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Nyheder2022juni24

Octopus brain and human brain share the same 'jumping genes'
The octopus is an exceptional organism with an extremely complex brain and cognitive abilities that are unique among invertebrates. So much so that in some ways it has more in common with vertebrates than with invertebrates. The neural and cognitive complexity of these animals could originate from a molecular analogy with the human brain, as discovered by a research paper recently published in BMC
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Tesla Brings Back Enhanced Autopilot, in Clever Scheme to Extract Even More Money From Drivers
Costly Update Tesla has brought back its Enhanced Autopilot feature, resurrected as an option for drivers who want to spend quite a bit of money, but not as much money as possible. That means there are now three options available: basic Autopilot, which comes standard in the vehicles, as well as the ever-controversial top-tier Full Self-Driving Mode , and now Enhanced Autopilot as a midpoint. Enh
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Changed gene expression after heart surgery extends cardiomyocyte regeneration
While lower vertebrates can repair their adult hearts after a heart attack, mammals — including humans — cannot. The ability to regenerate dead muscle tissue in mammalian hearts disappears just a few days after birth because the heart muscle cells, called cardiomyocytes, exit the cell cycle. In 2020, researchers reported that surgery to remove the left ventricle apex of the heart of pigs, one da
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Flexing the power of a conductive polymer
For decades, field-effect transistors enabled by silicon-based semiconductors have powered the electronics revolution. But in recent years, manufacturers have come up against hard physical limits to further size reductions and efficiency gains of silicon chips. That has scientists and engineers looking for alternatives to conventional metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) transistors.
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Microscopy technique enables 3D super-resolution nanometer-scale imaging
Over the last two decades, microscopy has seen unprecedented advances in speed and resolution. However, cellular structures are essentially three-dimensional, and conventional super-resolution techniques often lack the necessary resolution in all three directions to capture details at a nanometer scale. A research team has now investigated a super-resolution imaging technique that involves combini
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Environmental factors predict risk of death
Along with high blood pressure, diabetes, and smoking, environmental factors such as air pollution are highly predictive of people's chances of dying, especially from heart attack and stroke, a new study shows.
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NASA Spots Location Where Derelict Rocket Smashed Into the Moon
Moonstruck We may finally have found closure for the saga of the derelict rocket believed to have crashed into the Moon earlier this year. Scientists have discovered a newly-formed double crater on the far side of our natural satellite, according to a NASA press release , where they believe the defunct spacecraft smashed down. Using imagery captured by NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), a
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Best Mini PCs for Gaming in 2022
For anyone looking to slim down their rig, one of the best mini PCs for gaming is perfect for packing lots of power in a very small space. You'd be surprised at the speed, sound, and graphics that smaller PCs can put out, at a fraction of the size of the typical PC gaming tower. Some may even qualify as being portable, with a few extra accessories and a couple of compromises. Here is our thorough
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SpaceX Finally Lifts Super Heavy Booster Using Giant Robot Arms
Rocketus Lift For the first time, SpaceX has managed to lift its gargantuan Super Heavy rocket booster, the world's most powerful rocket, onto the launch pad using its colossal "chopsticks"-wielding launch tower , as seen in footage shared by NASASpaceFlight . It's a truly impressive feat of engineering, and one that brings SpaceX's inaugural Starship orbital test flight ever closer. Timelapse of
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Microscopy technique enables 3D super-resolution nanometer-scale imaging
Over the last two decades, microscopy has seen unprecedented advances in speed and resolution. However, cellular structures are essentially three-dimensional, and conventional super-resolution techniques often lack the necessary resolution in all three directions to capture details at a nanometer scale. A research team has now investigated a super-resolution imaging technique that involves combini
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Our global food supply is at risk when high gas prices limit the creation of fertiliser | Andrew Whitelaw
We need synthetic fertilisers to produce enough food for the world's population – there are no other alternatives yet Sign up for the Rural Network email newsletter Join the Rural Network group on Facebook to be part of the community If water is the source of life, fertiliser is the source of scaleable food production. The increasing cost of fertiliser is one of the largest contributors to a "cos
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Arsenic in private well water contributes to low birth weight even at low levels
In the largest epidemiologic study of arsenic and birth outcomes to date, researchers from the University of Illinois Chicago and collaborating institutions estimated arsenic levels in U.S. private well water sources by county and compared estimates to documented birth outcomes. They found an association between estimated groundwater arsenic concentration and risk of low birth weight.
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Scientists Develop Head-Mounted Device That Detects When You Watch Porn
Porn AIppraiser For some unlucky folks, hitting "clear history" may no longer be enough. The South China Morning Post reports that scientists in Beijing claim to have created a prototype device that monitors brain signals to detect when a man is watching porn. The purported headwear is designed to boost the productivity of professional Chinese content moderators, particularly porn-specific modera
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Light traveling in a distorting medium can appear undistorted
Researchers have made a new discovery on how light behaves in complex media, media that tends to distort light significantly. They demonstrated that 'distortion' is a matter of perspective, outlining a simple rule that applies to all light and a vast array of media, including underwater, optical fiber, transmission in the atmosphere and even through living biological samples. Their novel quantum a
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Characterization of the membrane interactions of phospholipase Cγ reveals key features of the active enzyme
Abstract PLCγ enzymes are autoinhibited in resting cells and form key components of intracellular signaling that are also linked to disease development. Insights into physiological and aberrant activation of PLCγ require understanding of an active, membrane-bound form, which can hydrolyze inositol-lipid substrates. Here, we demonstrate that PLCγ1 cannot bind membranes unless the autoinhibition is
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Optical suppression of energy barriers in single molecule-metal binding
Abstract Transient bonds between molecules and metal surfaces underpin catalysis, bio/molecular sensing, molecular electronics, and electrochemistry. Techniques aiming to characterize these bonds often yield conflicting conclusions, while single-molecule probes are scarce. A promising prospect confines light inside metal nanogaps to elicit in operando vibrational signatures through surface-enhanc
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Bubble energy generator
Abstract Bubbles have been extensively explored as energy carriers ranging from boiling heat transfer and targeted cancer diagnosis. Yet, despite notable progress, the kinetic energy inherent in small bubbles remains difficult to harvest. Here, we develop a transistor-inspired bubble energy generator for directly and efficiently harvesting energy from small bubbles. The key points lie in designin
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Locally controllable magnetic soft actuators with reprogrammable contraction-derived motions
Abstract Reprogrammable magneto-responsive soft actuators capable of working in enclosed and confined spaces and adapting functions under changing situations are highly demanded for new-generation smart devices. Despite the promising prospect, the realization of versatile morphing modes (more than bending) and local magnetic control remains challenging but is crucial for further on-demand applica
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Orally efficacious lead of the AVG inhibitor series targeting a dynamic interface in the respiratory syncytial virus polymerase
Abstract Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of lower respiratory infections in infants and the immunocompromised, yet no efficient therapeutic exists. We have identified the AVG class of allosteric inhibitors of RSV RNA synthesis. Here, we demonstrate through biolayer interferometry and in vitro RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) assays that AVG compounds bind to the viral poly
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Translational regulation of TFH cell differentiation and autoimmune pathogenesis
Abstract Little is known regarding T cell translational regulation. We demonstrate that T follicular helper (TFH) cells use a previously unknown mechanism of selective messenger RNA (mRNA) translation for their differentiation, role in B cell maturation, and in autoimmune pathogenesis. We show that TFH cells have much higher levels of translation factor eIF4E than non-TFH CD4 + T cells, which is
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A river ran through it: Floodplains as America's newest relict landform
Abstract Artificial levees are a major human modification of river corridors, but we still do not have a clear understanding of how artificial levees affect floodplain extent at regional and larger scales. We estimated changes in river-floodplain connectivity due to artificial levees in the contiguous United States (CONUS) using a combination of artificial levee databases, delineations of floodpl
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S-Adenosylmethionine–responsive cystathionine β-synthase modulates sulfur metabolism and redox balance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis
Abstract Methionine and cysteine metabolisms are important for the survival and pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis ( Mtb ). The transsulfuration pathway converts methionine to cysteine and represents an important link between antioxidant and methylation metabolism in diverse organisms. Using a combination of biochemistry and cryo–electron microscopy, we characterized the first enzyme of t
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The molecular impact of life in an indoor environment
Abstract The chemistry of indoor surfaces and the role of microbes in shaping and responding to that chemistry are largely unexplored. We found that, over 1 month, people's presence and activities profoundly reshaped the chemistry of a house. Molecules associated with eating/cooking, bathroom use, and personal care were found throughout the entire house, while molecules associated with medication
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Local lateral contact governs shear traction of micropatterned surfaces on hydrogel substrates
Abstract Micropatterned surfaces exhibit enhanced shear traction on soft, aqueous tissue-like materials and, thus, have the potential to advance medical technology by improving the anchoring performance of medical devices on tissue. However, the fundamental mechanism underlying the enhanced shear traction is still elusive, as previous studies focused on interactions between micropatterned surface
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There is chemistry in social chemistry
Abstract Nonhuman terrestrial mammals sniff themselves and each other to decide who is friend or foe. Humans also sniff themselves and each other, but the function of this is unknown. Because humans seek friends who are similar to themselves, we hypothesized that humans may smell themselves and others to subconsciously estimate body odor similarity, which, in turn, may promote friendship. To test
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A unique stone skipping–like trajectory of asteroid Aletai
Abstract Meteoroids/asteroids could deposit energy to Earth during their entries, which arouses great concerns. Strewn field, as a product of meteoroids/asteroids breakup, comprehensively reflects the trajectory, dynamics, and physical properties of meteoroids/asteroids. It typically has a length of several to a dozen kilometers. Nevertheless, the recently found massive Aletai irons in the northw
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Phased small RNA–mediated systemic signaling in plants
Abstract Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) involves the generation of systemically transported signal that arms distal plant parts against secondary infections. We show that two phased 21–nucleotide (nt) trans-acting small interfering RNA3a RNAs (tasi-RNA) derived from TAS3a and synthesized within 3 hours of pathogen infection are the early mobile signal in SAR. TAS3a undergoes alternate polyade
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Human organ rejuvenation by VEGF-A: Lessons from the skin
Abstract Transplanting aged human skin onto young SCID/beige mice morphologically rejuvenates the xenotransplants. This is accompanied by angiogenesis, epidermal repigmentation, and substantial improvements in key aging-associated biomarkers, including ß-galactosidase, p16 ink4a , SIRT1, PGC1α, collagen 17A, and MMP1. Angiogenesis- and hypoxia-related pathways, namely, vascular endothelial growth
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Human gingival mesenchymal stem cells retain their growth and immunomodulatory characteristics independent of donor age
Abstract Aging has been reported to deteriorate the quantity and quality of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which affect their therapeutic use in regenerative medicine. A dearth of age-related stem cell research further restricts their clinical applications. The present study explores the possibility of using MSCs derived from human gingival tissues (GMSCs) for studying their ex vivo growth charac
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Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) navigate to find hidden fruit in a virtual environment
Abstract Almost all animals navigate their environment to find food, shelter, and mates. Spatial cognition of nonhuman primates in large-scale environments is notoriously difficult to study. Field research is ecologically valid, but controlling confounding variables can be difficult. Captive research enables experimental control, but space restrictions can limit generalizability. Virtual reality
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Greenhouse gas emissions from African lakes are no longer a blind spot
Abstract Natural lakes are thought to be globally important sources of greenhouse gases (CO 2 , CH 4 , and N 2 O) to the atmosphere although nearly no data have been previously reported from Africa. We collected CO 2 , CH 4 , and N 2 O data in 24 African lakes that accounted for 49% of total lacustrine surface area of the African continent and covered a wide range of morphology and productivity.
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In the Balkans, researchers mobilize to protect a wild river
Five years ago, researchers from across Europe converged on a cold, fast-moving river in the highlands of Albania for a week of intensive fieldwork. Their mission: to kick off a multiyear effort to assemble a detailed ecological portrait of the Vyosa River, one of Eastern Europe's last free-flowing waterways. They hoped to draw public attention to the river's rich wildlife and persuade policymake
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Quantum network nodes with warm atoms
Communication networks need nodes at which information is processed or rerouted. Physicists have now developed a network node for quantum communication networks that can store single photons in a vapor cell and pass them on later.
