Search Posts

Nyheder2022juni17

Free Speech Champion Elon Musk Fires Employees for Criticizing Him
SpaceX CEO and self-described " free speech absolutist " Elon Musk has reportedly fired at least several employees at SpaceX who were involved in circulating an open letter criticizing him for his erratic behavior, The New York Times reports . Musk has a very long history of retaliating against those who criticize him — despite his repeated attempts to paint himself as the ultimate champion of "f
5h
Sponsored

LATEST

Best Roku TVs of 2022
Roku TVs feature a built-in interface so you don't need an additional device to enjoy your favorite Roku channels, which include all of your favorite streaming services and more. The best Roku TVs have 4K resolution and HDR support for brighter colors, deeper darks, and higher contrast that make images pop. There are a few more specs to watch for, including refresh rate port connectivity for conn
14min
Doctors Puzzled by Two-Year-Old Boy Who Already Hit Puberty
Content warning: This story involves frank discussion of a strange medical case involving a child. A UK toddler started puberty at just two years old after being exposed to his dad's testosterone gel, Insider reported this week. The toddler had the bone density of a child more than twice his age, according to the site's reporting, and as much of the hormone as an adult assigned-male-at-birth pers
14min
The lasting symptoms among COVID-19 long haulers
More than two years after the COVID-19 pandemic erupted, scientists have become increasingly aware of a group of patients — so-called 'long haulers' — who remain plagued by a combination of symptoms long after the infection passes. In a new study, researchers describe their findings related to their multidisciplinary clinical work in this area.
1h
10 Hours, Two Theme Parties
Sign up for Kaitlyn and Lizzie's newsletter here. Lizzie: Some summer Saturdays are lazy, languid, and planless, with no clearly defined structure other than the requirement that you eat at some point and go to bed at some other point. Others, through some combination of coincidence, clement weather, and calendar availability, are stacked with consecutive errands, events, and experiences such tha
1h
New York State May Ban Any Crypto Mining Powered by Fossil Fuels
Crypt Tick Boom For weeks now, a bill that would ban all crypto mining that uses fossil fuels has languished on the desk of New York's governor. The dramatic story, as reported by The Daily Beast , has gone mostly underreported as both the stock market and the cryptocurrency industry have cratered. In an extremely short time span, the Beast notes, New York's cryptocurrency mining bill went from l
1h
All You Need for a Stellar Night of Stargazing
Away from the bright lights of the city on a clear summer night, mere mortals can look up at ancient constellations, five planets , and SpaceX's Starlink satellite train. We rounded up the best companions for a night of stargazing, plus a few key items to loop the kids into an appreciation of the cosmos. This gear will help you unleash your inner Margherita Hack . Celestron Starsense Explorer Tel
1h
Scientists serendipitously discover rare cluster compound
Scientists at Kyoto University's Institute for Cell-Material Sciences have discovered a novel cluster compound that could prove useful as a catalyst. Compounds, called polyoxometalates, contain a large metal-oxide cluster carry a negative charge. They are found everywhere, from anti-viral medicines to rechargeable batteries and flash memory devices.
1h
Rethinking the rabies vaccine
Researchers may have discovered the path to better rabies vaccine design. Researchers share one of the first high-resolution looks at the rabies virus glycoprotein in its vulnerable 'trimeric' form.
1h
ADHD and ASD: What the eyes could reveal
Researchers found that recordings from the retina could identify distinct signals for both attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD), providing a potential biomarker for each condition.
1h
Perfume Genius Sings the Body Electric
On a warm, late-March night in Washington, D.C., just a few blocks from where Walt Whitman once visited Union soldiers and wooed his beloved Irish horse-car conductor, Mike Hadreas took the mic for a sold-out show. As Perfume Genius, his stage name, he quickly settled into the lilting groove of "Your Body Changes Everything," from his acclaimed 2020 album, Set My Heart on Fire Immediately . He pi
2h
Russia Forced to Dodge Space Debris From When It Blew Up Satellite
Well, if it isn't the consequences of my actions. Last night, a Russian cargo spacecraft had to perform an unplanned engine burn to avoid debris left behind by a Soviet Union-era satellite — which a Russian anti-satellite missile blew up into tiny pieces last year . The Progress MS-20 shuttle launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome on June 3 to send supplies to the International Space Station. But
2h
Bone loss meds may lower ovarian cancer risk
A medication used to prevent bone loss may help lower the risk of ovarian cancer, according to a new study. Researchers compared medications taken by more than 50,000 women over the age of 50, using de-identified medical records from 2004–2013, to analyze differences in those with ovarian cancer and those without. Women who used nitrogen-based bisphosphonates were found to be less likely to devel
2h
Scientists serendipitously discover rare cluster compound
Scientists at Kyoto University's Institute for Cell-Material Sciences have discovered a novel cluster compound that could prove useful as a catalyst. Compounds, called polyoxometalates, that contain a large metal-oxide cluster carry a negative charge. They are found everywhere, from anti-viral medicines to rechargeable batteries and flash memory devices.
2h
Mangrove and reef restoration yield positive returns on investment for flood protection, study shows
Restoration of mangroves and coral reefs can be a cost-effective solution for coastal flood reduction in more than 20 countries across the Caribbean. Researchers used methods from the risk and insurance industry to provide rigorous valuations of these natural defenses and show that they can deliver a positive return on investment, with the benefits from reduced flood damage exceeding the costs of
2h
Ukraine's President Making International Appearances Via Hologram
Keynote Hologram Ukranian President Volodymyr Zelensky appeared at four simultaneous European tech conferences yesterday via hologram, according to a new report published in The Next Web , which hosted one of the four conferences. The hologram projected Zelensky inside a roughly person-sized box manufactured by a company called ARHT Media. Some video footage of the appearances was less impressive
3h
Scientists Spot Dying Star Brutally Tearing Up Its Unfortunate Planets
Bad Neighbor A dying, Sun-like star violently devoured its solar system , and is now actively spitting out chunks of its unlucky neighbors. Gruesome? Sure. But according to a NASA press release , astronomers believe that this particular star-borne suburb might offer an unprecedented glimpse into planetary beginnings. The dying star at hand is now a White Dwarf, unceremoniously dubbed G238-44. Whi
3h
More than one way to skin a tumor
The mechanism by which active inflammation occurs in parallel with immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment has been identified. Results showed reduced gene expression of regulatory T cell involved in immunosuppression. Cancer treatment employing EP2/EP4 inhibitors might benefit some cancer patients.
3h
Next gen television and computer screens: Creating optically active polymers
A University of Tsukuba researcher describes a new method for obtaining conjugated polymers in a helical configuration. By using twisted liquid crystals as a template, the resulting polymers were found to be able to convert linearly polarized light into circularly polarized light. This work may be used for next-generation television and computer screens.
3h
Electrically conductive paints and other polymer alloys now produced easily
Researchers have synthesized electrically conductive polyaniline polymer in common organic solvents. A small quantity of added iodine facilitates the radical chain reaction that is critical to polymer synthesis. This protocol will facilitate processing of polyaniline in printed circuit boards, electrically conductive paints, and other advanced technologies, in a cheap and versatile manner.
3h
A new hope for a therapy against retinitis pigmentosa
Retinitis pigmentosa, a degenerative genetic disease of the eye, is characterized by progressive vision loss, usually leading to blindness. In some patients, structural defects in the photoreceptor cells have been observed, but the molecular mechanisms involved are not understood. A team has identified the essential role played by a molecular zipper formed by four proteins. The absence of this zip
3h
Did a Martian have a break – with a KitKat? | Brief letters
Litter left behind | Getting rid of things | Moving on from Partygate | Russian spy's wrong turn | The Green Man in the tree Call me a peddler of conspiracy theories if you like, but I have had a good look at that piece of silver paper on Mars and it looks very much like a KitKat wrapper to me ( Nasa rover sighting reignites fears about human space debris, 16 June ). David Gerrard Hove, East Suss
3h
Examining the impact of herbicide-resistant crops on weed management
Herbicide-resistant crops are now commonplace in the U.S. and Canada. With proper stewardship, these same crop-trait technologies can also play a key role in integrated weed management—reducing the intensity of herbicide use and the selection pressure on weed populations. But does this weed management potential match the reality in the field?
3h
How keeping trees when clearing pastures could reduce climate consequences
Land use change, like cutting down a forest to make way for agriculture, can be a major contributor to climate change by releasing greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. Researchers at the University of New Hampshire studied a practice known as silvopasture which intentionally preserves trees in pastures where livestock graze. They found that compared to a completely cleared, tree-less, open pastur
3h
Watch: Tiny frogs can't stick the landing
A group of frogs alternately called pumpkin toadlets and flea toads have become so small they're no longer able to maintain balance during quick maneuvers, like jumping, researchers report. "They're not great jumpers, and they're not particularly good walkers either." Amphibians are exceptionally good at being small. There are salamanders the size of your thumb nail, pygmy newts that live in moss
3h
Examining the impact of herbicide-resistant crops on weed management
Herbicide-resistant crops are now commonplace in the U.S. and Canada. With proper stewardship, these same crop-trait technologies can also play a key role in integrated weed management—reducing the intensity of herbicide use and the selection pressure on weed populations. But does this weed management potential match the reality in the field?
3h
How keeping trees when clearing pastures could reduce climate consequences
Land use change, like cutting down a forest to make way for agriculture, can be a major contributor to climate change by releasing greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. Researchers at the University of New Hampshire studied a practice known as silvopasture which intentionally preserves trees in pastures where livestock graze. They found that compared to a completely cleared, tree-less, open pastur
3h
How stock market inefficiencies can affect the real economy
Mutual fund investors are known to be vulnerable to fluctuating market conditions. What is less well understood is how corporate managers are affected by waves of investor optimism. A researcher has published a study in the journal Financial Innovation, where he argues that corporate managers and investors are jointly caught up in market euphoria. Using a long time series of aggregate flows in and
3h
The Personal Brand Is Dead
When I was 21, the cool thing to be was famous on Instagram. Now the cooler thing to be is a mystery. Anonymity is in. The youngest adult generation and the most online generation is frustrated with being surveilled and embarrassed by attention-seeking behaviors. This has instigated a retreat into smaller internet spaces and secret-sharing apps , as well as a mini-renaissance for Tumblr , where u
4h
New App Makes You Sound Like Morgan Freeman in Real Time
Morgan Freeman Here A new voice app transforms anybody's voice into the iconic, sonorous locution of Morgan Freeman, an impressive example of artificial intelligence-powered tech — and the potential for hijinks, needless to say, is off the charts. The new Voicemod AI Voices beta includes a number of new voices, including the voice of the iconic actor, a pilot, or the disembodied futuristic voice
4h
Best Cameras for Astrophotography in 2022
Astrophotography is popular with hobbyists, advanced amateurs, and professionals alike, and a high-quality camera is essential for capturing the cosmos. With NASA's recent achievements and the number of celestial events that have been visible from planet earth in recent years, it's no surprise that interest in this style of photography continues to grow. The best cameras for astrophotography will
4h
Good News! Catnip Is Good for Cats' Health, Scientists Say
Neat Nip Feline appreciation of catnip may go deeper than we thought, according to a new study published Tuesday in the journal iScience . A team of researchers from universities in the Japan and the UK say that when cats "damage" catnip — by, you know, rolling around in it or chewing it up with their adorable fangs — it releases terpenes known as iridoids that repel mosquitoes. "Cats rub and rol
4h
How holographic interferometry could influence the future
Holographic interferometry is the technique of measuring stress, strain, and vibration with light. It is defined by the wavelength of light, finding flaws in structural bonds. It makes full use of a hologram's ability to reproduce the optical field reflected or transmitted by an object.
