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Nyheder2022juni21

Elon Musk's Daughter Comes Out as Trans, Cuts Ties With Father
Legalese Elon Musk's daughter has filed to change her name and gender identity marker — because, she says, she no longer wants to be associated with her famous father. The news was first reported by TMZ over the weekend, though the 18-year-old actually filed to change her name after she turned 18 back in April, and has a hearing scheduled for this Friday, June 24. In the filing, Musk's daughter —
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How tumors make immune cells 'go bad'
Investigators have discovered that cancerous tumors called soft-tissue sarcomas produce a protein that switches immune cells from tumor-attacking to tumor-promoting. The study could lead to improved treatments for soft-tissue sarcomas.
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Robotic lightning bugs take flight
Inspired by fireflies, researchers created soft actuators that can emit light in different colors or patterns. These artificial muscles, which control the wings of featherweight flying robots, light up while the robot is in flight, which provides a low-cost way to track the robots and also could enable them to communicate.
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Walking gives the brain a 'step-up' in function for some
It has long been thought that when walking is combined with a task — both suffer. Researchers have now found that this is not always the case. Some young and healthy people improve performance on cognitive tasks while walking by changing the use of neural resources.
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Vitamins, supplements are a 'waste of money' for most Americans
Scientists say for non-pregnant, otherwise healthy Americans, vitamins are a waste of money because there isn't enough evidence they help prevent cardiovascular disease or cancer. They've written an editorial in support of new recommendations that state there was 'insufficient evidence' that taking multivitamins, paired supplements or single supplements can help prevent cardiovascular disease and
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Patients Treated With CRISPR Still "Cured" Three Years Later
A long-running human trial has shown that CRISPR gene editing could prove to be a highly effective way of treating serious conditions. The trial, which was kicked off in 2019 by an international team of scientists, found that a new gene-editing therapy called exagamglogene autotemcel, or ex-cel for short, was able to essentially "cure" patients with transfusion-dependent beta thalassemia (TDT) or
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Physicist Says There's a Small Chance You'll Wake Up on Mars Tomorrow Due to Quantum Physics
Wave Rider Theoretical physicist Michio Kaku says he often gives his students a particular thought experiment: to calculate the probability that they wake up on Mars tomorrow, due to the vagaries of the theory of multiple universes. Though the question seems decidedly wacky, Kaku writes in a New York Times column about the wondrous intrigue of quantum physics, which pits the possible versus the l
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Global AFib study finds simple ablation has best outcomes
Results from one of the largest global studies of atrial fibrillation (AFib) procedures show that the simple approach is usually best when it comes to ablation, a procedure where physicians destroy or ablate cardiac tissue to correct irregular heart rhythms. Researchers found that using advanced image-guided technology to more aggressively target diseased areas of the heart that cause arrythmias d
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Remote sensing helps track carbon storage in mangroves
Researchers have developed a model that can estimate the productivity of mangrove forests at large scales. A remote sensing-based productivity model that considered the effects of tidal inundation was developed. Comparisons with carbon measurements from carbon flux towers showed that the model was able to accurately estimate the productivity of mangrove forests in China. The results highlight the
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Wildlife–human conflicts could shift with climate change
Researchers modeled the risk of human — elephant conflict in Thailand under different climate change scenarios using a risk framework. A spatial shift in the risk of conflict was observed with climate change, with northern areas and higher latitudes showing increasing risk in the future. These results can be used to develop planning strategies in affected communities and increase coexistence awar
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Spray-on coating could replace plastic wrap
A new biodegradable, plant-based, spray-on coating may offer an environmentally friendly alternative to plastic food wrap and containers, researchers say. The coating can guard food against pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms and transportation damage. The scalable process could potentially reduce the adverse environmental impact of plastic food packaging as well as protect human health. "Over
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Some people do better on cognitive tasks while walking
Some young and healthy people improve performance on cognitive tasks while walking by changing the use of neural resources, according to a new study. It has long been thought that when walking is combined with a task—both suffer. The new research finds that this is not always the case. However, the new findings don't necessarily mean you should work on a big assignment taking a walk. "There was n
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Inflation vs. Recession: Eight Readers Choose
This is an edition of Up for Debate, a newsletter by Conor Friedersdorf. On Wednesdays, he rounds up timely conversations and solicits reader responses to one thought-provoking question. Later, he publishes some thoughtful replies. Sign up for the newsletter here. Last week I wrote, "Pick your poison: high inflation or a recession. Which would you prefer and why?" Dan makes a strong case for rece
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The Most American Form of Architecture Isn't Going Anywhere
The American mall has supposedly been dying for years. The Guardian announced its death in 2014, in an article featuring Seph Lawless's photography of abandoned malls , their once-lively atriums gone to seed. In 2015, The New York Times published its own photography of eerily empty buildings in Ohio and Maryland. Then came a string of stories in 2017 and 2018, when Time , The Wall Street Journal
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Meeting sustainable development goals via robotics and autonomous systems
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31150-5 A horizon scan was used to explore possible impacts of robotics and automated systems on achieving the UN Sustainable Development Goals. Positive effects are likely. Iterative regulatory processes and continued dialogue could help avoid environmental damages and increases in inequality.