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Theories on socio-political evolution put to the test
During the past 10,000 years—the Holocene—human societies became larger and ever more complex. An international team of scientists led by Peter Turchin from the Complexity Science Hub Vienna (CSH) set out to test various theories on what drove this process. According to its analyses of data from Seshat: Global History Databank, the best explanation for the evolution of socio-cultural complexity is
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Teen Makes $700,000 Selling Action Figures of Bored Apes to Adult Children
NFT Toys While NFT collectors are still spending appreciable amounts of money on JPEGs, others are finding creative ways to cash in on the trend in less digital ways. Take 18-year-old Ricky da Luz, for instance, who Insider reports figured out that people go absolutely hogwild over physical representations of their Bored Ape NFTs. In fact, he's already sold collectors $700,000 worth of NFT busts,
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Spacecraft Orbiting Mars Still Running Windows 98
Start Menu Talk about a blast from the past! Turns out the spacecraft that helped discover water on Mars has been running on Windows 98 this whole time. The European Space Agency published a press release Tuesday that said the Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding (MARSIS), which is an instrument on board the Mars Express orbiter, is finally getting a software upgrade. The M
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Elon Musk Says New Tesla Factories Are Wasting "Billions of Dollars"
Cash and Burn All is not well at the Gigafactory, apparently. In a just-released May 30th interview with the Tesla Owners of Silicon Valley fan club, billionaire Tesla CEO Elon Musk lamented that global supply chain issues and EV battery woes are causing serious financial fallout at both of the company's newly-built, extremely large manufacturing facilities, located in Berlin and Austin. "Both Be
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Red flag laws to prevent mass shootings: What does the research show?
Mass shootings are a source of shared anguish and outrage among Americans and are becoming more frequent. Extreme risk protection orders (ERPOs), also known as gun violence restraining orders or "red flag" laws, are designed to help prevent these shootings. Below, UC Davis Violence Prevention Research Program (VPRP) experts explain what is currently known about mass shootings, how ERPOs work and t
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Report finds 70% of 10-year-olds in 'learning poverty,' unable to read and understand a simple text
As a result of the worst shock to education and learning in recorded history, learning poverty has increased by a third in low- and middle-income countries, with an estimated 70% of 10-year-olds unable to understand a simple written text, according to a new report published today by the World Bank, UNESCO, UNICEF, UK government Foreign Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO), USAID, and the Bil
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Want to improve the company's performance? Get more women in the boardroom
A recent study out of the Complexity Science Hub Vienna (CSH) found that companies with female board members tend to perform better. The analysis examined the relationship between female board appointments and corporations' financial performance, based on data from about 4.000 Japanese firms collected between 2004 and 2013.
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A microfluidic optimal experimental design platform for forward design of cell-free genetic networks
Nature Communications, Published online: 24 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31306-3 Characterization of cell-free genetic networks is inherently difficult. Here the authors use optimal experimental design and microfluidics to improve characterization, demonstrating modularity and predictability of parts in applied test cases.
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The encephalomyocarditis virus Leader promotes the release of virions inside extracellular vesicles via the induction of secretory autophagy
Nature Communications, Published online: 24 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31181-y Picornaviruses can escape infected cells via packaging in extracellular vesicles (EVs). Here, van der Grein et al. show that the non-structural Leader protein of encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) promotes the release of EV-enclosed virus particles and provide evidence for a role of secretory autophagy in this pr
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US to proceed with production of biofuels despite global food crisis
Campaigners call to prioritise grain for human consumption over its use as a fuel The US will press ahead with biofuels production, the deputy secretary for agriculture has said, despite increasing concerns over a global food crisis , and calls from campaigners to prioritise grain for human consumption over its use as a fuel. Jewel Bronaugh, the deputy secretary of agriculture, said US farmers co
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Elvis Is Utterly Disorienting. That's the Point.
Baz Luhrmann is a filmmaker who picks subjects as extravagant as the genre allows. When he made a teen romance, it was William Shakespeare's Romeo + Juliet . His musical Moulin Rouge was scored with love songs from nearly every pop era. For a literary adaptation, he went with the totemic, supposedly unadaptable The Great Gatsby . He's an Australian director who made a movie about Australia and li
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Octopus brain and human brain share the same 'jumping genes'
The octopus is an exceptional organism with an extremely complex brain and cognitive abilities that are unique among invertebrates. So much so that in some ways it has more in common with vertebrates than with invertebrates. The neural and cognitive complexity of these animals could originate from a molecular analogy with the human brain, as discovered by a research paper recently published in BMC
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Supreme Court Strikes Down Right to Abortion, in Horrifying Public Health Disaster
The US Supreme Court has officially overturned Roe v. Wade, a landmark decision that will have devastating effects for roughly 40 million women and girls across the country, ending their country-wide right to a legal abortion. The decision now leaves the right to abortion in the hands of individual states. Roughly half the states are now expected to ban abortions — which is a massive public healt
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Best Bass Headphones for 2022
Bass just keeps on booming and fortunately, there are headphones for that. Our obsession with the low end of the musical spectrum has evolved from the trunk-rattling subwoofers of the CD era to more personalized experiences in the age of streaming music. Audio companies have successfully engineered the sound — and impressively, the feel — you get when the bass drops into over-ear headphones like
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NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter spots rocket impact site on moon
Astronomers discovered a rocket body heading toward a lunar collision late last year. Impact occurred March 4, with NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter later spotting the resulting crater. Surprisingly the crater is actually two craters, an eastern crater (18-meter diameter, about 19.5 yards) superimposed on a western crater (16-meter diameter, about 17.5 yards).
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'Hot' graphene reveals migration of carbon atoms
The migration of carbon atoms on the surface of the nanomaterial graphene was recently measured for the first time. Although the atoms move too swiftly to be directly observed with an electron microscope, their effect on the stability of the material can now be determined indirectly while the material is heated on a microscopic hot plate. The study by researchers at the Faculty of Physics of the U
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The octopus' brain and the human brain share the same 'jumping genes'
The neural and cognitive complexity of the octopus could originate from a molecular analogy with the human brain, according to a new study. The research shows that the same 'jumping genes' are active both in the human brain and in the brain of two species, Octopus vulgaris, the common octopus, and Octopus bimaculoides, the Californian octopus.
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Attosecond-scale measurement of Wigner time delay in molecular photoionization
The photoelectric effect is one of the most fundamental light-matter interactions, which is widely used in probing ultrafast dynamics in atoms, molecules and condensed matters. It has been in the research spotlight for more than 100 years and most of its natural aspects are well-understood. However, the basic questions about how long the photoionization process takes and how to identify the specif
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Climate change affects the likelihood of armed conflict
Climate change influences the likelihood and duration of armed conflicts in Africa. This is the finding of a study carried out by a team from the INGENIO Institute, a joint center of the Universitat Politècnica de València (UPV) and the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), together with the University of Rome III and the University of Urbino Carlo Bo, published in the latest iss
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Google Insider Says Company's AI Could "Escape Control" and "Do Bad Things"
Suspended Google engineer Blake Lemoine made a big splash earlier this month, claiming that the company's LaMDA chatbot had become sentient . The AI researcher, who was put on administrative leave by the tech giant for violating its confidentiality policy, according to the Washington Post , decided to help LaMDA find a lawyer — who was later "scared off" the case, as Lemoine told Futurism on Wedn
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Report: Texas distilleries generated nearly $2 billion in economic output and supported 4,900 jobs in the state in 2020
Researchers at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) today released "Economic Contributions of Distilled Spirits in Texas 2020," a new study highlighting the significant economic impact Texas distillers made to their local communities and the state in 2020, despite economic hardships of the pandemic and lingering Prohibition-era laws restricting sales.
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From outside to inside: A rapid and precise total assessment method for cells
Having a good eye for detail is an essential skill for many professions. In particular, biologists use special techniques and advanced technology to analyze individual cells with unprecedented precision. Impedance cytometry is one experimental method that can reveal specific characteristics of living single cells. This technique requires electrical penetration, in which high-frequency current can
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Light traveling in a distorting medium can appear undistorted
A team led by researchers at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa, with collaborators from the University of Pretoria (South Africa), as well as Mexico and Scotland, have made a new discovery on how light behaves in complex media, media that tends to distort light significantly. They demonstrated that "distortion" is a matter of perspective, outlining a simple rule tha
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A novel Raman chemical sensor made from noodlelike threads of gold
Researchers created a special ultrathin sensor, spun from gold, that can be attached directly to the skin without irritation or discomfort. The sensor can measure different biomarkers or substances to perform on-body chemical analysis. It works using a technique called Raman spectroscopy, where laser light aimed at the sensor is changed slightly depending on whatever chemicals are present on the s
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Go fish: Danish scientists work on fungi-based seafood substitute
Team call in Michelin-starred restaurant to help crack challenge of mimicking texture of seafood From plant-based meat that "bleeds" to milk grown in a lab, fake meats and dairy have come a long way in recent years. But there is another alternative that scientists are training their sights on, one with the most challenging texture to recreate of all: seafood. Scientists in Copenhagen are fermenti
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The Guardian view on Paul McCartney at Glastonbury: a state occasion | Editorial
At 80 years old, the one-time Beatle offers a vision of optimism and empathy just as moving as the pageantry of the platinum jubilee A week has passed since Paul McCartney's 80th birthday, and on Saturday he will play to a huge crowd at the Glastonbury festival. The great surge of reminiscence and celebration these two events have triggered – not least online, where millions of pictures, playlist
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Online platform designed to improve reproducibility, scientific collaborations
For centuries, scientists relied on a pen or pencil and trusty lab notebook to make sure their experiments could be understood and replicated by colleagues. Now, as experiments may involve dozens of steps and hundreds of materials, produce gigabytes of data that require supercomputers to process and are shared with collaborators around the globe, the lab notebook may no longer suffice.
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Online platform designed to improve reproducibility, scientific collaborations
For centuries, scientists relied on a pen or pencil and trusty lab notebook to make sure their experiments could be understood and replicated by colleagues. Now, as experiments may involve dozens of steps and hundreds of materials, produce gigabytes of data that require supercomputers to process and are shared with collaborators around the globe, the lab notebook may no longer suffice.
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Examining the supermassive black hole in our galaxy
The supermassive black hole (SMBH) at our galaxy's core, Sagittarius A*, is modest in size with only 4.15 million solar-masses. The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) recently released a dramatic submillimeter image of it as seen illuminated by its glowing environment. Many galaxies have nuclear SMBHs that are a thousand times bigger, for example the nucleus of M87, whose image was taken by the EHT in
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Tortoise and her egg found in new Pompeii excavations
Archaeologists in Pompeii have discovered the remains of a pregnant tortoise that had sought refuge in the ruins of a home destroyed by an earthquake in 62 AD, only to be covered by volcanic ash and rock when Mount Vesuvius erupted 17 years later.
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World's dirtiest oil and gas fields are in Russia, Turkmenistan and Texas
Oil and natural gas fields in Russia, Turkmenistan and Texas are the most climate-damaging on Earth, according to a first-of-its kind analysis that looks at greenhouse-gas emissions across entire supply chains and finds they vary widely. The dirtiest fields emit more than 10 times as much carbon dioxide equivalent as the least emissions-intensive sites, it finds.
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Raman and infrared spectroscopy help identify different acetylated lysines
A research team led by Prof. Huang Qing from the Hefei Institutes of Physical Science (HFIPS) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences has used infrared and Raman spectroscopy to identify lysine acetylation features, providing a theoretical and experimental basis for the analysis of protein acetylation structures in biological systems.
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Modeling historical biomass could be key to buffering climate change
A new study paints a vivid image of how forests developed over centuries and contribute to Earth's carbon balance — a crucial component to maintaining a steady global climate. The study reconstructed the natural pace and pattern of carbon storage in forests of the Midwestern United States over 10,000 years. The findings have the potential to shift ongoing debates about how landscapes can be manag
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Scientists apply genetic methods to linguistics to track human migration
EPFL scientists have produced a series of maps showing historical migration events, including the migration of mountain farmers native to Upper Valais who began to settle in German-speaking Switzerland in the 13th century, by applying methods from population genetics—but using linguistic data rather than genes.
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Analysis of citizen scientist's observations in 2015 reveals atmospheric phenomena
A team of researchers from New Zealand, the U.S. and Canada has confirmed the first observation of a SAR arc evolving into a STEVE. In their paper published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, the group details their analysis of multiple sets of data used to describe the rare and unique atmospheric event and what it showed them about such events in general.
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Microbes are recruited in soil environment according to ecosystem demand
Soil microbes (in terms of functional gene content) are key drivers of ecosystem functions, but their functional characterization and their ecological contributions are not sufficiently understood. It is important to understand how soil microbes ameliorate the nutrient stress environment and maintain their activity to support ecosystem multifunctionality in tropical forests.
