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Nyheder2022juni22

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How humans evolved to get along (to extent that we do)
The research shows that four neighboring groups of bonobos they studied at the Kokolopori Bonobo Reserve in the Democratic Republic of Congo maintained exclusive and stable social and spatial borders between them, showing they are indeed part of distinct social groups that interact regularly and peacefully with each other.
10min
The evolutionary origins of syntax: Event cognition in nonhuman primates
Abstract Languages tend to encode events from the perspective of agents, placing them first and in simpler forms than patients. This agent bias is mirrored by cognition: Agents are more quickly recognized than patients and generally attract more attention. This leads to the hypothesis that key aspects of language structure are fundamentally rooted in a cognition that decomposes events into agents
19min
Cenozoic megatooth sharks occupied extremely high trophic positions
Abstract Trophic position is a fundamental characteristic of animals, yet it is unknown in many extinct species. In this study, we ground-truth the 15 N/ 14 N ratio of enameloid-bound organic matter (δ 15 N EB ) as a trophic level proxy by comparison to dentin collagen δ 15 N and apply this method to the fossil record to reconstruct the trophic level of the megatooth sharks (genus Otodus ). These
19min
Subcritical escape waves in schooling fish
Abstract Theoretical physics predicts optimal information processing in living systems near transitions (or pseudo-critical points) in their collective dynamics. However, focusing on potential benefits of proximity to a critical point, such as maximal sensitivity to perturbations and fast dissemination of information, commonly disregards possible costs of criticality in the noisy, dynamic environ
19min
Phase separation of HRLP regulates flowering time in Arabidopsis
Abstract RNA binding proteins mediate posttranscriptional RNA metabolism and play regulatory roles in many developmental processes in eukaryotes. Despite their known effects on the floral transition from vegetative to reproductive growth in plants, the underlying mechanisms remain largely obscure. Here, we show that a hitherto unknown RNA binding protein, hnRNP R-LIKE PROTEIN (HRLP), inhibits cot
19min
Temozolomide-induced guanine mutations create exploitable vulnerabilities of guanine-rich DNA and RNA regions in drug-resistant gliomas
Abstract Temozolomide (TMZ) is a chemotherapeutic agent that has been the first-line standard of care for the aggressive brain cancer glioblastoma (GBM) since 2005. Although initially beneficial, TMZ resistance is universal and second-line interventions are an unmet clinical need. Here, we took advantage of the known mechanism of action of TMZ to target guanines (G) and investigated G-rich G-quad
19min
Mitonuclear genotype remodels the metabolic and microenvironmental landscape of Hürthle cell carcinoma
Abstract Hürthle cell carcinomas (HCCs) display two exceptional genotypes: near-homoplasmic mutation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and genome-wide loss of heterozygosity (gLOH). To understand the phenotypic consequences of these genetic alterations, we analyzed genomic, metabolomic, and immunophenotypic data of HCC and other thyroid cancers. Both mtDNA mutations and profound depletion of citrate p
19min
Early diagenetic control on the enrichment and fractionation of rare earth elements in deep-sea sediments
Abstract The rare earth elements and yttrium (REY) in bioapatite from deep-sea sediments are potential proxies for reconstructing paleoenvironmental conditions. However, the REY enrichment mechanism and the reliability of this tracer remain elusive because of the lack of key information from ambient pore water. Here, we report high-resolution geochemical data for pore water, bottom water, and bio
19min
Laser-scribed conductive, photoactive transition metal oxide on soft elastomers for Janus on-skin electronics and soft actuators
Abstract Laser-assisted fabrication of conductive materials on flexible substrates has attracted intense interests because of its simplicity, easy customization, and broad applications. However, it remains challenging to achieve laser scribing of conductive materials on tissue-like soft elastomers, which can serve as the basis to construct bioelectronics and soft actuators. Here, we report laser
19min
SNARE assembly enlightened by cryo-EM structures of a synaptobrevin–Munc18-1–syntaxin-1 complex
Abstract Munc18-1 forms a template to organize assembly of the neuronal SNARE complex that triggers neurotransmitter release, binding first to a closed conformation of syntaxin-1 where its amino-terminal region interacts with the SNARE motif, and later binding to synaptobrevin. However, the mechanism of SNARE complex assembly remains unclear. Here, we report two cryo-EM structures of Munc18-1 bou
19min
Kinetic diffusion–controlled synthesis of twinned intermetallic nanocrystals for CO-resistant catalysis
Abstract Intermetallic catalysts are of immense interest, but how heterometals diffuse and related interface structure remain unclear when there exists a strong metal-support interaction. Here, we developed a kinetic diffusion–controlled method and synthesized intermetallic Pt 2 Mo nanocrystals with twin boundaries on mesoporous carbon (Pt 2 Mo/C). The formation of small-sized twinned intermetall
19min
Dealumination of small-pore zeolites through pore-opening migration process with the aid of pore-filler stabilization
Abstract Small-pore zeolites are gaining increasing attention owing to their superior catalytic performance. Despite being critical for the catalytic activity and lifetime, postsynthetic tuning of bulk Si/Al ratios of small-pore zeolites has not been achieved with well-preserved crystallinity because of the limited mass transfer of aluminum species through narrow micropores. Here, we demonstrate
19min
Metal-free ferroelectric halide perovskite exhibits visible photoluminescence correlated with local ferroelectricity
Abstract Perovskite materials with tunable electronic and structural characteristics can realize various physical properties including electrical/ionic conduction, ferroelectricity, and luminescence. Integrating and coupling these properties in a single perovskite material offer new possibilities for fundamental research and applications. In particular, coupling ferroelectricity and luminescence
19min
Flexible bioelectronic device fabricated by conductive polymer–based living material
Abstract Living materials are worked as an inside collaborative system that could naturally respond to changing environmental conditions. The regulation of bioelectronic processes in living materials could be effective for collecting biological signals and detecting biomarkers. Here, we constructed a living material with conjugated polymers poly[3-(3′- N , N , N -triethylamino-1′-propyloxy)-4-met
19min
Untethered small-scale magnetic soft robot with programmable magnetization and integrated multifunctional modules
Abstract Intelligent magnetic soft robots capable of programmable structural changes and multifunctionality modalities depend on material architectures and methods for controlling magnetization profiles. While some efforts have been made, there are still key challenges in achieving programmable magnetization profile and creating heterogeneous architectures. Here, we directly embed programmed magn
19min
Palimpsest memories stored in memristive synapses
Abstract Biological synapses store multiple memories on top of each other in a palimpsest fashion and at different time scales. Palimpsest consolidation is facilitated by the interaction of hidden biochemical processes governing synaptic efficacy during varying lifetimes. This arrangement allows idle memories to be temporarily overwritten without being forgotten, while previously unseen memories
19min
Inhaled siRNA nanoparticles targeting IL11 inhibit lung fibrosis and improve pulmonary function post-bleomycin challenge
Abstract Interleukin-11 (IL-11) is a profibrotic cytokine essential for the differentiation of fibroblasts into collagen-secreting, actin alpha 2, smooth muscle–positive (ACTA2 + ) myofibroblasts, driving processes underlying the pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Here, we developed an inhalable and mucus-penetrative nanoparticle (NP) system incorporating siRNA against IL11 (si
19min
Cortical-subcortical structural connections support transcranial magnetic stimulation engagement of the amygdala
Abstract The amygdala processes valenced stimuli, influences emotion, and exhibits aberrant activity across anxiety disorders, depression, and PTSD. Interventions modulating amygdala activity hold promise as transdiagnostic psychiatric treatments. In 45 healthy participants, we investigated whether transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) elicits indirect changes in amygdala activity when applied
19min
Liver cancer heterogeneity modeled by in situ genome editing of hepatocytes
Abstract Mechanistic study and precision treatment of primary liver cancer (PLC) are hindered by marked heterogeneity, which is challenging to recapitulate in any given liver cancer mouse model. Here, we report the generation of 25 mouse models of PLC by in situ genome editing of hepatocytes recapitulating 25 single or combinations of human cancer driver genes. These mouse tumors represent major
19min
The promise and pitfalls of cross-partisan conversations for reducing affective polarization: Evidence from randomized experiments
Abstract Organizations, activists, and scholars hope that conversations between outpartisans (supporters of opposing political parties) can reduce affective polarization (dislike of outpartisans) and bolster democratic accountability (e.g., support for democratic norms). We argue that such conversations can reduce affective polarization but that these effects are likely to be conditional on topic
19min
Non–von Neumann multi-input spike signal processing enabled by an artificial synaptic multiplexer
Abstract Multiplexing is essential for technologies that require processing of a large amount of information in real time. Here, we present an artificial synaptic multiplexing unit capable of realizing parallel multi-input control system. Ion gel was used as a dielectric layer of the artificial synaptic multiplexing unit because of its ionic property, allowing multigating for parallel input. A cl
19min
Therapeutic inhibition of the SRC-kinase HCK facilitates T cell tumor infiltration and improves response to immunotherapy
Abstract Although immunotherapy has revolutionized cancer treatment, many immunogenic tumors remain refractory to treatment. This can be largely attributed to an immunologically "cold" tumor microenvironment characterized by an accumulation of immunosuppressive myeloid cells and exclusion of activated T cells. Here, we demonstrate that genetic ablation or therapeutic inhibition of the myeloid-spe
19min
Everything You Need for the Perfect Summer Outdoor Movie Night
If you have a backyard, and a few friends and family members who love film, you're very close to throwing a memorable summer outdoor movie night. With projectors becoming more popular and affordable, you can gather your pals for a movie screening from the comforts of a grassy lawn. It's a perfect way to soak in that summer breeze and throw a memorable little shindig. Here's everything you need to
26min
SpaceX Accused of Coloring Night Sky Red for Several Minutes
Red Glow SpaceX's latest launch of its Falcon 9 rocket tinted the night sky a terrifying shade of red, The Washington Post reports , visible in long-exposure images taken by astrophotographers. "I was shooting the Milky Way behind some silhouetted rocks when suddenly one of my images had this prominent red blob right in front of the core, that had not been there in the previous image 3 minutes be
26min
Attitudes around older motherhood too often emphasize risk and pregnancy timing
A political science professor argues that much of the official language around older motherhood is rooted in both ageism and ableism, as well as being out of step with current childbirth trends. The average age of childbirth has been rising steadily since the mid-1960s, and in some countries, more women are giving birth between the ages of 35 to 39 than between 20 and 24. But societal expectations
40min
Tree species diversity under pressure
A new global study of 46,752 tree species shows that many of them are under substantial pressure and poorly protected. The research team has also studied how this situation can be improved by ambitious and smart designation of new protected areas.