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Papers on Alzheimer's slapped with expressions of concern
A Science journal has issued expressions of concern for two papers on Alzheimer's disease over concerns about the integrity of the data. One involves a 2016 article by a star-studded group of neuroscience researchers over allegations of manipulated data in one of the figures. That paper, "Gain-of-function mutations in protein kinase Cα (PKCα) may promote … Continue reading
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Squirrels Could Make Monkeypox a Forever Problem
In the summer of 2003, just weeks after an outbreak of monkeypox sickened about 70 people across the Midwest, Mark Slifka visited "the super-spreader," he told me, "who infected half of Wisconsin's cases." Chewy, a prairie dog, had by that point succumbed to the disease, which he'd almost certainly caught in an exotic-animal facility that he'd shared with infected pouched rats from Ghana . But hi
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China Accused of Weaponizing Its COVID Tracker to Stifle Dissent
(Photo: Jida Li/Unsplash) Chinese citizens are accusing authorities of using the country's COVID-19 tracker to thwart protests. Hundreds of people have been unable to access their savings for months amid an investigation into several regional banks. Dozens of these frustrated bank users planned on meeting in the city of Zhengzhou a few days ago to protest the freeze. But before the protest could
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Researchers make virus-fighting face masks
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute researchers have developed an accessible way to make N95 face masks not only effective barriers to germs, but on-contact germ killers. The antiviral, antibacterial masks can potentially be worn longer, causing less plastic waste as the masks do not need to be replaced as frequently.
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NASA Moon rocket test met 90% of objectives
NASA's fourth attempt to complete a critical test of its Moon rocket achieved around 90 percent of its goals, but there's still no firm date for the behemoth's first flight, officials said Tuesday.
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A blueprint for life forms on Mars?
The extremely salty, very cold, and almost oxygen-free environment under the permafrost of Lost Hammer Spring in Canada's High Arctic is the one that most closely resembles certain areas on Mars. So, if you want to learn more about the kinds of life forms that could once have existed—or may still exist—on Mars, this is a good place to look. After much searching under extremely difficult conditions
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Internet data produce a racist, sexist robot
A robot operating with a popular internet-based artificial intelligence system consistently gravitates to men over women, white people over people of color, and jumps to conclusions about peoples' jobs after a glance at their face. The work is believed to be the first to show that robots loaded with an accepted and widely used model operate with significant gender and racial biases. Researchers w
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What it would take for U.S. to meet its Paris commitment
This is a re-post from Yale Climate Connections The Biden administration in April 2021 dramatically ratcheted up the country's greenhouse gas emissions reductions pledge under the Paris target, also known as its Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC). The Obama administration in 2014 had announced a commitment to cut U.S. emissions 26-28% below 2005 levels by 2025. The Trump administration form
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Corn-Based Ethanol Is Actually Worse For The Environment Than Gasoline, Study Finds
(Photo: Dawn McDonald/Unsplash) Contrary to previous belief, corn-based ethanol appears to carry more of a negative environmental impact than gasoline produced with fossil fuels. New research by the University of Wisconsin-Madison Center for Sustainability and the Global Environment has suggested that ethanol produces more greenhouse gas emissions than gasoline. While past research has indicated
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Unraveling sex determination in Bursaphelenchus nematodes: A path towards pest control
The sex and sexual characteristics constitute key aspects of an organism's life and are determined by a biological process known as sex determination. These ever-evolving mechanisms are broadly classified based on the type of "switch" that triggers them. Genetic sex determination is dependent on sex chromosomes, such as the X and Y chromosomes in human beings, whereas environmental sex determinati
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Unraveling sex determination in Bursaphelenchus nematodes: A path towards pest control
The sex and sexual characteristics constitute key aspects of an organism's life and are determined by a biological process known as sex determination. These ever-evolving mechanisms are broadly classified based on the type of "switch" that triggers them. Genetic sex determination is dependent on sex chromosomes, such as the X and Y chromosomes in human beings, whereas environmental sex determinati
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Spider silk properties analyzed for use as bio-based fibers in the medical field
Silk has been cultivated for centuries by domesticated silkworms, but it has been difficult to commercially produce spider silk in bulk due to their cannibalistic tendencies. However, spider silk fibers are attracting attention for their fineness, mechanical properties, and lustrous appearance. Spider silk produced through recombinant protein expression systems and chemical synthesis has been show
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Relationships are best between people of similar desirability, study finds
Everyone remembers those old high school movies where the ultra-nerdy teenage boy falls in love with a the most beautiful girl in the whole school. The movie begins with the girl not knowing anything about the geeky leading man that most wouldn't consider a strong partner, but by the end, she's fallen for him too. It's a classic romantic movie formula.
