a rumpled bed
8h
Ancient plague genomes reveal the origins of the Black Death
In 1347, plague first entered the Mediterranean via trade ships transporting goods from the territories of the Golden Horde in the Black Sea. The disease then disseminated across Europe, the Middle East and northern Africa claiming up to 60% of the population in a large-scale outbreak known as the Black Death. This first wave further extended into a 500-year-long pandemic, the so-called Second Pla
8h
Potential weakness in the protective layers surrounding Gram-negative bacteria
A new study published in Nature today has identified a potential Achilles heel in the protective layers surrounding Gram-negative bacteria that could aid in the development of next-generation antibiotics. The study, carried out jointly by Professor Waldemar Vollmer and Dr. Federico Corona at Newcastle University, alongside Professor Colin Kleanthous and Dr. Gideon Mamou in the Department of Bioche
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Building tomorrow's telecommunications network today
The current 5G evolution in network connectivity is expected to drive unprecedented demands for bandwidth, reliability, and security. However, a network of this magnitude and robustness doesn't pop up overnight and enterprises and consumers are just beginning to realize the myriad use cases a 5G network can support. For example, consider the increased number of connected devices in a house like s
8h
Building the necessary skills for digital transformation
The skills and capabilities needed to undergo digital transformation are in high demand as every company jockeys to gain a competitive advantage. To address the skills gap, some companies are prioritizing upskilling and reskilling. But to be effective, learning and development itself must undergo a transformation. According to Daniela Proust, global vice president and head of global people enable
8h
Potential weakness in the protective layers surrounding Gram-negative bacteria
A new study published in Nature today has identified a potential Achilles heel in the protective layers surrounding Gram-negative bacteria that could aid in the development of next-generation antibiotics. The study, carried out jointly by Professor Waldemar Vollmer and Dr. Federico Corona at Newcastle University, alongside Professor Colin Kleanthous and Dr. Gideon Mamou in the Department of Bioche
8h
Seagrass meadows are reliable fishing grounds for food
A new study shows that seagrass fisheries provide a reliable safety net for the poor, since fishermen perceive those habitats to maintain large fish catches over time. Surprisingly, even more so than coral reef fisheries, which people normally associate with small-scale fishery.
8h
Lager beer, whether it contains alcohol or not, could help men's gut microbes
Like wine, beer can have health benefits when consumed in moderation. Non-alcoholic beers have become wildly popular recently, but are these drinks also healthful? In a pilot study, researchers report that compared to their pre-trial microbiome, men who drank either one alcoholic or non-alcoholic lager daily had a more diverse set of gut microbes, which can reduce the risk for some diseases.
8h
Near-sun comet roasted to death
Astronomers using a fleet of world leading telescopes on the ground and in space have captured images of a periodic rocky near-Sun comet breaking apart. This is the first time such a comet has been caught in the act of disintegrating and could help explain the scarcity of such periodic near-Sun comets.
8h
A large predator from the Pyrenees
A fossilized lower jaw has led an international team of palaeontologists to discover a new species of predator that once lived in Europe. These large predators belong to a group of carnivores colloquially known as 'bear dogs'. They could weigh around 320 kilograms, appeared 36 million years ago before becoming extinct around 7.5 million years ago.
8h
The potential of probabilistic computers
The rise of artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) has created a crisis in computing and a significant need for more hardware that is both energy-efficient and scalable. A key step in both AI and ML is making decisions based on incomplete data, the best approach for which is to output a probability for each possible answer. Current classical computers are not able to do that in an
8h
Paleontologists discover a new type of 'bear dog,' a large predator from the Pyrenees
A fossilized lower jaw has led an international team of paleontologists, headed by Bastien Mennecart from the Natural History Museum Basel, to discover a new species of predator that once lived in Europe. These large predators belong to a group of carnivores colloquially known as "bear dogs." They could weigh around 320 kilograms and appeared 36 million years ago before becoming extinct around 7.5
8h
Physicists make leaps in reading out qubits with laser light
Qubits are a basic building block for quantum computers, but they're also notoriously fragile—tricky to observe without erasing their information in the process. Now, new research from the University of Colorado Boulder and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) could be a leap forward for handling qubits with a light touch.
8h
Mystery of Black Death's origins solved, say researchers
International team link spike in deaths at cemeteries in Kyrgyzstan in 1300s to start of plague pandemic Researchers believe they have solved the nearly 700-year-old mystery of the origins of the Black Death, the deadliest pandemic in recorded history , which swept through Europe, Asia and north Africa in the mid-14th century. At least tens of millions of people died when bubonic plague tore acro
8h
Paleontologists discover a new type of 'bear dog,' a large predator from the Pyrenees
A fossilized lower jaw has led an international team of paleontologists, headed by Bastien Mennecart from the Natural History Museum Basel, to discover a new species of predator that once lived in Europe. These large predators belong to a group of carnivores colloquially known as "bear dogs." They could weigh around 320 kilograms and appeared 36 million years ago before becoming extinct around 7.5
8h
Mapping carbon reserves to fight climate change
Carbon storage capacity in forests across the globe is only at 88% of its potential, according to a study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), which sets out to help prioritize locations for increasing reserves.
8h
Watching the death of a rare giant star
A University of Arizona-led team of astronomers has created a detailed, three-dimensional image of a dying hypergiant star. The team, led by UArizona researchers Ambesh Singh and Lucy Ziurys, traced the distribution, directions and velocities of a variety of molecules surrounding a red hypergiant star known as VY Canis Majoris.