40min
Optical microphone sees sound like never before
A camera system can see sound vibrations with such precision and detail that it can reconstruct the music of a single instrument in a band or orchestra. Even the most high-powered and directed microphones can't eliminate nearby sounds, ambient noise and the effect of acoustics when they capture audio. The novel system uses two cameras and a laser to sense high-speed, low-amplitude surface vibratio
40min
The Story of Fred, a Mastodon
In 1998, outside of Fort Wayne, Indiana, a hydraulic excavator at Buesching's Peat Moss & Mulch stripped back a layer of peat and struck bone in the underlying marl. Bone is the right word: This bone belonged to a mastodon, and mastodons are still fresh bodies in the dirt, not petrified fossils entombed in the rock. Although they might be popularly imagined living way back with the dinosaurs, the
45min
Branched actin networks are organized for asymmetric force production during clathrin-mediated endocytosis in mammalian cells
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31207-5 Drubin et al. use three different advanced imaging approaches to show that actin assembles preferentially at stalled clathrin-mediated endocytosis sites, where the actin pulls vesicles into the cell asymmetrically, as a bottle opener pulls off a cap.
46min
Mites that mate on our faces at night face extinction threat
Study of tiny parasites points to gene loss from adaptation putting them on dead-end evolutionary course Gliding through grease, and protected by our pores, tiny Demodex folliculorum mites lead a secretive life within our skin, only emerging at night to mate on our foreheads, noses and nipples. Successful as these sexual encounters are, their days as independent parasites may be numbered. The fir
51min
Breast cancer cells spread during sleep
Circulating breast cancer cells that later form metastases mainly arise during a person's sleep phase, a new study shows. To date, cancer research has not paid much attention to the question of when tumors shed metastatic cells. Researchers previously assumed that tumors release such cells continuously. Breast cancer is one of the most common forms of cancer, according to the World Health Organiz
51min
Couples with similar desirability are most likely to have good relationships
People of similar desirability are most likely to pair up and have long-lasting and successful relationships, according to new research. Sean Prall, an assistant professor of anthropology at the University of Missouri, traveled to northwest Namibia in southern Africa to study the behavior of Himba, a group of semi-nomadic agro-pastoralists. There he found that not only are people who are similarl
51min
Maine wild blueberry fields experience warming differently depending on location, season, time, study finds
To identify variations in climate across Maine wild blueberry fields at different times of the day and year, researchers analyzed annual and seasonal data from 1980-2020 for Washington, Hancock, Piscataquis, Waldo, Knox, Lincoln, Kennebec and York counties. They found that location, season and the time of day influence how fast temperatures are rising at wild blueberry fields due to climate change
1h
World's Largest Cruise Ship Headed Straight From Shipyard to Junkyard
Junkyard Pinball In a bleak financial and maritime saga, the nearly-completed mega cruise ship Global Dream II will never take to the high seas, and instead will be scrapped — because its builder ran out of cash, and no one wants to buy it, The Guardian reports . Once destined to each hold 9,000 seaward travelers, Global Dream II and its sister ship, Global Dream, would together have been the top
1h
Organic bipolar transistor developed
Researchers have developed a highly efficient organic bipolar transistor. The work opens up new perspectives for organic electronics — both in data processing and transmission, as well as in medical technology applications.
1h
Women in science receive less credit for their contributions
Women in science are less likely than their male counterparts to receive authorship credit for the work they do, new research finds. Researchers for the first time used a large set of administrative data from universities that revealed exactly who was involved with and paid on various research projects.
1h
Collecting a library of bee genomes
The USDA Agricultural Research Service is leading a project dubbed "Beenome100" to produce high-quality maps of the genomes of at least 100 bee species, capturing the diversity of bees in the United States, representing each of the major bee taxonomic groups in this country.
1h
Researchers develop a low-background neutron detector array
A research team from the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), together with their collaborators from Sichuan University and Chinese Institute of Atomic Energy, has recently developed a high-efficiency low-background neutron detector array, which is essential for the precise cross-section measurement of the 13C(α,n)16O reaction at stellar energies in China Jin
1h
Data gaps for race and ethnicity are holding back antiracism efforts, new report says
During the first year of the pandemic, Black people accounted for a disproportionate 15 percent of COVID-19 deaths in the United States. That number is bleak, but it's also probably incomplete: it includes only deaths where an official took the time to log the deceased's race and ethnicity. In many cases, that information was not recorded, meaning the full unequal impact of the pandemic may never
1h
Great Lakes levels are likely to see continued rise in next three decades
The Great Lakes in the Midwest U.S. comprise the largest unfrozen freshwater stores on Earth. But too much of a good thing can create problems. New research using the most advanced regional climate modeling systems finds that the baseline lake level for Lake Superior, Michigan-Huron and Erie are expected to rise by roughly 20 to 50 centimeters by 2050 as a result of climate change.
1h
How you can help scientists study the atmosphere on Jupiter
A new citizen science project, led by researchers at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities with support from NASA, allows volunteers to play an important role in helping scientists learn more about the atmosphere on Jupiter. Citizen scientists can help astrophysicists categorize tens of thousands of stunning images taken from the Juno spacecraft with just a web browser.
2h
Study links obsessive passion and social alienation to support for political violence
Violent extremism could be defined as support for violence to achieve political, ideological or social objectives. Under the umbrella of this type of mindset, violent acts are seen as a legitimate means of imposing a way of life in which there is no room for diversity. But what really underlies this type of behavior, and what drives a given person to exhibit these behaviors in which political viol
2h
Using microbrewery waste to synthesize carbon quantum dots
For a few years now, spent grain, the cereal residue from breweries, has been reused in animal feed. This material could also be used in nanotechnology. Professor Federico Rosei's team at the Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS) has shown that microbrewery waste can be used as a carbon source to synthesize quantum dots. The work, done in collaboration with Claudiane Ouellet-Plamon
2h
How to Be a Good Person Without Annoying Everyone
You've heard the joke: How do you know someone's vegan? Don't worry; they'll tell you . The punch line to the punch line, though, is that they very deliberately may not. Vegans and vegetarians are aware of their reputation as sanctimonious killjoys—so aware that nearly half of the non-meat-eating participants in one recent study declined to promote vegetarian options when in the company of unsymp
2h
Examining the zoonotic disease risk to non-traditional pet owners
Contact with non-traditional pets increases the risk of exposure to zoonotic pathogens, which are pathogens that spread between animals and people. The National Association of State Public Health Veterinarians, together with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, examine the threat to pet owners and provide recommendations for prevention in an article published in Vector-Borne and Zoonoti
2h
Local Residents Threaten to Shoot Amazon Drones Out of the Sky
Target Practice Amazon announced earlier this month that it would be launching its long-anticipated drone delivery service, Prime Air, in Lockeford, California — which was news to many of the rural town's residents, many of whom went as far as to say that they'll shoot unwelcome delivery drones right out of the sky, The Washington Post reports . "Target practice!" announced one unnamed resident,
2h
Women scientists don't get authorship they should, new study suggests
Poba/iStock Science is increasingly conducted by teams. But within those teams, credit isn't always allocated equitably: Women are less likely to be authors than men in their research group at the same career stage , even accounting for the hours each individual worked on the project, according to a study published today in Nature . "The consequences of such disparities on the retention of senior
2h
Scientists map sulfur residue on Jupiter's icy moon Europa
A team has used the Hubble Space Telescope to observe Jupiter's moon, Europa, at ultraviolet wavelengths, filling in a 'gap' in the various wavelengths used to observe this icy water world. The team's near-global UV maps show concentrations of sulfur dioxide on Europa's trailing side.