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If the Supreme Court Can Reverse Roe, It Can Reverse Anything
For months and even years I have seen this coming , and yet the reality of the Supreme Court's decision is still a shock. How can it be that people had a constitutional right for nearly half a century, and now no more? How can it not matter that Americans consistently signaled that they did not want this to happen, and even so this has happened? The Court's answer is that Roe is different. Roe ,
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Microbes are recruited in soil environment according to ecosystem demand
Soil microbes (in terms of functional gene content) are key drivers of ecosystem functions, but their functional characterization and their ecological contributions are not sufficiently understood. It is important to understand how soil microbes ameliorate the nutrient stress environment and maintain their activity to support ecosystem multifunctionality in tropical forests.
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Vegan Snack Linked to Organ Failure
A vegan subscription service has a lot of explaining to do after a number of people reported intense stomach issues and even organ failure after consuming the plant-based foodstuffs. Over the weekend, the Daily Harvest vegan smoothie and victuals company issued a statement recalling its French Lentil + Leek Crumbles because they were, as the announcement put it, "causing gastrointestinal issues"
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The US Supreme Court has overturned Roe v. Wade. What does that mean?
The US Supreme Court has ruled to overturn Roe v. Wade , the landmark 1973 legal decision that enshrined abortion as a constitutional right. Ending federal protection for abortion access across the US will have lasting health, emotional, and financial repercussions for millions of people and casts American reproductive rights back 50 years. The final decision ends weeks of speculation following t
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Despite improvements, China's air remains unsafe
Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and ozone exposure are major public health problems in China. Although useful, atmospheric models used to analyze these and other air quality concerns over the years are expensive to run, limiting how often researchers can use them.
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Do ancient coins record the supernova of 1054?
SN 1054 was one of the most spectacular astronomical events of all time. The supernova explosion eventually formed what is today known as the M1—the Crab Nebula. But in 1054 AD, the year it occurred, it was an ultrabright star in the sky and one of only eight recorded supernovae in the history of the Milky Way. However, it was only noted by half of the literate world. Primarily written about in th
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Without Choice
This poem is a cento, consisting entirely of lines from other poems, compiled here in chorus. Some punctuation and tenses have been changed. I'm grateful to these poets for their lines, each attributed at the bottom of the page. Soon enough, the whole small city of my being will demolish— Without choice, no politics, no ethics lives. I hold my grief like two limp tulips. What am I allowed to have
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Astronomers find imprint of the bubbles produced by the explosion of dying stars in our galaxy
An international group of astronomers, led by Juan Diego Soler of the Italian National Institute for Astrophysics (INAF), have found the imprint of the bubbles produced by the explosion of dying stars in the structure of the gas that pervades our galaxy. They made this discovery by applying techniques from artificial intelligence to the HI4PI survey data, which provides the most detailed whole-sky
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Boom in UK dog fertility clinics raises welfare and ethics concerns
Experts worry about financial incentives for unnatural breeding methods without regulation Canine fertility clinics have boomed in the UK during the pandemic, experts have revealed, as calls grow for greater oversight of the industry. The clinics offer services ranging from artificial insemination to ultrasound scanning, semen analysis, progesterone testing and in some cases caesarean sections. C
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Empathy Isn't Enough
Supposedly, one of the benefits of reading books is that they can make you a better, more empathetic person—whether you pick up a novel that makes you feel for its characters, or a nonfiction book with a moral message. But what are the limits of writing that tries to provoke empathy in its readers? When it was published in 2020, Jeanine Cummins's novel American Dirt, which follows the harrowing m
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Unveiling the mysteries of the genome structure in the human cell nucleus using a 3D computational simulation
A team of researchers at Nagoya University in Japan has created a 3-dimensional computational simulation of the process of genome structure formation in the human cell nucleus. They expect the model to contribute to the understanding of cellular regulatory mechanisms and diseases, such as cancer, that damage the genome.
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Study shows calls to reduce 'intensive' livestock farming practices to mitigate EID risk may be premature
A team of researchers from the University of Cambridge and the University of Leeds has found evidence that we currently lack adequate information to reach a robust view of the relationship between contrasting livestock systems and emerging infectious disease (EID) risk. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, the group describes their review of livestock production meth
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Josh Puts His Greenhorn Brother to the Test | Deadliest Catch
Stream Deadliest Catch on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/deadliest-catch #DeadliestCatch #Discovery #DiscoveryPlus Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Disco
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Study shows calls to reduce 'intensive' livestock farming practices to mitigate EID risk may be premature
A team of researchers from the University of Cambridge and the University of Leeds has found evidence that we currently lack adequate information to reach a robust view of the relationship between contrasting livestock systems and emerging infectious disease (EID) risk. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, the group describes their review of livestock production meth
8h
Finely tunable dynamical coloration using bicontinuous micrometer-domains
Nature Communications, Published online: 24 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31020-0 Structural colors are often produced by periodic structured materials leading to the constructive interference of light waves. Here, the authors report control of structural color and light transmission via a colloidal gel and dynamic coloration with a precise wavelength selectivity over a broad range of wavelen
8h
Home Chef review
We tested the Home Chef meal kit for one week to evaluate the experience, food, and quality. Here's how we found it
8h
Cosmic Dust From Venus Is Inspiring New Air Pollution-Busting Technology
Reducing carbon emissions from roads, railways, and shipping requires implementing a range of solutions simultaneously. As far as cars are concerned, cutting the number of journeys altogether (by making it easier for people to walk and cycle and improving public transport), changing the fuel in vehicles, and making the most of those vehicles already on the road must all play a part. None of these
8h
Females itch less than males
The female hormone estradiol was found to suppress psoriasis in mice by regulating neutrophil and macrophage cells. The conditional knockout mice without the natural ovarian hormones estradiol showed symptoms of severe skin inflammation.
8h
Wearable chemical sensor is as good as gold
Researchers created a special ultrathin sensor, spun from gold, that can be attached directly to the skin without irritation or discomfort. The sensor can measure different biomarkers or substances to perform on-body chemical analysis. It works using a technique called Raman spectroscopy, where laser light aimed at the sensor is changed slightly depending on whatever chemicals are present on the s
8h
A new model sheds light on how we learn motor skills
Researchers have developed a mathematical model of motor learning that reflects the motor learning process in the human brain. Their findings suggest that motor exploration — that is, increased variability in movements — is important when learning a new task. These results may lead to improved motor rehabilitation in patients after injury or disease.
8h
Wild turtles age slowly. Some basically don't age at all
New research finds that turtles in the wild age slowly and have long lifespans, and identifies several species that essentially don't age at all. At 190 years old, Jonathan the Seychelles giant tortoise recently made news for being the "oldest living land animal in the world." Although, anecdotal evidence like this exists that some species of turtles and other ectotherms—or "cold-blooded" animals
8h
Addressing the architecture of global trade in the context of climate
Climate policy is currently in the balance, as was evident this month in Bonn at the first round of UN negotiations since the start of the Ukraine war. On the one hand, governments must become more ambitious, increasing the costs of climate-damaging economic activity and, if necessary, securing this externally through trade measures. On the other hand, they must abide by the rules agreed in the Wo
8h
Defects in quartz crystal structure reveal the origin of dust
Global warming and a progressively drier climate in many parts of the world are causing more dust storms. To predict how these storms are caused, researchers are looking into the past to understand where the dust came from, for how long, and over what distances it was transported. An international research team led by Dr. Aditi K. Dave and Professor Kathryn Fitzsimmons from the Department of Geosc
8h
Adopting My Son Changed My Understanding of Family
We were ready to try again. This time, Eric and I worked with an agency. We'd passed background checks, completed adoption trainings, and were just waiting for a call. Then it came. "She wants to meet you," Kaitlyn, our agency representative, told us, so we canceled everything. On a Wednesday morning, we drove two and half hours to Boise, Idaho, to meet a 32-year-old pregnant woman named Nicole.
8h
Samsung Rumored to Begin 3nm Mass Production Next Week
A news agency in Korea is reporting Samsung is about to make a major announcement. The world's second-largest silicon foundry will reportedly enter mass production of its 3nm process next week. In doing so, Samsung becomes the first global foundry to reach this milestone in advanced node production. It notably beats its main rival TSMC to the punch, as the Taiwanese powerhouse isn't expected to r
8h
How to align gold nanorods without losing their powers
A new technique uses magnetic fields to align gold nanorods while preserving their underlying optical properties, report researchers. "Gold nanorods are of interest because they can absorb and scatter specific wavelengths of light, making them attractive for use in applications such as biomedical imaging, sensors, and other technologies," says Joe Tracy, corresponding author of a paper on the wor
9h
Structure-property relationships in nanoporous and amorphous iridium oxides
South Korean-based researchers have used first-principles quantum mechanical simulations to better understand the structure-property relationships in various polymorphic phases of iridium oxides to elucidate their outstanding performance in catalyzing the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). The OER is an important half-cell reaction where water is catalytically split to evolve oxygen. However, due to
9h
Chain flexibility of medicinal lipids determines their selective partitioning into lipid droplets
Nature Communications, Published online: 24 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31400-6 Lipid droplet (LD) is a highly dynamic organelle capable of regulating lipid metabolism, storage and transportation. Here, by combining molecular dynamics simulations and microbial LD engineering, the authors demonstrate that the structural flexibility of lipids is one of decisive factors in selective partitioni
9h
Porphyrin as a versatile visible-light-activatable organic/metal hybrid photoremovable protecting group
Nature Communications, Published online: 24 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31288-2 Photoremovable protecting groups (PPGs) represent one of the main contemporary implementations of photochemistry. Here, the authors show that meso-methylporphyrin unites traditionally exclusive features of organic and metal-complex PPGs within a single entity.
9h
Cell surface glycan engineering reveals that matriglycan alone can recapitulate dystroglycan binding and function
Nature Communications, Published online: 24 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31205-7 Matriglycan, a repeating disaccharide on α-dystroglycan, is the receptor for Lassa virus and specific extracellular matrix proteins. Here, the authors demonstrate that matriglycan, in a length-dependent tunable manner, is both necessary and sufficient for protein binding and viral infection.
9h
A phase 1b randomised controlled trial of a glucagon-like peptide-1 and glucagon receptor dual agonist IBI362 (LY3305677) in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes
Nature Communications, Published online: 24 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31328-x Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP1R) agonists are used to treat type 2 diabetes (T2D), and polyagonists targeting multiple hormone receptors are investigated as potential therapeutics for T2D. Here the authors report that IBI362 (LY3305677), a balanced once-weekly GLP-1 and glucagon receptor dual agonist, sh
9h
Nasa halts auction of moon dust and cockroaches expected to sell for $400,000
Space agency says daughter of entomologist sold samples from 1969 Apollo 11 mission that belonged to Nasa Nasa wants its moon dust and cockroaches back. The space agency has asked Boston-based RR Auction to halt the sale of moon dust collected during the 1969 Apollo 11 mission that had subsequently been fed to cockroaches during an experiment to determine if the lunar rock contained any sort of p
9h
Pompeii excavation unearths remains of pregnant tortoise
Animal thought to have been seeking place to lay egg in ruins of quake-hit home when Mount Vesuvius erupted Archaeologists in Pompeii have discovered the remains of a pregnant tortoise that sought refuge in the ruins of a home destroyed by an earthquake in AD62 only to be covered by volcanic ash and rock when Mount Vesuvius erupted. The 14cm (5.5in) long Hermann's tortoise and her egg were discov
9h
Review suggests current global efforts are insufficient to limit warming to 1.5°C
A pair of climate scientists at Concordia University has concluded that despite efforts to curb greenhouse gas emissions by many nations, the goal of limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius by the middle of this century will not be met. In their paper, published in the journal Science, H. Damon Matthews and Seth Wynes reviewed the current global climate system and compared it to efforts to
9h
Covid vaccines cut global death toll by 20m in first year, study finds
First major analysis examines impact across 185 countries since first jab was administered in December 2020 Covid vaccines cut the global death toll by 20 million in the first year after they were available, according to the first major analysis. The study, which modelled the spread of the disease in 185 countries and territories between December 2020 and December 2021, found that without Covid v
9h
The Download: Yann LeCun's AI vision, and smart cities' unfulfilled promises
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. Yann LeCun has a bold new vision for the future of AI Around a year and a half ago, Yann LeCun realized he had it wrong. LeCun, who is chief scientist at Meta's AI lab and one of the most influential AI researchers in the world, had been trying to give machine
10h
Yann LeCun has a bold new vision for the future of AI
Around a year and a half ago, Yann LeCun realized he had it wrong. LeCun, who is chief scientist at Meta's AI lab and one of the most influential AI researchers in the world, had been trying to give machines a basic grasp of how the world works—a kind of common sense —by training neural networks to predict what was going to happen next in video clips of everyday events. But guessing future frames
10h
Food Without Photosynthesis
Yesterday I wrote about the fact that as resources become limited, people have typically found ways around that limitation through technology and ingenuity. Specifically, as land-based resources of the metals we need for our technology, such as batteries, becomes limited, we may turn to the sea which has vastly greater reserves of many of those metals. There is essentially an inexhaustible supply
10h
J. Lo's Tragic Fame Cycle
Jennifer Lopez has lived more lives than most celebrities. She's been a dancer and a movie star and a pop singer and an entrepreneur and a reality-TV mainstay and part of the reason for the existence of Google Images . She's been box-office gold and box-office poison. She's considered one of the most influential Latina celebrities in America, both revered and denigrated—though not always in equal
11h
Sizing up DNA nanostructure assembly with native mass spectrometry and ion mobility
Nature Communications, Published online: 24 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31029-5 Interest in oligonucleotide nanostructures has recently surged in basic and applied research. Here, the authors use native mass spectrometry and ion mobility to elucidate a prototypical hexameric DNA barrel structure as well as intermediates and byproducts of the assembly reaction.