8h
Astronomers discover a multiplanet system nearby
Astronomers at MIT and elsewhere have discovered a new multiplanet system within our galactic neighborhood that lies just 10 parsecs, or about 33 light-years, from Earth, making it one of the closest known multiplanet systems to our own.
8h
A new approach to studying ancient South American rodents suggests they were smaller than thought
A researcher at Case Western Reserve University has found that the extinct Josephoartigasia, believed to be the largest rodent to ever live, and other ancient rodents in South America were smaller than has been thought. In his paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, Russell Engelman describes his study of the joint at the back of the ancient creature's skull (the occipital condy
8h
Near-sun comet roasted to death
Astronomers using a fleet of world leading telescopes on the ground and in space have captured images of a periodic rocky near-sun comet breaking apart. This is the first time such a comet has been caught in the act of disintegrating and could help explain the scarcity of such periodic near-sun comets.
8h
Tesla Semi Truck Spotted Cruising Down Public Highway
Full Speed Ahead A Tesla Semi was seen in-action on California's Highway 580 West, as shown in a video captured by a member of a EV-enthusiast community group called Tesla Owners Silicon Valley (TOSV). While the sizeable big rig in the clip is being driven without its detachable trailer, it's still hauling what looks to be trees, which are lying on the vehicle's bed — an intriguing glimpse of a m
8h
That AI Image Generator Is Spitting Out Some Awfully Racist Stuff
Everyone's having a grand old time feeding outrageous prompts into the viral DALL-E Mini image generator — but as with all artificial intelligence, it's hard to stamp out the ugly, prejudiced edge cases . Released by AI artist and programmer Boris Dayma , the DALL-E Mini image generator has a warning right under it that its results may "reinforce or exacerbate societal biases" because "the model
8h
A new approach to studying ancient South American rodents suggests they were smaller than thought
A researcher at Case Western Reserve University has found that the extinct Josephoartigasia, believed to be the largest rodent to ever live, and other ancient rodents in South America were smaller than has been thought. In his paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, Russell Engelman describes his study of the joint at the back of the ancient creature's skull (the occipital condy
8h
A bit of coffee is okay during pregnancy
Enjoying a bit of coffee causes no increased risk to pregnancy, researchers report. The researchers used genetics to analyze coffee drinking behavior, and their findings show limited coffee consumption during pregnancy didn't increase the risk of miscarriage, stillbirth, or premature birth. "Current World Health Organization guidelines say pregnant women should drink less than 300mg of caffeine,
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Wheel Made of 'Odd Matter' Spontaneously Rolls Uphill
In a physics lab in Amsterdam, there's a wheel that can spontaneously roll uphill by wiggling. This "odd wheel" looks simple: just six small motors linked together by plastic arms and rubber bands to form a ring about 6 inches in diameter. When the motors are powered on, it starts writhing, executing complicated squashing and stretching motions and occasionally flinging itself into the air… Sou
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The link between sex and imagination | Gina Gutierrez
Sex is as much mental as it is physical — and imagination is the most powerful tool we have to expand our personal agency and capacity for pleasure, says sexual wellness storyteller Gina Gutierrez. The founder of audio-erotica company Dipsea, Gutierrez creates immersive audio stories designed to open up space to explore your desires and fantasies on your terms. She shares some tips to inspire you
8h
How cannabis-fed chickens may help cut Thai farmers' antibiotic use
Scientists observed fewer cases of avian bronchitis and superior meat after chickens given cannabis It all began when Ong-ard Panyachatiraksa, a farm owner in the north of Thailand who is licensed to grow medicinal cannabis, was wondering what to do with the many excess leaves he had amassed. He asked: could his brood of chickens benefit from the leftovers? Academics at Chiang Mai University were
9h
Jake Has a Good Haul, But Makes a HUGE Mistake! | Deadliest Catch
Stream Deadliest Catch on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/deadliest-catch #DeadliestCatch #Discovery #DiscoveryPlus Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Disco
9h
If Artificial Intelligence Were to Become Sentient, How Would We Know?
Google's LaMDA software (Language Model for Dialogue Applications) is a sophisticated AI chatbot that produces text in response to user input. According to software engineer Blake Lemoine, LaMDA has achieved a long-held dream of AI developers: it has become sentient . Lemoine's bosses at Google disagree, and have suspended him from work after he published his conversations with the machine online
9h
Få erbjuds stöd när en familjemedlem dör i hjärtstopp
Varje år dör tusentals svenskar av plötsligt hjärtstopp. För anhöriga och vänner kan den plötsliga förlusten utlösa mycket starka sorgereaktioner som är svåra att hantera, men få närstående erbjuds professionellt stöd från vården. Det visar en avhandling. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
9h
Tolkars kunskaper kan utnyttjas bättre
Tolkar sitter på viktig kunskap om hur missförstånd och kulturkrockar kan undvikas i mötet mellan människor som inte delar språk. I ett forskningsprojekt fick tolkar föreläsa om sina erfarenheter för migranter och personal inom kommuner och regioner. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
9h
Äntligen fri? Hbtq-flyktingar bär på många lager av utsatthet
Hbtq-flyktingar tvingas lämna sina hemländer på grund av vilka de är och vem de älskar. Många kommer från länder där homosexualitet är kriminaliserat. Ett nytt forskningsprojekt undersöker gruppens behov av psykosocialt stöd och hur vården i Sverige kan möta dessa. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
9h
Geologic map of the entire moon at 1:2,500,000 scale
Chinese scientists have created the most detailed map of the moon yet. It took them 10 years and involved hundreds of researchers. The new map will be a boon to lunar exploration and for anyone who just wants to study our natural satellite in more detail.