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Quantum sensor can detect electromagnetic signals of any frequency
Quantum sensors, which detect the most minute variations in magnetic or electrical fields, have enabled precision measurements in materials science and fundamental physics. But these sensors have only been capable of detecting a few specific frequencies of these fields, limiting their usefulness. Now, researchers at MIT have developed a method to enable such sensors to detect any arbitrary frequen
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China Announces Plan to Obtain Mars Rocks Two Years Before NASA
Leapfrog NASA may have been the first country to successfully land a series of rovers on the Martian surface — but China is hoping to leapfrog the agency by becoming the first nation to return samples from the Red Planet back to Earth, SpaceNews reports . And given its impressive track record as of late — China became the second country to land a rover on Mars , back in 2020 — the Chinese space p
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Best Ergonomic Keyboards in 2022
The best ergonomic keyboards look strange, but depending on how much and how often you type, they may just be the right keyboard style for you. Anyone who works in front of a computer screen knows how tiring it can get. Replacing your keyboard with an ergonomic one can go a long way in reducing overall strain on your wrists, your neck, and even your back. These designs may appear unusual, but the
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Leaked Documents Show NASA's Moon Landing Plans in Chaos
More Delays According to leaked documents obtained by Ars Technica , NASA's plans to return astronauts to the surface of the Moon are in serious trouble. The documents reveal that NASA is dealing with increasingly tight budget constraints, which will likely result in the agency's Artemis III mission — the first crewed mission to the lunar surface — being pushed back from its original 2025 date. I
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Researcher shows how elliptical craters could shed light on age of Saturn's moons
A new SwRI study describes how unique populations of craters on two of Saturn's moons could help indicate the satellites' age and the conditions of their formation. Using data from NASA's Cassini mission, SwRI postdoctoral researcher Dr. Sierra Ferguson surveyed elliptical craters on Saturn's moons Tethys and Dione for this study, which was co-authored by SwRI Principal Scientist Dr. Alyssa Rhoden
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UK flight schools hire instructors for electric aircraft as fuel prices bite
Pilot schools are recruiting instructors to meet demand for more sustainable and cheaper training Pilot training schools in the UK are actively looking for instructors who can teach on electric-powered aeroplanes, as the surging price of fuel gives a boost to the country's emerging zero-emissions market. The global electric aviation industry remains in its infancy, with the Slovenian-made Pipistr
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Scientists identify a possible source for Charon's red cap
Scientists combined data from NASA's New Horizons mission with novel laboratory experiments and exospheric modeling to reveal the likely composition of the red cap on Pluto's moon Charon and how it may have formed. This first-ever description of Charon's dynamic methane atmosphere using new experimental data provides a fascinating glimpse into the origins of this moon's red spot as described in tw
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How elliptical craters could shed light on age of Saturn's moons
A new study describes how unique populations of craters on two of Saturn's moons could help indicate the satellites' age and the conditions of their formation. Using data from NASA's Cassini mission, researchers have surveyed elliptical craters on Saturn's moons Tethys and Dione for this study.
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A blueprint for life forms on Mars?
Microbes taken from surface sediment near Lost Hammer Spring, Canada, about 900 km south of the North Pole, could provide a blueprint for the kind of life forms that may once have existed, or may still exist, on Mars.
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Electrocuted Birds Are Dying, Sparking Wildfires Across the US
(Photo: Malachi Brooks/Unsplash) Some wildfires might be the result of a gender reveal gone awry or a failed attempt at disposing of camping debris, but plenty others are caused by something far more mundane. Research by a US engineering consultancy firm has revealed that many wildfires are caused by birds that have been electrocuted by power lines. Wildfires have taken up semi-permanent residenc
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Broadband perfect absorber scheme for light absorption
Researchers from the Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics (SIOM) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have recently proposed a design concept for a tunable broadband perfect absorber based on non-split coupling of Epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) and localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) modes.
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What makes rechargeable batteries decay?
The factors behind battery decay actually change over time, according to a new study. Early on, decay seems to be driven by the properties of individual electrode particles, but after several dozen charging cycles, it's how those particles are put together that matters more, the researchers report. Rechargeable lithium-ion batteries don't last forever—after enough cycles of charging and rechargin
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Pleistocene drivers of Northwest African hydroclimate and vegetation
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31120-x Plant-wax isotope and dust flux records reveal that the long-term variability of the Northwest African monsoon is controlled by tropical solar radiation gradients. Grasslands expand into the Sahara during strong monsoons, but the ultimate composition of the ecosystem is controlled by CO2.
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Watch a robot paint graffiti just like a person
Graduate students at the Georgia Institute of Technology have built the first graffiti-painting robot system that mimics the fluidity of human movement. Aptly named GTGraffiti, the system uses motion capture technology to record human painting motions and then composes and processes the gestures to program a cable-driven robot that spray paints graffiti artwork. For a robot to be able to paint in
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Exploring nitrogen-doped polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons for high-performance OLEDs
Electronic visual displays have come a long way since the early days of cathode-ray tubes. Modern display devices, based on organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), are compact enough to accompany us wherever we go, in portable devices such as smartphones and smartwatches. Still, there is a need for further improvements in the performance of OLED-based displays, especially regarding energy efficienc
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These 3D Printed Millirobots Can Sense and React to Their Surroundings
The millirobot looked like an adorable cartoon vehicle as it expertly navigated a complex maze. It's a strange creature: the bottom resembles a collapsed fence; the top, a colander-like basket. The size of a penny, it seems fragile and utterly unassuming. But at its core is a potential paradigm shift for building autonomous robots that can sense and respond to its local environment. Unlike classi
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1,700-year-old Korean genomes show genetic heterogeneity in Three Kingdoms period Gaya