11h
The U.S. Is Underreacting to Monkeypox
Yesterday, a CDC panel discussed whether smallpox vaccines should be offered more widely as a preventive measure against monkeypox. The panel made no decision. But getting those shots into patients' arms—and particularly gay and bisexual men's arms—is an urgent matter. Since May 13 , more than 3,300 cases of monkeypox have been reported in 58 countries where the disease was not previously thought
11h
NYU postdoc with federal research misconduct settlement awarded NIH grant
A postdoc at New York University's Grossman School of Medicine who the U.S. Office of Research Integrity found engaged in research misconduct while a postdoc at another institution has been awarded an NIH grant just months after being sanctioned. The postdoc, Shuo Chen, didn't admit or deny the ORI's findings, but agreed to one year … Continue reading
12h
Bipolar membrane electrolyzers enable high single-pass CO2 electroreduction to multicarbon products
Nature Communications, Published online: 24 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31295-3 In the carbon dioxide (CO2) to multicarbon electrolysis, the crossover CO2 to the oxygen-rich anodic gas stream add a further energy-intensive chemical separation step. Here, the authors demonstrate a bipolar membrane-based electrolyzer design that eliminates the crossover CO2.
13h
America Is Growing Apart, Possibly for Good
I t may be time to stop talking about "red" and "blue" America. That's the provocative conclusion of Michael Podhorzer, a longtime political strategist for labor unions and the chair of the Analyst Institute, a collaborative of progressive groups that studies elections. In a private newsletter that he writes for a small group of activists, Podhorzer recently laid out a detailed case for thinking
13h
The Surprising Voice Missing From Gun-Control Talks
O f the 100 members of the United States Senate, none has a more intimate understanding of gun violence than Mark Kelly. Arizona's junior senator is a Gulf War veteran and a retired astronaut. But if any single fact best explains Kelly's election to the Senate as a Democrat in 2020, it's that he is married to Gabby Giffords, the former representative who in 2011 was shot and severely wounded whil
13h
The smart city is a perpetually unrealized utopia
In 1959, in a short essay called "The Great Game to Come," a little-known Dutch visual artist named Constant Nieuwenhuys described a new utopian city—one that he was soon to dub "New Babylon." "The technical inventions that humanity has at its disposal today," he presciently stated, "will play a major role in the construction of the ambiance-cities of the future." Like nearly every imagined futur
13h
Climate change negatively impacting bumblebees, study finds
Temperature changes have negatively impacted most species of bumblebees over the past 120 years, according to new research published this week in Biology Letters. The researchers note that changes in temperature had more of a negative impact than other factors—such as precipitation or floral resources.
14h
A glycine-rich PE_PGRS protein governs mycobacterial actin-based motility
Nature Communications, Published online: 24 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31333-0 Mycobacterium marinum, a close relative of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, polymerizes host actin at the bacterial surface to drive intracellular movement and cell-to-cell spread during infection. Here, Hill & Welch identify an M. marinum surface protein that binds to and activates the host protein NWASP to stimulat
14h
Book Excerpt: A Summer Camp for Sleep Experiments
In an unusual long-term sleep study in the 1970s and '80s, adolescent campers were plugged into bedside consoles during frequent "nap tests" to monitor brainwaves, eye movements, and chin-muscle activity. The results helped to change our understanding of how much sleep teens need.
14h
Primary-age children's screen time went up by 83 minutes a day during pandemic – study
Global analysis finds increase most sharp among age group, prompting concerns about impact on health Screen time during the Covid pandemic increased the most among primary schoolchildren, by an extra hour and 20 minutes a day on average, according to the first global review of research. The sharp rise in screen time was associated with poorer diets in children, poor eye health, deteriorating ment
16h
Results of the phase I CCTG IND.231 trial of CX-5461 in patients with advanced solid tumors enriched for DNA-repair deficiencies
Nature Communications, Published online: 24 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31199-2 G-quadruplex stabilizers, including CX-5461, exhibit synthetic lethality with loss of BRCA1/2 in preclinical models. Here the authors report the results of a phase I study of CX-5461 in patients with solid tumors enriched for DNA-repair deficiencies.
17h
Spatiotemporal analysis of glioma heterogeneity reveals COL1A1 as an actionable target to disrupt tumor progression
Nature Communications, Published online: 24 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31340-1 It is essential to improve our understanding of the features that influence aggressiveness and invasion in high grade gliomas (HGG). Here, the authors characterize dynamic anatomical structures in HGG called oncostreams, which are associated with tumor growth and are regulated by COL1A1.
17h
Schneider Shorts 24.06.2022 – Professor XYZ
Schneider Shorts 24.06.2022 – bad choices in Dresden end with research misconduct findings, where the money for heart stem cell research went, nicotine and Photoshop fraud fail in clinical trials, with the most authoritative papermill guidelines, a coronavirus zapper from Italy, and a plant science professor who wasn't so great after all.
17h
Hvad blev der af Ulrich?
Går du i kødet – især offentligt – på dine foresatte, så kan det være en god ide at vente, til du har dit på det tørre såvel karrieremæssigt som økonomisk. Sådan lyder budskabet fra den i dag multibeskæftigede Ulrich Fredberg, som tidligere var ledende overlæge på Diagnostisk Center i Silkeborg.
18h
Yvonne og radiologien
LEDER: Et stigende antal radiologiske opgaver og et faldende antal uddannede radiologer betyder, at radiologien i det danske sundhedsvæsen mildest talt ikke har det ret godt. Der er brug for langsigtet planlægning og løsninger her og nu.
18h
Sundhedsreformen bliver en udfordring
KRONIK: Der er mange opgaver, der skal løses, for at sundhedsreformen kan komme i mål. Her bliver viljen til at samarbejde på tværs af sektorer, fagligheder og patienter og pårørende central.
18h
Climate change could lead to a dramatic temperature-linked decrease in essential omega-3 fatty acids, according to new study
The effects of global climate change already are resulting in the loss of sea ice, accelerated sea level rise, and longer and more intense heat waves, among other threats. Now, a survey of planktonic lipids in the global ocean predicts a temperature-linked decrease in the production of essential omega-3 fatty acids, an important subset of lipid molecules. A significant implication of the survey is
20h
Mathematical Connect-the-Dots Reveals How Structure Emerges
Imagine 100 dots scattered in front of you. In a haphazard variation on connect-the-dots, start drawing lines between the points. How many lines can you draw without producing a triangle? A square? An 11-pointed star? These types of problems have a long history in mathematics. In a paper posted on April 26, Oliver Janzer and Benny Sudakov of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich have..
21h
Poliovirus in London sewage sparks alarm
Yesterday, declaring a "national incident" after poliovirus was detected in London sewage, public health officials in the United Kingdom asked physicians to be on alert for polio cases and urged residents to check whether they are up to date with their vaccinations for the now-rare disease. The source of the virus is still a mystery, but was likely someone from outside of the United Kingdom who h
23h
Putin Brags That "Satan II" Nuclear Missile Almost Ready for Launch
Near Missile Speak of the devil — Russian President Vladimir Putin has happily announced the country's so-called "Satan II" rocket is ready for deployment this year. Yesterday, the Independent reported that the Sarmat intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM), also evocatively known as the Satan II, is nuclear capable and can hold 10 or more warheads. It's also so fast that the outlet said the mi
23h
Best Logitech Keyboards in 2022
Whether you're looking to build out your dream home office, optimize your mobile work gear, or upgrade your in-office computer setup, a Logitech keyboard can help you get the job done. Anyone who's spent an extended period of time stuck at their computer can attest to how important it is to have a comfortable keyboard. These days, an external keyboard, regardless of whether it's wired or wireless
23h
Scientists Say "No Need to Panic" as Sunspot Pointed at Earth Doubles in Size Again
Shoot the Sun Space weather experts are monitoring a growing sunspot that's pointing straight towards Earth, USA Today reports — but there's "no need to panic," an expert says. It's absolutely nothing out of the ordinary, scientists say. Sunspots form when magnetic activity on the surface stop heat from reaching the surface. They generally grow over time and decay. But they've also been associate
23h
Scientists Worried NASA Will Infect Earth With Deadly Martian Pathogens
Cosmic Cooties Mars exploration is a still-growing focus for the international space community, and organizations worldwide — particularly China and the US — have their sights set on obtaining Martian samples back to Earthly labs over the next ten or so years. Some scientists, however, aren't exactly thrilled about the rock retrieval missions, Scientific American reports . Many fear that Martian
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The Problem Is Gun Culture, Not SCOTUS
This is an edition of The Atlantic Daily, a newsletter that guides you through the biggest stories of the day, helps you discover new ideas, and recommends the best in culture. Sign up for it here . I used to think of myself as a gun-control conservative—I supported both the right to own firearms and the interest of the state to limit that right—but America's gun culture isn't about rights. It's
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'Structural racism' cited in study of breast-biopsy delays
Black and Asian women are more likely than white women to experience significant delays in getting breast biopsies after a mammogram identifies an abnormality. Moreover, those delays appear to be influenced by screening site-specific factors that may stem from structural racism, according to new research.
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Hidden carbon layer may have sparked ancient bout of global warming
There is no perfect parallel in Earth's past for present-day climate change—human-driven warming is simply happening too fast and furiously. The closest analog came 56 million years ago, when over the course of 3000 to 5000 years, greenhouse gases soared in the atmosphere, causing at least 5°C of warming and pushing tropical species to the poles. The cause of the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum
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Gravitational wave radar could probe deep space for tiny stellar objects
Theoretical physicists have hit on a new way to test Albert Einstein's theory of gravity, or general relativity, and—just maybe—probe the distant universe for tiny, hard to detect objects. Gravitational waves —ripples in space set off when massive objects such as black holes whirl together and collide—should bounce off other massive objects to produce echoes of the signals coming directly to Eart
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A potentially more effective treatment for HER2 mutant metastatic breast cancer
Researchers have identified a HER2 mutation that confers therapeutic resistance and promotes metastatic behavior in lobular breast cancer. Importantly, they also showed that the drug poziotinib, which is already approved for other cancer types, reduced tumor growth and multi-organ metastasis in laboratory tests and animal models. A phase II clinical trial is on the works to determine the value of
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Secrets of aging revealed in largest study on longevity, aging in reptiles and amphibians
An international team of 114 scientists reports the most comprehensive study of aging and longevity to date of reptiles and amphibians worldwide. Among their many findings, they document for the first time that turtles, crocodilians and salamanders have particularly low aging rates and extended lifespans for their sizes. The team also finds that protective phenotypes, such as the hard shells of mo
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Self-assembled, interlocked threads: Spinning yarn with no machine needed
Researchers unexpectedly discovered that the ability for spirals to form in nature also happens in some non-biological systems that convert chemical energy into mechanical action — allowing two-dimensional polymer sheets to rise and rotate in spiral helices without the application of external power. This self-assembly into coherent three-dimensional structures represents the group's latest contri
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Self-assembled, interlocked threads: Spinning yarn with no machine needed
Researchers unexpectedly discovered that the ability for spirals to form in nature also happens in some non-biological systems that convert chemical energy into mechanical action — allowing two-dimensional polymer sheets to rise and rotate in spiral helices without the application of external power. This self-assembly into coherent three-dimensional structures represents the group's latest contri
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Lipid nanoparticles carry gene-editing cancer drugs past tumor defenses
As they grow, solid tumors surround themselves with a thick, hard-to-penetrate wall of molecular defenses. Getting drugs past that barricade is notoriously difficult. Now, scientists have developed nanoparticles that can break down the physical barriers around tumors to reach cancer cells. Once inside, the nanoparticles release their payload: a gene editing system that alters DNA inside the tumor,
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UM study finds microplastic pollution in Flathead Lake
They're in our oceans and rivers. They're in the food we eat and the water we drink. They've even been detected inside the human body. They're called microplastics—particles of plastic so small they can't be seen by the naked eye. While researchers have known for years that these microplastics exist in Flathead Lake, the concentrations and origins of the microplastic pollution have remained a myst
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Neutralization of Omicron BA.1, BA.2, and BA.3 SARS-CoV-2 by 3 doses of BNT162b2 vaccine
Nature Communications, Published online: 23 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30681-1 It is essential to test the neutralization of approved vaccines against SARSCoV-2 Omicron sublineages. Kurhade et al. find that sera from people with three doses of BNT162b2 neutralize Omicron BA.1, BA.2, and BA.3 to a lesser extent than the original strain USAWA1/2020.