9h
Freshwaters release methane, even when they dry out
Freshwaters are underestimated sources of greenhouse gases. In a study published in Science of The Total Environment, researchers with the Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) have now shown that even dry water bodies can release considerable amounts of methane. An overview of the causes and magnitudes of methane emissions from freshwaters and an outlook on future dev
9h
Older Australians need more financial support amid pandemic
Financial experts are encouraging pre-retirees to sharpen their financial skills as a new report from the University of South Australia shows that 31% of older Australians (aged 55+ years) feel insecure about their financial futures, particularly amid the current pandemic.
9h
How your brain interprets motion while you're moving
New research clarifies how our brains interpret motion while in motion. Imagine you're sitting on a train. You look out the window and see another train on an adjacent track that appears to be moving. But, has your train stopped while the other train is moving, or are you moving while the other train is stopped? The same sensory experience —viewing a train—can yield two very different perceptions
9h
Daily briefing: What's holding back new treatments for COVID-19
Nature, Published online: 14 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01670-7 Testing new COVID drugs is getting more difficult — but we need them. Plus, how a mega-map of the Milky Way adds depth to stars' motions, and the faltering quest for palladium-free catalysts.
9h
WHO to rename monkeypox virus to avoid discrimination
Urgent move to change name comes after scientists call it 'inaccurate' and 'stigmatising' as virus spreads The World Health Organization has said it will rename monkeypox to avoid discrimination and stigmatisation as the virus continues to spread among people in an unprecedented global outbreak of the disease. Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, the WHO's director general, said the organisation was "w
10h
Climate change: The issue on which Australians do not want both sides of the argument
Should journalists always treat an issue even-handedly? Our research reveals that when it comes to climate change, many Australians would prefer they didn't. For general news, people want news outlets to reflect a range of views so they can make up their own mind about an issue. However, when it comes to news about climate change, four in ten say news outlets should pick a side.
10h
Improving the accuracy of international standards for graphene
The results of the first international comparison of the measurement of graphene have been published in 2D Materials, led by the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) in the U.K., through the Versailles Project on Advanced Materials and Standards (VAMAS) and in collaboration with institutes from around the world.
10h
Cancer cases and deaths in Africa could double by 2040
Cancer cases and deaths in Africa are expected to double during the next two decades, reaching 2.1 million new cases and 1.4 million deaths by 2040, according to a new study. Further, the region lacks region lacks sufficient health care resources and infrastructure to handle the growing burden, the researchers report. Dietary and lifestyle changes, along with behavioral and environmental risk fac
10h
Structural basis of rapid actin dynamics in the evolutionarily divergent Leishmania parasite
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31068-y The authors report here the structure-function analysis of highly divergent actin from Leishmania parasite. The study reveals remarkably rapid dynamics of parasite actin as well as the underlying molecular basis, thus providing insight into evolution of the actin cytoskeleton.
10h
Børne- og ungdomspsykiaters nødråb giver ekko
Ressourcerne mangler i psykiatrien i forhold til at tilbyde unge og deres familier den hjælp, de har brug for. Det er ingen nyhed. Men en kronik fra en læge har den seneste tid på tværs af platforme samlet mange stemmer under hashtagget #DetErOgsåMig. Forperson for BUP bakker op og håber, at politikerne lytter.
10h
Spain bakes on fifth day of early heatwave
Spain's second heatwave in less than a month dragged on Wednesday for a fifth day, with temperatures expected to top 40 degrees Celsius in parts of the country as the mass of hot air pushed into France.
10h
How protists crack the walls of algae
A team of researchers led by Dr. Sebastian Hess from the University of Cologne's Institute of Zoology has studied the expression of carbohydrate-active enzymes in the unicellular organism Orciraptor agilis by RNA sequencing. Orciraptor is a so-called "protoplast feeder" and lives exclusively from the cell contents of dead algae. To do this, it has to penetrate the cellulosic cell wall of the prey.
10h
Tea and dried herb samples reveal large numbers of arthropod eDNA
A team of researchers from Trier University and the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology reports that there are large amounts of arthropod eDNA in commercially sold tea and dried herbs. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the group describes collecting multiple samples of commercially sold teas and dried herbs and then analyzing each sample for environmental DNA (eDNA
10h
Group living puts guppies at risk of deadly parasites
Guppies that group together to avoid being eaten run the risk of breeding nastier parasites, researchers report. The pattern is likely common across the animal kingdom and may even be the case for some human diseases. The social lives of animals all over the world are likely shaped by the twin threats of being eaten and getting sick. "There are so many animal hosts that shoal or flock or herd for
10h
How protists crack the walls of algae
A team of researchers led by Dr. Sebastian Hess from the University of Cologne's Institute of Zoology has studied the expression of carbohydrate-active enzymes in the unicellular organism Orciraptor agilis by RNA sequencing. Orciraptor is a so-called "protoplast feeder" and lives exclusively from the cell contents of dead algae. To do this, it has to penetrate the cellulosic cell wall of the prey.