4h
New, fully biodegradable cellulose membrane proves effective in oil-water separation
Oil spills and industrial pollution pose a huge threat to the ecological environment. Concerns over safety have seen an increased focus on improving the filtration of oily wastewater; for example, during the treatment of sewage. Membrane separation technology offers a promising and efficient option for treating that wastewater, particularly with its low energy consumption. However, it remains a ch
4h
The Democrats' New Spokesman in the Culture Wars
O n May 4, two days after Politico rocked Washington by revealing the draft of a Supreme Court decision to overturn the constitutional right to abortion, California Governor Gavin Newsom delivered remarks at a Los Angeles Planned Parenthood office—and triggered a small earthquake of his own. Newsom pledged that, however the Court ruled, California would ensure legal access to abortion. But it was
4h
Forest to pasture: Keeping trees could reduce climate consequences
Researchers studied a practice known as silvopasture which intentionally preserves trees in pastures where livestock graze. They found that compared to a completely cleared, tree-less, open pasture, the integrated silvopasture released lower levels of carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide and soil carbon storage remained the same, offering a possible alternative for farmers with less climate consequenc
4h
Engineers create single-step, all-in-one 3D printing method to make robotic materials
Engineers have developed a new design strategy and 3D printing technique to build robots in one single step. The breakthrough enabled the entire mechanical and electronic systems needed to operate a robot to be manufactured all at once by a new type of 3D printing process for engineered active materials with multiple functions (also known as metamaterials). Once 3D printed, a 'meta-bot' will be ca
4h
SpaceX Fires Employees Behind Musk Open Letter
SpaceX has made it clear, in no uncertain terms, that criticism of founder and CEO Elon Musk will not be tolerated. Just days after a group of employees released an open letter criticizing Musk , some of those involved have found themselves out of a job. SpaceX president Gwynne Shotwell sent an email (that didn't address the content of the letter), saying the writers made others "uncomfortable" w
4h
Engineers create single-step, all-in-one 3D printing method to make robotic materials
Engineers have developed a new design strategy and 3D printing technique to build robots in one single step. The breakthrough enabled the entire mechanical and electronic systems needed to operate a robot to be manufactured all at once by a new type of 3D printing process for engineered active materials with multiple functions (also known as metamaterials). Once 3D printed, a 'meta-bot' will be ca
4h
Electrically conductive paints and other polymer alloys now produced easily
Medical devices, cars, and many advanced technologies contain innumerable delicate components that are held together by electrically conductive polymers, such as polyaniline. For several decades, synthesis of polyaniline for industrial electronics applications has faced a major limitation: what solvent best facilitates synthesis? This abstract question is important for minimizing the cost and comp
4h
Tackling air quality and COVID-19 in the classroom
As the days get colder, teachers not only face the usual seasonal battle of keeping classrooms at a comfortable temperature but also trying to reduce the COVID-19 virus count in the environment. How to reduce virus spread is important knowledge for teachers—just as it was a century ago when the 1918 flu pandemic hit.
4h
US prison labor programs violate fundamental human rights, new report finds
Incarcerated workers generate billions of dollars worth of goods and services annually but are paid pennies per hour without proper training or opportunity to build skills for careers after release, according to a comprehensive nationwide report released by the University of Chicago Law School's Global Human Rights Clinic and the American Civil Liberties Union
4h
Most major US cities are underprepared for rising temperatures
This month, Denver, Las Vegas and Phoenix all posted record high temperatures. And across the nation, Americans are ramping up for a scorching summer. Yet despite more frequent and intense heat waves on the horizon, cities are underprepared to deal with the challenge, according to a UCLA-led research team.
4h
Potency of staph-fighting antibiotic blunted by blood serum
Staph infections pose lethal threats in hospitals, where the Staphylococcus aureus bacterium can be transferred from the skin or nasal passages into open wounds and, potentially, the bloodstream. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that staph infections killed nearly 20,000 Americans in 2017 alone. Antibiotic-resistant strains of S. aureus, including the notorious MRSA, present
4h
This Week in Space: New, Super-Detailed Maps of 16 Psyche and the Milky Way Light Up the Sky
Hello, readers, and happy Friday! This week we've got some great news concerning maps and asteroids, along with updates from the world's major space agencies. James Webb has finally powered on all its instruments. And it seems like NASA's Lucy spacecraft has nine lives! We'll wrap up with skywatching opportunities for the week, as five celestial bodies come into graceful alignment. Gaia Project R
4h
Potency of staph-fighting antibiotic blunted by blood serum
Staph infections pose lethal threats in hospitals, where the Staphylococcus aureus bacterium can be transferred from the skin or nasal passages into open wounds and, potentially, the bloodstream. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that staph infections killed nearly 20,000 Americans in 2017 alone. Antibiotic-resistant strains of S. aureus, including the notorious MRSA, present
4h
The mission to safeguard Black history in the US | Julieanna L. Richardson
Black history in the US is rich, profound — and at risk of being lost forever, if not for the monumental efforts of Julieanna L. Richardson. As the founder of The HistoryMakers — the largest national archive of African American video-oral history — Richardson shares some of the unknown and incredible legacies of Black America, highlighting the importance of documenting and preserving the past f
4h
Spanish citizens are more supportive of climate action after COVID-19, but more pessimistic in their expectations
Most of the Spanish population is pessimistic about the future climate actions by the government and citizens after the impact of COVID-19. This is the conclusion of a study carried out by researchers at the Institute of Environmental Science and Technology of the Universitat Autònoma of Barcelona (ICTA-UAB), which seeks to determine how the COVID-19 crisis has affected society's attitude toward c
5h
Australian rural communities under-resourced to take on refugees
As Australia continues to take on refugees from Ukraine, education experts are calling for essential supports as new research from the University of South Australia shows that rural and regional schools can be under-resourced and ill-prepared to support refugee children and their families.
5h
The Book That Captures My Life as a Dad
Once, when my daughter was six months old, my mind started wandering while washing dishes. The chore had become a soothing break from the ceaselessness of the baby's need. I'd lose myself in thought as the warm water rushed over my hands, and this particular time, I was attempting to construct a theory of my dish-doing, how edifying and rewarding the rote task could be. My tentative title for the
5h
New star systems are young and blue, not 'red and dead'
Astronomers have identified five examples of a new class of stellar system. They're not quite galaxies and only exist in isolation. The new stellar systems contain only young, blue stars , which are distributed in an irregular pattern and seem to exist in surprising isolation from any potential parent galaxy. The stellar systems—which astronomers say appear through a telescope as "blue blobs" and
5h
Horses and pigs can tell if you're being positive or negative
Horses, pigs, and wild horses can distinguish between negative and positive sounds from their fellow species and near relatives, as well as from human speech, researchers report. The study provides insight into the history of emotional development and opens up interesting perspectives with regards to animal welfare. Along with her colleagues, behavioral biologist Elodie Briefer of the University
5h
Exploring formation of ultra-massive carbon-oxygen white dwarfs
White dwarf stars (WDs) are the most numerous members of the stellar graveyard. It is widely accepted that more than 97% of the stars in the universe will evolve into WDs. These numerous objects are considered a powerful tool to understand the formation and evolution of stars, the history of our galaxy and stellar populations.
5h
How can cities respond to extreme heat?
A new report gives city planners a set of principles and guidelines to equitably address extreme heat in their communities. As extreme heat becomes more persistent and prevalent, and as the United States braces for a new season of heat waves, Ladd Keith, an assistant professor in the University of Arizona College of Architecture, Planning, and Landscape Architecture, says city planners can and sh
5h
How inflation is influencing the way we think and behave
Driven largely by soaring gas prices, inflation reached levels not seen in decades over the last year, according to new Consumer Price Index data. Prices at the pump helped accelerate inflation to 8.6% for the 12 months ending in May, CNN reports—and there seems to be no end in sight.
5h
Repeated hurricane exposure may harm mental health
Repeated exposure to hurricanes is linked to adverse psychological symptoms and may be associated with increased mental health problems, according to a new study. The findings, which hold true whether the exposure is direct, indirect, or media-based, are critical for understanding the psychological impacts of recurring natural disasters, particularly in the context of the escalating threat of cli
5h
Exciting light emission and measuring temperature with ultrasound
If mechanoluminescent materials are subjected to external mechanical stress, they emit visible or invisible light. Such excitation can occur due to bending or gentle pressure, for example, but also completely contact-free through ultrasound. In this way, the effect can be triggered remotely and light can be brought to places that normally tend to be in the dark, for example in the human body. If t
5h
Researchers discover 'hotspots' of three-layered alternatively rotating circulation in South China Sea
A research team led by Prof. Gan Jianping, director of the Center for Ocean Research Hong Kong and Macau (CORE) at The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), carried out field observations and conducted numerical simulations in the South China Sea (SCS) and revealed never-before-seen characteristics of the three-dimensional ocean motion in the SCS through geophysical fluid dynamic
5h
A celebrated AI has learned a new trick: How to do chemistry
Artificial intelligence has changed the way science is done by allowing researchers to analyze the massive amounts of data modern scientific instruments generate. It can find a needle in a million haystacks of information and, using deep learning, it can learn from the data itself. AI is accelerating advances in gene hunting, medicine, drug design and the creation of organic compounds.
5h
New polymer mesophase structure discovered
Polymers, large molecules made up of repeating smaller molecules called monomers, are found in nearly everything we use in our day-to-day lives. Polymers can be natural or created synthetically. Natural polymers, also called biopolymers, include DNA, proteins, and materials like silk, gelatin, and collagen. Synthetic polymers make up many different kinds of materials, including plastic, that are u
5h
Disinfectant mechanism of nano-sized electrostatic atomized water particles on SARS-CoV-2
Current disinfection strategies have major drawbacks, which is why the World Health Organization does not advise routine spraying or fogging of biocidal agents, or UV light sterilization, in occupied areas. One possible alternative is nano-sized electrostatic atomized water particles generated by an electrospray device developed by Panasonic Corporation. The water particles contain reactive oxygen
5h
Pentacene derivative has 100 times more light durability than conventional products
Due to high hole mobility, pentacene and its derivatives have been the representative organic semiconductor and have been the subject of much research, both basic and applied. In particular, they are expected to be applied to semiconductor devices, such as field-effect transistors. In addition, organic semiconductors have the advantage of being inexpensive to produce through inkjet printing, and t
5h
New device gets scientists closer to quantum materials breakthrough
Researchers from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and the University of California, Berkeley, have developed a new photonic device that could get scientists closer to the "holy grail" of finding the global minimum of mathematical formulations at room temperature. Finding that illusive mathematical value would be a major advancement in opening new options for simulations involving quantum materia
5h
Method for creating optically active polymers using a helical liquid crystal template
A scientist from the Faculty of Pure and Applied Sciences at the University of Tsukuba developed a method for producing electrically conductive polymers that assume a helical configuration. By using a liquid crystal as a template, he was able to produce optically active polymers that can convert light into a circular polarization. This approach may help lower the cost of smart displays. The result
5h
Grain size of rocks in Earth's mantle affects tectonics
The planet is shaped by forces deep within its interior. These push the plates of the Earth's crust against each other, causing mountains and volcanoes to form along the collision zones. But when reconstructing what exactly is happening inside the Earth, we are limited to indirect observation; for example, by conducting pressure experiments on rocks from the Earth's mantle or by analyzing seismic
5h
The actual cost of preventing climate breakdown | Yuval Noah Harari
Nobody really knows how much it would cost to avoid the worst impacts of climate change. Yet historian Yuval Noah Harari's analysis, based on the work of scientists and economists, indicates that humanity might avert catastrophe by investing the equivalent of just two percent of global GDP into climate solutions. He makes the case that preventing ecological cataclysm will not require the major glo
5h
A celebrated AI has learned a new trick: How to do chemistry
Artificial intelligence has changed the way science is done by allowing researchers to analyze the massive amounts of data modern scientific instruments generate. It can find a needle in a million haystacks of information and, using deep learning, it can learn from the data itself. AI is accelerating advances in gene hunting, medicine, drug design and the creation of organic compounds.