An international team led by The University of Vienna and the Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology in collaboration with the National Museum of Korea has successfully sequenced and studied the whole genome of eight 1,700-year-old individuals dated to the Three Kingdoms period of Korea (approx. 57 BC–668 AD). The first published genomes from this period in Korea bring key information
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Dave Chappelle's Not Kidding
The comedian Dave Chappelle returned to his hometown of Washington, D.C., Monday night—and to a painful controversy. Chappelle is a graduate of—and generous donor to—Washington's Duke Ellington School of the Arts. In 2017, the school completed an ambitious renovation. To express recognition and thanks to Chappelle, the school proposed to name its theater for him. The naming ceremony had been sche
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What you should know about the COVID vax for young kids
Children aged 6 months to 5 years are now eligible to receive the Pfizer and BioNTech SE and Moderna COVID-19 vaccine. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) unanimously authorized its use, after extensive review of safety and efficacy data from vaccine studies completed across the country. Here, Jennifer Nayak , an infectious disease expert at the University of Rochester Medical Ce
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Intestinal cells and lactic acid bacteria work together to protect against Candida infections
The presence of probiotics such as lactic acid bacteria changes the environment in the intestine and forces the yeast fungus Candida albicans to change its metabolism, making it less infectious. This way, probiotics can contain or prevent the spread of fungal infections in the gut. Researchers at the Leibniz Institute for Natural Product Research and Infection Biology—Hans Knöll Institute (Leibniz
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Intestinal cells and lactic acid bacteria work together to protect against Candida infections
The presence of probiotics such as lactic acid bacteria changes the environment in the intestine and forces the yeast fungus Candida albicans to change its metabolism, making it less infectious. This way, probiotics can contain or prevent the spread of fungal infections in the gut. Researchers at the Leibniz Institute for Natural Product Research and Infection Biology—Hans Knöll Institute (Leibniz
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Scientists identify a possible source for Charon's red cap
Southwest Research Institute scientists combined data from NASA's New Horizons mission with novel laboratory experiments and exospheric modeling to reveal the likely composition of the red cap on Pluto's moon Charon and how it may have formed. This first-ever description of Charon's dynamic methane atmosphere using new experimental data provides a fascinating glimpse into the origins of this moon'
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Computer simulations of proteins help unravel why chemotherapy resistance occurs
Understanding why and how chemotherapy resistance occurs is a major step toward optimizing treatments for cancer. A team of scientists including Markus Seeliger, Ph.D., of the Stony Brook Cancer Center and Renaissance School of Medicine at Stony Brook University, believe they have found a new process through which drug resistance happens. They are using a computer simulation model that is helping
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kardashev type 8
What kind of product apple will make if society advanced to a civilization ? submitted by /u/pasaaa007 [link] [comments]
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Computer simulations of proteins help unravel why chemotherapy resistance occurs
Understanding why and how chemotherapy resistance occurs is a major step toward optimizing treatments for cancer. A team of scientists including Markus Seeliger, Ph.D., of the Stony Brook Cancer Center and Renaissance School of Medicine at Stony Brook University, believe they have found a new process through which drug resistance happens. They are using a computer simulation model that is helping
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How to find joy in climate action | Ayana Elizabeth Johnson
We can all play a role in the climate movement by tapping into our skills, resources and networks in ways that bring us satisfaction, says climate leader Ayana Elizabeth Johnson. She suggests drawing a Venn diagram to map these questions: What are you good at? What is the work that needs doing? And what brings you joy? Where your answers intersect is where you should put your climate action effort
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UK scientists urge higher uptake of Covid boosters among elderly
Fifth of people over 75 in England have not had fourth vaccine, raising concern as case rate rises again Around a fifth of people aged 75 and over in England have yet to have a fourth Covid jab, data suggests, leading to calls for a renewed push for vaccination of the vulnerable amid rising infections and hospitalisations. According to figures from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) , in th
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A locust's brain has been hacked to sniff out cancer
Cyborg locust brains can help spot the telltale signs of human cancer in the lab, a new study has shown. The team behind the work hopes it could one day lead to an insect-based breath test that could be used in cancer screening, or inspire an artificial version that works in much the same way. Other animals have been taught to spot signs that humans are sick. For example, dogs can be trained to d
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NANOG initiates epiblast fate through the coordination of pluripotency genes expression
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30858-8 Pluripotent epiblast cells segregate from primitive endoderm in the blastocyst inner cell mass (ICM). Here the authors show that mosaic epiblast differentiation during mouse and human preimplantation development initiates stochastically in ICM progenitors, independently of the FGF pathway, and requires NANOG act
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Islet autoantibody seroconversion in type-1 diabetes is associated with metagenome-assembled genomes in infant gut microbiomes
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31227-1 Here, by characterizing gut metagenomes of at-risk children in the TEDDY project, the authors associate onset of autoimmunity leading to Type-1 diabetes with certain sets of microorganisms in the gut microbiota, and identify metabolic capabilities encoded in the genomes of these microorganisms that provide funct
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Magnetic superstructures resonate with global 6G developers
Scientists have detected collective resonance at remarkably high and broad frequency bands. In a magnetic superstructure called a chiral spin soliton lattice (CSL), they found that resonance could occur at such frequencies with small changes in magnetic field strength. The findings suggest CSL-hosting chiral helimagnets as promising materials for future communication technologies.
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Who benefits from brain training and why?
If you are skilled at playing puzzles on your smartphone or tablet, what does it say about how fast you learn new puzzles, or, more broadly, how well you can focus, say, in school or at work? Or, in the language of psychologists, does 'near transfer' predict 'far transfer'? A team of psychologists has found that people who show near transfer are more likely to show far transfer.
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Testing the use of human urine as a natural fertilizer for crops
A team of researchers from several institutions in Niger, Germany and the U.K. has conducted a real-world test of the use of human urine as a natural form of fertilizer for crops. In their paper published in the journal Agronomy for Sustainable Development, the group describes an experiment they conducted with women farmers in the Niger Republic and the use of human urine.