10h
Tea and dried herb samples reveal large numbers of arthropod eDNA
A team of researchers from Trier University and the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology reports that there are large amounts of arthropod eDNA in commercially sold tea and dried herbs. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the group describes collecting multiple samples of commercially sold teas and dried herbs and then analyzing each sample for environmental DNA (eDNA
10h
Cultural stratification in the UK: Persistent gender and class differences in cultural voraciousness
SCI Honorary Researcher Tally Katz-Gerro co-published a new journal article with Oriel Sullivan in the Journal of Consumer Culture that adds to the literature on cultural stratification by revisiting cultural voraciousness, nearly two decades after it was first introduced as a measure of cultural participation designed to capture inequalities in the pace and variety of cultural activities.
10h
How people, food and water affect large herbivore distribution in East African savannas
To survive, animals must find nutritious food and drinking water—sometimes during long dry seasons or cold periods—and at the same time avoid being eaten. Plant-eating mammals with hooves are an extraordinarily diverse group of animals and are critically important in East African savannas. Yet they must compete more and more with humans for space in a fast-changing world while also evading hungry
10h
How people, food and water affect large herbivore distribution in East African savannas
To survive, animals must find nutritious food and drinking water—sometimes during long dry seasons or cold periods—and at the same time avoid being eaten. Plant-eating mammals with hooves are an extraordinarily diverse group of animals and are critically important in East African savannas. Yet they must compete more and more with humans for space in a fast-changing world while also evading hungry
10h
Researchers synthesize a nanocluster of superfluorinated gold
The SupraBioNano Lab (SBNLab)at the Politecnico di Milano's Department of Chemistry, Materials and Chemical Engineering "Giulio Natta," in partnership with the University of Bologna and the Aalto University of Helsinki (Finland) has, for the first time, synthesized a superfluorinated gold nanocluster, made up of a core of only 25 gold atoms, to which 18 branch-structured fluorinated molecules are
11h
The Download: Abortion pill access, and Europe's ethical AI
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. Where to get abortion pills and how to use them If the US Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade, the 1973 legal decision that enshrined abortion as a constitutional right, parts of the country will be ready to plunge into a reproductive-rights dark age in which
11h
Bumblebees pick up more parasites on some flower shapes
The shape of flowers has the biggest effect on how bumblebees acquire parasites, a study shows. The findings could help people plant flowers that are less likely to spread parasites in pollinator habitats. The researchers examined the common eastern bumble bee ( Bombus impatiens ) and a gut parasite called Crithidia bombi to study how floral traits—like the size and shape of flowers or number of
11h
could someone maybe explains this post in layman's and do you agree with the post?
I read this elsewhere posted by a anonymous poster and its over my head understanding it, just wondering if someone could maybe explains this post in layman's and do you agree with what the poster said in the post? Question … Is there original thought? Answer …The idea of volition simply doesn't fit in reality. Thoughts arise from neurons firing, and there is no magical thingy called "I" that
11h
New material paves the way for remote-controlled medication and electronic pills
Biomedicines are produced by living cells and are used to treat cancer and autoimmune diseases among other things. One challenge is that the medicines are very expensive to produce, something that limits global access. Now researchers from Chalmers have invented a material that uses electrical signals to capture and release biomolecules. The new and efficient method may have a major impact in the
11h
New material paves the way for remote-controlled medication and electronic pills
Biomedicines are produced by living cells and are used to treat cancer and autoimmune diseases among other things. One challenge is that the medicines are very expensive to produce, something that limits global access. Now researchers from Chalmers have invented a material that uses electrical signals to capture and release biomolecules. The new and efficient method may have a major impact in the
11h
How Safe is CBD?
CBD is a drug, but sold as both a drug and herbal supplement. What does the current evidence say about its safety? The post first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .
12h
Monocytose betyder sjældent blodkræft
Selvom risikoen for en malign hæmatologisk diagnose er forhøjet ved monocytose, er det kun sjældent forklaringen på tilstanden. Der er behov for, at praktiserende læger tænker andet end blodkræft først, siger forsker.
12h
Under the Banner of Hulu
Give this to Under the Banner of Heaven , the buzzy true-crime miniseries that recently concluded its run on FX and Hulu: It wastes little time in getting to the point. Minutes into the first episode, Detective Jeb Pyre is interviewing Allen Lafferty in a Utah jail cell. Allen's wife and daughter have just been brutally murdered by fundamentalist Mormon zealots, and in his grief and anger he unlo
12h
The U.S. Leaves Parents On Their Own for a Reason
On so many measures of family hardship, young children and their parents in the U.S. suffer more than their counterparts in other high-income nations. Babies are more likely to die and children are more likely to grow up in poverty. The U.S. is the only rich country in the world without national paid family leave. And while other wealthy countries spend an average of $14,000 each year per child o
12h
The Brexit Revolution That Wasn't
When the British government announced its latest "Brexit dividend" at the start of the year—a return to stamping a tiny crown onto our beer glasses—I was surprised. Mostly because I had not noticed that we'd stopped. Clearly I gave up pretending to like beer sometime before 2006, when the rules supposedly changed. Except they didn't. A close reading of the government press release revealed that i
13h
The Rifle That Ruined America
Less than 20 years ago, when I was a rising executive at an up-and-coming gun company, most people in the firearms industry regarded the AR-15 rifle as distasteful and dangerous, and they chose not to promote it at events. Trade shows did not allow the display or advertisement of tactical gear like that worn by the Uvalde and Buffalo shooters, who both used AR-15-type rifles to carry out those at
13h
They Bent to Their Knees and Kissed the Sand
I. Victoria, Seychelles When Olivier Bancoult boarded the ship that was to take him 1,000 miles across the Indian Ocean to the Chagos Archipelago—his childhood home, from which he and his fellow islanders had been expelled 50 years earlier—he carried five wrought-iron crosses. Most of them bore a short inscription, hand-lettered in white paint, memorializing the return of Chagossians to their bir
13h
Sex-specific multi-level 3D genome dynamics in the mouse brain
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30961-w Here the authors provide evidence that 3D chromatin structure in the mouse brain differs between males and females and undergoes dynamic remodelling during the female ovarian cycle. They show female-specific 3D genome dynamics affects neuronal gene expression and brain disorder-relevant genes, and could play a r
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Remote solid cancers rewire hepatic nitrogen metabolism via host nicotinamide-N-methyltransferase
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30926-z The presence of cancer can induce systemic disruption of the host homeostasis. Here, the authors show that different solid tumours remotely increase hepatic nicotinamide-Nmethyltransferase disrupting the host urea cycle metabolism in the liver.