6h
Preprogrammed aging: Gene-controlled growth in youth drives aging of blood stem cells in late life
Throughout one's life, the blood is constantly being replenished from blood stem cells. However, these cells lose their functionality in old age. Researchers at the Leibniz Institute on Aging—Fritz Lipmann Institute (FLI) have now found a gene mechanism that is responsible for the aging of hematopoietic stem cells. The gene Igf2bp2 is important in youth for the full function of these cells, as it
6h
Preprogrammed aging: Gene-controlled growth in youth drives aging of blood stem cells in late life
Throughout one's life, the blood is constantly being replenished from blood stem cells. However, these cells lose their functionality in old age. Researchers at the Leibniz Institute on Aging—Fritz Lipmann Institute (FLI) have now found a gene mechanism that is responsible for the aging of hematopoietic stem cells. The gene Igf2bp2 is important in youth for the full function of these cells, as it
6h
The Time Bandit's Propeller Gets Stuck on Someone's Buoys | Deadliest Catch
Stream Deadliest Catch on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/deadliest-catch #DeadliestCatch #Discovery #DiscoveryPlus Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Disco
6h
Digitaliseringen går trögt i offentlig sektor
Offentlig sektors förmåga att utveckla och använda digitala tjänster och verktyg minskade under förra året. Orsaken var bland annat en tendens att nedprioritera utvecklingsinsatser under coronapandemin. Det visar en ny rapport från Göteborgs universitet. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
6h
Friare tolkning av noter gjuter liv i klassisk musik
Teknisk perfektion och nottrohet har varit ett ideal inom västerländsk klassisk musik. Men ett friare förhållande till noterna kan ge lyssnarna nya perspektiv och upplevelser, menar Tomas Löndahlv som undersökt sätt för musiker att frigöra sig från notbilden. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
6h
Svenska släktforskare skulle värvas att jobba för rasbiologin
Under 1900-talet första hälft försökte olika grupperingar värva amatörsläktforskare, för att registrera ärftliga sjukdomar, ögon- och hårfärg, personlighetsdrag och skallform hos olika släkter. Det kallades "vetenskaplig släktforskning" Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
6h
Amazon Will Pilot Drone Delivery in California This Year
The number of packages people order—and the number of people ordering packages—isn't likely to go down anytime in the foreseeable future, and companies are working on ways to get those packages delivered quickly and cheaply. Too many delivery trucks cause traffic and congestion; you've doubtless seen the Amazon, FedEx, or UPS trucks take over loading zones on your block for an annoyingly long tim
6h
The Awkward Intimacy of Therapy
When Lori Gottlieb, the author of The Atlantic 's " Dear Therapist " column, started her first therapy session, her client started crying almost immediately. The experience was "simultaneously awkward and intimate," Gottlieb wrote in her book Maybe You Should Talk to Someone —and a reminder of the ultimate humanity of the therapeutic relationship. Although Gottlieb entered the room concerned abou
6h
Scientists harness light therapy to target and kill cancer cells in world first
Exclusive: experts believe new form of photoimmunotherapy may become fifth major cancer treatment Scientists have successfully developed a revolutionary cancer treatment that lights up and wipes out microscopic cancer cells, in a breakthrough that could enable surgeons to more effectively target and destroy the disease in patients. A European team of engineers, physicists, neurosurgeons, biologis
6h
After years of COVID, fires and floods, kids' well-being now depends on better support
Every student in every school in Australia has experienced unprecedented disruptions to their schooling over the past three years. On top of the disruptions and stress of COVID-19 lockdowns, isolation from their schools, their friends and (for many) their extended families, tens of thousands of Australian families have also seen their communities ravaged by fires and floods.
6h
How to prepare for a hyperactive hurricane season
It could be a busy hurricane season in the Atlantic this year. Between June 1 and November 30, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) forecasts above-average activity, with a likely range of 14 to 21 named storms, of which 6 to 10 could become hurricanes, including 3 to 6 major hurricanes (Category 3, 4 or 5).
6h
Researchers find gene that prompts the African sleeping sickness parasite to convert to its dormant phase
A team of researchers from Portugal, Israel, Poland and Spain has found the gene that prompts the parasite Trypanosoma brucei to change from its normal long, slender shape to one that is short and stumpy. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes how they found the gene and their hope that doing so will lead to a cure for African sleeping sickness.
7h
The quiet life of Messier 94
Just like a murder of crows, a shrewdness of apes and a murmuration of starlings, tightly packed stars of a similar age within the center of a galaxy have a collective name: a bulge.
7h
Researchers find gene that prompts the African sleeping sickness parasite to convert to its dormant phase
A team of researchers from Portugal, Israel, Poland and Spain has found the gene that prompts the parasite Trypanosoma brucei to change from its normal long, slender shape to one that is short and stumpy. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes how they found the gene and their hope that doing so will lead to a cure for African sleeping sickness.
7h
Tight budgeters beware: Skip the coffee before shopping
If you're trying to scale back on impulse purchases, then you may want to hold off on drinking that coffee. An international study led by the University of South Florida (USF) found that caffeine impacts what you buy and how much you spend when shopping.
7h
Webb's mid-infrared spectroscopy will reveal molecules, elements
NASA's James Webb Space Telescope team continues to work its way through the 17 science instrument modes. This week they checked off numbers (5) NIRCam grism time series and (4) imaging time series, both used to study exoplanets and other time-variable sources; (12) NIRISS aperture masking interferometry mode, for direct detection of a faint object that is very close to a bright one; (11) NIRISS w
7h
Researchers use ketyl radicals for a new multi-component reaction
A more sustainable use of chemical resources is part of the United Nations' Agenda 2030. Synthetic chemists are therefore working to design and carry out efficient syntheses. Within the synthetic organic chemist's arsenal, processes that link several molecules (coupling partners) in a single step—so-called multi-component reactions (MCRs)—play a central role. These are considered sustainable and e
7h
Climate-fueled wave patterns pose an erosion risk for developing countries
The world's coastlines are at the forefront of climate change. That's because they're constantly changing, and respond quickly to changes in climate. They're particularly important because around 70% of the world's population live within 100km of the coast, and 90% of the world's trade passes through ports on the coast. The global economy relies on our coastal systems functioning because of the vo
7h
See a tiny robot suck up cargo as prep for drug delivery
Magnetic fields power the tiny crawling robots that scientists are creating to improve drug delivery. If you've ever swallowed the same round tablet in hopes of curing everything from stomach cramps to headaches, you already know that medicines aren't always designed to treat precise pain points. While over-the-counter pills have cured many ailments for decades, biomedical researchers have only r
8h
Electrochemically driven regioselective C−H phosphorylation of group 8 metallocenes
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31178-7 Metallocene-based phosphines are compounds with potential use in catalysis. Here, the authors report the electrochemical regioselective functionalization of group 8 metallocenes with phosphine oxides; over 60 examples of phosphorylated (benzo)ferrocenes and ruthenocenes can be accessed via this method without th
8h
3 systems develop together for baby's respiratory health
The co-development of three systems—the gut microbiome, respiratory system, and immune system—is correlated with a baby's respiratory health, research shows. The finding also indicates that an infant can have negative respiratory outcomes if the development of one of these systems is disrupted. The project looked at 148 preterm and 119 full-term infants from birth through one year of age to exami
8h
Daily briefing: Ancient DNA traces origin of Black Death
Nature, Published online: 15 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01703-1 The Black Death plague has been traced back to a fourteenth-century outbreak in what is now Kyrgyzstan. Plus, climate change is turning more of Central Asia into desert and light and sound pollution has disconnected us from nature.
8h
In-Group Cognitive Bias
Human nature (and it's pretty clear that we do have a nature) is complex and multifaceted. We have multiple tendencies, biases, and heuristics all operating at once, pulling us in different directions. These tendencies also interact with our culture and environment, so we are not a slave to our biases. We can understand and rise above them, and we can develop norms, culture, and institutions to n
8h
Journalister uddeler pris til Sundhedsministeriet
Årets Lukkethedspris går til Sundhedsministeriet med sundhedsminister Magnus Heunicke (S) i spidsen. Prisen uddeles af journalistforbundet og tildeles på baggrund af de bekymrende lange sagsbehandlingstider på anmodninger om aktindsigter, som fandt sted under coronakrisen.
8h
Researchers observe vital cellular machinery behind the body's incorporation of selenium
A Rutgers scientist is part of an international team that has determined the process for incorporating selenium—an essential trace mineral found in soil, water and some foods that increases antioxidant effects in the body—includes 25 specialized proteins, a discovery that could help develop new therapies to treat a multitude of diseases from cancer to diabetes.
9h
PODCAST: Evighedskemikalier i drikkevand er vor tids miljøbombe
PFAS ligner mere og mere vores tids mest sundhedsskadelige kemikalieforurening, for det nedbrydes ikke i kroppen og mistænkes for at have en lang række skadevirkninger. I ugens podcast kan du også høre om Googles sprogmodel LaMBDA, der hævder at have følelser, og om Ellertens historie.
9h
Police Militarization Gave Us Uvalde
All my adult life I've been around policing, including working as a civilian cop, training and leading military police battalions, and studying police culture as an academic and a researcher. I've spent hundreds of hours riding along with cops, interviewing police leaders, and helping educate trainees. I love the police, and I love policing. Few professions will expose you to the gamut of human e
9h
This is going to hurt: how to have awkward conversations
We've all had an everyday interaction go horribly wrong. Experts give advice on how to handle difficult issues like sex, money and even dog poo Tricky conversations are easy to put off – but dodging them only makes things harder. They're often about something that could make life easier or better but the fact that the exchange may be embarrassing or difficult for one party or both, forms a big ba
10h
Conservatives Can Win By Embracing 'Selectionism'
The conservative intelligentsia is in the grip of a profound demographic pessimism—a sense that a diversifying America necessarily spells doom for the right, and that the movement's only hope is therefore to halt, or at least sharply reduce, immigrant inflows. Portents of demographic doom have long been a mainstay of conservative media, whether on the Fox News prime-time lineup or in highbrow jou
10h
America's Most Important Economic Storyteller Is Confused
Sign up for Derek's newsletter here . As somebody who's paid to tell stories about the economy, I always find it satisfying to assemble data points to produce a compelling pointillist picture about the state of the world. But these are rough times for economic pointillism. The data are all over the place, and the big picture is a big mess. I look at the stock market, where valuations have collaps
10h
A Lost Trove of Civil War Gold, an FBI Excavation, and Some Very Angry Treasure Hunters
Illustrations by Erik Carter. Photographs by Jingyu Lin. T he FBI was excited . That much seemed evident from the affidavit the agency lodged on March 9, 2018, asking a court for permission to dig up a Pennsylvania hillside in search of Civil War gold. The affidavit related a story from a document titled "The Lost Gold Ingot Treasure," which had been found in the archives at the Military History
10h
SpaceX Employees Pen Open Letter Denouncing Elon Musk's Online Behavior
Elon Musk has also spoken out about the dangers of AI and the need to evaluate it very seriously. SpaceX has changed the game in rocketry with the Falcon 9, and the upcoming Starship could make space more accessible than ever. However, not all is well at the aerospace company. A group of employees fed up with the behavior of CEO Elon Musk have released an open letter calling on SpaceX to address
11h
Comparative parallel multi-omics analysis during the induction of pluripotent and trophectoderm states
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31131-8 Ectopic transcription factor expression can reprogram mouse fibroblasts to pluripotent or trophoblast stem cells. Here the authors apply multi-omics analyses to the induction of pluripotency and trophoblast stem cell state from fibroblasts, comparing these with the changes in transcriptome of early embryonic cel
11h
The Objective Reality of the U.S.-Saudi Relationship
After more than a week of indecision, the Biden administration has confirmed that the president will travel to Saudi Arabia next month to meet with Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, the country's ruler. When I spoke with bin Salman—known universally as MBS—in December, he all but dared President Joe Biden not to meet with him. He told me that Biden's job is to look out for American interests, and
11h
Clues to bee health found in their gut microbiome
The local environment plays a pivotal role in the health and diversity of the gut microbiome of wild bees which could help detect invisible stressors and early indicators of potential threats, say York University scientists in a new study.