2h
The secret lives of mites in the skin of our faces
A full DNA analysis of mites that live in the hair follicles of all humans reveals explanations for their bizarre mating habits, body features and evolutionary future. Inbreeding and isolation means they have shed genes and cells and are moving closer to a permanent existence with us.
2h
Examining the zoonotic disease risk to non-traditional pet owners
Contact with non-traditional pets increases the risk of exposure to zoonotic pathogens, which are pathogens that spread between animals and people. The National Association of State Public Health Veterinarians, together with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, examine the threat to pet owners and provide recommendations for prevention in an article published in Vector-Borne and Zoonoti
2h
How much is the 'great resignation' costing companies?
For many investors, the SEC's November 2020 human capital disclosure requirement didn't require enough. The rule allows companies to choose what workforce costs, wellness, diversity and retention details—among other human capital data—to share, providing substantial managerial discretion. Human capital has become a major financial performance predictor, especially amidst a tight labor market. On a
2h
A postdoc's guide to choosing the right lab
Nature, Published online: 22 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01728-6 Allison McClure describes how she secured her first postdoctoral position and shares her thoughts on how laboratories can attract candidates.
2h
A lab leader's guide to hiring a postdoc
Nature, Published online: 22 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01729-5 It's worth waiting for the right postdoctoral researcher to come along, says Caroline Hill. But how do you choose the best candidate?
2h
'The complexities are staggering.' U.S. plans huge trial of blood tests for multiple cancers
Tests that screen seemingly healthy people for many kinds of cancer by analyzing a blood sample are starting to enter the clinic—worrying some physicians and scientists that they could do more harm than good. Now, as part of President Joe Biden's reignited Cancer Moonshot, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) is laying plans to evaluate the promise of such tests. Last week, NCI advisers endorsed a
3h
Custom suits for worms that really deliver
Researchers have found that nematodes can be coated with a protective hydrogel sheath that can be engineered to carry functional cargo. This system could potentially be developed to deliver anti-cancer drugs to tumors using worms with a natural predilection for human cancer cells.
3h
Topological superconductors: Fertile ground for elusive Majorana ('angel') particle
A new review investigates the search of Majorana fermions in iron-based superconductors. The elusive Majorana fermion, or 'angel particle' simultaneously behaves like a particle and an antiparticle — and surprisingly remains stable rather than being self-destructive. Majorana fermions promise information and communications technology with zero resistance, addressing the rising energy consumption
3h
Diabetes: Dopamine regulates insulin secretion through a complex of receptors
In a leap forward for diabetes research, researchers reveal that the feel-good hormone, dopamine, regulates insulin secretion through a heteromeric complex of receptors, thereby providing new targets for antidiabetic medication and therapy. The study is the first to elucidate the mechanism behind dopamine's down-regulation of insulin secretion.
3h
Mugwort allergy: Study creates basis for vaccine
A research team has discovered key mechanisms of allergy to pollen from the common weed mugwort, thereby also laying the foundation for the development of the world's first vaccine. Mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris) poses a serious problem for allergic individuals in certain latitudes from July through to September. Currently, the symptoms, which often lead to asthma, can only be treated symptomaticall
3h
PICASSO technique drives biological molecules into technicolor?
Pablo Picasso's surreal cubist artistic style shifted common features into unrecognizable scenes, but a new imaging approach bearing his namesake may elucidate the most complicated subject: the brain. Employing artificial intelligence to clarify spectral color blending of tiny molecules used to stain specific proteins and other items of research interest, the PICASSO technique, allows researchers
3h
Following ultrafast magnetization dynamics in depth
The future development of functional magnetic devices based on ultrafast optical manipulation of spins requires an understanding of the depth-dependent spin dynamics across the interfaces of complex magnetic heterostructures. A novel technique to obtain such an 'in depth' and time-resolved view on the magnetization has now been demonstrated.
3h
Researchers make virus-fighting face masks
Researchers have developed an accessible way to make N95 face masks not only effective barriers to germs, but on-contact germ killers. The antiviral, antibacterial masks can potentially be worn longer, causing less plastic waste as the masks do not need to be replaced as frequently.
3h
PICASSO technique drives biological molecules into technicolor?
Pablo Picasso's surreal cubist artistic style shifted common features into unrecognizable scenes, but a new imaging approach bearing his namesake may elucidate the most complicated subject: the brain. Employing artificial intelligence to clarify spectral color blending of tiny molecules used to stain specific proteins and other items of research interest, the PICASSO technique, allows researchers
3h
Robot scanner skibsskrog med autonomi som en Tesla
PLUS. Opstartsvirksomheden Blue Atlas Robotics har udviklet en undervandsrobot, der omsætter inspektionsdata til en detaljeret 3D-model og dermed forbedrer beslutnings­grundlaget for vedligehold af skibsskrog, havne og vindmøllefundamenter.
3h
Bionic robo-fish able to remove microplastics from seas revealed by scientists – video
Scientists have designed a tiny robot fish that is programmed to remove microplastics from seas and oceans by swimming around and adsorbing them. Microplastics are the billions of tiny plastic particles which fragment from bigger plastic things used every day. They are one of the 21st century's biggest environmental problems because once they are dispersed into the environment they are very hard
3h
Female scientists less likely to be given authorship credits, analysis finds
Disparities extend to lower chance of being named on patents and to areas such as healthcare where women dominate Female scientists are less likely to receive authorship credit or to be named on patents related to the work they do compared with their male counterparts – including in fields such as healthcare, where women dominate – data suggests. This gender gap may help to explain well-documente
3h
Canada Bans Single-Use Plastics, Including Bags and Straws
Last Straw The government of Canada has announced a sweeping ban on "harmful single-use plastics" to "keep them out of the environment" — becoming the latest international player to jump on the trend after China and the European Union , among others. The final regulations, published in a statement this week, put the kibosh on everything from checkout bags and cutlery to ring carriers, stir sticks
3h
Best Turntables in 2022
The best turntables allow you to get the most out of your records, while doing the least amount of damage to their grooves each time you lower the needle. Vinyl sales have skyrocketed over the past few years, due in part to interest in the format by indie artists, the longevity of classic bands, and an official, annual Record Store Day. Unsurprisingly, the increased interest in vinyl has resulted
3h
The FDA Is Reportedly About to Shut Down JUUL
It could soon be over for JUUL, at least in the United States. The Food and Drug Administration is getting ready to boot the popular e-cigarette company out of the US market, The Wall Street Journal reports . An announcement is expected as early as Wednesday, according to the WSJ 's sources, in the culmination of a two-year-long investigation into the company. JUUL, one of the most popular vaping
3h
Study highlights undiscovered potential of bacterial compounds and genes linked to colon cancer-related toxin
The last two decades have seen the development of sophisticated computational tools that explore the DNA of bacteria. These tools are on the lookout for interesting metabolites (metabolism-related molecules) that illicit a strong biological reaction. Their impact might be toxic, or it might be life enhancing; for example, informing the development of new antibiotics, anti-cancer drugs or bio-based
3h
Study highlights undiscovered potential of bacterial compounds and genes linked to colon cancer-related toxin
The last two decades have seen the development of sophisticated computational tools that explore the DNA of bacteria. These tools are on the lookout for interesting metabolites (metabolism-related molecules) that illicit a strong biological reaction. Their impact might be toxic, or it might be life enhancing; for example, informing the development of new antibiotics, anti-cancer drugs or bio-based
3h
Can we save more lives if we let resistant bacteria live?
Antibiotic resistance is a ticking timebomb under public health. The WHO predicts that in 2050 more people will die from infections than from cancer—and we are talking about infections that we today consider harmless; infections that occur in a cut or wound—or perhaps cystitis.
3h
Modern city dwellers have lost about half their gut microbes
Deep in the human gut, myriad "good" bacteria and other microbes help us digest our food, as well as keep us healthy by affecting our immune, metabolic, and nervous systems. Some of these humble microbial assistants have been in our guts since before humans became human—certain gut microbes are found in almost all primates, suggesting they first colonized a common ancestor. But humans have also l
3h
How science can tackle inequality
Nature, Published online: 22 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01721-z We dive into Nature's special edition on efforts to quantify and tackle inequality around the world, and investigate why breast cancers spread more at night.
3h
Ablation of cDC2 development by triple mutations within the Zeb2 enhancer
Nature, Published online: 22 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04866-z The transcription factor NFIL3 acts antagonistically to C/EBP proteins by binding the Zeb2 enhancer to prevent Zeb2 expression and the development of the conventional type 2 dendritic cell lineage. Author: A single sentence summarizing your paper has been provided (editor's summary in the eproof), which will appear online on t
3h
Biosynthetic potential of the global ocean microbiome
Nature, Published online: 22 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04862-3 Global ocean microbiome survey reveals the bacterial family 'Candidatus Eudoremicrobiaceae', which includes some of the most biosynthetically diverse microorganisms in the ocean environment.