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Clinical sequencing of soft tissue and bone sarcomas delineates diverse genomic landscapes and potential therapeutic targets
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30453-x Sarcomas are rare tumours with many different subtypes and clinical outcomes; a broader knowledge of their genetic features is required. Here, the authors analyse 2138 soft tissue and bone sarcomas across 45 subtypes using MSK-IMPACT targeted sequencing and find genomic groups that are distinct from histological
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Clinical genomic profiling in the management of patients with soft tissue and bone sarcoma
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30496-0 Comprehensive molecular profiles are required to understand and treat sarcomas, which comprise more than 70 different subtypes. Here, the authors profile the genomic landscape of 7494 sarcomas across 44 histologies using targeted panel sequencing and identify potential therapeutic targets.
13h
Husk at spørge en kvinde – og alle de andre
Repræsentation i kliniske studier er et vigtigt emne at problematisere kontinuerligt. Inddragelse af overvejelser om risiko, sårbarhed og videnskabelig soliditet tilføjer en række vigtige nuancer, der må tages i betragtning sammen med overvejelser om køn.
13h
Where to get abortion pills and how to use them
If the US Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade , the 1973 legal decision that enshrined abortion as a constitutional right, parts of the country will be ready to plunge into a reproductive-rights dark age in which doctors are forbidden from providing any abortions, in some states even in cases of rape, incest , or a fetus with genetic abnormalities. But there's still one huge loophole: most of the
13h
How Ukraine's Environmentalists Are Helping the War Effort
Amid Ukraine's whole-of-society wartime reorganization, environmentalists are using their resources to support people and nature in crisis by monitoring air quality, tracking environmental war crimes, and protecting animals. Since March, many have spoken with Undark, describing a vast network of resistance.
14h
'I swear I saw faces in the darkness': can you scare yourself happy?
From a walk in the woods at night to exploring a ghostly derelict building or riding a bloodcurdling rollercoaster, can a dose of fear make you forget your everyday worries? 'Fifty feet, Danny!" Lucy shrieks as we ascend to the top of the Big One, the UK's tallest rollercoaster. "One hundred feet … one hundred and fifty feet … two hun …" she continues. "OK, I get it; we're high," I reply. "Oh God
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Effect of the grain arrangements on the thermal stability of polycrystalline nickel-rich lithium-based battery cathodes
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30935-y Enhancing the stability of positive electrodes at thermally-abused conditions is vital for next-generation lithium-based batteries. Here, the authors report in situ physicochemical characterizations to improve the fundamental understanding of the degradation mechanism in polycrystalline Ni-rich cathodes.
14h
The strawberry moon – in pictures
The moon reached its full stage on Tuesday, during a phenomenon known as a supermoon because of its proximity to Earth, and it is also called the strawberry moon because it is the full moon at strawberry harvest time Continue reading…
15h
Veterinary: Urgent action needed on English Bulldog breeding
English Bulldogs must be bred with more moderate physical features, as a new study reports that the breed is significantly less healthy than other dog breeds. English Bulldogs are at increased risk of breathing, eye, and skin conditions due to their extreme physical features, including shortened muzzles, folded skin, and a squat body, reports the paper published in the journal Canine Medicine and
15h
Veterinary: Urgent action needed on English Bulldog breeding
English Bulldogs must be bred with more moderate physical features, as a new study reports that the breed is significantly less healthy than other dog breeds. English Bulldogs are at increased risk of breathing, eye, and skin conditions due to their extreme physical features, including shortened muzzles, folded skin, and a squat body, reports the paper published in the journal Canine Medicine and
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Distributed genetic architecture across the hippocampal formation implies common neuropathology across brain disorders
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31086-w The hippocampus has been associated with memory traits and a variety of neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. Here, the authors have done a multivariate GWAS revealing 177 genetic loci, and overlap with various brain disorders may suggest partly age- and disorder-independent mechanisms underlying hippocam
17h
Multivariate Information Theory Uncovers Synergistic Subsystems of the Human Cerebral Cortex
One of the most well-established tools for modeling the brain as a complex system is the functional connectivity network, which examines the correlations between pairs of interacting brain regions. While powerful, the network model is limited by the restriction that only pairwise dependencies are visible and potentially higher-order structures are missed. In this work, we explore how multivariate
19h
Disease modeling by efficient genome editing using a near PAM-less base editor in vivo
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31172-z Base Editors are emerging as an innovative technology to introduce point mutations in complex genomes. Here the authors describe a near PAM-less base editor and its application in zebrafish to efficiently create disease models harbouring specific point mutations.