11h
Homophobic misinformation is making it harder to contain the spread of monkeypox
Homophobic misinformation circulating about monkeypox on social media is hampering efforts to curb the disease's spread, research conducted on behalf of MIT Technology Review has found. There have been 2,093 confirmed cases of the virus reported worldwide as of June 17. So far cases have mainly been identified among men who have sex with men, according to the World Health Organization . Its direc
11h
For hydrogen power to be a climate solution, leaks must be curbed
Unlike carbon dioxide, hydrogen does not have a direct effect on climate – it affects other pollutants We are taught at school that hydrogen burns to produce water. This is part of its image as clean fuel. But new analysis is providing warnings for the engineers who will create and operate our future energy systems. In 2021, the UK government launched its hydrogen strategy , providing a roadmap t
12h
Book Review: The Unleashing of Tyrannosaurus Rex
David K. Randall's "The Monster's Bones" is a fresh and engrossing account of the exploits of early dinosaur fossil hunters and how their remarkable discoveries — notably the first bones of Tyrannosaurus Rex in the Montana wilderness — became the perfect bridge between science and spectacle.
12h
Bird flu outbreak waning but threat of virus lingers
A bird flu outbreak in the U.S. that led to the deaths of more than 40 million chickens and turkeys and contributed to a spike in egg and meat prices appears to be waning, but experts caution the virus hasn't disappeared and worry another surge could take hold this fall.
13h
Skeptical Science tackles 'discourses of climate delay' and 'solutions denial'
Where we've been Time flies. This coming summer will mark 15 years of Skeptical Science focusing its effort on "traditional" climate science denial. Leaving aside frivolities , we've devoted most of our effort to combatting "serious" denial falling into a handful of broad categories of fairly crisp misconceptions: "radiative physics is wrong," "geophysics is wrong," " modeling of geophysical syst
13h
Cryo-EM structure of an amyloid fibril formed by full-length human SOD1 reveals its conformational conversion
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31240-4 Misfolded SOD1 has been linked to both familial and sporadic ALS. Here the authors have determined the cryo-EM structure of SOD1 fibrils, providing insights into the conversion of SOD1 from its immature form into an aggregated form during pathogenesis of ALS.
14h
Secondary through-space interactions facilitated single-molecule white-light emission from clusteroluminogens
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31184-9 Although mature and systematic theories of molecular photophysics have been developed, it is still challenging to endow clusteroluminogens (CLgens) with designed photophysical properties by manipulating through-space interactions. Here, the authors design three CLgens that show multiple emissions and white-light
14h
Deficiency in endocannabinoid synthase DAGLB contributes to early onset Parkinsonism and murine nigral dopaminergic neuron dysfunction
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31168-9 2- arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), an abundant endocannabinoid in the brain, regulates diverse neural functions. Here, the authors identified four loss-of-function mutations in dicylglycerol lipase β (DAGLB) from six patients with early onset Parkinsonism. In mice, loss of DAGLB in dopamine neurons reduced neuronal
14h
Om kopplingen mellan kvalster och luftvägsinfektioner
När astmatikers luftvägar exponeras för kvalster försämras immunresponsen vilket kan leda till ett nedsatt immunförsvar. Personer med förkylningsastma kan då lättare drabbas av sekundära virus- och bakterieinfektioner. Nya resultat tyder på att astmatiker bör undvika kvalster och att de patienter som dessutom är allergiska mot kvalster bör överväga att genomgå så kallad hyposensibilisering, menar
14h
A global lipid map reveals host dependency factors conserved across SARS-CoV-2 variants
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31097-7 Here, Farley et al. perform untargeted lipidomics to assess how SARS-CoV-2 rewires host lipid metabolism. SARS-CoV-2 viral proteins specifically induce lipid droplet formation and dramatically change lipid metabolism to support infection; interfering with lipid metabolism using small molecule inhibitors decrease
15h
Context-dependent enhancer function revealed by targeted inter-TAD relocation
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31241-3 Here the authors show that a strong enhancer sequence can be controlled by the chromatin environment provided by a topologically associated domain (TAD) located nearby. An enhancer relocated by homologous recombination takes all the hallmarks of its new neighboring enhancers located in the recipient TAD.
15h
Photos of the Week: Paddle Steamer, Floating Restaurant, Glass Bridge
Wildfires in Arizona and California, scenes from Russia's ongoing invasion of Ukraine, fancy hats at the Royal Ascot in England, a display of the AIDS Memorial Quilt in San Francisco, anti-government protests in Ecuador, heavy rainfall and flooding in India, BMX racing in the Netherlands, a ballet performance in Ukraine, lightning over Kansas City, and much more
15h
FUNDC2 promotes liver tumorigenesis by inhibiting MFN1-mediated mitochondrial fusion
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31187-6 Fragmented mitochondria are a frequent hallmark of cancer, but the cause and consequence are less clear. The authors demonstrate that elevated FUNDC2 causes mitochondrial fragmentation through inhibition of MFN1 in hepatocellular carcinoma and that knockdown of FUNDC2 inhibits liver tumorigenesis in mice.
16h
The chromatin remodeller ATRX facilitates diverse nuclear processes, in a stochastic manner, in both heterochromatin and euchromatin
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31194-7 The chromatin remodeling complex ATRX can promote gene expression, for example by binding G-quadruplexes (G4s) to prevent their negative effect on expression. Here the authors use a single-cell approach to show that only a subset of erythroid cells isolated from patients with ATRX mutations have reduced chromati
16h
Greenery and bright colours in cities can boost morale – study
Researchers in France used virtual reality to test the impact of tweaks made to urban settings Having bright colours and greenery in our cities can make people happier and calmer, according to an unusual experiment involving virtual reality headsets. A team of researchers at the University of Lille, in France, used VR to test how volunteers reacted to variations of a minimalist concrete, glass an
17h
30-year study links childhood obesity and fitness to midlife cognition
A new study of the impact of childhood fitness and obesity on cognition in middle age, followed over 1200 people who were children in 1985 for over 30 years, has found that better performance on physical tests is related to better cognition later in life and may protect against dementia in later years. Importantly these findings are not impacted by academic ability and socioeconomic status at chil
19h
Surfaces So Different Even a Fourth Dimension Can't Make Them the Same
In geometry and the closely related field of topology, adding a spatial dimension can often have wondrous effects: Previously distinct objects become indistinguishable. But a new proof finds there are some objects whose differences are so stark, they can't be effaced with a little more space. The work, posted at the end of May, solves a question posed by Charles Livingston in 1982 concerning… S
19h
Sharks may be closer to the city than you think, new study finds
The world's coastlines are rapidly urbanizing, but how this increased human presence may impact species living in the ocean is not fully understood. Scientists tracked the movements of three shark species, bull, nurse and great hammerhead, in relation to the city of Miami. Given the chemical, light, and noise pollution emanating from the coastal metropolis, researchers expected sharks to avoid are
20h
The January 6 Committee's Most Damning Revelation Yet
T he most damning piece of evidence presented at today's Select Committee hearing on the January 6 insurrection wasn't a sound bite from a star witness, nor was it another never-before-seen video of the assault on the Capitol. The revelation amounted to a single highlighted sentence in an email sent days after the attack by one of Donald Trump's lawyers, John Eastman, to another, Rudy Giuliani: "
21h
Google Allegedly Infiltrated by "Cult-Like Religious Sect"
Hiring Freeze Sounds like it might actually pretty easy to get hired at Google — as long as you're a member of an unusual religious group in California that believes most people exist in a state of "waking sleep." The New York Times reported today that a group called the Fellowship of Friends, which one of the story's reporters described as a "cult-like religious sect," gained power at the tech g
22h
Trump's Dangerous Wannabes
This is an edition of The Atlantic Daily, a newsletter that guides you through the biggest stories of the day, helps you discover new ideas, and recommends the best in culture. Sign up for it here . As more revelations emerge from the January 6–committee proceedings, I am struck by how much the Constitution was threatened not only by outsize figures such as Donald Trump, but even more so by medio
22h
Sharks may be closer to the city than you think, new study finds
The world's coastlines are rapidly urbanizing, but how this increased human presence may impact species living in the ocean is not fully understood. In a new study led by scientists at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, researchers tracked the movements of three shark species, bull, nurse and great hammerhead, in relation to the city of Miami. Given t
23h
Sharks may be closer to the city than you think, new study finds
The world's coastlines are rapidly urbanizing, but how this increased human presence may impact species living in the ocean is not fully understood. In a new study led by scientists at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, researchers tracked the movements of three shark species, bull, nurse and great hammerhead, in relation to the city of Miami. Given t
23h
Disgraced Italian surgeon convicted of criminal harm to stem cell patient
A surgeon who just a decade ago was celebrated around the globe as a pioneer in stem cell transplants has been convicted of one count of "causing bodily harm," a felony, in a Swedish court. The district court in Solna today found Paolo Macchiarini not guilty on other charges, including aggravated assault, relating to three patients he treated while working for the famed Karolinska Institute (KI).
23h
Solving the puzzle of 2D disorder
When players try to solve word games, they attempt to put together clues to find the solution. Sure, it helps to have a strong vocabulary, but finding the right answers to those puzzles is as much about logic and strategy as it is about being a wordsmith.
23h
NASA completes critical testing milestone for NOAA's JPSS-2 satellite
The Joint Polar Satellite System-2 satellite, or JPSS-2, has cleared a critical testing milestone, bringing it a step closer to launch. Last week, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's polar-orbiting satellite emerged from the chamber after completing its thermal vacuum testing. This test is meant to show that the spacecraft and all of its instruments will perform successfully when
23h
During Business Meeting, Elon Musk Suddenly Starts Talking About Aliens
CEOs vs Aliens Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk addressed Twitter employees for the very first time today, months after announcing plans to buy the social network. But in one peculiar moment, Musk deviated from the discussion of potential layoffs and content moderation to an entirely unexpected topic: aliens. According to CNBC 's reporting on the closed-door meeting, Musk took the time to discuss h
23h
Best Places to Buy A Printer in 2022
Printers have one (very important) job: Turning your digital files into objects you can hold in the physical world. It doesn't matter if you need copies of that school day's notes for a classmate, photos for your friends, or a last-minute thank you card, a printer's got you covered. If you need help selecting the right printers for your situation, we recommend consulting our buyer's guides on thi
23h
Supercomputing helps reveal weaknesses in HIV-1 virus
Much remains to be discovered on how the HIV-1 virus infects our cells. Scientists know that it slips past the defenses of our immune system, entering white blood cells to deliver its genetic payload and hijack the cell's transcription machinery that in turn cranks out copies of viral RNA and new HIV-1 viruses. But many of the details remain hazy.