3h
Observation of a correlated free four-neutron system
Nature, Published online: 22 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04827-6 Experiment based on knocking out an alpha particle from a high-energy helium isotope shows a resonance-like structure that is consistent with a quasi-bound tetraneutron state existing for a very short time.
3h
eIF5B and eIF1A reorient initiator tRNA to allow ribosomal subunit joining
Nature, Published online: 22 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04858-z Single-molecule spectroscopy and structural studies were used to examine the dynamics of association of eIF1A and eIF5B with the human translation initiation complex and their role in presenting tRNA to the complex to initiate translation.
3h
PIEZO1 transduces mechanical itch in mice
Nature, Published online: 22 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04860-5 Experiments in mice show that the mechanically activated ion channel PIEZO1 is expressed in itch-specific sensory neurons and has a role in transducing mechanical itch.
3h
Organic bipolar transistors
Nature, Published online: 22 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04837-4 An organic bipolar junction transistor composed of highly crystalline rubrene thin films has a device architecture that could be used in organic electronics with greatly improved high-frequency performance
3h
Clonally expanded CD8 T cells characterize amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-4
Nature, Published online: 22 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04844-5 An immune signature characterized by activated antigen-specific CD8 T cells is identified in the brain and blood of mice with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-4 (ALS4), suggesting that the immune system is involved in ALS4 neurodegeneration.
3h
De novo design of discrete, stable 310-helix peptide assemblies
Nature, Published online: 22 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04868-x A study demonstrates the rational de novo design of water-soluble assemblies constructed from long 310-helical peptides, and details their characterization by circular dichroism spectroscopy, analytical ultracentrifugation and X-ray crystallography.
3h
The metastatic spread of breast cancer accelerates during sleep
Nature, Published online: 22 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04875-y A study of patients with breast cancer and mouse models demonstrates that most circulating tumour cells are generated during the rest phase of the circadian rhythm, and that these cells are highly prone to metastasize.
3h
Cryo-EM structure of a type IV secretion system
Nature, Published online: 22 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04859-y Cryo-electron microscopy structures of a 2.8 megadalton bacterial type IV secretion system encoded by the plasmid R388 and comprising 92 polypeptides provide insights into the stepwise mechanism of pilus assembly.
3h
Tackling inequality takes social reform
Nature, Published online: 22 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01680-5 In separate books, leading economists explore the wide-ranging changes needed to produce a more just society.
3h
Collisions hint that four neutrons form a transient isolated entity
Nature, Published online: 22 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01634-x An experiment firing helium-8 nuclei at a proton target has generated evidence that four neutrons can exist transiently without any other matter. But doubts remain, because the existence of such systems is at odds with theory.
3h
Cancer cells spread aggressively during sleep
Nature, Published online: 22 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01639-6 The deadly spread of cancer occurs predominantly during sleep, as revealed by an analysis of migrating human tumour cells in the bloodstream. What are the implications of this finding for the treatment of cancer?
3h
These cancer cells wake up when people sleep
Nature, Published online: 22 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01724-w Researchers make 'striking' discovery that breast cancer cells are more likely to jump into the blood when people are resting.
3h
A wealth of new biosynthetic pathways from the global ocean microbiome
Nature, Published online: 22 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01545-x DNA from more than 1,000 marine microbial communities around the world was used to reconstruct around 26,000 genomes. The analyses identified a highly biosynthetically diverse family of bacteria in the open ocean, as well as new enzymes and biochemical compounds.
3h
Not all inequalities are alike
Nature, Published online: 22 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01682-3 Better data and new statistical techniques could enable researchers to measure the form of inequality that seems most harmful to society — inequality of opportunity.
3h
Touch-evoked itch pinned on Piezo1 ion-channel protein
Nature, Published online: 22 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01571-9 The sensation of touch-evoked itch is common in people who have chronic itch conditions. Evidence in mice now suggests that the mechanoreceptor protein Piezo1 underlies this sensation.
3h
Separating molecules by their shapes can purify natural gas
Nature, Published online: 22 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01548-8 Membranes made from metal–organic frameworks contain modular pores that can separate mixtures of gas. By changing the shape of these pores to improve molecular separation, we produced a membrane that could remove nitrogen and carbon dioxide from natural gas in an energy-efficient and cost-effective way.
3h
Versatile optical technique for unveiling thermophysical properties of complex fluids
Nanofluids (NFs) have been found to possess enhanced thermophysical properties compared to those of bare fluids like organic solvents or water. Since the first study was published in 1951, NFs have emerged as promising heat transport fluids with enhanced thermal conductivity in a wide range of technological applications, e.g., electronic cooling, solar water heating devices, nuclear reactors, radi
3h
Depression symptoms spike for teen boys after grandma's death
Losing a beloved family member is never easy, but a new study suggests the loss of a grandmother may have repercussions for the loved ones she leaves behind. The study finds that for up to seven years after the death of their grandmother, adolescent boys have a 50% increase in depression symptoms compared to peers not grieving. Additionally, this loss also was associated with a higher chance of b
3h
The Download: China's possible surveillance sanctions, and hacking locusts
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. The world's biggest surveillance company you've never heard of You may never have heard of Hikvision, but chances are you've already been captured by one of its millions of cameras. The Chinese company's products can be found anywhere from police surveillance
3h
Tree species diversity under pressure
In a new global study of more than 46,000 species of trees, an international team of researchers has shown that many tree species are under substantial pressure and poorly protected. The research team, headed by Aarhus University, has also studied how this situation can be improved by means of ambitious and smart designation of new protected natural areas.
4h
Following ultrafast magnetization dynamics in depth
The future development of functional magnetic devices based on ultrafast optical manipulation of spins requires an understanding of the depth-dependent spin dynamics across the interfaces of complex magnetic heterostructures. A novel technique to obtain such an "in depth" and time-resolved view on the magnetization has now been demonstrated at the Max Born Institute in Berlin, employing broadband
4h
What Causes Itch
A previously overlooked protein is important to this type of itch, an insight that could aid the development of new treatments.
4h
Improving the future of purification by using molecular silhouette to separate compounds in fluids
Impure chemical mixtures can now be separated based on differences in molecular silhouette. Membranes have been developed with nanoscale pores that match the shape of impurities in the mix so that only the impurity can pass through. KAUST researchers have suggested that the first application of these metal-organic framework (MOF) based shape-selective membranes could be energy-efficient, low-cost
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What happens to people's donated eggs and sperm after they die? | Ellen Trachman
Today, there are many ways to conceive a child, thanks to assisted reproductive technologies like IVF and egg-freezing. But the law lags behind these advancements, says attorney Ellen Trachman, troubling parents-to-be with stranger-than-fiction mix-ups and baffling lawsuits. Trachman makes the case for legality to reflect the realities of reproductive innovation — and prompts you to reconsider wh
4h
Track-and-trace method predicts best possible resolution in microscopy
TU Delft scientists provide insight into the limitations of super-resolution microscopy and offer a new calculation method to determine maximum resolution. The technology is important for studying processes in the living cell, discovering the origin of diseases and developing new medicines. Their findings were published in the Biophysical Journal.
4h
Tapping the ocean as a source of natural products
The oceans are teeming with countless forms of life, from the world's largest creature—the blue whale—to miniscule microorganisms. In addition to their vast numbers, these microorganisms are also crucial for ensuring that the entire eco- and climate system work properly. For instance, there are photosynthetically active varieties such as cyanobacteria that produce around 50 percent of the oxygen i
4h
Track-and-trace method predicts best possible resolution in microscopy
TU Delft scientists provide insight into the limitations of super-resolution microscopy and offer a new calculation method to determine maximum resolution. The technology is important for studying processes in the living cell, discovering the origin of diseases and developing new medicines. Their findings were published in the Biophysical Journal.
4h
'Fishing' for toxic contaminants using superparamagnetic nanoparticles
Once a water source is contaminated, it can be costly and difficult to remediate. Natural remedies can take hundreds of years and still may not successfully remove all the dangerous contaminants. When it comes to global public health issues such as this, the need for new and safe solutions is urgent. John Fortner is designing solutions from scratch to do just that.