19h
Right whales' survival rates plummet after severe injury from fishing gear
Most North Atlantic right whales that are severely injured in fishing gear entanglements die within three years, a study finds. Severely injured whales were up to eight times more likely to die than those with minor injuries, and only 44% of males and 33% of females with severe injuries survived longer than 36 months. Females that did survive had low birth rates and longer intervals between calvin
22h
Engineer Who Says AI Came to Life Says He Can't Comment Further Because He's on His Honeymoon
Vacation Nation You'd think that Blake Lemoine, the suspended Google engineer who went public with his belief that advanced Google AI is sentient , would be giving interviews left and right. Lemoine's story — a saga involving a language modeling system called LaMDA and a battle with the tech giant's management over the alleged personhood of an advanced artificial intelligence — took off like wild
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Journal run by new AMA president-elect caught in special issue scam
A med-tech journal whose editor-in-chief is the president-in-waiting of the American Medical Association has retracted six papers for compromised peer review and related problems. The Journal of Medical Systems, led by Jesse Ehrenfeld – an anesthesiologist in Wisconsin who this week became president-elect of the AMA – said the articles were part of a special … Continue reading
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LaMDA and the Sentient AI Trap
Arguments over whether Google's large language model has a soul distract from the real-world problems that plague artificial intelligence.
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Sea level rise in England 'will put 200,000 homes at risk by 2050'
Due to the climate crisis, within 30 years these coastal properties will be potentially unsalvageable, researchers say Sea level rise will put about 200,000 coastal properties in England at risk within 30 years, new data suggests, as the climate crisis takes hold. These are the homes that may not end up being saved because it would be very expensive to try, by measures such as seawalls and other
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Quantum computer programming basics
For would-be quantum programmers scratching their heads over how to jump into the game as quantum computers proliferate and become publicly accessible, a new beginner's guide provides a thorough introduction to quantum algorithms and their implementation on existing hardware. Deep-diving guide explains the basics, surveys major quantum algorithms and steps through implementing them on publicly ava
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River belt discovery helps scientists understand ancient rivers
A researcher has come up with a rule that connects channel belts to river patterns, finding that, in general, the more channels a river has, the narrower its channel belt. Since the physics shaping rivers is the same over time and place, the rule should hold for ancient rivers and rivers on other planets, too.
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is Western individualism doomed
how will liberal values affect evolution? It is a fact that people who are more conservative have large family's. And the more liberal you are the less likely you are to have children. How likely is this phenomenon, to result in future humans being instinctually inclined toward being very religious, anti-Western individualist, anti-materialist, and instinctually disinclined to become LGBTQ. I don
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Beleaguered beagle facility to close; fate of 3000 dogs bred for research unclear
Facing growing financial and legal hurdles, a company that owns a troubled research beagle breeding facility in Cumberland, Virginia, said last night it will shutter the establishment, which until recently supplied dogs to universities, major drugmakers, and the National Institutes of Health. Because of the growing cost of bringing the complex of several large buildings into compliance with the A
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Demo test: Need your help for testing please
Dear friends, Live Demo: https://neuroneural.github.io/brainchop/ We are trying for 3D deep learning inference directly in browser with an application in MRI. This is the first time a 3D inference run in the frontend. I am trying now to analysis the browser minimum requirements for each model to advance the tool general performance. The demo is tried for now with around 37 different HW configurat
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MemoryTube Podcast on Podbean
Listen to our new Podbean podcast. At Scintilla.ai we are passionate about helping people quiz and learn at the same time. In this series of podcasts, founder, Alan, takes you on a quizzical journey down a historical timeline from our History Sprockets app. Can you use your historical knowledge to get as close to each event's real date. What else do you know about the event? Then you will learn s
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[Academic] Loss of control eating, Inattention and Impulsivity Research: is experiencing a loss of control eating is more common in people with inattentive and impulsive tendencies than the general population?
Hey all, My MSc research aims to investigate whether experiencing a loss of control eating is more common in people with inattentive and impulsive tendencies than the general population. If you wouldn't mind taking around 7 mins to participate I'd be ecstatic! All data collected is confidential and completely non-identifiable. This study has been reviewed and approved by the Psychology Department
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Study reveals how epilepsy and migraine drug causes birth defects
Valproic acid — a drug used to treat epilepsy, migraine, and bipolar disorder — can cause birth defects when taken during pregnancy. Now, a study reveals one reason why: valproic acid (VPA) puts some cells of the developing nervous system into senescence, a kind of halted state that keeps them from growing and dividing correctly.