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The obligate intracellular bacterium Orientia tsutsugamushi differentiates into a developmentally distinct extracellular state
Nature Communications, Published online: 23 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31176-9 Orientia tsutsugamushi (Ot) the causing agent of scrub typhus exits infected cells using a unique mechanism that involves budding off the surface of infected cells. Here, Atwal et al. report that Ots that have budded from their host cells are in a distinct developmental stage than intracellular bacteria and prov
1d
Coastal marsh migration may further fuel climate change
As rising sea levels cause marshes to move inland in six mid-Atlantic states, coastal habitats will not serve as a carbon sink but instead will release more carbon into the atmosphere, a new modeling study finds. The research raises questions about the persistence of coastal habitats' carbon benefits in the face of sea level rise.
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Microplastic pollution in Montana's flathead lake
Scientists have a greater understanding of the amount of microplastics polluting Flathead Lake, the likely sources of these microplastics and what can be done to prevent more from finding their way into the lake's world-renowned pristine water.
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COVID's Catch-22: The paradox of masking and disease
Standard infection models for COVID-19 tend to focus only on disease states, overlooking the dynamics of a complex paradox: While masking reduces transmission rates and consequently disease prevalence, the reduction of disease inhibits mask-wearing — thereby promoting epidemic revival.
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Lipid nanoparticles carry gene-editing cancer drugs past tumor defenses
As they grow, solid tumors surround themselves with a thick, hard-to-penetrate wall of molecular defenses. Getting drugs past that barricade is notoriously difficult. Now, scientists have developed nanoparticles that can break down the physical barriers around tumors to reach cancer cells. Once inside, the nanoparticles release their payload: a gene editing system that alters DNA inside the tumor,
1d
Team composition, structure, members' gender influence ability to focus, work together
The ability of team members to work together across a range of tasks, called collective intelligence (CI), varies significantly between teams. Research suggests that the level of collective attention (the quality and coordination of members' focus) a team develops influences its level of CI. A new study examined what factors enhance collective attention, focusing on the influence of teams' hierarc
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Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter releasing one of its last rainbow-colored maps
Scientists are about to get a new look at Mars, thanks to a multicolored 5.6-gigapixel map. Covering 86% of the Red Planet's surface, the map reveals the distribution of dozens of key minerals. By looking at mineral distribution, scientists can better understand Mars' watery past and can prioritize which regions need to be studied in more depth.
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Elon Musk Reportedly Started SpaceX After Russian Engineer Spat on Him
In her new book "Escaping Gravity: My Quest to Transform NASA and Launch a New Space Age," former NASA deputy administrator Lori Garver is revealing some juicy details about the early days of Elon Musk's rocket venture SpaceX. In one particularly lurid detail, according to Garver's account, Musk was inspired to launch the company after having a Russian engineer spat on his shoes. It turned out to
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Best Bone-Conduction Headphones of 2022
Bone-conduction headphones may have seemed like a crazy gadget when they first hit the market, but they've become a staple among athletes and outdoor enthusiasts. Wireless bone-conduction headphones are comfortable, stay in place while you're on the move, and offer impressive audio for headphones that don't cover or enter the ear. These headphones may include a microphone so you can take phone ca
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Drone Crashes Into Russian Oil Refinery, Explodes
Suicide Mission A drone crashed into a Russian oil refinery Wednesday, creating a huge explosion that's already drenched in intrigue. The Telegraph posted video footage to YouTube and called the drone a "kamikaze" sent by Ukraine, but the Guardian says details are still forthcoming and can't confirm whether the drone was Ukrainian in origin. The clip shows a small drone fly over the refinery, at
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Automation builds bigger, better ice tower reservoirs for high, dry farming
Towering artificial ice reservoirs called "ice stupas" have emerged since 2014 as an accessible means of storing irrigation water in dry, high-altitude mountain villages. Now, experiments with automated systems have demonstrated that construction of these giant ice cones, which top 30 meters (100 feet), can be accomplished with about one-tenth the volume of water manual methods use, according to n
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Tiny fish-shaped robot 'swims' around picking up microplastics
Microplastics are found nearly everywhere on Earth and can be harmful to animals if they're ingested. But it's hard to remove such tiny particles from the environment, especially once they settle into nooks and crannies at the bottom of waterways. Now, researchers have created a light-activated fish robot that 'swims' around quickly, picking up and removing microplastics from the environment.
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In situ 3D bioprinting with bioconcrete bioink
Nature Communications, Published online: 23 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30997-y Bioinks used in current in-situ bioprinting have limitations when applied to complex operational environments. Here, the authors report on the creation of a microgel reinforced GelMA bioink which can be simply prepared and used in different biomedical settings. The application is demonstrated in a cranial defect
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U.S. science agencies would see budgets rise under draft budget bills
Spending panels for the U.S. House of Representatives kicked off the 2023 federal budget cycle this week by recommending healthy increases for several research agencies. In some cases, however, those increases fall below the much larger boosts President Joe Biden has requested. At the same time, lawmakers bucked that trend by adding to Biden's meager request for the National Institutes of Health
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Artificial photosynthesis can produce food without sunshine
Scientists have found a way to bypass the need for biological photosynthesis altogether and create food independent of sunlight by using artificial photosynthesis. The technology uses a two-step electrocatalytic process to convert carbon dioxide, electricity, and water into acetate. Food-producing organisms then consume acetate in the dark to grow. The hybrid organic-inorganic system could increas
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What a Gas-Tax Holiday Won't Do
Gas prices in the U.S. are close to $5 a gallon, President Joe Biden's approval rating is 36 percent , and the first phenomenon has a lot to do with the second. But the factors that have driven gas prices higher are largely out of Biden's control, at least in the near term. So it wasn't a shock when he announced yesterday that he was asking Congress to suspend the 18.4-cents-a-gallon federal gas
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Police Arrest Two for Plan to Harvest Child's Organs
Welcome to hell, where human organs are so valuable people sell their own kidneys for food and two Nigerian officials were arrested this week for allegedly trying to harvest some from a child. Earlier today, a Nigerian senator and his wife were charged with bringing a child to the UK in order to harvest their organs, the Daily Beast reported . While the Beast didn't say how old the child is or re
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Ultra-thin film creates vivid 3D images with large field of view
Researchers have developed a new ultra-thin film that can create detailed 3D images viewable under normal illumination without any special reading devices. The images appear to float on top of the film and can be clearly viewed from all angles. The new imaging film uses a technology known as light-field imaging, which captures the direction and intensity of all rays of light within a scene to crea
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Artificial photosynthesis can produce food without sunshine
Scientists have found a way to bypass the need for biological photosynthesis altogether and create food independent of sunlight by using artificial photosynthesis. The technology uses a two-step electrocatalytic process to convert carbon dioxide, electricity, and water into acetate. Food-producing organisms then consume acetate in the dark to grow. The hybrid organic-inorganic system could increas
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Polluted land can be planted with flowers and tobacco
Zinnia (popular ornamental flowers) and tobacco adapt to copper in the soil. They accumulate heavy metal in the roots and limit the transport of copper to the aerial parts of the plant: stem, leaves, and beyond. At the same time, these plants not only survive in difficult conditions, but also grow better. This feature was revealed by scientists of the Ural Federal University (UrFU). They conducted
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Polluted land can be planted with flowers and tobacco
Zinnia (popular ornamental flowers) and tobacco adapt to copper in the soil. They accumulate heavy metal in the roots and limit the transport of copper to the aerial parts of the plant: stem, leaves, and beyond. At the same time, these plants not only survive in difficult conditions, but also grow better. This feature was revealed by scientists of the Ural Federal University (UrFU). They conducted
1d
The star that survived a supernova
A supernova is the catastrophic explosion of a star. Thermonuclear supernovae, in particular, signal the complete destruction of a white dwarf star, leaving nothing behind. At least that's what models and observations suggested.
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Coastal marsh migration may further fuel climate change
As rising sea levels cause marshes to move inland in six mid-Atlantic states, the coastal zone will not continue to serve as a carbon sink but release more carbon into the atmosphere, a new modeling study led by researchers at Duke University finds.
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I Was a Police Officer for 20 Years. I Know What It Means to Put More Guns on the Street.
Police officers have a vested interest in keeping illegal guns off the streets, a difficult-enough task already. Now the United States Supreme Court decision in New York State Rifle & Pistol Association Inc. v. Bruen has found unconstitutional the New York law that strictly limited who could carry a firearm in public in the nation's largest metropolis. At one blow, this ruling ends a restriction
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The ancient Egyptians were concerned with more than just death
When we think about ancient Egypt, the first things that come to mind are usually mummies and sarcophagi. According to researcher and Rijksmuseum van Oudheden curator Lara Weiss, that impression is unjustified. She made an audio tour for the Rijksmuseum van Oudheden that focuses on living Egyptians and their relationship with death and the dead.
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News at a glance: An apology for 'conversion therapies,' Long Covid, and a narrowing racial gap in NIH grants
DIVERSITY Groups regret 'homosexuality' views Two scientific societies this month disavowed their past involvement in practices and public statements that deemed "homosexuality" a treatable disorder—a mistaken notion that has harmed LGBTQI+ people. Decades ago, some members and former presidents of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies helped create, study, and use "conversion th
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Can farm and food waste power tomorrow's airplanes?
.news-article__hero–featured .parallax__element{ object-position: 15% 50%; -o-object-position: 15% 50%; } It's a painful truth for people who fly: Airplanes are climate killers. Air travel is among the most carbon-polluting human activities. A round trip from New York City to London emits nearly 1000 kilograms of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) per passenger, more than an average person in Burundi, Nicar
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Fusion power may run out of fuel before it even gets started
In 2020, Canadian Nuclear Laboratories delivered five steel drums, lined with cork to absorb shocks, to the Joint European Torus (JET), a large fusion reactor in the United Kingdom. Inside each drum was a steel cylinder the size of a Coke can, holding a wisp of hydrogen gas—just 10 grams of it, or the weight of a couple sheets of paper. This wasn't ordinary hydrogen but its rare radioactive isoto
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US Government Bans JUUL
As predicted , the US Food and Drug Administration has ordered popular e-cigarette maker JUUL off the US market, a notable turning point in the regulation of vaping products. That means the JUUL device itself, as well as tobacco and menthol flavored pods that provide the nicotine hits, will no longer be sold in the United States going forward. The sale of all sweet and fruit-flavored e-cigarette
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Startup Says It's Within a Year of Practical Fusion Power
Yet another startup says it's nearing tests for a system that could once and for all prove the technology can actually generate more energy than it consumes, The New York Times reports — even telling the newspaper that it's "within a year" of that crucial break-even point. Seattle-based startup Zap Energy says its approach to fusion energy — potentially an entirely green source of renewable energ
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'Exomuscle' boosts upper body strength and endurance
Researchers have developed a wearable textile exomuscle that serves as an extra layer of muscles. They aim to use it to increase upper body strength and endurance of people with restricted mobility. "My arms are simply getting weaker," says Michael Hagmann, who was diagnosed with a rare form of muscular dystrophy known as Bethlem myopathy back in 2016. To compensate for the lack of muscle strengt
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New hope to stop spread of antibiotic resistance
A new path to help stop the spread of antibiotic resistance has been uncovered by a team led by University College London (UCL) and Birkbeck researchers, in a move that could impact the lives of millions globally.