4h
Tapping the ocean as a source of natural products
The oceans are teeming with countless forms of life, from the world's largest creature—the blue whale—to miniscule microorganisms. In addition to their vast numbers, these microorganisms are also crucial for ensuring that the entire eco- and climate system work properly. For instance, there are photosynthetically active varieties such as cyanobacteria that produce around 50 percent of the oxygen i
4h
Scientists poke holes in liquid to keep airplanes from freezing on a rainy day
Droplets hitting aircraft plating can break the protective film of anti-icing fluid, leaving behind dry spots susceptible to hazardous freezing. In a similar way, lubricated parts in an industrial machine can lose their protection from friction if falling droplets poke holes in the film. Published in Fluids, the latest installment in a series of studies with showy slo-mo experiments by Skoltech re
4h
Human cells take in less protein from a plant-based 'meat' than from chicken
Many people have now embraced the plant-based 'meat' movement. Plants high in protein, such as soybeans, are common ingredients, but it's been unclear how much of the nutrient makes it into human cells. Researchers now report that proteins in a model plant-based substitute were not as accessible to cells as those from meat. The team says this knowledge could eventually be used to develop more heal
4h
Sniffing out your identity with breath biometrics
Researchers have developed an artificial 'nose' that can identify individuals from their breath. Built with a 16-channel sensor array that can detect different compounds found in a person's breath, the olfactory sensor system has the potential to become another option in the biometric security toolkit. Combined with machine learning, the 'artificial nose' was able to authenticate up to 20 individu
4h
NASA's Super Expensive Mega Moon Rocket Starts Leaking During Test
Launch Leak During a crucial test over the weekend, NASA's long delayed , ultra-expensive Space Launch System (SLS) sprang a leak in a hydrogen fuel valve. This was the fourth try at what NASA calls a "wet dress" rehearsal for the Artemis 1 mission , of which the previous three attempts were considered failures due to other fueling issues . Despite this most recent fuel fiasco — which caused Arte
4h
Projected increase in space travel may damage ozone layer
Projected growth in rocket launches for space tourism, moon landings, and perhaps travel to Mars has many dreaming of a new era of space exploration. But a NOAA study suggests that a significant boost in spaceflight activity may damage the protective ozone layer on the one planet where we live.
4h
Modeling electrolyte transport in water-rich exoplanets
Oceans on water-rich exoplanets may be enriched with electrolytes, including salts such as sodium chloride, suggests a modeling study published in Nature Communications. The research proposes electrolytes can be transported from the rocky core of these planets and may have implications for the potential habitability of these ocean worlds.
4h
Using a locust's brain and antennae to detect mouth cancer
A team of researchers at Michigan State University has found a way to use a locust's brain and antennae to sniff out mouth cancer. Their work has not yet been peer-reviewed, but they have posted a paper describing their work on the bioRxiv preprint server.
4h
The secret of cell growth could be in 'yo-yo' and 'gear-like' tendencies
Cells, the most basic units of life that form all living organisms, have long guarded their secrets, but now an international team from the University of Sydney, ETH Zurich and the University of Basel has uncovered some of their secrets through the development of a world-first technique.
5h
European map of aerosol pollution can help improve human health
Researchers have measured the composition of fine dust at 22 locations in Europe. The result of this international study, led by the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI, is a European map of the most important aerosol sources. The researchers have now published their findings in the journal Environment International.
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Large-scale cultivation of microalgae can clean emissions from industry, can also be used in Nordic climate
Microalgae can recover greenhouse gases and nutrients from industrial waste. This technology can be used to reduce climate footprint and eutrophication. Lina Mattsson's dissertation in ecology shows that microalgae can also be used in the Nordic climate, which has previously been considered a challenge as the algae are dependent on heat and sunlight.
5h
Scientists map sulfur residue on Jupiter's icy moon Europa
A Southwest Research Institute-led team used the Hubble Space Telescope to observe Jupiter's moon, Europa, at ultraviolet wavelengths, filling in a "gap" in the various wavelengths used to observe this icy water world. The team's near-global UV maps show concentrations of sulfur dioxide on Europa's trailing side.
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Citizen scientists from three continents help discover a new, giant slug from Europe
You might think that Europe is so well studied that no large animals remain undiscovered. Yet today, a new species of giant keelback slug from Montenegro was announced in the open-access Biodiversity Data Journal. The animal, as big as a medium-sized carrot, was discovered on a citizen-science expedition and jointly described by its participants.
5h
Deletion of 'Wt1' gene produces alterations in the reproductive organs of mice
The deletion of the Wt1 gene during the early stages of the embryonic reproductive organ formation leads to differences in sex development in adult mice, according to an article published in the journal PLOS Genetics and led by the lecturer Ofelia Martínez-Estrada, from the Faculty of Biology and the Biomedicine Research Institute (IRBio) of the UB.
5h
Maximize business value with data-driven strategies
Every company is collecting data, whether it's consumer buying habits, demographic data from third-party sources or insights from weather patterns. That's good news—it wasn't long ago that this kind of critical information was mostly ignored. But it's not enough: companies must now start using that data to run every part of their business. There's more progress to be made: just 34% of executives
5h
Deletion of 'Wt1' gene produces alterations in the reproductive organs of mice
The deletion of the Wt1 gene during the early stages of the embryonic reproductive organ formation leads to differences in sex development in adult mice, according to an article published in the journal PLOS Genetics and led by the lecturer Ofelia Martínez-Estrada, from the Faculty of Biology and the Biomedicine Research Institute (IRBio) of the UB.
5h
Citizen scientists are demographically homogenous: The need for a volunteer-centric approach
Over the last century, the contributions of citizen scientists have proven a vital source of scientific data, with projects such as the Christmas Bird Count fueling high-impact research programs. However, less data has been accrued about those who actually participate in these important programs. Writing in BioScience, Bradley Allf (North Carolina State University) and colleagues turn the lens of
5h
Celibacy: Its surprising evolutionary advantages
Why would someone join an institution that removed the option of family life and required them to be celibate? Reproduction, after all, is at the very heart of the evolution that shaped us. Yet many religious institutions around the world require exactly this. The practice has led anthropologists to wonder how celibacy could have evolved in the first place.
5h
NASA announces Artemis concept awards for nuclear power on moon
NASA and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are working together to advance space nuclear technologies. The agencies have selected three design concept proposals for a fission surface power system design that could be ready to launch by the end of the decade for a demonstration on the moon. This technology would benefit future exploration under the Artemis umbrella.
5h
Software upgrade for 19-year-old martian water-spotter
The MARSIS instrument on ESA's Mars Express spacecraft, famous for its role in the discovery of signs of liquid water on the Red Planet, is receiving a major software upgrade that will allow it to see beneath the surfaces of Mars and its moon Phobos in more detail than ever before.
5h
Discovering new plant and fungi species
There is so much we still don't know about native species in Australia and New Zealand. Best estimates suggest that we have yet to discover and name some 70% of the life living around us.
5h
New imaging technique drives biological molecules into technicolor
Pablo Picasso's cubist artistic style shifted common features into unrecognizable scenes, but a new imaging approach bearing his namesake may elucidate the most complicated subject: the brain. Employing artificial intelligence to clarify spectral color blending of tiny molecules used to stain specific proteins and other items of research interest, the PICASSO technique, allows researchers to use m
5h
More than 100 fossils discovered in Brazilian paleontological site that was lost for 70 years
Paleontologists from three universities in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, found a fossiliferous site lost for more than 70 years near the city of Dom Pedrito, the heart of the Campanha region and a city that borders Uruguay. About 260 million years ago, even before the first dinosaurs, the ideal environmental conditions were present for the preservation of the organisms that inhabited this area in the
5h
Natural mineral hackmanite can change color almost indefinitely enabling numerous applications
While investigating hackmanite, a natural wonder material, researchers found that it, in addition to two other minerals, can change their color upon exposure to UV radiation repeatedly without wearing out. The results show that the inexpensive hackmanite, which is easy to synthesise, is also an excellent material because of its high durability and applicability for different purposes.
5h
New imaging technique drives biological molecules into technicolor
Pablo Picasso's cubist artistic style shifted common features into unrecognizable scenes, but a new imaging approach bearing his namesake may elucidate the most complicated subject: the brain. Employing artificial intelligence to clarify spectral color blending of tiny molecules used to stain specific proteins and other items of research interest, the PICASSO technique, allows researchers to use m
5h
More than 100 fossils discovered in Brazilian paleontological site that was lost for 70 years
Paleontologists from three universities in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, found a fossiliferous site lost for more than 70 years near the city of Dom Pedrito, the heart of the Campanha region and a city that borders Uruguay. About 260 million years ago, even before the first dinosaurs, the ideal environmental conditions were present for the preservation of the organisms that inhabited this area in the
5h
'Tattoo' continuously monitors blood pressure
A new electronic tattoo can be worn comfortably on the wrist for hours to deliver continuous blood pressure measurements, a new study shows. The measurements exceed accuracy levels of nearly all available options on the market today. Blood pressure is one of the most important indicators of heart health, but it's tough to frequently and reliably measure outside of a clinical setting. For decades,
5h
Japan's Kairyu Sea Turbine Will Harvest the Never-Ending Power of Deep Ocean Currents
A little over a year ago, a Scottish company called Orbital Marine Power was getting a two-megawatt tidal turbine up and running in the North Sea. The system was expected to generate enough electricity to power around 2,000 Scottish homes and offset 2,200 tons of CO2 annually. Meanwhile, a similar ocean turbine called Kairyu was already in the water off the coast of Japan, undergoing a three-year
5h
Researchers discover a new receptor regulating sebaceous gland progenitor cell function
Stem cells and progenitor cells play an important role in the renewal of multiple tissues. Professor Jyrki Heino's research group from the University of Turku together and Professor Fiona Watt´s research group from King's College London have discovered a molecule called embigin on the surface of epithelia progenitor cells and proven its significance to sebaceous gland function.