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Stress accelerates immune aging, study finds
Stress — in the form of traumatic events, job strain, everyday stressors and discrimination — accelerates aging of the immune system, potentially increasing a person's risk of cancer, cardiovascular disease and illness from infections such as COVID-19, according to a new study. The research could help explain disparities in age-related health, including the unequal toll of the pandemic, and iden
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Leave Joe Biden Alone
This is an edition of The Atlantic Daily, a newsletter that guides you through the biggest stories of the day, helps you discover new ideas, and recommends the best in culture. Sign up for it here . Every administration has its ups and downs; today I examine why the Biden White House is taking more than its fair share of hits. But first, here are three great new stories from The Atlantic . The ri
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Opioid analgesic fentanyl may cause autism-like behavior in young mice, study finds
A new study reveals that opioid analgesic fentanyl may induce autism-like behaviors in young male and female mice. The findings indicate that reduced expression of the gene Grin2b in the anterior cingulate cortex of the brain following fentanyl treatment accounts for the autism-like behavior in the mice. However, there is no current evidence that fentanyl is associated with a similar effect in hum
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Bask Outdoors Safely With These Natural (But Effective) Sunscreens
Sun damage is no joke. It makes you look older than you are and can lead to skin cancer . That doesn't mean you should hole up inside and never see the sun. The answer is sunscreen. By using organic, bioactive, and vegan ingredients that actually work, these companies are making sunscreen more skin- and earth-friendly. If the drug store stuff is letting you down with its chemical-laden sticky goo
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Financial Planner Desperately Explains to Clients Why the Bitcoin Crash Is Good, Actually
Crypto is crashing, and bitcoin bros are having a tough week. In a long and winding thread , financial advisor and Coinbase commentator Isaiah Douglass laid out his case for why the currency's second major crash in two months is actually good news for people who've invested in blockchain assets. "I regret nothing," Douglass began in the thread, which he says is excerpted from an email he sent his
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New, highly tunable composite materials–with a twist
Mathematicians have found that they can design a range of composite materials from moiré patterns created by rotating and stretching one lattice relative to another. Their electrical and other physical properties can change –s ometimes quite abruptly, depending on whether the resulting moiré patterns are regularly repeating or non-repeating.
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Evidence that early galaxies may be bigger and more complex than previously thought
Scientists using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA)— an international observatory co-operated by the U.S. National Science Foundation's National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO)—have observed a significant amount of cold, neutral gas in the outer regions of the young galaxy A1689-zD1, as well as outflows of hot gas coming from the galaxy's center. These results may shed ligh
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Genome-wide introgression between two sympatric Asian oak species
The genus Quercus, commonly known as oaks, is one of the most evolutionarily successful genera in the Northern Hemisphere in terms of species diversity, biomass and distribution range. Oaks can usually live up to a few hundred years, and during the long lifespan they exhibit high tolerance to various abiotic and biotic threats. Meanwhile, oaks are also well known for their extensive interspecific
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A weird star produced the fastest nova on record
Astronomers are buzzing after observing the fastest nova ever recorded. The unusual event drew scientists' attention to an even more unusual star. As they study it, they may find answers to not only the nova's many baffling traits, but to larger questions about the chemistry of our solar system, the death of stars and the evolution of the universe.
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Genome-wide introgression between two sympatric Asian oak species
The genus Quercus, commonly known as oaks, is one of the most evolutionarily successful genera in the Northern Hemisphere in terms of species diversity, biomass and distribution range. Oaks can usually live up to a few hundred years, and during the long lifespan they exhibit high tolerance to various abiotic and biotic threats. Meanwhile, oaks are also well known for their extensive interspecific
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A dynamic duo of cells identified in lung blood vessels
Scientists have identified two subtypes of lung blood vessel cells. One subtype expresses more genes involved in inflammation and the regulation of the immune response; the other expresses more genes involved in cell regeneration and proliferation. The findings could lead to better treatments for lung infections.
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Companies' use of renewable energy certificates masks inaction on carbon emissions
A new study argues that renewable energy certificates — a market-based tool that certifies the bearer owns one megawatt hour of electricity produced from renewable energy sources — generally do not reduce emissions and firms using them are overstating their climate mitigation claims. In one calculation, the researchers show how a sample of 115 companies between 2015 and 2019 reported a 31 per ce
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Real-time imaging of dynamic atom-atom interactions
Researchers have managed to observe and characterize dynamic assembly of metallic atoms using an ingenious combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy and a video-based tracking. By visualizing short-lived molecules, such as metallic dimers and trimers, that cannot be observed using traditional methods, the researchers open up the possibility of observing more such dynamic structures
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Study explores uncertainties in flood risk estimates
Flood frequency analysis is a technique used to estimate flood risk, providing statistics such as the '100-year flood' or '500-year flood' that are critical to infrastructure design, dam safety analysis, and flood mapping in flood-prone areas. But the method used to calculate these flood frequencies is due for an update, according to a new study.
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Developing sustainable membranes for future energy
A recently published paper in Science "Polytriazole membranes with ultrathin tunable selective layer for crude oil fractionation," offers an innovative membrane development solution to handle unique industrial conditions, such as hydrocarbon fractionation.