23h
Experiment results confirm anomaly, could point to new elementary particle
New scientific results confirm an anomaly seen in previous experiments, which may point to an as-yet-unconfirmed new elementary particle, the sterile neutrino, or indicate the need for a new interpretation of an aspect of standard model physics, such as the neutrino cross section, first measured 60 years ago. Los Alamos National Laboratory is the lead American institution collaborating on the Baks
23h
Arkansas scientist gets 1-year sentence in case stemming from China Initiative
U.S. District Court Judge Timothy Brooks today sentenced Simon Ang to 1 year and 1 day in prison for lying to FBI about his status as an inventor. He was also fined $5500. Ang, a former engineering professor at the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, was ordered to report to federal prison on 20 July to begin serving his sentence, after which he will be on supervised release for 1 year. Here's
1d
Tragedy! NASA Says the Voyager Space Probes are Powering Down
Powering Down The clock is ticking for Voyager space vehicles 1 and 2. Voyager 1 has gone farther since being launched in 1977, along with its twin, than any other manmade space vehicles in human history — but NASA says they'll soon run out of power. News outlets have been reporting attempted cuts and reductions of the Voyagers for a while, including in 2005 and again in 2021 . But this week's Sc
1d
Understanding learning by inference
Both humans and other animals are good at learning by inference, using information we do have to figure out things we cannot observe directly. New research shows how our brains achieve this by constructing cognitive maps.
1d
Researchers change the game when it comes to activity tracking
The creation of high-resolution extrusion printing — think 3D printing but with ink that conducts electricity — has enabled researchers to explore the potential of wearable human motion devices. Wearable technology — smartwatches, heart monitors, sleep aid devices, even step counters — have become part of everyday life. And researchers have now created even smaller, lighter and highly-accurate
1d
Soy sauce's salt-enhancing peptides
Soy sauce deepens the flavor of soup stocks, gives stir-fried rice its sweet-salty glaze and makes a plate of dumplings absolutely enjoyable. But what exactly makes this complex, salty, umami sauce so tasty? Now, researchers have discovered the proteins and other compounds that give soy sauce its distinctive flavors and they say that proteins and peptides help make it salty.
1d
A glucose meter could soon say whether you have SARS-CoV-2 antibodies
Over-the-counter COVID tests can quickly show whether you are infected with SARS-CoV-2. But if you have a positive result, there's no equivalent at-home test to assess how long you're protected against reinfection. Researchers now report a simple, accurate glucose-meter-based test incorporating a novel fusion protein. The researchers say that consumers could someday use this assay to monitor their
1d
Watching the death of a rare giant star
Extreme supergiant stars known as hypergiants are very rare, with only a few known to exist in the Milky Way. By tracing molecular emissions in the outflows around the red hypergiant star VY Canis Majoris, astronomers obtained the first detailed map of the star's envelope, which sheds light on the mechanisms involved in the final stages of extreme supergiant star.
1d
Breathe in the Benefits: Hyperbaric Oxygen for PTSD
Even if you haven't heard the term "hyperbaric oxygen treatment" (HBOT), you are actually probably familiar with its premise. Most often, we hear of this treatment being used for divers that ascend from depth too quickly and experience decompression sickness ("the bends") caused by a buildup of gas bubbles in their blood from rapid changes […]
1d
Off-season cattle grazing to help control fire danger from invasive cheatgrass
Cheatgrass, an invasive annual grass that has invaded Nevada rangelands, is responsible for much of the increasing wildfire danger in the Intermountain West. However, scientists have discovered that fire danger can be reduced through the application of targeted cattle grazing in the dormant growing season by attracting the cattle with stations containing protein feed supplements.
1d
Peanut allergy treatment safest when started for infants under 12 months, researchers find
Researchers demonstrated in 2019 that pre-schoolers can safely overcome peanut allergies with a treatment called oral immunotherapy. Now they have evidence that the earlier pre-schoolers start this treatment, the better. This real-world study focused on infants younger than 12 months old and reveals that not only is oral immunotherapy effective against peanut allergies, it's even safer for this ag
1d
Murders of women worldwide remain vastly undercounted. Activists are now filling in the gaps
An unknown number of women and girls are killed every year primarily because of their gender, murders known as "femicides" or "feminicides." Although gender-related violence is a serious problem worldwide, official government data on the issue are often inaccurate, incomplete, or nonexistent. These "missing data" have real consequences, says Helena Suárez Val, a researcher at the University of Wa
1d
New global biodiversity framework falls short on inclusion of chemical pollutants, say environmental experts
Environmental scientists, ecologists, and policy experts argue in a letter published today in Science that the proposed Post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework—a new international agreement to protect biodiversity—fails to account for the totality of chemical pollutants that threaten the health of ecosystems worldwide. Their recommendations arrive ahead of Post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework n
1d
Off-season cattle grazing to help control fire danger from invasive cheatgrass
Cheatgrass, an invasive annual grass that has invaded Nevada rangelands, is responsible for much of the increasing wildfire danger in the Intermountain West. However, scientists at the University of Nevada, Reno have discovered that fire danger can be reduced through the application of targeted cattle grazing in the dormant growing season by attracting the cattle with stations containing protein f
1d
Off-season cattle grazing to help control fire danger from invasive cheatgrass
Cheatgrass, an invasive annual grass that has invaded Nevada rangelands, is responsible for much of the increasing wildfire danger in the Intermountain West. However, scientists at the University of Nevada, Reno have discovered that fire danger can be reduced through the application of targeted cattle grazing in the dormant growing season by attracting the cattle with stations containing protein f
1d
Exploring soy sauce's salt-enhancing peptides
Soy sauce deepens the flavor of soup stocks, gives stir-fried rice its sweet-salty glaze and makes a plate of dumplings absolutely enjoyable. But what exactly makes this complex, salty, umami sauce so tasty? Now, researchers reporting in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have discovered the proteins and other compounds that give soy sauce its distinctive flavors and they say that prot
1d
Exploring soy sauce's salt-enhancing peptides
Soy sauce deepens the flavor of soup stocks, gives stir-fried rice its sweet-salty glaze and makes a plate of dumplings absolutely enjoyable. But what exactly makes this complex, salty, umami sauce so tasty? Now, researchers reporting in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have discovered the proteins and other compounds that give soy sauce its distinctive flavors and they say that prot
1d
Blockchain Guy Struggles to Explain a Single Practical Use for Web3
According to its evangelists, Web3 is supposed to revolutionize by decentralizing it with the help of blockchain technology. But there's one big problem: nobody seems to know what tangible benefits that would have — especially in concrete terms that apply to the real world as it exists today. During a recent chat with author, podcast host, and Bloomberg columnist Tyler Cowen, billionaire investor
1d
NASA Accuses NASA of Littering on Mars
Gotcha! J'accuse… moi? As it rolled its way through the beautiful Jezero Crater , NASA's Perseverance Mars rover spotted something interesting tucked into a small boulder. Upon closer inspection, the robot's team was able to confirm that it was not, in fact, a sign of extraterrestrial life — just a regular ol' piece of human trash, which NASA believes came from, well, NASA. "My team has spotted
1d
Quantum simulator delivers new insight
A quantum simulator is giving physicists a clear look at spin-charge separation, a bizarre phenomenon in which two parts of indivisible particles called electrons travel at different speeds in extremely cold 1D wires. The research has implications for quantum computing and electronics with atom-scale wires.
1d
Researchers develop a comprehensive atlas of disease mortality
Researchers have published a detailed collection of mortality estimates for diseases, disorders and external factors. The study provides a resource to estimate reductions in life expectancy for a comprehensive range of disorders. The atlas will be a useful tool for clinicians, academics, and policymakers looking into links between disorders and mortality estimates, as well as for researchers study
1d
Once seen as fleeting, a new solar tech proves its lasting power
Researchers have developed the first perovskite solar cell with a commercially viable lifetime, marking a major milestone for an emerging class of renewable energy technology. The team projects their device can perform above industry standards for around 30 years, far more than the 20 years used as a threshold for viability for solar cells.
1d
How the cerebellum modulates our ability to socialize
The cerebellum is essential for sensorimotor control but also contributes to higher cognitive functions including social behaviors. Researchers uncovered how dopamine in the cerebellum modulates social behaviors via its action on D2 receptors (D2R). These new findings pave the way to determine whether socially related psychiatric disorders are also associated with altered dopamine receptors expres
1d
To treat or to tolerate (pathogens), that is the question
Scientists have used Xenopus laevis tadpoles to tease out the genetic and biological mechanisms that enhance disease tolerance, and have identified drugs that can keep the tadpoles alive even in the presence of lethal bacteria. Many of the same mechanisms are also found in mammals, suggesting that humans and other animals could one day be treated for disease by increasing their tolerance to pathog
1d
US infertility rate plateaus
During recent decades, the rate of infertility among women in the United States has remained largely the same, according to researchers. Their new analysis of data collected from 1995 and 2019 found that infertility is more common among women who are older, who are non-Hispanic Black and who have less income or education, and women without access to sexual and reproductive health services.
1d
Record-shattering events spur advances in tying climate change to extreme weather
Table of contents A version of this story appeared in Science, Vol 376, Issue 6599. Download PDF In June 2021, a jet stream charged with heat and chaotic energy from a nearby cyclone stalled over the Pacific Northwest. The mass of trapped air baked the already hot landscape below to a record 49.6°C. More than 1000 people died from heat exposure. Scientists quickly began working to figure out how
1d
Newly identified population of polar bears survives on glacier slush, not sea ice
Polar bears typically depend on solid sea ice to hunt and keep their bellies full. To breathe, seals pop up in holes in the frozen seawater, and there the bears ambush and eat them. Now, however, scientists have discovered a group of polar bears in southeastern Greenland that does things differently, using a slushy mix of freshwater snow and ice as a platform to ambush seals. This new population
1d
News at a glance: Webb telescope dinged, U.S.-Russia research paused, and NASA's UFO study
Table of contents A version of this story appeared in Science, Vol 376, Issue 6599. Download PDF ASTRONOMY Star mapper provides Milky Way portrait he European Space Agency's Gaia satellite has now mapped almost 2 billion of the Milky Way's stars, logging their positions, speeds, temperatures, and other parameters—and allowing astronomers to chart the Galaxy's structure and evolution. Last week, o
1d
What causes Long Covid? Here are the three leading theories
Table of contents A version of this story appeared in Science, Vol 376, Issue 6599. Download PDF .circle-wrap{ width: 40%; float: right!important; border-radius: 50%; shape-outside:ellipse(); } .illo { padding: 1rem; position: absolute; min-width: auto; height: auto; object-fit: unset !important; transform: translate(-50%, -50%); } .illo_cause { width: 18% !important; max-width: 280px; min-width:
1d
To treat or to tolerate pathogens, that is the question
Why do some people seem to never get sick while others consistently fall prey to viruses and bacteria? How can the spouse of a sick person avoid catching their partner's bug despite sleeping next to them every night? Questions like these have become top-of-mind for many people during the COVID-19 pandemic, and scientists are now a big step closer to answering them thanks to some aquatic helpers: t
1d
An Elsevier book plagiarizes an abstract published by…Elsevier
Elsevier plans to remove the introduction from a book on mineralogy after investigating allegations of plagiarism, including from another Elsevier publication, according to emails obtained by Retraction Watch. Photo Atlas of Mineral Pseudomorphism by J. Theo Kloprogge and Robert Lavinsky, was published in 2017 and still appears to be for sale for $100 for a … Continue reading
1d
To treat or to tolerate pathogens, that is the question
Why do some people seem to never get sick while others consistently fall prey to viruses and bacteria? How can the spouse of a sick person avoid catching their partner's bug despite sleeping next to them every night? Questions like these have become top-of-mind for many people during the COVID-19 pandemic, and scientists are now a big step closer to answering them thanks to some aquatic helpers: t
1d
Did supernovae help form Barnard's Loop?