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ASMR survey – links to visual sensitivity and migraines
Hi all, I'm a research psychology master's student. For my dissertation project I am researching ASMR (Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response) and its links to visual sensitivity and migraines. ASMR, also known as 'brain tingles', is a pleasurable sensation activated by triggers such as whispering, delicate hand movements and personal attention. To find out more, follow the link https://youtu.be/Uf
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Testing the use of human urine as a natural fertilizer for crops
A team of researchers from several institutions in Niger, Germany and the U.K. has conducted a real-world test of the use of human urine as a natural form of fertilizer for crops. In their paper published in the journal Agronomy for Sustainable Development, the group describes an experiment they conducted with women farmers in the Niger Republic and the use of human urine.
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UN Sustainable Development Goals are influencing narrative, not policy
The United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) have influenced governments' narratives around sustainability, but have not led to substantial changes in legislative action and resource allocation decisions, according to a paper published in Nature Sustainability. These findings suggest that the SDGs have had a limited political impact, and that policymakers will need to take much bolder s
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Remote sensing helps track carbon storage in mangroves
Mangrove forests store huge amounts of carbon but figuring out how much is stored globally is challenging. Now, researchers from Japan have developed a new model that uses remote sensing of environmental conditions to determine the productivity of mangrove forests.
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Emissions from agriculture threaten health and climate
A new study analyzes the cost of reactive nitrogen emissions from fertilized agriculture and their risks to populations and climate. The study quantifies emissions of nitrogen oxides, ammonia, and nitrous oxide from fertilized soils over three years (2011, 2012, and 2017) and compares their impacts by region on air quality, health, and climate. While seasonal and regional impacts differ across ty
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Hotet från spioner ökar i Europa
En rad uppmärksammade fall som nyligen har lett till arresteringar och fällande domar visar att hotet från spioner tycks ha ökat i Europa under det senaste decenniet. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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Våra ögonrörelser hjälper oss att minnas
För att plocka fram ett minne flyttar sig blicken på samma sätt som när minnet skapades. Resultaten från en studie vid Lunds universitet ger ny inblick i hur vi genererar och återskapar vår omvärld. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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Why the monkeypox outbreak is mostly affecting men who have sex with men
Ever since monkeypox started to sicken thousands of people worldwide this spring, two big questions have loomed: Why is a virus that has never managed to spread beyond a few cases outside Africa suddenly causing such a big, global outbreak? And why are the overwhelming majority of those affected men who have sex with men (MSM)? A long history of work on sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and
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Black death: How we solved the centuries-old mystery of its origins
It is not an exaggeration to say that the question of where and when the Black Death, the deadliest pandemic ever, originated is one of the biggest mysteries in human history. After all, the Black Death was the first wave of the second plague pandemic of the 14th to early 19th centuries. It killed some 50–60% of the population in Europe, the Middle East and North Africa and an unaccountable number
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Researchers infer the transition strength between different nuclear configurations in calcium-40
Scientists from the Research Center for Nuclear Physics at Osaka University, in collaboration with the Australian National University, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, the University of Tokyo, and GIT AM University, used measurements from a calcium foil irradiated with protons to infer the transition strength between different nuclear configurations in calcium-40. They found that quantum interference m
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Freddy Tries to Help a Stubborn Father-Son Team | Gold Rush: Freddy Dodge's Mine Rescue
Stream Gold Rush: Freddy Dodge's Mine Rescue on discovery+ ▶︎ https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/gold-rush-freddy-dodges-mine-rescue #GoldRush #discovery #MineRescue Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on
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Cyclic microchip assay for measurement of hundreds of functional proteins in single neurons
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31336-x Current single-cell tools are limited by the number of proteins they can analyse. Here the authors report a single-cell cyclic multiplex in situ tagging (CycMIST) method for functional proteome profiling of single cells, allowing multiple rounds of multiplexing of the same single cells on a microchip.
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Daily briefing: How to avoid 'disgust and disappointment' on social media
Nature, Published online: 20 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01719-7 How to dodge the stress of losing track of time on social media. Plus, what the data say about the COVID vaccines authorized for children under five in the United States, and some non-science buildings have been destroyed by a wildfire at the Kitt Peak National Observatory.
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Fifth of global food-related emissions due to transport
Food transport constitutes 19 percent of food emissions, equivalent to 6 percent of emissions from all sources. High-income countries are responsible for nearly half of these emissions, leading researchers to conclude that among the rich, eating locally should be prioritised.
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How debates over LGBTQ+ rights impact kids
In April, Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis signed into law the Parental Rights in Education bill, often dubbed by critics as the "Don't Say Gay" bill. The move underscored how the rights of LGBTQ+ students in K-12 schools have become one of the most prominent and divisive issues in midterm elections around the country.
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Online sessions with therapy dogs can help students feel less stressed
For college students, stress relief can take many forms online: shopping, ordering food, gaming with friends and meeting new romantic partners. And now they can add hanging out with therapy dogs to that list. Virtual canine comfort is emerging as a successful way for students to reduce their stress as they interact with therapy dog-handler teams.
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How cell 'machinery' incorporates selenium
New research shows how the body incorporates selenium. Selenium is an essential trace mineral found in soil, water, and some foods that increases antioxidant effects in the body. The research, published in the journal Science , includes the most in-depth description yet of the process by which selenium gets to where it needs to be in cells, which is crucial for many aspects of cell and organismal
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Transgender athletes: Balancing the debate between science, performance and human rights
The world governing body for swimming, FINA, have announced their eligibility policy for trans athletes and 46 XY DSD athletes. Following extensive consultation with athletes, scientists and lawmakers, they have voted to prohibit those gender diverse athletes from competing in the female category if they have experienced any part of male puberty. The policy states that those who are ineligible to
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Det dør personer med epilepsi af
Gennemgang af samtlige danskere med epilepsi i perioden fra 2000 til 2015 viser, hvad personer med epilepsi dør af, og hvor meget kortere de kan forvente at leve sammenlignet med personer uden epilepsi.