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What shedding light on plant growth could mean for cancer
Understanding how plants process light is key to improving crop yields. Light helps plants know when to grow and flower at the right time. Plants find light using proteins called photoreceptors. Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) Assistant Professor Ullas Pedmale's team uncovered how proteins called UBP12 and UBP13 help regulate a photoreceptor called CRY2. Published in Current Biology, their di
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What shedding light on plant growth could mean for cancer
Understanding how plants process light is key to improving crop yields. Light helps plants know when to grow and flower at the right time. Plants find light using proteins called photoreceptors. Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) Assistant Professor Ullas Pedmale's team uncovered how proteins called UBP12 and UBP13 help regulate a photoreceptor called CRY2. Published in Current Biology, their di
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A warming climate decreases microbial diversity, study finds
Researchers at the University of Oklahoma have found that the warming climate is decreasing microbial diversity, which is essential for soil health. Led by Jizhong Zhou, Ph.D., the director of the Institute for Environmental Genomics at OU, the research team conducted an eight-year experiment that found that climate warming played a predominant role in shaping microbial biodiversity, with signific
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Mass Canadian Internet Outage Caused by Single Destructive Beaver
Beaver Blackout A marauding beaver has plunged several small towns into an internet blackout in northern British Columbia, Canada, after chewing through the base of an aspen tree, CTV News reports . The downed tree damaged electricity and fiber-optic lines, plunging some customers into a blackout — and cutting many more off from the internet. It's not even the first time a beaver has been blamed
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Crypto Exchanges Lay Off Thousands, Months After Uber-Expensive Super Bowl Ads
Just months after spending staggering sums on lavish Super Bowl ads, leading cryptocurrency exchanges are now laying off thousands of employees amid the second crypto crash of 2022. In statements posted to company websites and on Twitter, the CEOs of exchanges like Crypto.com and Coinbase , both of which bought much-hyped ad spots during the big game this year, announced that they're laying off s
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Best Remote Car Starters for 2022
A remote car starter is something you don't truly appreciate until you have one. In the winter, it starts the car and warms it up while defrosting the windshield. During the hot summer months, it cools the car so you don't roast when you get in. It even comes in handy when you're caught in the rain and need to make a run for your car. Unfortunately, many people miss out on this little luxury. The
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Rural areas will bear the brunt of US sea-level rise
It's hotly debated whether coastal wetlands can survive sea-level rise by migrating inland. A new analysis using highly detailed elevation maps of the Chesapeake Bay region shows that—contrary to previous studies—human barriers will do little to slow this marsh migration. Instead, extensive areas of low-lying rural land will allow coastal marshes to persist or even expand as salty water creeps upw
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A warming climate decreases microbial diversity, study finds
Researchers at the University of Oklahoma have found that the warming climate is decreasing microbial diversity, which is essential for soil health. Led by Jizhong Zhou, Ph.D., the director of the Institute for Environmental Genomics at OU, the research team conducted an eight-year experiment that found that climate warming played a predominant role in shaping microbial biodiversity, with signific
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Innovation talk with Standard Lesotho Bank
Thank you for joining us on "The cloud hub: From cloud chaos to clarity." Watch this video where Anton Nicolaisen, chief executive at Standard Lesotho Bank, talks about the drivers for running a pilot on migrating its core banking solution on cloud, the success they have experienced, and the way forward for the bank. Click here to continue.
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Study explores uncertainties in flood risk estimates
Flood frequency analysis is a technique used to estimate flood risk, providing statistics such as the "100-year flood" or "500-year flood" that are critical to infrastructure design, dam safety analysis, and flood mapping in flood-prone areas. But the method used to calculate these flood frequencies is due for an update, according to a new study by scientists from The Desert Research Institute (DR
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'Alternative facts' are cons, and journalists can help quash them, new paper argues
Journalists need not cover both sides of an argument when one side is advancing what experts widely regard as a con, Illinois Institute of Technology John and Mae Calamos Endowed Chair in Philosophy J. D. Trout argues in his latest publication. "The Epistemic Virtues of a Closed Mind: Effective Science Reporting in the Golden Age of the Con" appears in Frontiers in Communication: Science and Envir
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Double-layered catalyst generates more hydrogen
Hydrogen-generating catalysts can create synergistic effects when different materials are layered with their unique properties. Recently, a Korean research team has developed a technology to enhance the hydrogen generation efficiency by flattening platinum (Pt) over the surface of NiFe-layered double hydroxide (LDH).
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New study determines that Catalonia's anchovies are healthy and free of the parasite Anisakis
A study conducted by the research group SEAaq (Ecosystem and Aquatic Animal Health) of the Department of Animal Biology, Plant Biology and Ecology at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB) and published in the journal Science of The Total Environment has focused on the analysis of the state of health of anchovies found in different points of the Catalan coast (Tarragona, Barcelona and Blanes)
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New study determines that Catalonia's anchovies are healthy and free of the parasite Anisakis
A study conducted by the research group SEAaq (Ecosystem and Aquatic Animal Health) of the Department of Animal Biology, Plant Biology and Ecology at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB) and published in the journal Science of The Total Environment has focused on the analysis of the state of health of anchovies found in different points of the Catalan coast (Tarragona, Barcelona and Blanes)
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First-mover advantages of implementing data privacy in countries where data protection laws are under consideration
Thank you for joining us on "The cloud hub: From cloud chaos to clarity." Increasingly, countries across the globe are enforcing data protection laws. Organizations can stay ahead of new mandates by implementing data privacy norms. Companies must view customers as allies when protecting their privacy and gain their brand loyalty. Click here to continue.
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Accelerate and simplify SASE with zero trust adoption
Thank you for joining us on "The cloud hub: From cloud chaos to clarity." Watch this video featuring Infosys and Palo Alto Networks discussing how to leverage SASE with zero trust adoption. The discussion covers the best practices and steps needed to ensure robust security of enterprise network perimeters, workloads, and workplaces with a cloud-delivered security platform. Click here to continue.
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