Astronomers studying the structure of the Milky Way galaxy have released the highest-resolution 3D view of the Orion star-forming region. The image and interactive figure were presented today at a press conference hosted by the American Astronomical Society.
1d
Diamonds are for quantum sensing
Researchers measured tiny magnetic fields with unprecedented speed. By monitoring spins at nitrogen-vacancy centers along using ultrafast spectroscopy, this work may lead to extremely accurate future quantum computers.
1d
Wildfire smoke exposure negatively impacts dairy cow health
Increasing frequency and size of wildfires in the United States over the past several decades affect everything from human life and health to air quality, biodiversity, and land use. The US dairy industry is not exempt from these effects. The Western states, where wildfires are especially prevalent, are home to more than two million dairy cows that produce more than 25% of the nation's milk. A new
1d
Can a parasitic wasp save your fruit crops?
Researchers developed a toolkit for investigating the molecular mechanisms governing the parasitic nature of the wasp species Asobara japonica. They first used DNA and RNA-sequencing-based techniques to identify genes controlling the wasp's body color, as well as the putative toxic components in its venom. They used RNA interference to block expression of the body color gene, darkening its appeara
1d
Gene interaction that contributes to rice heat tolerance identified
Rice is one of the most important staple crops, on which more than half of the world's population depends. But as temperatures rise and extreme weather events increase, rice is becoming more vulnerable. Genetically modified strains can withstand some flooding, but few, if any, can survive the heat stress caused by the combination of high temperatures and drought. There may be hardier crops on the
1d
Largest study of domestic cat DNA identifies disease-causing variants in new breeds
Thirteen genetic variants associated with disease in cats are present in more pedigreed breeds than previously thought, according to the largest ever DNA-based study of domestic cats, led by Heidi Anderson from Wisdom Panel in the United States and colleagues from the University of Helsinki in Finland. However, these variants are declining in frequency in breeds that are regularly screened for the
1d
Newly documented population of polar bears in Southeast Greenland sheds light on the species' future in a warming Arctic
Scientists have documented a previously unknown subpopulation of polar bears living in Southeast Greenland. The polar bears survive with limited access to sea ice by hunting from freshwater ice that pours into the ocean from Greenland's glaciers. Because this isolated population is genetically distinct and uniquely adapted to its environment, studying it could shed light on the future of the speci
1d
Will These Be the Last Polar Bears on Earth?
The last surviving member of a species—the individual whose death brings extinction— is called an endling . Those individuals can sometimes be identified , even named . Many more of them live and die unseen. For example, archaeological evidence shows that the woolly mammoth endling lived about 4,000 years ago on Wrangel Island, 87 miles off the coast of Siberia. Mammoths survived there for millen
1d
Alarming Footage Shows Robot Battle Tank Blowing Up Cars
Fire Power A new video shared by Estonian robotics and autonomous systems developer Milrem Robotics shows an AI-powered tank blowing up cars and other targets, in a terrifying glimpse of the future of warfare. The tank, dubbed Type-X , is designed to allow troops to "breach enemy defensive positions with minimal risk," according to a 2021 statement from Milrem Robotics, by providing them with "eq
1d
Droughts in the sixth century paved the way for Islam
Extreme dry conditions contributed to the decline of the ancient South Arabian kingdom of Himyar. Researchers from the University of Basel have reported these findings in the journal Science. Combined with political unrest and war, the droughts left behind a region in disarray, thereby creating the conditions on the Arabian peninsula that made possible the spread of the newly emerging religion of
1d
Gene interaction that contributes to rice heat tolerance identified
Rice is one of the most important staple crops, on which more than half of the world's population depends. But as temperatures rise and extreme weather events increase, rice is becoming more vulnerable. Genetically modified strains can withstand some flooding, but few, if any, can survive the heat stress caused by the combination of high temperatures and drought. There may be hardier crops on the
1d
Largest study of domestic cat DNA identifies disease-causing variants in new breeds
Thirteen genetic variants associated with disease in cats are present in more pedigreed breeds than previously thought, according to the largest ever DNA-based study of domestic cats, led by Heidi Anderson from Wisdom Panel in the United States and colleagues from the University of Helsinki in Finland. However, these variants are declining in frequency in breeds that are regularly screened for the
1d
Photonic integrated erbium doped amplifiers reach commercial performance
Erbium-doped fiber amplifiers (EDFAs) are devices that can provide gain to the optical signal power in optical fibers. They are often used in long-distance communication fiber optic cables and fiber-based lasers. Invented in the 1980s, EDFAs have profoundly impacted our information society enabling signals to be routed across the Atlantic and replacing electrical repeaters.
1d
Red meat consumption may remain high in Finland despite consumer support for plant-based diets
Meat production is a significant source of greenhouse gasses and widespread adoption of a plant-based diet is key to achieving the United Nations 2030 Sustainable Development Goals. A study publishing June 16th in PLOS Sustainability and Transformation by Maijaliisa Erkkola at the University of Helsinki, Finland, and colleagues suggests that while consumers may have an attitudinal openness to shif
1d
Newly documented population of polar bears in Southeast Greenland sheds light on the species' future in a warming Arctic
Scientists have documented a previously unknown subpopulation of polar bears living in Southeast Greenland. The polar bears survive with limited access to sea ice by hunting from freshwater ice that pours into the ocean from Greenland's glaciers. Because this isolated population is genetically distinct and uniquely adapted to its environment, studying it could shed light on the future of the speci
1d
Martian meteorite upsets planet formation theory
A new study of an old meteorite contradicts current thinking about how rocky planets like the Earth and Mars acquire volatile elements such as hydrogen, carbon, oxygen, nitrogen and noble gases as they form. The work is published June 16 in Science.
1d
Bernard Bigot (1950–2022)
Nature, Published online: 16 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01681-4 Director-general of ITER, the world's largest fusion experiment.
1d
Shedding light on linguistic diversity and its evolution
Scholars have created a new global repository of linguistic data. The project is designed to facilitate new insights into the evolution of words and sounds of the languages spoken across the world today. The Lexibank database contains standardized lexical data for more than 2000 languages. It is the most extensive publicly available collection compiled so far.
1d
Let machines do the work: Automating semiconductor research with machine learning
The development of new thin semiconductor materials requires a quantitative analysis of a large amount of reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) data, which is time consuming and requires expertise. To tackle this issue, scientists identify machine learning techniques that can help automate RHEED data analysis. Their findings could greatly accelerate semiconductor research and pave th
1d
Climate change may take a bite out of ketchup tomatoes
Rising temperatures are projected to lower yields around the world for "processing tomatoes," those used in ketchup, pasta sauce, and other tomato products, new research shows. By 2050, the global supply of processing tomatoes is expected to decrease by 6% compared to the study's baseline of 1990-2009, with Italy's crop being among the hardest hit. "The processing tomatoes are grown in the open f
1d
When parenting style predicts political leanings
Parenting style—helicopter parenting (disciplinarian) versus free-range explorer (nurturing)—may be a key to the country's political future. A new study out of Carnegie Mellon University has found a person's parenting style tips their hand to the adoption of future government policies across a wide range of social issues, including education, elder care and medicine. The results are available in t
1d
How the debt crisis of 2008-09 fueled populist politics
The economic downturn of 2008-09 has often been described as a financial-sector crisis, featuring failing banks. But it was much more than that. Many people with stagnant or dropping incomes, having borrowed to sustain their standard of living, found themselves deep in debt when the economy sagged and joblessness increased.
1d
Photos: Devastating Floods Hit the Yellowstone Region
Earlier this week, heavy rains and melting snow near Yellowstone National Park combined, causing rivers to overflow, flooding farms and ranches, washing out roads and bridges, and forcing the park to close. The Yellowstone River hit its highest level in decades, and the surge is now moving through nearby Billings, Montana . When Yellowstone National Park reopens—possibly as soon as next week—it w
1d
Method lets humans help robots 'see' to get around stuff
Researchers have come up with a new strategy that allows humans to help robots "see" their environments and carry out tasks. Just like us, robots can't see through walls. Sometimes they need a little help to get where they're going. The strategy called Bayesian Learning IN the Dark—BLIND, for short—is a new solution to the long-standing problem of motion planning for robots that work in environme
1d
The Future of Air Travel Is Apparently the Final Circle of Hell
Nightmare (Jet) Fuel Close quarters. Armrest battles. That one passenger who chooses evil by eating eggs in a flying metal can. For most, flying coach is not exactly a great time. But just you wait! Economy travel may just get worse. Meet the Chaise Lounge Airplane Seats, a proposal for a bunk-like jetliner layout wherein one passenger sits in a fairly comfortable-looking seat a few steps up, whi
1d
Best Samsung Tablets in 2022
The best Samsung tablets pack an intense amount of possibilities in portable form. Samsung offers one of the best Android smartphones on the market, and has replicated this experience in a larger form with its line of Galaxy tablets. Great graphics, super-fast processing, and some serious versatility put these tablets toe to toe with the other nearly ubiquitous tablet brand on the market. You kno
1d
Chemists create a sensor that accurately detects the saliva pH of humans
Chemists at the Ural Federal University have created a sensor for determining the pH of human saliva. This is a fluorophore with strong and stable emission, which picks up the smallest fluctuations in the pH in biological fluids. The analysis is performed using microdoses of the substance and a spectrometer, in which the substance is irradiated with a special lamp. The pH data appears in 5-7 secon
1d
Rare Anglo-Saxon burial site found along HS2 route – video
An Anglo-Saxon burial site containing over 140 people along with their belongings has been uncovered near Wendover, Buckinghamshire, along the route of the HS2 railway. 'To find this number of individuals is really unique,' said Rachel Wood, a lead archaeologist working on the site. A total of 138 graves were found at the site, making it 'one of the largest Anglo-Saxon burial grounds uncovered in
1d
Olive trees were first domesticated 7,000 years ago, study finds
A new study has unraveled the earliest evidence for domestication of a fruit tree, researchers report. The researchers analyzed remnants of charcoal from the Chalcolithic site of Tel Zaf in the Jordan Valley and determined that they came from olive trees. Since the olive did not grow naturally in the Jordan Valley, this means that the inhabitants planted the tree intentionally about 7,000 years ag
1d
Polio outbreak risk increases in western Ukraine as war ensues
The reintroduction of the wild-type poliovirus or circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus (cVDPV) is a sizeable threat in Ukraine, which is considered a high-risk country for vaccine-preventable infections, including poliomyelitis, an extremely dangerous disease that causes paralysis in children. The situation has been exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic, the war in eastern Ukraine, and ongoing he
1d
Biotechnology platforms enable fast, customizable vaccine production
An examination of the COVID-related transition to biotechnology platform-based techniques for vaccine development concludes that such smart manufacturing techniques could in the future be applied to other viruses, potentially allowing vaccine development to keep pace with constantly evolving pathogens.
1d
How much money is needed for ideal life? Most are OK with £8m, study finds
Research counters idea that everyone wants to be as rich as possible, though many Americans want $100bn How much money do you need to lead your "absolutely ideal life"? The answer for most people, according to new research by university psychologists, is $10m (£8.6m) – but not Americans, who say they need at least $100m, and frequently insist on $100bn. Academics at the universities of Bath, Bath
1d
Predicting rainfall futures
Despite decades of research, what will happen to rainfall in years to come remains unknown, and severe floods as well as prolonged droughts are already defying expectations.
1d
Intrinsic optical nonlinearities and carrier dynamics of InSe
Recently, researchers in Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics (SIOM) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences carried out a systematic investigation on the microscopic optical nonlinearities and transient carrier dynamics in Indium Selenide (InSe) Nanosheet. Related research results were published in Optics Express on May 9, 2022.