5h
The Cornelia Marie Tries One Last Desperation Move to Find Crab | Deadliest Catch
Stream Deadliest Catch on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/deadliest-catch #DeadliestCatch #Discovery #DiscoveryPlus Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Disco
5h
Infrared cameras show moths have a wide variety of coloring
A team of researchers working at Lund University in Sweden has found that despite their drab appearance in daylight, moths have a wide variety of bright coloring when viewed using an infrared camera. In their paper published in Journal of the Royal Society Interface, the group describes the interesting coloring of 82 moth specimens.
5h
Researchers discover a new receptor regulating sebaceous gland progenitor cell function
Stem cells and progenitor cells play an important role in the renewal of multiple tissues. Professor Jyrki Heino's research group from the University of Turku together and Professor Fiona Watt´s research group from King's College London have discovered a molecule called embigin on the surface of epithelia progenitor cells and proven its significance to sebaceous gland function.
5h
Upcycling plastics through dynamic cross-linking
If bioengineers can upcycle commodity plastics into higher-performance materials, they can establish sustained closed-loop manufacturing with broader industrial and environmental benefits. For example, upcycled plastics can be reprocessed to form custom-designed structures via an energy-resource-efficient additive manufacturing circuit based on fused filament fabrication (the FFF method). In a new
5h
Forest research links carbon uptake and water use
New research links the amount of carbon dioxide taken in by land ecosystems, such as forests, to the availability of water, which is in short supply during droughts. Our climate is rapidly warming with rising temperatures affecting the physical environments that support entire ecosystems. Humans and animal species both face daunting challenges for survival because of climate change. During a PhD
5h
Babbling discovered in wild baby parrots
A team of researchers from the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, working with colleagues from several research facilities in Venezuela, has found evidence of babbling in wild baby parrots. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes the unique vocalizations of the baby birds, similar to human infants, and what they learned about the role of stress hormo
5h
Dopamin-opdagelse peger på helt nye lægemiddelmål
Danske forskere har opdaget, at kalium spiller en uventet, men alligevel helt central, rolle i reguleringen af dopamin i hjernen. Opdagelsen er muligvis ikke unik for dopamin og kan åbne op for nye lægemiddelmål mod en lang række lidelser fra Parkinsons sygdom til depression.
5h
Babbling discovered in wild baby parrots
A team of researchers from the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, working with colleagues from several research facilities in Venezuela, has found evidence of babbling in wild baby parrots. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes the unique vocalizations of the baby birds, similar to human infants, and what they learned about the role of stress hormo
5h
Fertilization reshapes the tree-fungi relationship in boreal forests
How do nutritional changes affect the interaction between trees and soil microorganisms? This has long remained a black box but a new study has shed light onto this cryptic association. It shows that increased soil nutrition changes the communication between trees and their associated fungi, restructuring the root-associated fungal community with major implications for carbon cycling in the forest
6h
Fertilization reshapes the tree-fungi relationship in boreal forests
How do nutritional changes affect the interaction between trees and soil microorganisms? This has long remained a black box but a new study has shed light onto this cryptic association. It shows that increased soil nutrition changes the communication between trees and their associated fungi, restructuring the root-associated fungal community with major implications for carbon cycling in the forest
6h
New gel protects eggs—and maybe someday, heads—from damage
Humpty Dumpty, the famous egg of nursery rhyme fame, fell off a wall and couldn't be put back together again. But if he'd worn a protective jacket made of gelatin and cornstarch, he could have stayed intact. Researchers in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces report that by adding starch to gelatin, they have created gels that protect fragile objects, such as eggs—and maybe someday, people's heads.
6h
Side Effects May Include … A Completely New Hair Color?
In October 2019, Jordan Janz became the first person in the world to receive an experimental therapy for cystinosis, a rare genetic disease. The treatment was physically grueling. Doctors extracted blood stem cells from Janz's bone marrow and genetically modified them in a lab. Meanwhile, he underwent chemotherapy to clear out the remaining faulty cells in his bone marrow before he got the newly
6h
The science of smell steps into the spotlight
Nature, Published online: 22 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01625-y With millions of people losing their ability to detect aromas as a result of COVID-19, our most underappreciated sense is drawing researchers' attention.
6h
Building neural networks that smell like a brain
Nature, Published online: 22 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01633-y Computational neuroscientist Guangyu Robert Yang lifts the lid on the use of machine learning to detect and process odours, and the wider implications for neuroscience.
6h
Olfactory receptors are not unique to the nose
Nature, Published online: 22 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01631-0 The hundreds of receptors that give us our sense of smell have been found to have important roles in other parts of the body, and the prospect of targeting them with drugs is growing.
6h
The dogs learning to sniff out disease
Nature, Published online: 22 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01629-8 Veterinarian Cynthia Otto explains how we might harness animals' ability to smell human illnesses — including COVID-19.
6h
The science behind COVID's assault on smell
Nature, Published online: 22 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01627-w The loss of the sense of smell has been a hallmark symptom of COVID-19. The mechanisms behind SARS-CoV-2's ability to interfere with this sense — as well as why variants such as Omicron do so less frequently — are becoming clearer.
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Sniffing out smell's effects on human behaviour
Nature, Published online: 22 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01632-z Olfaction could influence how people respond to threats or select a partner. To investigate, researchers need to design experiments that can capture its effects.
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How to bring back the sense of smell
Nature, Published online: 22 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01628-9 Treatments for olfactory loss are currently scarce, but with millions of people unable to smell as a result of COVID-19, researchers are pursuing the problem with renewed vigour.
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Unpicking the link between smell and memories
Nature, Published online: 22 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01626-x The ability of aromas to bring back highly specific memories is becoming better understood, and could be used to boost and heal our brains.
6h
New shelter designs boost firefighters' survival chances
Four new designs for shelters to protect firefighters trapped in wildfires could increase survival time compared with the current industry standard, according to a new study. In lab simulations of wildfire burn-overs—where a wildfire sweeps over a group of trapped firefighters or equipment—temperatures inside the shelters remained within survival limits for longer, and the shelters took longer to
6h
Your soul in a pot
Nature, Published online: 22 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01439-y A taste of things to come?
6h
Custom suits for worms that can deliver functional cargo
James Bond's legendary quartermaster Q provided the special agent with an endless array of tools and gadgets to help him accomplish his missions. Now, researchers from Japan have demonstrated equal prowess at equipping microscopic worms with a surprising arsenal of functional and protective factors.
6h
Scientists unveil bionic robo-fish to remove microplastics from seas
Tiny self-propelled robo-fish can swim around, latch on to free-floating microplastics and fix itself if it gets damaged Scientists have designed a tiny robot-fish that is programmed to remove microplastics from seas and oceans by swimming around and adsorbing them on its soft, flexible, self-healing body. Microplastics are the billions of tiny plastic particles which fragment from the bigger pla
7h
Black Flamingo
Learned today that flamingos can live up to seventy years. I gasped at the fact, thinking about a bird, pink and slender and older than my parents, out there somewhere preening its coat of feathers, or sifting through a lake for food, a flock of them flying southeast, their bodies against the sky like a postcard. Meanwhile, several states from here, another Black twenty-something who could've bee
7h
Human cells take in less protein from a plant-based meat than from chicken
Many people have now embraced the plant-based meat movement. Plants high in protein, such as soybeans, are common ingredients, but it's been unclear how much of the nutrient makes it into human cells. In ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, researchers report that proteins in a model plant-based substitute were not as accessible to cells as those from meat. The team says this knowledge
7h
Can scientists use plants to study human mental illness?
A team of researchers thinks it's possible to study human psychiatric illness in plants and have taken the first step toward this goal. In a study in Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences , they report investigating a gene very similar in both plants and mammals and looking at how it affects behavior in each. "Years ago, I started to become interested in this idea that every living organism must h
7h
Human cells take in less protein from a plant-based meat than from chicken
Many people have now embraced the plant-based meat movement. Plants high in protein, such as soybeans, are common ingredients, but it's been unclear how much of the nutrient makes it into human cells. In ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, researchers report that proteins in a model plant-based substitute were not as accessible to cells as those from meat. The team says this knowledge
7h
Tiny fish-shaped robot 'swims' around picking up microplastics
Microplastics are found nearly everywhere on Earth and can be harmful to animals if they're ingested. But it's hard to remove such tiny particles from the environment, especially once they settle into nooks and crannies at the bottom of waterways. Now, researchers in ACS' Nano Letters have created a light-activated fish robot that "swims" around quickly, picking up and removing microplastics from
7h
LARPing has more intense effect than other entertainment
In season four of the Netflix series "Stranger Things," an alternate dimension "the Upside Down" bleeds into the real world. Now new research by the University of Sydney and Monash University has found this is a common experience for people who engage in live action role-playing games.
7h
Slut med tutorlæger på Vestlolland: »Hvis der ikke engang er plads til os yngre læger, kommer der jo ingen nye læger til«
Læger under uddannelse udgør en vigtig brik i de kommende år, hvor mange praktiserende læger går på pension og fortsat udfordrer lægedækningen flere steder i landet. Men på Lolland, det mest lægefattige område i Danmark, er situationen nu så kritisk, at der ikke er en eneste tutorlæge tilbage vest for Maribo. Fødekæden synes dermed at være brudt.