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Diverse habitats are required for river fish biodiversity restoration
Floodplains must contain a variety of fish habitats, among other things, to restore river fish biodiversity. This is the result of a large-scale study conducted by Wageningen University & Research (WUR) in collaboration with Rijkswaterstaat, which is published in Science of the Total Environment (STOTEN). Additionally, the extent to which the restored floodplain is connected to the river determine
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Diverse habitats are required for river fish biodiversity restoration
Floodplains must contain a variety of fish habitats, among other things, to restore river fish biodiversity. This is the result of a large-scale study conducted by Wageningen University & Research (WUR) in collaboration with Rijkswaterstaat, which is published in Science of the Total Environment (STOTEN). Additionally, the extent to which the restored floodplain is connected to the river determine
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Scientists discover world's largest bacterium, the size of an eyelash
At about 1cm long, Thiomargarita magnifica is roughly 50 times larger than all other known giant bacteria Scientists have discovered the world's largest known bacterium, which comes in the form of white filaments the size of human eyelashes, in a swamp in Guadeloupe. At about 1cm long, the strange organism, Thiomargarita magnifica , is roughly 50 times larger than all other known giant bacteria a
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How Slow Can You Go?
Two studies show negligible rates of aging in some types of turtles and other cold-blooded creatures, but that doesn't mean they're immortal.
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Giant bacteria found in Guadeloupe mangroves challenge traditional concepts
At first glance, the slightly murky waters in the tube look like a scoop of stormwater, complete with leaves, debris, and even lighter threads in the mix. But in the Petri dish, the thin vermicelli-like threads floating delicately above the leaf debris are revealed to be single bacterial cells, visible to the naked eye.
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Secrets of aging revealed in largest study on longevity, aging in reptiles and amphibians
At 190 years old, Jonathan the Seychelles giant tortoise recently made news for being the "oldest living land animal in the world." Although, anecdotal evidence like this exists that some species of turtles and other ectotherms—or 'cold-blooded' animals—live a long time, evidence is spotty and mostly focused on animals living in zoos or a few individuals living in the wild. Now, an international t
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Improved protein function opens way for new drug development concept
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet and SciLifeLab in Sweden describe in a study published in Science how they have improved the ability of a protein to repair oxidative DNA damage and created a new protein function. Their innovative technique could lead to improved drugs for diseases involving oxidative stress, such as cancer, Alzheimer's disease and lung diseases, but the researchers believe it
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Many human genomes shaped by past events that caused sharp dips in the population
Human populations have waxed and waned over the millennia, with some cultures exploding and migrating to new areas or new continents, others dropping to such low numbers that their genetic diversity plummeted. In some small populations, inbreeding causes once rare genetic diseases to become common, despite their deleterious effects.
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Secrets of aging revealed in largest study on longevity, aging in reptiles and amphibians
At 190 years old, Jonathan the Seychelles giant tortoise recently made news for being the "oldest living land animal in the world." Although, anecdotal evidence like this exists that some species of turtles and other ectotherms—or 'cold-blooded' animals—live a long time, evidence is spotty and mostly focused on animals living in zoos or a few individuals living in the wild. Now, an international t
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Smell of desert rainstorms may have health benefits
Oils and other chemicals plants release after a rainstorm may explain the feelings of euphoria and the health benefits that follow a storm in the desert, research shows. "The Sonoran Desert flora is one of the richest in the world in plants that emit fragrant volatile oils, and many of those fragrances confer stress-reducing health benefits to humans, wildlife, and the plants themselves," says Ga
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Improved protein function opens way for new drug development concept
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet and SciLifeLab in Sweden describe in a study published in Science how they have improved the ability of a protein to repair oxidative DNA damage and created a new protein function. Their innovative technique could lead to improved drugs for diseases involving oxidative stress, such as cancer, Alzheimer's disease and lung diseases, but the researchers believe it
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Keep Your Devices Together With These Tech Organizers
Messy cables are unsightly and can even be dangerous — whether they clutter your desk or you have kids that might trip over them. If you're looking for ways to minimize clutter and maximize function, these chargers will help you organize — and even hide — your cables so that you can reduce the clutter in your home. Thunderbolt 4-Dock Pro Key Selling Point: This compact charging station can work w
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Vulnerability Allows Hackers to Set Hot Tub Temp to Anything They Want
Hot Tub Hell A white hat hacker says he's discovered a vulnerability in Jacuzzi's SmartTub app — which allows hot tub owners to control their relaxation cauldrons via smartphone — that could let bad actors access personal data. But that's not all. As TechCrunch reports , the digital vulnerability also gives potential malefactors access to SmartTub controls — in other words, the ability to control
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Our 3rd Early Career Researchers Peer Review programme is open for applications
Nature Communications, Published online: 23 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31260-0 Our peer review programme was launched in 2020 to support Early Career Researchers in building confidence to participate in peer review. The initiative has proved very successful and popular with both ECRs and editors and we are pleased to invite applicants to apply to our 2022 programme.
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Transcription factor-driven coordination of cell cycle exit and lineage-specification in vivo during granulocytic differentiation
Nature Communications, Published online: 23 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31332-1 Here the authors show that differentiation of haematopoietic stem cells into mature blood cells is primed by cell type-specific transcription factors at the enhancer level during early differentiation, before they confere promoter-driven growth arrest, and activate post-mitotic terminal differentiation.
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Study reveals the first deep-sea crustacean genome
The deep-sea environment is characterized by darkness, low temperature, high hydrostatic pressure and lack of food. Despite the hostile environment, a growing number of deep-dwelling animals have been identified in this ecosystem, including worms, mollusks, fish and crustaceans.
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Shedding light on the impact of microplastics on lentil seedling growth
Microplastic pollution is known to negatively impact seed germination and seedling growth. Although some studies have demonstrated the effects of microplastics on seed germination, the impact of microplastics on the internal biological activity of seeds remained unknown. Now, a group of researchers has used biospeckle optical coherence tomography to reveal that microplastics significantly hinder t
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Shedding light on the impact of microplastics on lentil seedling growth
Microplastic pollution is known to negatively impact seed germination and seedling growth. Although some studies have demonstrated the effects of microplastics on seed germination, the impact of microplastics on the internal biological activity of seeds remained unknown. Now, a group of researchers has used biospeckle optical coherence tomography to reveal that microplastics significantly hinder t
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New aging-related molecular pathway discovered
A collaborative project between the labs of Maulik Patel, assistant professor of biological sciences, and Kris Burkewitz, assistant professor of cell and developmental biology, has identified a new molecular pathway that plays a key role in the ability of cells to sense and respond to stressed mitochondria. Defects in mitochondrial function are particularly relevant to aging and aging-related dise
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New technology helps reveal inner workings of human genome
Weill Cornell Medicine and New York Genome Center researchers, in collaboration with Oxford Nanopore Technologies, have developed a new method to assess on a large scale the three-dimensional structure of the human genome, or how the genome folds. The genome is the complete set of genetic instructions, DNA or RNA, enabling an organism to function.
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New aging-related molecular pathway discovered
A collaborative project between the labs of Maulik Patel, assistant professor of biological sciences, and Kris Burkewitz, assistant professor of cell and developmental biology, has identified a new molecular pathway that plays a key role in the ability of cells to sense and respond to stressed mitochondria. Defects in mitochondrial function are particularly relevant to aging and aging-related dise
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Water receding slowly in flood-hit northeast Bangladesh
Water levels were slowly receding Thursday in major rivers in Bangladesh's flood-hit northeast, bringing hopes of relief to millions of Bangladeshis, but woes continued in India's northeast, where 5.5 million people remained affected, officials said.
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How intimate partner violence affects custody decisions
Intimate partner violence (IPV) can have significant implications for the well-being of mothers and children during separation and divorce. Yet IPV is often not included in custody cases or factored into court decisions, a new University of Illinois study shows.
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Ultra-thin film creates vivid 3D images with large field of view
Researchers have developed a new ultra-thin film that can create detailed 3D images viewable under normal illumination without any special reading devices. The images appear to float on top of the film and exhibit smooth parallax, which means they can be clearly viewed from all angles. With additional development, the new glass-free approach could be used as a visual security feature or incorporat
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David A. Evans (1941–2022)
Nature, Published online: 23 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01737-5 Chemist who developed ways to synthesize and depict bioactive products.
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Monkeypox in Africa: the science the world ignored
Nature, Published online: 23 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01686-z African researchers have been warning about monkeypox outbreaks for years. As vaccines are deployed globally, they worry they will be left behind.
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The pandemic's unequal toll
Nature, Published online: 22 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01722-y COVID has exposed stark inequality – we walk through the latest data
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Fashion Has Abandoned Human Taste
As best as I can tell, the puff-sleeve onslaught began in 2018. The clothing designer Batsheva Hay's eponymous brand was barely two years old, but her high-necked, ruffle-trimmed, elbow-covering dresses in dense florals and upholstery prints—bizarro-world reimaginings of the conservative frocks favored by Hasidic Jewish women and the Amish—had developed a cult following among weird New York fashi
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A Genetic Identity Crisis: Mosaicism in the Brain
We carry with us every day trillions of copies of one of the best stories ever written: the human genome. Carefully drafted and edited over 4 billion years, our genome contains all the information necessary, and then some, for making a human being from scratch. Often we think of this recipe book as a monolith: […]
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Lipid nanoparticles carry gene-editing cancer drugs past tumor defenses
As they grow, solid tumors surround themselves with a thick, hard-to-penetrate wall of molecular defenses. Getting drugs past that barricade is notoriously difficult. Now, scientists at UT Southwestern have developed nanoparticles that can break down the physical barriers around tumors to reach cancer cells. Once inside, the nanoparticles release their payload: a gene editing system that alters DN
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Shedding light on the impact of microplastics on lentil seedling growth
Microplastic pollution is known to negatively impact seed germination and seedling growth. Although some studies have demonstrated the effects of microplastics on seed germination, the impact of microplastics on the internal biological activity of seeds remained unknown. Now, a group of researchers has used biospeckle optical coherence tomography to reveal that microplastics significantly hinder t
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Are babies the key to the next generation of artificial intelligence?
Babies can help unlock the next generation of artificial intelligence (AI), according to neuroscientists who have just published new guiding principles for improving AI. The research examines the neuroscience and psychology of infant learning and distills three principles to guide the next generation of AI, which will help overcome the most pressing limitations of machine learning.
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Study shows that getting pesticide reduction policies right is crucial for food security
The term peri-urban agriculture is generally used to describe the cultivation of plants and livestock on the fringes of large population centers. However, factors such as urban expansion, rising labor costs and limited labor supply are putting peri-urban agriculture under increasing pressure. As a result, agribusinesses are seeking ways to minimize workloads and increase yields; for example, many
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Study shows that getting pesticide reduction policies right is crucial for food security
The term peri-urban agriculture is generally used to describe the cultivation of plants and livestock on the fringes of large population centers. However, factors such as urban expansion, rising labor costs and limited labor supply are putting peri-urban agriculture under increasing pressure. As a result, agribusinesses are seeking ways to minimize workloads and increase yields; for example, many
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Amazon Shows Off Tech That Lets Alexa Copy Voice of Dead Relatives
Alex-sad It's something only a corporation as soulless as Amazon could dream up. The e-retailer is planning to allow its Alexa smart speaker to mimic the voices of deceased loved ones — arguably a rather "Black Mirror"-esque failure to read the room. During its annual re:Mars conference this week, Amazon's senior vice president and head scientist for Alexa, Rohit Prasad, showed off a demo of a la
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Best Apple Watches in 2022
The best Apple Watch can do way more than tell the time. The smartwatch can give you up-to-the-second information about your health, track and record your exercise, and even perform smartphone-like tasks when you want to leave your iPhone at home. Apple has continually updated the Apple Watch's software, which is named WatchOS, to bring new features to the smartwatch every year. These changes var
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44 Early Prime Day 2022 Deals You Can Get Right Now
Amazon's Prime Day 2022 doesn't officially kick off until July 12, but you don't have to wait until the two-day deals event to get solid discounts on tech, appliances, and more. Thousands of items across virtually every category are already on sale, with more being added every day. The best part about pre-Prime Day deals is that most of them don't require you to have an active Amazon Prime to tak
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New PET-like plastic made directly from waste biomass
It is becoming increasingly obvious that moving away from fossil fuels and avoiding the accumulation of plastics in the environment are key to addressing the challenge of climate change. In that vein, there are considerable efforts to develop degradable or recyclable polymers made from non-edible plant material referred to as "lignocellulosic biomass."