1d
There could be four hostile civilizations in the Milky Way, researcher speculates
In 1977, the Big Ear Radio Telescope at Ohio State University picked up a strong narrowband signal from space. The signal was a continuous radio wave that was strong in intensity and frequency and had many expected characteristics of an extraterrestrial transmission. This event would come to be known as the "Wow!" signal, and it remains the strongest candidate for a message sent by an extraterrest
1d
Sweden: surgeon convicted of bodily harm over synthetic trachea transplant
Court finds that Paolo Macchiarini carried out experimental procedure on patient who was not critically ill A Swedish court has found an Italian surgeon, once hailed for pioneering windpipe surgery, guilty of causing bodily harm to a patient, but cleared him of assault charges. Paolo Macchiarini won praise in 2011 after claiming to have performed the world's first synthetic trachea transplants us
1d
Airbnb Denies That Woman's Rental Was Filled With Hidden Cameras
Twitter Terror In a viral tweet , an Airbnb guest claimed that she and a friend had found what they believed to be several hidden cameras in a Philadelphia rental. "BE CAUTIOUS BOOKING AIR BNBs! My friend and I recently stayed at [an] air bnb in Philadelphia with over 10 hidden cameras all over the house," read the renter's viral post, which included several videos of the purported cameras. "Incl
1d
SpaceX Employees Slam Elon Musk's Bizarre Behavior in Open Letter
Public Embarrassment An open letter circulating on SpaceX's internal chat system and obtained by The Verge denounces CEO Elon Musk's behavior in the public sphere. In a particularly hard-hitting quip, the employs accuse Musk of failing to fulfil the team's "No Asshole" and zero-tolerance sexual harassment policies. It's unclear how many employees have signed the letter, which is addressed to Spac
1d
How Indian women in Australia experience family violence, and how to combat it
Manjula Datta O'Connor is a clinical psychiatrist and chair of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists Family Violence Psychiatry Network. She has a particular interest in the mental health experiences of migrant women affected by family violence. She has been supporting women in her clinical practice for the past three decades.
1d
Vega-C set for inaugural launch
ESA's new medium-lift Vega-C rocket is nearly ready for its inaugural flight, with its four fully-stacked stages now ready for payload integration, final checks and launch from Europe's Spaceport in French Guiana.
1d
Weighing the cost of increasing Saudi heritage tourism
The impact of tourism development at the Al-Hijr Archaeological Site, decreed Saudi Arabia's first UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2008, has been significant since the Saudi Vision 2030 strategy was launched in 2016, which positioned heritage tourism sites as important catalysts in the nation's long-term transition to a post-oil economy.
1d
NASA telescope to help untangle galaxy growth, dark matter makeup
NASA's Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope will study wispy streams of stars that extend far beyond the apparent edges of many galaxies. Missions like the Hubble and James Webb space telescopes would have to patch together hundreds of small images to see these structures around nearby galaxies in full. Roman will do so in a single snapshot. Astronomers will use these observations to explore how gala
1d
New method helps exfoliate hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets
Chinese researchers recently reported an innovative mechanical process for controllably exfoliating hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets (h-BNNSs).This method, known as the "water-icing triggered exfoliation process," was proposed by Prof. Zhang Junyan's group from the Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics (LICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS).
1d
Can a parasitic wasp save your fruit crops?
The wasp species Asobara japonica (A. japonica) is a parasitic organism, meaning it sustains its life by hijacking resources from a host such as the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. The wasp mother can secrete a venom full of toxic components that overcome the host's immune defenses to enable its baby wasp to live inside the host. In a newly published article in DNA Research, a team led by resea
1d
Can a parasitic wasp save your fruit crops?
The wasp species Asobara japonica (A. japonica) is a parasitic organism, meaning it sustains its life by hijacking resources from a host such as the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. The wasp mother can secrete a venom full of toxic components that overcome the host's immune defenses to enable its baby wasp to live inside the host. In a newly published article in DNA Research, a team led by resea
1d
Indirect effects of climate change adaptations on alpine and pre‐alpine freshwater systems
When thermometers in California recorded scorching temperatures in the summer of 2000, even the salmon in Klamath River felt the effects. The temperature of the water drove them to gather in unusually large numbers in confined spaces, creating the perfect food source for pathogens. At the same time, farmers redirected increasing amounts of water to their arid fields, which reduced the streamflow.
1d
Examining the sensations experienced when reading poetry
In addition to searching for the meaning of poems, they can also often be described through the emotions that the reader feels while reading them. Kristiine Kikas, a doctoral student at the School of Humanities of Tallinn University, studied which other sensations arise whilst reading poetry and how they affect the understanding of poems.
1d
Olive trees were first domesticated 7,000 years ago
A joint study by researchers from Tel Aviv University and the Hebrew University unraveled the earliest evidence for domestication of a fruit tree. The researchers analyzed remnants of charcoal from the Chalcolithic site of Tel Zaf in the Jordan Valley and determined that they came from olive trees. Since the olive did not grow naturally in the Jordan Valley, this means that the inhabitants planted
1d
Public database of standardized linguistic features
Is it true that many languages in the world use words similar to "mama" and "papa" for "mother" and "father"? If a language uses only one word for both "arm" and "hand," does it also use only one word for both "leg" and "foot"? How do languages manage to use a relatively small number of words to express so many concepts? An interdisciplinary team of linguists, computational scientists and psycholo
1d
Unique Viking shipyard discovered at Birka
Archaeologists have located a unique Viking Age shipyard site at Birka on Björkö in Lake Mälaren. The discovery challenges previous theories about how the maritime activities of the Viking Age were organized.
1d
Grab Last-Minute Father's Day Deals on the Rachio Smart Sprinkler Controller and More at The Home Depot
If your dad really cares about having the nicest-looking lawn on the block, you should take advantage of this $100 discount on Rachio's R3 Smart Sprinkler Controller at The Home Depot. The R3 is a WiFi-connected gadget that will allow him to segment his sprinkler system into eight zones, each of which can be controlled independently through an app on his phone. Rachio also offers a six- and 16-zo
1d
That Viral DALL-E AI Is Great at Generating Images of Drugs
The viral DALL-E Mini image-generating neural network contains, like all artificial intelligences, multitudes — and those multitudes include an apparent knowledge of drugs. After reporting that the DALL-E Mini unfortunately is capable of generating some pretty terrible racist stuff, Futurism decided to see how well it handles other types of controversial content. Our finding? That the AI is quite
1d
Feral cats pushing critically endangered marsupial further towards extinction
Predation by feral cats is putting the critically endangered Kangaroo Island dunnart—a small, mouse-sized marsupial found only on the Kangaroo Island off South Australia—to the brink of extinction. The study, published in Scientific Reports, highlights the urgent need to protect vulnerable species from feral cat predation, particularly following natural disasters such as bushfires.
1d
Research extends the lifetime of molecules in organic flow batteries to practical values
Researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), in collaboration with colleagues at the University of Cambridge, have developed a new method to dramatically extend the lifetime of organic aqueous flow batteries, improving the commercial viability of a technology that has the potential to safely and inexpensively store energy from renewable sources such
1d
Feral cats pushing critically endangered marsupial further towards extinction
Predation by feral cats is putting the critically endangered Kangaroo Island dunnart—a small, mouse-sized marsupial found only on the Kangaroo Island off South Australia—to the brink of extinction. The study, published in Scientific Reports, highlights the urgent need to protect vulnerable species from feral cat predation, particularly following natural disasters such as bushfires.
1d
Researchers recognize activists' work using data science to monitor and challenge feminicide
Feminicide, the most extreme outcome of gender-related violence, is a worldwide problem. In 2017, 87,000 women were intentionally killed. However, we don't know how many of these killings were gender-related. We need to know information like who the women were and what their relationship was to their killer, for example. This missing contextual data is key to understanding gender-related violence,
1d
Evidence found of butterflies using tails to distract predators from more vital parts
A team of researchers at Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle, working with a colleague at Station d'Ecologie Theorique et Experimentale du CNRS, has found evidence that suggests butterflies use their tails to distract predators from more vital body parts as a means of survival. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes experiments they conducted with bird
1d
Evidence found of butterflies using tails to distract predators from more vital parts
A team of researchers at Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle, working with a colleague at Station d'Ecologie Theorique et Experimentale du CNRS, has found evidence that suggests butterflies use their tails to distract predators from more vital body parts as a means of survival. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes experiments they conducted with bird
1d
The love, forgiveness and healing fathers need | Charles C. Daniels, Jr.
Fathers have a profound impact on their children's lives, yet an estimated ten million kids in the US see their dads less than once a month. Through his advocacy and mental health center, therapist Charles C. Daniels, Jr. empowers fathers to be more present by providing mentorship and community, so they learn to forgive their own shortcomings and, most importantly, learn how to reconnect with thei
1d
To fight anemia, prompt women to recognize fatigue
Half of women in India are anemic, but may not recognize fatigue as a symptom. Research in Odisha identifies an intervention that boosts iron levels. People who don't eat enough iron-rich foods —such as leafy greens, seafood, or meat—can develop iron-deficiency anemia, a condition in which their blood produces fewer than normal red blood cells, or hemoglobin. Left untreated, it can lead to fatigu
1d
Nanochannels light the way towards new medicine
To develop new drugs and vaccines, detailed knowledge about nature's smallest biological building blocks — the biomolecules — is required. Researchers are now presenting a groundbreaking microscopy technique that allows proteins, DNA and other tiny biological particles to be studied in their natural state in a completely new way.
1d
First giant molecular cloud simulation for star formation that includes jets, radiation, winds, supernovae
Star formation is arguably the most important process in the universe. Over their lifetimes, and then with their deaths, stars produce of all the chemical elements except for hydrogen and helium (produced in the big bang). In their youth, stars nurture the birth of planets and smaller bodies, and their demise results in supernovae, super-dense bodies like black holes, neutron stars or white dwarfs
1d
Improving quantum sensors by measuring the orientation of coherent spins inside a diamond lattice
Scientists from the University of Tsukuba demonstrated how ultrafast spectroscopy can be used to improve the temporal resolution of quantum sensors. By measuring the orientation of coherent spins inside a diamond lattice, they showed that magnetic fields can be measured even over very short times. This work may allow for the advancement of the field of ultra-high accuracy measurements known as qua
1d
Mars as a base for asteroid exploration and mining
Mining the asteroids for resources like iron, precious metals, water, or other valuable species may someday become profitable. Mining will probably starting with near Earth objects (NEOs), asteroids whose paths cross the Earth's orbital path. In the long-term, however, mining will want to access the Main Belt of asteroids that orbit between Mars and Jupiter.
1d
Sugary protein could play key role in Alzheimer's disease
A sugar molecule known as a glycan could play a key role in the development of Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study. For the study, researchers conducted a bit of "reverse engineering," using brain tissues from five people who died with Alzheimer's disease. If further research confirms the glycan finding, the molecule could serve as a target for early diagnostic tests, treatments, and pe
1d
Scientists unravel mechanism for melting of DNA double helix
Researchers at the Francis Crick Institute have uncovered how the double helix structure of DNA is opened to allow DNA replication. The work could lead to further studies to better understand this process including how it can go wrong in diseases, such as cancer.
1d
Electric shock to petroleum coke generates sustainable graphene
Researchers at Texas A&M University and ExxonMobil are developing a method to reprocess petroleum coke—a byproduct of refining crude oil—into a sustainable, high-value alternative. Using a chemical process called electrochemical exfoliation, they have converted petroleum coke into graphene, a nanomaterial with applications in electronics, medicine and energy storage.