7h
Floating City in The Maldives Will Rise With The Sea Level
(Photo: Dutch Docklands) The Maldives is more than just a picturesque vacation destination. It's home to over half a million people, whose homes and livelihoods are at risk of sinking as the planet warms and sea levels rise. It sounds like something out of a sci-fi paperback: climate change has wreaked havoc on the planet, and a community's only hope of survival is to build a floating utopia. And
8h
Pixel super-resolution with spatially entangled photons
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31052-6 Pixelation is common in quantum imaging systems and limit the image spatial resolution. Here, the authors introduce a pixel super-resolution approach based on measuring the full spatially-resolved joint probability distribution of spatially-entangled photons, and improve pixel resolution by a factor two.
8h
What My Mom Told Me About America Before Roe
My world has always been conditioned by an automatic assumption of reproductive rights that my mother, the writer Erica Jong, did not have when she came of age. I was born in 1978, five years after Roe v. Wade . Like most women under 50, under 60 even, I find it hard even to imagine what life was like for women in those pre- Roe years. Yet that is the world we're going back to if Justice Samuel A
8h
Near-ideal electromechanical coupling in textured piezoelectric ceramics
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31165-y "k" is the electromechanical coupling factor, and determines the efficiency of conversion between electrical and mechanical energy or vice-versa in piezoelectric materials. Here, Yan et al. present an optimization strategy for "k" via texturing and covalency tuning that results in "k" values comparable to that o
9h
Welcome to the Summer of Dancing and Darkness
The wisdom of the expression "Dance like nobody's watching" is going to be put to the test this summer. Both Drake's Honestly, Nevermind , the 14-song album that the rapper dropped with little warning on Friday, and Beyoncé's "Break My Soul," the hugely anticipated single that the singer put out last night, see superstars resetting their sound to the thump thump thump of '90s house. Their music a
9h
Farewell to Hong Kong and Its Big Lie
Earlier this month, a few days before I packed up my apartment and left Hong Kong, I made my way across the city to Victoria Park. For decades, the city's residents would gather there in the thousands on the night of June 4 to commemorate the victims of the Tiananmen Square massacre , a moment of mass collective remembrance for those killed by Chinese forces in Beijing in 1989 and, though less so
9h
Bi by Julia Shaw review – the past and present of a maligned minority
A tour of the science, culture and history of bisexuality that ranges from the vehemently political to the charmingly weird According to periodic reports in the media, bisexuality has been a brand-new fad since at least the 1890s. It was all the rage in 1974, for example, when the US magazine Newsweek discovered "Bisexual Chic: Anyone Goes". A generation later, in 1995, the same magazine publishe
9h
UPenn prof with four retractions "may no longer be affiliated" with school
A pharmacology researcher with four retractions appears to have left the University of Pennsylvania, where he had worked for at least 30 years and won more than $7 million in NIH grants. The school's faculty page for William Armstead, who held ​​a research professorship in Anesthesiology and Critical Care, now bears only the statement that … Continue reading
9h
New ultrathin capacitor could enable energy-efficient microchips
The silicon-based computer chips that power our modern devices require vast amounts of energy to operate. Despite ever-improving computing efficiency, information technology is projected to consume around 25% of all primary energy produced by 2030. Researchers in the microelectronics and materials sciences communities are seeking ways to sustainably manage the global need for computing power.
9h
Våra ögonrörelser hjälper oss att minnas
En femtio år gammal tes inom den kognitiva neurovetenskapen har nu belagts: våra ögonrörelser hjälper oss att minnas. För att plocka fram ett minne flyttar sig blicken på samma sätt som när minnet skapades. Resultaten ger ny inblick i hur vi genererar och återskapar representationer av vår omvärld.
10h
The world's biggest surveillance company you've never heard of
You may never have heard of Hikvision, but chances are you've already been captured by one of its millions of cameras. The Chinese company's products can be found anywhere from police surveillance systems to baby monitors in more than 190 countries. Its ability to make decent-quality products at cheap prices (as well as its ties with the Chinese state) has helped make Hikvision the largest manufa
10h
Energy-hungry data centers are quietly moving into cities
In 1930, the telegraph giant Western Union put the finishing touches on its new crown jewel: a 24-story art deco building located at 60 Hudson Street in lower Manhattan. Soon after, over a million telegraphs each day shuttled in and out, carried by a network of cables, pneumatic tubes, and 30 employees in roller skates who sped across the building's linoleum floors. Today, much of it is home to v
10h
RNase III-CLASH of multi-drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus reveals a regulatory mRNA 3′UTR required for intermediate vancomycin resistance
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31177-8 Regulatory small RNA (sRNA) interact with mRNAs to regulate their stability, transcription, and translation via diverse mechanisms. Here, Mediati et al. apply RNase III-CLASH to multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus to characterise the network of RNA–RNA interactions associated with RNase III and identify a
10h
High-resolution mass measurements of single budding yeast reveal linear growth segments
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30781-y Measuring the mass of individual microbial cells remains challenging. Here, the authors present a cell balance to monitor the proliferation of single budding yeast cells under culture conditions in real time, showing that single cells increase total mass in multiple linear segments of constant growth rates.
10h
RNase III CLASH in MRSA uncovers sRNA regulatory networks coupling metabolism to toxin expression
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31173-y Regulatory small RNA (sRNA) interact with mRNAs to regulate their stability, transcription, and translation via diverse mechanisms. Here, McKellar et al. apply RNase IIICLASH of multi-drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus under different culture conditions to link the network of RNA-RNA interactions to environmen
10h
Warming climate upends Arctic mining town
Tor Selnes owes his life to a lamp. He miraculously survived a fatal avalanche that shed light on the vulnerability of Svalbard, a region warming faster than anywhere else, to human-caused climate change.
11h
At least 255 killed in Afghanistan earthquake
A powerful earthquake struck a remote border region of Afghanistan overnight killing at least 255 people and injuring hundreds more, officials said Wednesday, with the toll expected to rise as rescuers dig through collapsed dwellings.
11h
A New Mexico firewatcher describes watching his world burn
Philip Connors deeply loves the forest he has watched over every summer for the past 20 years. But it was a different forest two decades ago, and will be even more changed once the flames die down. (Image credit: Philip Connors/Philip Connors)
11h
How the Yurok Tribe Is Bringing Back the California Condor
In the 1980s, the total condor population dwindled to fewer than 30 individuals. Biologists concluded the species' only chance of survival lay in capturing every living condor in order to breed the birds in captivity, safe from poisons and power lines. But reintroducing them to the wild proved difficult.
11h
Can gender diversity on boards of directors improve companies' social commitment and sustainability?
Social commitment leads to good relationships between companies and its stakeholders, and it is the board of directors' responsibility to ensure that companies fulfill their commitment to the communities and society of which they are a member. In a study published in Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, researchers who analyzed the boards of directors of publicly listed US
12h
Researchers derive new theory on behavior of new class of materials
Researchers led by CEE Professor Oscar Lopez-Pamies have derived the governing equations that describe and explain the macroscopic mechanical behavior of elastomers filled with liquid inclusions directly in terms of their microscopic behavior. The work is described in an article by Lopez-Pamies and Ph.D. student Kamalendu Ghosh recently published in the Journal of the Mechanics and Physics of Soli
12h
Terrawatch: saltier oceans could have prevented Earth from freezing
Study may have solved paradox of the faint young Sun – which shone 20% less bright in Archean times The Sun shone 20% less brightly on early Earth, and yet fossil evidence shows that our planet had warm shallow seas where stromatolites – microbial mats – thrived. Now a study may have solved the "faint young Sun paradox", showing that saltier oceans could have prevented Earth from freezing over du
12h
Research uncovers 'digital poverty' across North West's rural communities
A new study by researchers at Lancaster University reveals 28% of the population in North West England are not confident completing key tasks online, such as applying for a job or making an online call. Most alarmingly, over half of those aged 65 and above and those on lower incomes lack digital skills, meaning those most in need of online services are least likely to be able to access them.
12h
How is pharmaceutical pollution affecting the world's rivers?
During their production, use, and disposal, pharmaceutical ingredients in prescription and over-the-counter drugs are released into the environment, especially in surface waters. Results from a recent study published in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry indicate that pharmaceutical pollution is a global problem that is likely negatively affecting the health of the world's rivers.
12h
Cooperative chalcogen bonding interactions in confined sites activate aziridines
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31293-5 The activation of aziridines is typically achieved via reaction with strong Lewis acids or transition metals. Here, the authors report that cooperative Se ∙ ∙∙O and Se ∙ ∙∙N noncovalent interactions can activate sulfonyl-protected aziridines, which enables their use in cycloaddition reactions with nonactivated a
13h
Bad Choices in Dresden III
Lorenza Colzato was a rising star of psychology and a role model for Women in STEM. All Dutch media and even some local German newspapers talk about her now. But I want to talk about her husband Bernhard Hommel instead.