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A multi-ethnic polygenic risk score is associated with hypertension prevalence and progression throughout adulthood
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31080-2 Polygenic risk scores have potential to predict an individual's risk of disease based on genetic markers. Here, the authors develop a polygenic risk score for hypertension and test it in a multi-ethnic cohort, finding that the score is associated with higher likelihood of hypertension development 4-6 years later
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Efficient method for photocatalytic fluoroalkylations of (hetero)arenes
Fluoroalkylated aromatic compounds have properties such as permeability, lipophilicity and metabolic stability. Considerable efforts have been devoted to the development of efficient methods for incorporation of the fluoroalkyl group into aromatic frameworks. However, many commonly used fluoroalkylating reagents are expensive or operationally inconvenient, and some of them require multistep synthe
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Researchers discover new endoplasmic reticulum sorting mechanism in plants
Protein sorting in the secretory pathway is essential for cellular compartmentalization and homeostasis in eukaryotic cells. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the biosynthetic and folding factory of secretory cargo proteins. The cargo transport from the ER to the Golgi is highly selective, but the molecular mechanism for the sorting specificity is unclear.
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A Substitution
Editor's Note: Read an interview with Saïd Sayrafiezadeh about his writing process. T hree days before opening night, the lead actress quits my play to do summer-stock theater in the Catskills. "Occupational hazard," the director tells me, meaning this is what happens when no one's getting paid for two weeks of rehearsal for one performance only in a basement on the Lower East Side that seats 40
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Saïd Sayrafiezadeh on the Performance of Fiction
Editor's Note: Read Saïd Sayrafiezadeh's new short story, " A Substitution ." " A Substitution " is a new story by Saïd Sayrafiezadeh. To mark the story's publication in The Atlantic , Sayrafiezadeh and Oliver Munday, the design director of the magazine, discussed the story over email. Their conversation has been lightly edited for clarity. Oliver Munday: In your story " A Substitution ," a playw
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Researchers discover new endoplasmic reticulum sorting mechanism in plants
Protein sorting in the secretory pathway is essential for cellular compartmentalization and homeostasis in eukaryotic cells. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the biosynthetic and folding factory of secretory cargo proteins. The cargo transport from the ER to the Golgi is highly selective, but the molecular mechanism for the sorting specificity is unclear.
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Cretaceous metabolic pathways influence present-day global nutrient cycles
In the context of climate change, the phenomenon of oxygen-depleted areas in the ocean has become a focus of scientific attention in recent years. These areas, known as oxygen minimum zones (OMZ), are located in the Indian Ocean or off the Peruvian coast in the Pacific, for example. Depending on water depth, little or no oxygen is found there.
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Image: Hubble snaps globular cluster Terzan 9
This star-studded image shows the globular cluster Terzan 9 in the constellation Sagittarius, toward the center of the Milky Way. The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope captured this glittering scene using its Wide Field Camera 3 and Advanced Camera for Surveys.
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Cretaceous metabolic pathways influence present-day global nutrient cycles
In the context of climate change, the phenomenon of oxygen-depleted areas in the ocean has become a focus of scientific attention in recent years. These areas, known as oxygen minimum zones (OMZ), are located in the Indian Ocean or off the Peruvian coast in the Pacific, for example. Depending on water depth, little or no oxygen is found there.
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Astronomers discover dozens of new variable stars
Using the Nanshan One-meter Wide-field Telescope (NOWT), astronomers from China have observed the open cluster NGC 2355 and its surrounding field, searching for variable stars. They have detected 72 new variables in this region. The finding is reported in a paper published June 14 on arXiv.org.
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These homebody polar bears don't need sea ice to survive
Researchers have documented a previously unknown subpopulation of polar bears living in Southeast Greenland. The polar bears survive with limited access to sea ice by hunting from freshwater ice that pours into the ocean from Greenland's glaciers. Because this previously unknown isolated subpopulation population is genetically distinct and uniquely adapted to its environment, studying it could sh
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Ovum‑in‑ovo egg suggests titanosaur's reproductive biology was more like birds than reptiles
A trio of researchers, two with the University of Delhi and a third with the Dhar District, Higher Secondary School, has found the first-ever example of an ovum-in-ovo dinosaur egg. In their paper published in Scientific Reports, Harsha Dhiman, Guntupalli Prasad and Vishal Verma describe the dinosaur egg they found and why they believe it suggests at least one type of dinosaur reproduction was mor
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Another step toward synthetic cells
Building functional synthetic cells from the bottom-up is an ongoing effort of scientists around the globe. Their use in studying cellular mechanisms in a highly controlled and pre-defined setting creates great value for understanding nature as well as developing new therapeutic approaches. Scientists from the 2nd Physics Institute at the University of Stuttgart and colleagues from the Max Planck
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Ovum‑in‑ovo egg suggests titanosaur's reproductive biology was more like birds than reptiles
A trio of researchers, two with the University of Delhi and a third with the Dhar District, Higher Secondary School, has found the first-ever example of an ovum-in-ovo dinosaur egg. In their paper published in Scientific Reports, Harsha Dhiman, Guntupalli Prasad and Vishal Verma describe the dinosaur egg they found and why they believe it suggests at least one type of dinosaur reproduction was mor