1d
Tonåringars sömnproblem måste tas på allvar
Det är väl bara att gå och lägga sig!? Denna kommentar har Gita Hedin hört många gånger genom åren. Men som forskare med särskilt intresse för sömn, är hon av en annan åsikt. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
1d
Diabetes plus hjärt-kärlsjukdom ökar risk för demens
Att ha minst två av sjukdomarna diabetes typ 2, hjärtsjukdom eller stroke ökar risken att utveckla demens, visar en studie från Karolinska Institutet. Bara en så kallad kardiometabol sjukdom går däremot inte att koppla till en ökad risk för att utveckla demens. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
1d
Ska barnen få kolla Youtube på fritids?
Hur ska lärare förhålla sig till elevers användning av digitala medier? En studie visar att integrering av barns medieintressen i fritidsverksamheter kan leda till mer utvecklande samtal med eleverna om deras vardag. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
1d
Tidig muslimsk gravplats upptäcktes med kombinerad forskning
Forskare har oväntat hittat kvarlevor som begravts enligt muslimsk sed i Levanten, det område som idag är Syrien. Fynden som ger ökad kunskap om både regionens historia och tidig islam kom efter att data från arkeologi, historia och bioarkeologi kombinerades. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
1d
Alquist Says It Will 3D Print 200 Houses in a Small Virginia Town
In late 2021, a 3D printed house went up in Williamsburg, Virginia. The printed portion of the three-bed two-bath home—that is, the exterior walls—took just 22 hours to complete. The house was a collaboration between Habitat for Humanity and Alquist 3D . The project's success helped kick Alquist, a 3D printing construction company, into gear on an ambitious new effort launched this spring: to bui
1d
When a Team Member Takes the Day Off | Naked and Afraid
Stream Naked and Afraid on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/naked-and-afraid #NakedAndAfraid #Discovery #Survival Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discover
1d
Understanding the nature of big earthquakes
Songqiao "Shawn" Wei, an Endowed Assistant Professor of Geological Sciences in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences in the College of Natural Science at Michigan State University has been studying the earthquakes in response to Earth's tectonic plate movement around the world.
1d
The impact of climate change on groups of people
The socio-economic effects of climate change often do not receive enough attention. At the EuroScience Open Forum (ESOF) a group of researchers will provide more insight. How does climate change affect whether people work together or conversely end up as opponents? And what can we learn from societies from prehistory?
1d
Graphene dust is not harmful, study finds
Graphene-related materials (GRMs) are often used to reinforce polymers. In small concentrations of up to five weight percent, GRMs can significantly enhance the strength, electrical conductivity and thermal transport of composites for a variety of applications. However, being a relatively new set of materials, graphene and GRMs need to be carefully assessed in order to identify potential adverse e
1d
Do shared life experiences make it harder to understand others?
Understanding each other's thoughts and feelings is a vital component of successful relationships. For example, when we're discussing emotional or stressful situations with other people, our intuition may tell us that someone who has gone through a similar experience is better at understanding what we're going through. But a new study, led by Annenberg School for Communication's Yoona Kang, has fo
1d
NASA's Chandra catches pulsar in X-ray speed trap
A young pulsar is blazing through the Milky Way at a speed of over a million miles per hour. This stellar speedster, witnessed by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, is one of the fastest objects of its kind ever seen. This result teaches astronomers more about how some of the bigger stars end their lives.
1d
Most injured right whales die within 3 years
Most North Atlantic right whales that are severely injured in fishing gear entanglements die within three years, according to a new study. The whales are a critically endangered species whose population has shrunk in recent decades. Scientists estimate fewer than 350 of the iconic whales are still alive in the wild today. To examine the role fishing gear entanglements have played in the species'
1d
Microsoft to Store World's Music Collection on Quartz Wafers
(Photo: Daniel Kivle) Everyone knows that if the apocalypse ever arrives, we will need to keep certain items safe for future generations. We've already taken care of our collections of plant species with the Global Seed Vault, aka the Doomsday Vault. That currently holds 1,145,693 backup copies of the world's seed varieties. They will soon be joined by a new vault, which will attempt to backup th
1d
Is there an upside to today's high gasoline prices?
Pulling up to the pump these days requires a major financial commitment, what with the national average price of gasoline at close to $5 per gallon—and over $6 in California. But while higher gas prices take a bigger bite out of everyone's wallet, do they have any advantages?
1d
High fossil fuel prices are good for the planet: How to keep them high while avoiding riots or hurting the poor
In the U.K., it now costs more than £100 to fill up a typical family car with petrol, and oil prices could rise even further. But are such high prices for fossil fuels a bad thing? While attention is focused on measures to tackle the global cost of living crisis, there has been much less focus on a very uncomfortable truth—that solving the climate crisis requires fossil fuel prices for consumers t
1d
No link between SSRI exposure, childhood depression
A recent study finds no association between children's exposure to SSRIs, a common type of antidepressant, in the womb and later childhood depression. It's one of the first studies to look at the association between SSRIs (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors) and brain development in young children. SSRIs are a class of medications often prescribed to treat depression, but are also used as tr
1d
Tiny Brazilian frogs are poor jumpers because their ear canals are too small
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in the U.S. and Brazil has found evidence that pumpkin toadlets (Brachycephalus) have poor jumping skills because their inner ear canals are too small. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their study of the inner-ear anatomy of nearly 150 frogs and toads. The researchers believe that the inner ear
1d
Researchers identify key protein in a mechanism that controls the life of proteins
Proteins are existential building blocks of life that also have numerous functions in plants. An average plant cell contains more than 20 billion protein molecules that maintain cellular metabolism and stabilize their structure. Researchers at the Center for Organismal Studies of Heidelberg University recently shed light on a cellular mechanism that extends the life of plant proteins. They have no
1d
Unmixing for ultra-high-plex fluorescence imaging
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31110-z Writing in Nature communications, Seo and collaborators presented PICASSO as a method to achieve 15-color imaging of spatially overlapping proteins using no reference emission spectra in a single staining and imaging round. This accessible tool has the potential to be applied to diverse applications within the s
1d
Pilot study of bempegaldesleukin in combination with nivolumab in patients with metastatic sarcoma
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30874-8 The activity of PD-1 blockade in patients with sarcoma has been modest so far. Here, the authors report the results of a pilot clinical trial to assess the efficacy and safety of bempegaldesleukin, a CD122-preferential interleukin-2 (IL-2) pathway agonist, in combination with the PD1 blockade (nivolumab) in pati
1d
Tiny Brazilian frogs are poor jumpers because their ear canals are too small
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in the U.S. and Brazil has found evidence that pumpkin toadlets (Brachycephalus) have poor jumping skills because their inner ear canals are too small. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their study of the inner-ear anatomy of nearly 150 frogs and toads. The researchers believe that the inner ear
1d
Researchers identify key protein in a mechanism that controls the life of proteins
Proteins are existential building blocks of life that also have numerous functions in plants. An average plant cell contains more than 20 billion protein molecules that maintain cellular metabolism and stabilize their structure. Researchers at the Center for Organismal Studies of Heidelberg University recently shed light on a cellular mechanism that extends the life of plant proteins. They have no
1d
A Pox on All Our Houses
'Tis but thy name that is my enemy; Thou art thyself, though not a Monkeypox. What's Monkeypox? It is nor hand, nor foot, Nor arm, nor face, nor any other part Belonging to a man. O, be some other name! What's in a name? That which we call an orthopoxvirus By any other name would sicken as much; So Monkeypox would, were he not Monkeypox call'd, Retain that dear perfection which he owes Without th
1d
The Download: Trouble for a CO2 removal startup, and a US spy spyware bid
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. Running Tide is facing scientist departures and growing concerns over seaweed sinking for carbon removal Running Tide, an aquaculture company based in Portland, Maine, has said it expected to set tens of thousands of tiny floating kelp farms adrift in the Nort
1d
Nanochannels light the way toward new medicine
To develop new drugs and vaccines, detailed knowledge about nature's smallest biological building blocks—biomolecules—is required. Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, are now presenting a groundbreaking microscopy technique that allows proteins, DNA and other tiny biological particles to be studied in their natural state in a completely new way.
1d
Nanochannels light the way toward new medicine
To develop new drugs and vaccines, detailed knowledge about nature's smallest biological building blocks—biomolecules—is required. Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, are now presenting a groundbreaking microscopy technique that allows proteins, DNA and other tiny biological particles to be studied in their natural state in a completely new way.
1d
New luminous quasar detected by astronomers
An international team of astronomers reports the detection of a new luminous quasi-stellar object, or quasar. The newly found object, designated SMSS J114447.77-430859.3 (or J1144 for short) turns out to be the most luminous quasar known over the last 9 billion years of cosmic history. The discovery was presented in a paper published June 9 on the arXiv pre-print repository.
1d
Virtual Influencers
This is a relatively new phenomenon, gaining in visibility, but probably most people have not yet heard about it – virtual influencers . These are entirely digital creations, people that don't actually exist but who have a social media presence. They may be the creation of a single individual, a team of people, a corporation, or even crowd-sourced. They have a recognizable look, personality, and
1d
More than a quarter of people with asthma still over-using rescue inhalers, putting them at increased risk of severe attacks
Researchers have found that more than a quarter of asthma patients are still over-using inhalers intended for rapid relief of symptoms. Overuse of these inhalers is linked to an increased risk of hospital admissions and severe asthma attacks. They also found that prescribing varies between GP practices, with some overprescribing rescue inhalers to 6% of their asthma patients and some to as many as
1d
Astronomers find evidence for most powerful pulsar in distant galaxy
Astronomers using data from the VLA Sky Survey have discovered one of the youngest known neutron stars — possibly as young as only 14 years. The dense remnant of a supernova explosion was revealed when bright radio emission powered by the pulsar's powerful magnetic field emerged from behind a thick shell of debris from the explosion.
1d
Tracing the remnants of Andromeda's violent history
A detailed analysis of the composition and motion of more than 500 stars revealed conclusive evidence of ancient a collision between Andromeda and a neighboring galaxy. The findings improve our understanding of the events that shape galaxy evolution.
1d
US Army Deploys First Floating Solar Array
(Photo: US Army) The US Army conducted a ribbon-cutting ceremony over the weekend for a new clean energy facility: the Department of Defense's first floating solar array. The system sits atop the surface of North Carolina's Big Muddy Lake, where it will generate clean energy for Fort Bragg. At 1.1 megawatts, it's the biggest floating solar array in the Southeast United States. The Army base will
1d
Nasa rover sighting reignites fears about human space debris
Mars object thought to be piece of thermal blanket from when Perseverance touched down on planet Nasa's Perseverance rover typically beams back evocative images of bleak dusty landscapes, red-hued sandstorms and Martian rock samples. So its operators were surprised to receive an image on Monday of a shiny silver object resembling a discarded crisp packet wedged between two rocks. The object, the
1d
Catalytical nano-immunocomplexes for remote-controlled sono-metabolic checkpoint trimodal cancer therapy
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31044-6 Ultrasound-based therapies in combination with immune checkpoint blockade have been shown to improve the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy. Here the authors report the design of a pH-responsive and sono-irradiation activatable nanosystem functionalized with anti-PD-L1 and adenosine deaminase for sono-metabolic ca
1d
What If All Men Disappeared and the World Was Just Boring?
This article was featured in One Story to Read Today, a newsletter in which our editors recommend a single must-read from The Atlantic , Monday through Friday. Sign up for it here. W ithin days of the sudden disappearance of every last earthly bearer of XY chromosomes (fetuses included), things are pretty much back to normal. Trash collection in Los Angeles is up and functioning again. Cross-coun
1d