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Abortion and bioethics: Principles to guide US abortion debates
The U.S. Supreme Court will soon decide the fate of Roe v. Wade, the landmark 1973 decision that established the nationwide right to choose an abortion. If the court's decision hews close to the leaked draft opinion first published by Politico in May 2022, the court's new conservative majority will overturn Roe.
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Artificial photosynthesis can produce food without sunshine
Photosynthesis has evolved in plants for millions of years to turn water, carbon dioxide, and the energy from sunlight into plant biomass and the foods we eat. This process, however, is very inefficient, with only about 1% of the energy found in sunlight ending up in the plant. Scientists at UC Riverside and the University of Delaware have found a way to bypass the need for biological photosynthes
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Unveiling the mechanism by which light regulates rice flowering time
Light affects most organisms. In plants, many behaviors and functions are determined by the length of light and dark cycles, including flowering. In the most recent publication of The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), a team of researchers that brings together the Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica António Xavier da Universidade NOVA de Lisboa (ITQB NOVA), the Leibni
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Discovering a hybrid skin-topological effect induced by gain and loss
Recently, Associate Professor Yong-Chun Liu of the Department of Physics and others have found the hybrid skin-topological effect induced by gain and loss and the parity-time phase transition between skin-topological modes. The research results were published in Physical Review Letters under the title of "Gain-loss-induced hybrid skin-topological effect."
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Artificial photosynthesis can produce food without sunshine
Photosynthesis has evolved in plants for millions of years to turn water, carbon dioxide, and the energy from sunlight into plant biomass and the foods we eat. This process, however, is very inefficient, with only about 1% of the energy found in sunlight ending up in the plant. Scientists at UC Riverside and the University of Delaware have found a way to bypass the need for biological photosynthes
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Unveiling the mechanism by which light regulates rice flowering time
Light affects most organisms. In plants, many behaviors and functions are determined by the length of light and dark cycles, including flowering. In the most recent publication of The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), a team of researchers that brings together the Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica António Xavier da Universidade NOVA de Lisboa (ITQB NOVA), the Leibni
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Advanced 'mini brains' in a dish: Organoids that mimic human brain cortex in development and disease
"Outer Radial Glia" (oRG) cells are nervous system stem cells that are instrumental for the development of the human cortex and have been challenging to produce in the lab. Now, a team of Max Planck researchers from Berlin succeeded in generating brain organoids that are enriched with these stem cells by refining and standardizing existing protocols for these mini-organs.
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The Next Fight Over Guns in America
This morning, the Supreme Court struck down a New York State law that limited concealed-firearm permits to those with a demonstrated need to carry arms outside the home. Justice Clarence Thomas, writing for the 6–3 majority in New York State Rifle & Pistol Association Inc. v. Bruen , said , "The Second and Fourteenth Amendments protect an individual's right to carry a handgun for self-defense out
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What This Is Going to Hurt Leaves Out
U p until rather recently, the history of gynecological health was written and recorded by men who seemed to have an inordinate degree of suspicion regarding vaginas. Aristotle, considered by some to be the founder of biology, believed that being born female was an innate sign of deficiency and a "departure" from nature. James Marion Sims, the inventor of the speculum who performed medical experi
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An Autonomous Ship Used AI to Cross the Atlantic Without a Human Crew
Just under 402 years ago, in August of 1620, the Mayflower set sail from Southampton, England, bound for America. The 100-foot-long-long, triple-masted wooden vessel with canvas sails took more than two months to cross the Atlantic. It carried 102 passengers, had a max speed of three knots an hour (that's about 6 kilometers or 3.7 miles an hour) and required a crew of 30 to operate. Earlier this
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Spread of 'free-range' farming may raise risk of animal-borne pandemics – study
If we can't dramatically cut meat consumption then intensive 'factory farming' may be comparatively less risky, say authors The industrial farming of animals such as pigs, poultry and cattle to provide meat for hundreds of millions of people may reduce the risk of pandemics and the emergence of dangerous diseases including Sars, BSE, bird flu and Covid-19 compared with less-intensive farming, a m
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Cardiac rehab attendance lower among Asian, Black and Hispanic adults at all income levels, study finds
In a study of more than 107,000 people eligible for cardiac rehabilitation programs, Asian, Black and Hispanic adults were significantly less likely to attend cardiac rehabilitation programs compared to white adults. These differences in cardiac rehabilitation participation were seen at all income levels. The timeframe between hospital discharge and starting cardiac rehabilitation, which can affec
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It sucked to be the prey of ancient cephalopods
The Jurassic cephalopod Vampyronassa rhodanica, thought to be the oldest known ancestor of the modern-day vampire squid (Vampyroteuthis infernalis), was likely an active hunter — a mode of life that is in contrast with its opportunistic descendant. Scientists came to this conclusion after analyzing microtomographic data of this rare fossil.
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Modeling a devastating childhood disease on a chip
Millions of children globally suffer from environmental enteric dysfunction (EED), a chronic inflammatory disease of the intestine that causes malnutrition and stunts their growth. A new Organ Chip models this devastating disease in living human tissue for the first time in vitro. This EED Chip allowed researchers to tease out the complex interplay of genetics and nutrition underpinning the diseas
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All-in-one, bio-inspired, and low-power crypto engines for near-sensor security based on two-dimensional memtransistors
Nature Communications, Published online: 23 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31148-z Internet of things (IoT) sensors can collect, store and communicate large volumes of information, which require effective security measures. Here, the authors report the realization of low-power edge sensors based on photosensitive and programmable 2D memtransistors, integrating sensing, storage and encryption f
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A broadly neutralizing antibody protects Syrian hamsters against SARS-CoV-2 Omicron challenge
Nature Communications, Published online: 23 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31259-7 SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern such as the Omicron variant pose a challenge for vaccination and antibody immunotherapy. Here, Zhou et al. isolate a broadly neutralizing antibody (bNAb), named ZCB11, that protects Golden Syrian hamsters against Omicron. Applying CryoEM the authors show that ZCB11 heavy chain pred
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Peripherally restricted transthyretin-based delivery system for probes and therapeutics avoiding opioid-related side effects
Nature Communications, Published online: 23 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31342-z The current peripherally acting mu-opioid receptor antagonists present limited permeability and pharmacokinetic properties. Here, the authors develop a drug delivery approach based on AG10, which demonstrates the impact of mu-opioid receptors in the central nervous system in precipitating opioid-induced constipa
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Amazing Shot Captures Space Station Flying Directly Across the Moon
Forced Perspective Photographer and astronomer Andrew McCarthy has shared a stunning new image he took of the International Space Station transiting in front of a sunlit Moon — and the details are absolutely breathtaking. "Possibly my new favorite shot of all time," McCarthy gloated . "I woke up at 1:30 am this morning to capture a rare scene — the sunlit international space station transiting ic
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Former NASA Official Says Many at Agency Deeply Oppose SpaceX
Airing Out In a new tell-all memoir, the former second-in-command at NASA has aired a ton of the agency's dirty laundry — including significant fights with Bill Nelson, the man who now helms it. When she was NASA's deputy administrator, ex-official Lori Garver told Politico that she not only dealt with vile sexism from coworkers , but also with what she calls "passive-aggressive" behavior from no
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Scientists take the first step to master an all-powerful cell type from the beginning of life
From cloning to regeneration, how to find alternative paths to create or rejuvenate life has been one of the big questions for biologists. It is this question that's behind the work of generations of scientists who went on to win Nobel Prizes. It is also this question that drives the recent research led by Sheng Ding at Tsinghua University, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, now published in Natur
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Virtual reality trip as sea turtle ups empathy
A virtual reality simulation called Project Shell, lets people take on the body of a loggerhead sea turtle. Participants in Project Shell don a virtual reality headset and sport flippers instead of arms. During a 15-minute immersive experience, they journey from a hatchling to an adult turtle, dodging hazards like ships and wayward fishing gear. Participating in the simulation increased people's
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New pic sheds light on the death of 'hypergiant' stars
Astronomers have created a detailed, three-dimensional image of a dying hypergiant star. The team traced the distribution, directions, and velocities of a variety of molecules surrounding a red hypergiant star known as VY Canis Majoris. Their findings offer insights, at an unprecedented scale, into the processes that accompany the death of giant stars. Extreme supergiant stars known as hypergiant
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Scientists take the first step to master an all-powerful cell type from the beginning of life
From cloning to regeneration, how to find alternative paths to create or rejuvenate life has been one of the big questions for biologists. It is this question that's behind the work of generations of scientists who went on to win Nobel Prizes. It is also this question that drives the recent research led by Sheng Ding at Tsinghua University, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, now published in Natur
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Exotic photonic crystals empower robust one-way transport of light
Topological photonics is an emerging area that provides unprecedented opportunities for controlling the flow of light in photonic integrated circuits. With the introduction of non-trivial topological phases, a one-way street for light is feasible in photonic crystals (PhCs) and other platforms. Like a tightly regulated one-way traffic lane, light cannot be reflected back in these exotic structures
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Amphioxus sequencing gives insight on vertebrate evolution
Vertebrate evolution was accompanied by two rounds of whole genome duplication followed by functional divergence in terms of regulatory circuits and gene expression patterns. As a basal and slow-evolving chordate species, amphioxus is an ideal paradigm for exploring the origin and evolution of vertebrates.
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Five COVID Numbers That Don't Make Sense Anymore
The past two and a half years have been a global crash course in infection prevention. They've also been a crash course in basic math: Since the arrival of this coronavirus, people have been asked to count the meters and feet that separate one nose from the next; they've tabulated the days that distance them from their most recent vaccine dose, calculated the minutes they can spend unmasked, and
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Inside the jellyfish's sting: Exploring the micro-architecture of a cellular weapon
Summertime beachgoers are all too familiar with the painful reality of a jellyfish sting. But how do the stinging cells of jellyfish and their coral and sea anemone cousins actually work? New research unveils a precise operational model for the stinging organelle of the starlet sea anemone, Nematostella vectensis. The study involved the application of cutting-edge microscopic imaging technologies
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New insight into the hunting patterns of ancient cephalopods
The Jurassic cephalopod Vampyronassa rhodanica, thought to be the oldest known ancestor of the modern-day vampire squid (Vampyroteuthis infernalis), was likely an active hunter—a mode of life that is in contrast with its opportunistic descendant. Scientists led by Sorbonne University came to this conclusion after analyzing microtomographic data of this rare fossil, acquired at the ESRF and the Mus
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New insight into the hunting patterns of ancient cephalopods
The Jurassic cephalopod Vampyronassa rhodanica, thought to be the oldest known ancestor of the modern-day vampire squid (Vampyroteuthis infernalis), was likely an active hunter—a mode of life that is in contrast with its opportunistic descendant. Scientists led by Sorbonne University came to this conclusion after analyzing microtomographic data of this rare fossil, acquired at the ESRF and the Mus
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A fine-tuned gene editor that minimizes adverse consequences
The molecular tool CRISPR-Cas9 can be used to treat inherited blood disorders, but this may cause unintended genetic alterations. A team led by MDC researchers Klaus Rajewsky and Van Trung Chu has now presented an approach in Science Advances that minimizes such adverse consequences.
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Default options facilitate faster carbon offsetting in air travel
The defaults on a carbon offsetting website can cause a large percentage of customers to select faster CO2 compensation, even if this entails higher costs. In cooperation with a web portal offering carbon offsetting, a research team at the University of Bern with the participation of Professor Dr. Axel Ockenfels at the University of Cologne explored the question of the costs at which people are st
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Photos From the 2022 Westminster Dog Show
The 146th annual Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show took place over the weekend, hosting about 3,000 dogs consisting of more than 200 different breeds or varieties. This year's Best in Show was awarded to a bloodhound named Trumpet. Below are images from this week's competition and preliminary activities held at the Lyndhurst estate, in Tarrytown, New York.
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Hydrology controls lithium isotopes in rivers and seawater
Seawater lithium isotopes (δ7Li) record changes over Earth history, including a ~9‰ increase during the Cenozoic, which is interpreted as the reflection of either a change in continental silicate weathering rate or weathering feedback strength, associated with tectonic uplift. However, mechanisms controlling the dissolved δ7Li remain debated.