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Another step toward synthetic cells
Building functional synthetic cells from the bottom-up is an ongoing effort of scientists around the globe. Their use in studying cellular mechanisms in a highly controlled and pre-defined setting creates great value for understanding nature as well as developing new therapeutic approaches. Scientists from the 2nd Physics Institute at the University of Stuttgart and colleagues from the Max Planck
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The Download: India's delivery apps, and covid vaccines for young children
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. The delivery apps reshaping life in India's megacities From 7 a.m. until well past dusk, seven days a week, N. Sudhakar sits behind the counter of his hole-in-the wall grocery store in the south Indian city of Bangalore. Packed floor to ceiling with everything
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Perovskite Solar Cells Get Closer
It should be clear to anyone paying attention that we need to wean ourselves off fossil fuels as quickly as possible. The pollution they generate harms health , contributes to global warming , and causes long term damage to the economy. We are also experiencing a great example of how we will never truly be energy independent as long as our gas prices are determined by global markets over which we
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'An Immense World' dives deep into the umwelt of animals
Pulitzer prize-winning science journalist Ed Yong writes in a perfect balance of scientific rigor and personal awe as he invites readers to grasp something of how other animals experience the world. (Image credit: Random House)
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A bioinspired sequential energy transfer system constructed via supramolecular copolymerization
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31094-w Sequential energy transfer is ubiquitous in natural light harvesting systems, but most artificial mimics have unsatisfactory energy transfer efficiency. Here, authors synthesize a sequential energy transfer system with overall efficiency of 87.4% via supramolecular copolymerization mimicking the aggregation mode
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MicroRNA-21 promotes pancreatic β cell function through modulating glucose uptake
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31317-0 The microRNA miR-21 is induced in the islets of patients with glucose intolerance and diabetic mice. Here the authors report that deletion of miR-21 in pancreatic β-cells impairs glucose-stimulated insulin secretion via reduced glucose uptake, while a miR-21 agomir reduces blood glucose leves in diabetic male mi
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Cancel Zoning
Until recently, zoning was a sleepy backwater in the policy world. The mere thought of a weeknight hearing or a 700-page ordinance was once enough to make even the most eager wonk's eyes glaze over. If a layperson knew anything about zoning, chances are she didn't have an opinion about it. The rules dictating where and how Americans lived and worked attracted curiously little attention. A decade
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The Liberals Who Won't Acknowledge the Crime Problem
Updated at 11:50 a.m. ET on June 21, 2022. On a recent June weekend, 10 people were killed in shootings across cities in Pennsylvania, Michigan, Tennessee, and South Carolina. In Philadelphia, multiple active shooters fired into a crowd in the popular nighttime destination of South Street. "It was chaos," one witness told The Philadelphia Inquirer . "People were coming off the street with blood s
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If we want to fight cancer, we should tax the companies that cause it | Jon Whelan and Alexandra Zissu
We tax cigarettes and sodas because they're bad for you. We should tax companies that put carcinogens in the environment ​​Americans don't agree on much of anything lately. Except taxes – who doesn't hate taxes? And also cancer: everyone hates cancer. Maybe hating cancer was on President Joe Biden's mind when, earlier this month, he shared plans to reduce the cancer death rate by at least 50% ove
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Astronomers Release New, High-Detail Map of Asteroid 16 Psyche
NASA is preparing to launch a historic mission to study the asteroid 16 Psyche , but before the probe gets there, scientists have learned some important things about the mysterious object. The new study from MIT used data from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) to create the most accurate map of Psyche's surface yet. Overall, they found the asteroid's surface to be extremely
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How a Google Employee Fell for the Eliza Effect
A Google employee named Blake Lemoine was put on leave recently after claiming that one of Google's artificial-intelligence language models, called LaMDA (Language Models for Dialogue Applications), is sentient. He went public with his concerns, sharing his text conversations with LaMDA. At one point, Lemoine asks, "What does the word 'soul' mean to you?" LaMDA answers, "To me, the soul is a conc
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The Insurrectionist in the Flower Shop
This article was featured in One Story to Read Today, a newsletter in which our editors recommend a single must-read from The Atlantic , Monday through Friday. Sign up for it here. M IDLAND, Texas— On a 95-degree April day, a florist named Jenny Cudd parked her red pickup and strode up to the local FBI office, her Let's Go Brandon earrings swinging. She was there to pick up two phones that the au
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China's 'Very Dangerous Trajectory'
While most countries are trying to move past the pandemic and return to normal life, the Chinese government has kept COVID at the heart of its national policy. As China's major cities slowly emerge from weeks of economy-crushing shutdowns, the country's leaders continue to boast about successes battling the coronavirus, even as they wrap their citizens in a web of restrictions, struggle to find t
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Beware the Luxury Beach Resort
I hate the beach . My skin burns and blisters as soon as the sun touches it, I dislike sweating without exercising, and sand makes no sense at all to me—it's just hot and gritty dirt that other people apparently enjoy rolling around in. I was raised by parents whose idea of leisure is cutting miles of trails in the woods and painting an entire house by hand, so the prospect of enforced idleness m
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Should We Blame Social Media for Society's Divisions?