13h
Half in UK back genome editing to prevent severe diseases
Survey also finds younger generations far more in favour of designer babies than older people are More than half the UK backs the idea of rewriting the DNA of human embryos to prevent severe or life-threatening diseases, according to a survey. Commissioned by the Progress Educational Trust (PET), a fertility and genomics charity, the Ipsos poll found that 53% of people support the use of human ge
14h
An Immunologist Fights Covid with Tweets and a Nasal Spray
In the United States and some other countries, the Covid-19 pandemic has entered a paradoxical stage in which the coronavirus has evolved into a highly contagious variant and sent cases soaring, but the public's attitude has evolved toward indifference, deflating precautionary measures. Immunologists like Akiko Iwasaki of the Yale School of Medicine, keenly aware that the consequences of the… S
19h
Muscle biopsy test for biomarker could lead to earlier diagnosis of ALS
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive disease of the nervous system. It affects nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord called motor neurons. Motor neurons control muscle movement and ALS causes them to deteriorate and eventually die. The motor neurons lose the ability to send messages to the muscles in the body, affecting voluntary muscle movements. There have been recent advances
19h
2021 heat wave created 'perfect storm' for shellfish die-off
It's hard to forget the excruciating heat that blanketed the Pacific Northwest in late June 2021. Temperatures in Oregon, Washington and British Columbia soared to well above 100 degrees Fahrenheit, with Seattle setting an all-time heat record of 108 degrees on June 28. A team has now compiled and analyzed hundreds of field observations to produce a comprehensive report of the impacts of the 2021
19h
Does Academia have a Monopoly on Credibility and Expertise?
My field of interest is cognitive science. I'm planning projects that will require me to have a decent level of credibility and demonstrated expertise in this field (which I don't currently have). I've considered doing a Ph.D. and becoming a researcher but it seems the opportunity cost of 6 additional years of schooling + post-docs would be too great for me. I see doing a master's degree or two a
19h
Quantum sensor can detect electromagnetic signals of any frequency
Researchers developed a method to enable quantum sensors to detect any arbitrary frequency, with no loss of their ability to measure nanometer-scale features. Quantum sensors detect the most minute variations in magnetic or electrical fields, but until now they have only been capable of detecting a few specific frequencies, limiting their usefulness.
20h
Plant virus plus immune cell-activating antibody clear colon cancer in mice, prevent recurrence
A new combination therapy to combat cancer could one day consist of a plant virus and an antibody that activates the immune system's 'natural killer' cells, shows a new study. In mouse models of colon cancer, the combination therapy eliminated all tumors and prevented their recurrence, which in turn resulted in 100% survival. The therapy also increased survival in mouse models of melanoma.
20h
Wrist-worn trackers can detect Covid before symptoms, study finds
Sensor tech can alert wearer to Covid early, helping to prevent onward transmission Health trackers worn on the wrist could be used to spot Covid-19 days before any symptoms appear, according to researchers. Growing numbers of people worldwide use the devices to monitor changes in skin temperature, heart and breathing rates. Now a new study shows that this data could be combined with artificial i
20h
Robots turn racist and sexist with flawed AI, study finds
A robot operating with a popular Internet-based artificial intelligence system consistently gravitates to men over women, white people over people of color, and jumps to conclusions about peoples' jobs after a glance at their face. The work is believed to be the first to show that robots loaded with an accepted and widely-used model operate with significant gender and racial biases.
21h
Research highlights importance of large wood in streams for land-based animals
Land managers have invested millions of dollars annually since the 1980s to place large pieces of wood back in streams, owing primarily to its importance for fish habitat. But little is known about how large wood in streams impacts birds and land-based animals. Scientists are beginning to change that with a just-published paper that outlines what they observed from one year of footage from motion-
21h
Long-lasting HIV prevention drug too slow to reach Africa, activists say
KAMPALA, UGANDA— Melb Simiyu, an HIV prevention officer at a support organization for sex workers here, says most of her clients have asked when a drug called CAB-LA will become available. Approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in December 2021, the HIV prevention drug could drastically reduce infections among marginalized groups like the one she works with. But even though a tri
21h
What Are Trump Supporters So Afraid Of?
This is an edition of The Atlantic Daily, a newsletter that guides you through the biggest stories of the day, helps you discover new ideas, and recommends the best in culture. Sign up for it here . As more truths about Donald Trump and his attempted coup come out, I fear there will be more irrational anger and threats from people who cannot bear the truth. But first, here are three new stories f
21h
Scientists Are Getting Better and Better at Levitating Objects With Sound Waves
Levitating Researchers have come up with a new and improved way to levitate objects using sound waves alone , an impressive feat of mixed-reality technology that could pave the way for some seriously futuristic hologram-like displays. As seen in a new video , the researchers were able to levitate individual polystyrene beads and water particles inside a special enclosure, making them move in thre
22h
Best Routers for Spectrum in 2022
Personal routers can often give you better speed and network control and security. Spectrum is like most internet service providers (ISP) in that they provide a modem (sometimes free), router (also sometimes free, depending on the package), or both with their internet packages for a rental fee. The best routers for Spectrum are compatible with Spectrum's protocol, have speeds that match your inte
22h
NFT Conference Allegedly Hires Snoop Dogg Impersonator to "Drum Up Excitement"
NBC News reporter Kevin Collier had a bizarre encounter at this year's NFT NYC conference — not with acclaimed rapper Calvin "Snoop Dogg" Broadus Jr, he says, but a lookalike. "I'm at the NFT NYC conference again in Times Square, and Snoop walked by, flanked by security," Collier recounted today . "I grabbed his handler, said I'm a reporter, would love a few minutes. The guy said actually that's
22h
Zuckerberg Shows Off VR Headsets Designed to Be "Indistinguishable From Reality"
Holocake Butterscotch, Starburst, Holocake 2, and Mirror Lake aren't military codewords, up-and-coming Soundcloud rappers, or Petfinder pups . Instead, they're the names of four newly-unveiled, purportedly advanced virtual reality headset prototypes by Meta Reality Labs — devices, Meta claims, that represent movement toward a virtual experience that's "indistinguishable from reality." Revealed by
22h
Researchers harness the power of a new solid-state thermal technology
Researchers have discovered a way to make a versatile thermal conductor, with promise for more energy-efficient electronic devices, green buildings and space exploration. They have demonstrated that a known material used in electronic equipment can now be used as a thermal regulator, too, when it is in a very pure form. This new class of material gives engineers the ability to make thermal conduct
22h
Natural mineral hackmanite can change color almost indefinitely enabling numerous applications
While investigating hackmanite, a natural wonder material, researchers found that it, in addition to two other minerals, can change their color upon exposure to UV radiation repeatedly without wearing out. The results show that the inexpensive hackmanite, which is easy to synthesise, is also an excellent material because of its high durability and applicability for different purposes.
22h
Decoupling the electronic and geometric effects of Pt catalysts in selective hydrogenation reaction
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31313-4 Decoupling the electronic and geometric effects has been a long cherished goal for heterogeneous catalysis due to their tangled relationship. Here the authors propose a novel orthogonal decomposition method to decouple the electronic and geometric effect for supported metal catalysts.
23h
The antenna of far-red absorbing cyanobacteria increases both absorption and quantum efficiency of Photosystem II
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31099-5 Some cyanobacteria acclimate to far-red light by integrating chlorophyll f into their photosystems. Additional chlorophylls typically slow down charge separation but here the authors show that charge separation in chlorophyll-f-containing Photosystem II is faster in the presence of red-shifted allophycocyanin an
23h
Heat wave of 2021 created 'perfect storm' for shellfish die-off
It's hard to forget the excruciating heat that blanketed the Pacific Northwest in late June 2021. Temperatures in Oregon, Washington and British Columbia soared to well above 100 degrees Fahrenheit, with Seattle setting an all-time heat record of 108 degrees on June 28.
23h
AI Dreamed Up a Bizarre Nightmare Creature That Doesn't Actually Exist… We Hope
Straight from the depths of AI hell hails Crungus — or somewhere like that, because until a few days ago, nobody knew this thing existed. The monstrosity known only by his meme-y sounding name appears to have been birthed into this plane by Twitch streamer and voice actor Guy Kelly. Over the weekend, Kelly posted a screenshot of a DALL-E Mini — now known as Craiyon — prompt featuring the word "Cr
23h
Best Budget Camera Phones of 2022
Budget camera phones used to be cheap in all aspects, including build quality and overall functionality. But fortunately there are now some high-quality, affordable options to choose from. Whether you're simply looking to save money because you primarily use your phone for communication and taking photos, or whether you've learned that you're simply too drop-prone to invest in the latest technolo
23h
Dynamic ring resonator offers new opportunity in synthetic frequency dimension
Synthetic dimensions in photonics offer exciting new ways to manipulate light, to study physical phenomena with exotic connectivities, and explore higher-dimensional physics. Dynamically modulated ring resonator systems, where resonant modes are coupled to construct a synthetic frequency dimension, can provide great experimental flexibility and reconfigurability.
23h

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