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Macrocycle-stabilization of its interaction with 14-3-3 increases plasma membrane localization and activity of CFTR
Nature Communications, Published online: 23 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31206-6 Mutations in the chloride channel CFTR that impair plasma membrane insertion and ion transport are the cause of cystic fibrosis. Here, the authors identify a macrocycle that stabilizes the interaction of mutant CFTR with the chaperone-like protein 14-3-3 and rescues its biological function.
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Diagnosing jaundice using tear fluids
Human tear fluids contain many proteins, metabolites, and other molecules whose concentrations change significantly with certain diseases. A research team has now developed a handy test kit for tears that can identify patients with jaundice. Their success is based on a hybrid sensor that simultaneously removes impurities from the sample. This approach could provide new methods for early detection
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SpaceX's supersized Starship rocket — and the future of galactic exploration | Jennifer Heldmann
SpaceX's Starship launch vehicle has the potential to explore the solar system in a bold, new — and supersized — way. Planetary scientist Jennifer Heldmann talks about how reusable, large-scale spacecraft like Starship could help humanity achieve its next galactic leaps and usher in a new era of space exploration, from investigating the solar system's many ocean worlds to launching bigger telesc
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Untangling the role of tau in Alzheimer's disease
A team of scientists has revealed how excess tau — a key protein implicated in Alzheimer's disease — impairs signaling between neurons in the brains of mice. The study could open new pathways for treating the symptoms and even halting the progression of Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders.
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Can robotics help us achieve sustainable development?
Scientists have assessed how robotics and autonomous systems might facilitate or impede the delivery of the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Their findings identify key opportunities and key threats that need to be considered while developing, deploying and governing robotics and autonomous systems.
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Astrocytic urea cycle in the brain controls memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease
Researchers have revealed the presence of a functional urea cycle in the star-shaped cells of the Alzheimer's Disease (AD) brain. Key results point to the role of the urea cycle in amyloid-beta plaque clearance, and the memory impairment caused by consequent excess GABA, ammonia, and H2O2 production. Astrocyte-specific silencing of enzyme ODC1 in AD mouse model rescues memory impairment and can be
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Nya retrovirus upptäckta i koalans arvsmassa
Australiens koalor är drabbade av ett retrovirus som kopplas till sjukdomar hos det populära djuret. Nu har forskare upptäckt fler retrovirus i arvsmassan. De tror även att andra aktiva virus kan finnas både hos koalan och andra djur i samma miljö. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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Fåglar gynnas av evighetsträd i granskog
Har träd som lämnas kvar på ett kalhygge någon betydelse för fågellivet? Ja, det finns både fler arter och fler individer i sådan skog, visar forskning. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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Tveksam nytta att sockertesta alla 40-åringar
Att testa hur kroppen klarar att hantera socker genom att göra en glukosbelastning kan vara värdefullt för att hitta förstadier till typ 2-diabetes. Nyttan med att testa 40-åringar utan andra riskfaktorer är dock väldigt liten. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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New Open Frame PC Chassis Transforms to All-In-One PC
(Photo: Nagao) Open air PC cases are nothing new, as they've always existed at the upper echelon of "nerd cred" builds. Hanging all your PC gear out for everyone to see just looks cool, period. Plus, it makes upgrades and maintenance a heck of a lot easier and improves airflow. Now an open air chassis maker from Japan has added a new twist to the design: it's added a mount for your monitor. This
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What's the best way to tackle teacher burnout?
Two education researchers have some insights on the rising rates of teacher resignation and growing concerns for the future of the field. Teachers have one of the most important roles in society, yet they have always been up against a host of challenges–both inside and outside of their classrooms. From low wages, to extended hours, to the pressures of meeting the unique needs of each student, the
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Book considers more sustainable food production methods
In his new book "Regenesis," journalist and environmental activist George Monbiot describes problems associated with agriculture now and into the future. He also gives examples of how agriculture can be improved to produce healthy food sustainably. He does this in an engaging manner by combining his own experiences with an impressive knowledge of the literature.
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Jeff Lutz Challenges Bobby Ducote for a Top 3 Spot | Street Outlaws: America's List
Stream Street Outlaws: America's List on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/street-outlaws-americas-list #StreetOutlaws #StreetRacing #Discovery Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter:
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Book considers more sustainable food production methods
In his new book "Regenesis," journalist and environmental activist George Monbiot describes problems associated with agriculture now and into the future. He also gives examples of how agriculture can be improved to produce healthy food sustainably. He does this in an engaging manner by combining his own experiences with an impressive knowledge of the literature.
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The quest for a better sunscreen
Many summer days start with slathering on sunscreen to prevent sunburn, skin damage, and skin cancer. A common ingredient in sunscreens is avobenzone, which works by absorbing the sun's ultraviolet rays.
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What is BPA and why is it in so many plastic products?
Bisphenol A, or BPA, is a chemical widely used to make hard, clear plastics. It is an endocrine disruptor that has been linked to many negative health effects, including cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. In 2013, the U.S. government banned its use in baby products that come into contact with food, like bottles or the packaging of infant formula.
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Wearable antimicrobial copper nanomesh sticks to human skin, killing microbes nearly instantly
A team of researchers from the University of Tokyo, the Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology and the Center for Emergent Matter Science & Thin-Film Device Laboratory RIKEN 2-1 Hirosawa has developed a wearable antimicrobial nanomesh material that sticks to human skin, killing microbes nearly instantly. They have published their creation in Proceedings of the National Academy of
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How the first biomolecules could have been formed
The chemical precursors of present-day biomolecules could have formed not only in the deep sea at hydrothermal vents, but also in warm ponds on the Earth's surface. The chemical reactions that may have occurred in this "primordial soup" have now been reproduced in experiments by an international team led by researchers of Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Germany. They even found that one of the
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Study finds evidence of resonant Raman scattering from surface phonons of Cu(110)
Researchers at Johannes Kepler University in Linz have been investigating the physical properties of Cu(110), a surface attained when cutting a single copper crystal in a specific direction, for several years. Their most recent study, featured in Physical Review Letters, provides the first evidence of so-called resonant Raman scattering from the surface of the metal. This phenomenon entails the in
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Searching for matter–antimatter asymmetry with the Higgs boson
Symmetries make the world go round, but so do asymmetries. A case in point is an asymmetry known as charge–parity (CP) asymmetry, which is required to explain why matter vastly outnumbers antimatter in the present-day universe even though both forms of matter should have been created in equal amounts in the Big Bang.
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Zone-by-zone study of Central Asia shows hotter and drier deserts and warmer and wetter mountains due to climate change
A pair of researchers at the University of Nebraska's School of Natural Resources and Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences has conducted a zone-by-zone study of weather in Central Asia to learn more about changing conditions under global warming. In their paper published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, Qui Hu and Zihang Han describe how they separated the region into separate
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How the first biomolecules could have been formed
The chemical precursors of present-day biomolecules could have formed not only in the deep sea at hydrothermal vents, but also in warm ponds on the Earth's surface. The chemical reactions that may have occurred in this "primordial soup" have now been reproduced in experiments by an international team led by researchers of Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Germany. They even found that one of the
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Women in science get less credit on papers and patents
Women in science are less likely than their male counterparts to receive authorship credit for their work, a study shows. Researchers used a large set of administrative data from universities that revealed exactly who was involved with and paid on various research projects. They linked the data to authorship information on patents and articles published in scientific journals to see which people
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Parasites affect salmon in several ways
As we know, our genes can greatly affect our health. We can inherit genetic disorders and defects as well as positive traits from our parents. But our genes are not the only players contributing to our health.
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Decades of climate change in the mountains do not cause a shift in the tree line
Living conditions for forests at high elevations have changed significantly in recent decades as a result of climate change. In many mountain regions, they have become more favorable above the tree line than in lower-lying forested areas. Nevertheless, climate change has not yet led to forests adapting directly to this change and shifting to higher regions. This is confirmed by a new biogeographic
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Decades of climate change in the mountains do not cause a shift in the tree line
Living conditions for forests at high elevations have changed significantly in recent decades as a result of climate change. In many mountain regions, they have become more favorable above the tree line than in lower-lying forested areas. Nevertheless, climate change has not yet led to forests adapting directly to this change and shifting to higher regions. This is confirmed by a new biogeographic
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Antimicrobial natural product active against both MRSA and malaria causing parasite
The development of new active substances against pathogenic bacteria, parasites, fungi and viruses is gaining importance, as established anti-infectives are becoming increasingly ineffective due to the development of resistance. At the Helmholtz Institute for Pharmaceutical Research Saarland (HIPS), a team led by Prof Rolf Müller has optimized an antimicrobial natural product that is active agains
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Antimicrobial natural product active against both MRSA and malaria causing parasite
The development of new active substances against pathogenic bacteria, parasites, fungi and viruses is gaining importance, as established anti-infectives are becoming increasingly ineffective due to the development of resistance. At the Helmholtz Institute for Pharmaceutical Research Saarland (HIPS), a team led by Prof Rolf Müller has optimized an antimicrobial natural product that is active agains
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Substrate binding in the mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier is a step-wise process guiding the structural changes in the transport cycle
Nature Communications, Published online: 23 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31366-5 The mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier transports adenine nucleotides. Here, authors identify the residues involved in substrate binding. One set forms the central substrate binding site and two asparagine/arginine pairs help to guide the substrates during the transport cycle.
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Racial disparities showed up in opioid addiction treatment during COVID
People from racial and ethnic minority groups were less likely to obtain prescriptions to treat opioid addiction during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new study. The findings give further weight to the conclusion that the COVID-19 pandemic more negatively affected minority groups, who face more barriers to health care in general. "Drops in prescribing medication to treat opioid addiction a
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Researchers extend quantum amplification to Floquet systems
Detection of weak signals is a crucial step in the verification of physics hypotheses and making breakthroughs in cutting-edge and fundamental physics research. However, if the signals are too weak to measure, they need enhancement. One attractive way to amplify the signals is quantum amplification. The state-of-the-art quantum amplification techniques still have some limitations because they rely
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X-ray binary GX 3+1 investigated with AstroSat
Using the AstroSat spacecraft, Indian astronomers have investigated a low-mass X-ray binary known as GX 3+1. The study provided more insights into the properties of GX 3+1 and detected a thermonuclear burst from this source. The findings are reported in a paper published June 15 on arXiv.org.
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The impact of social media disclosures on veteran hiring
Asper Assistant Professor Wenxi Pu wants to shine a light on the stigmatizing effects that post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has on veterans who are looking to re-enter the workforce. Alongside co-authors Philip L. Roth, Jason B. Thatcher, Christine Nittrouer, and Mikki Hebl, Dr. Pu examines the role of social media disclosures of PTSD on hiring assessments of veterans in their paper entitled
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Inca-era tomb unearthed beneath home in Peru's capital
500-year old structure, found in working-class area of Lima, thought to contain remains of society elites Scientists have unearthed an Inca-era tomb under a home in the heart of Peru 's capital, Lima, a burial believed to hold remains wrapped in cloth alongside ceramics and fine ornaments. The lead archeologist, Julio Abanto, told Reuters the 500-year-old tomb contained "multiple funerary bundles
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New sunscreen component would last longer
Researchers have created a longer-lasting version of avobenzone, a common ingredient in sunscreen. Avobenzone breaks down under sunlight, which renders it ineffective in a matter of hours. "I have two small kids, and I'm always telling them to reapply sunscreen every hour or two because as avobenzone decomposes, it doesn't do its job anymore," says Marcus Weck, a professor of chemistry at New Yor
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Interlocking rings unlock new material properties
Researchers working with Jonathan Barnes, assistant professor in the Department of Chemistry, have recently shown how molecules with interlocking ring architectures can be functionalized and incorporated into three-dimensional polymer networks and materials. First author Mark Nosiglia, a graduate student in Barnes' lab, led the new work, which builds on the team's previous efforts to streamline th
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HOX epimutations driven by maternal SMCHD1/LRIF1 haploinsufficiency trigger homeotic transformations in genetically wildtype offspring
Nature Communications, Published online: 23 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31185-8 Hox genes are known to control anteroposterior patterning, including the vertebrate spine. Here Xue et al. show that maternal Smchd1 regulates Hox expression in an epigenetic manner, and that wild type offspring from heterozygous mothers show skeletal homeotic transformations as a result of this dysregulation.
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Advancing our understanding of genetic risk factors and potential personalized strategies for pelvic organ prolapse
Nature Communications, Published online: 23 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31188-5 Although pelvic organ prolapse is a common gynecological condition, the genetic component of disease risk is not well known. Here the authors find common genetic variants associated with the disease and present a polygenic risk score to enhance individual risk prediction.
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