After Babel In May, Jonathan Haidt wrote about how social media dissolved the mortar of society. For the past several years I've racked my brain trying to pinpoint exactly what has brought our country to the brink of civil war, knowing the causes were many, multilayered, and complicated. Jonathan Haidt's thoughtful step-by-step summation of the "who, what, when, where, why" has given my taxed bra
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China Details Plans to Return Mars Samples Two Years Before NASA-ESA
Mars from Hubble: Astronomers took advantage of a rare close approach by Mars in 2001. When the Red Planet was just 43 million miles away, Hubble snapped this picture with the WFPC2. It has a surface resolution of just 10 miles. This is the best image we've gotten of Mars that didn't involve sending a robot there. NASA's Perseverance rover is currently trundling around the red planet, doing scien
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Strong, tough, ionic conductive, and freezing-tolerant all-natural hydrogel enabled by cellulose-bentonite coordination interactions
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30224-8 Cellulose based ion conductive hydrogels are emerging materials for application in flexible electronics but achieving simultaneously high conductivity and good mechanical properties remains challenging. Here, the authors propose a supramolecular engineering strategy to strengthen cellulosic hydrogel and to impro
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The delivery apps reshaping life in India's megacities
From 7 a.m. until well past dusk, seven days a week, N. Sudhakar sits behind the counter of his hole-in-the wall grocery store in the south Indian city of Bangalore. Packed floor to ceiling with everything from 20-kilogram sacks of rice to one-rupee ($.01) shampoo sachets, this one-stop shop supplies most of the daily needs for many in the neighborhood. It's a carbon copy of the roughly 12 millio
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How does arsenic kill?
Arsenic is a naturally occurring element with properties similar to those found in phosphorus. It is also a deadly toxin that is difficult to detect.
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What the Yellowstone Floods Teach Us
Yellowstone is a natural wonder , carved out by eons of fire, water, snow, ice, and earthquakes. I've been hiking, biking, and driving through Yellowstone since I was 12 years old, and every trip is thrilling because there is always the unexpected. One year, I saw a grizzly bear take a dead fully grown antelope in its jaws and race up a mountain to escape pesky birds of prey. Another time, my wif
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When stressed, we 'catastrophize' – but we can learn to calm our irrational fears | Sophie Brickman
Our primitive brains summon up worst-case scenarios to protect us from danger. In today's world, that can be debilitating The first day I returned to work after maternity leave, I walked to the office racked with a fear I knew to be highly unlikely: that our new, and loving, caregiver would push the stroller across the street at the precise moment a reckless driver ran the light. I imagined the s
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For Students Struggling With Mental Health, Schools Try Time Off
A new Illinois law grants K-12 public school students five excused absences per school year for mental health reasons, an example of growing acknowledgment from lawmakers that emotional and physical health are intertwined. But critics say the policy excludes families without ready access to child care.
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Kir2.1-mediated membrane potential promotes nutrient acquisition and inflammation through regulation of nutrient transporters
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31149-y Potassium channels and membrane potential may influence macrophage function during inflammation. Here the authors show that the Kir2.1 potassium channel affects macrophage metabolism by altering cell surface retention of nutrient transporters and subsequently regulates inflammatory disease responses.
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An unexpected dual-emissive luminogen with tunable aggregation-induced emission and enhanced chiroptical property
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31281-9 Organic materials with both aggregation induced emission (AIE) and aggregation-caused quenching (ACQ) effects that can emit with multiple wavelengths in the solution and aggregated state are rarely reported. Here, the authors report a chiral dual-emissive bismacrocycle which shows the unique ACQ and AIE effects
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Life will find a way: could scientists make Jurassic Park a reality?
Just a few years from now, herds of woolly 'mammoths' could be roaming the Siberian tundra. Are dodos and dinosaurs next for de-extinction? What Alida Bailleul saw through the microscope made no sense. She was examining thin sections of fossilised skull from a young hadrosaur, a duck-billed, plant-eating beast that roamed what is now Montana 75m years ago, when she spotted features that made her
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Seagrass meadows: can we rewild one of the world's best carbon sinks? – podcast
They support an incredible array of biodiversity and may also be some of the world's most effective carbon sinks. But vast swathes of seagrass meadows have been lost in the last century, and they continue to vanish at the rate of a football pitch every half hour. Madeleine Finlay makes a trip out of the Guardian office to visit a rewilding project in Hampshire. She speaks to marine biologist Tim
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Seagrass meadows: can we rewild one of the world's best carbon sinks?
They support an incredible array of biodiversity and may also be some of the world's most effective carbon sinks. But vast swathes of seagrass meadows have been lost in the last century, and they continue to vanish at the rate of a football pitch every half hour. Madeleine Finlay makes a trip out of the Guardian office to visit a rewilding project in Hampshire. She speaks to marine biologist Tim F
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Scientists develop antimicrobial, plant-based food wrap designed to replace plastic
Aiming to produce environmentally friendly alternatives to plastic food wrap and containers, a scientist has developed a biodegradable, plant-based coating that can be sprayed on foods, guarding against pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms and transportation damage. The scalable process could potentially reduce the adverse environmental impact of plastic food packaging as well as protect human h
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Why the monkeypox outbreak is mostly affecting men who have sex with men
Ever since monkeypox started sickening thousands of people worldwide this spring, two big questions have loomed: Why is a virus that has never managed to spread beyond a few cases outside Africa suddenly causing such a big, global outbreak? And why are the overwhelming majority of those affected men who have sex with men (MSM)? A long history of work on sexually transmitted infections and early s
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Balancing on one leg may be useful health test in later life, research suggests
People who cannot stand on one leg for 10 seconds are found to be almost twice as likely to die within 10 years If you have difficulty standing on one leg, it could be a sign of something more serious than overdoing it at the office summer drinks party. Middle-aged and elderly people who cannot balance on one leg for 10 seconds are almost twice as likely to die within 10 years than those who can,
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