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Nyheder2022juni28

The Most Damning January 6 Testimony Yet
Donald Trump knew the protesters marching on the Capitol on January 6 were armed. He knew they could do harm to someone. He wanted to go to the Capitol with them as they marched that afternoon. And he did nothing to stop them as they attacked. These are the stark and rattling takeaways from today's hearing of the House committee investigating former President Trump's attempt to overturn the 2020
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Early 4th of July 2022 Deals You Can Get Right Now
Taking advantage of the sales held during the 4th of July weekend is just one of the ways to celebrate the United States' independence from England. While the holiday isn't happening for a few more days, retailers have already begun discounting some of their best gear, and we've rounded up the top deals for your convenience. What's so impressive about 4th of July deals is the breadth of items tha
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Crypto Startup in Crisis Insists That Its CEO Isn't Trying to Flee the Country
No Worries! In news that we definitely, one hundred percent believe, with absolutely no hesitation: Alex Mashinsky, CEO of anguished crypto lending firm Celsius, did NOT attempt to flee the US amid the ongoing bitcoin crash, as a Celsius spokesperson has clarified to Cointelegraph . The company was moved to speak out after widely-followed crypto analyst and investor Mike Alfred alleged, in a Sund
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Weirdly, It Appears the Flu Vaccine May Protect Against Alzheimer's
In a surprise finding, researchers have found that getting at least one flu shot makes it 40 percent less likely for people over the age of 65 to be diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, up to four years later. While it's still far too early to determine if there are any direct causal links between the common vaccine and neurological health outcomes like Alzheimer's — in other words, we don't know
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Does warfare make societies more complex? Controversial study says yes
War is hell. It breaks apart families, destroys natural resources, and drives humans to commit unspeakable acts of violence. Yet according to a new analysis of human history, war may also prod the evolution of certain kinds of complex societies. The twin developments of agriculture and military technology—especially cavalries and iron weapons—have predicted the rise of empires. "I think they make
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Extreme temperatures in major Latin American cities could be linked to nearly 1 million deaths
In mid-January, the southern tip of South America suffered its worst heat wave in years. In Argentina, temperatures in more than 50 cities rose above 40°C, more than 10°C warmer than the typical average temperature in cities such as Buenos Aires. The scorching heat sparked wildfires, worsened a drought, hurt agriculture, and temporarily collapsed Buenos Aires's electrical power supply. It also ki
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Chemicals in Fairbanks winter air
A chemical compound discovered in 2019 in Fairbanks' wintertime air accounts for a significant portion of the community's fine particulate pollution, according to new research that seeks to better understand the causes and makeup of the dirty air. The finding is the first measurement of how much hydroxymethanesulfonate, or HMS, is in Fairbanks' air.
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Early human ancestors one million years older than earlier thought
Fossils from South African cave are 3.4 to 3.6m years old and walked the Earth at same time as east African relatives The fossils of our earliest ancestors found in South Africa are a million years older than previously thought, meaning they walked the Earth around the same time as their east African relatives like the famous "Lucy", according to new research. The Sterkfontein caves at the Cradle
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U.K. set to abandon Europe's top science funding program, go it alone
A few months ago, Teresa Thurston, a cellular microbiologist at Imperial College London, could not have imagined losing her €1.5 million European research grant. But the United Kingdom's role in the European Union's €95 billion Horizon Europe funding program is now crumbling thanks to lingering Brexit disputes, forcing many U.K. grant winners like Thurston to give up grants they thought they coul
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Chemicals in Fairbanks winter air
A chemical compound discovered in 2019 in Fairbanks' wintertime air accounts for a significant portion of the community's fine particulate pollution, according to new research that seeks to better understand the causes and makeup of the dirty air. The finding is the first measurement of how much hydroxymethanesulfonate, or HMS, is in Fairbanks' air.
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Many pain medications can be used for spine-related pain in older adults
Now a new review study has found acetaminophen is safe in older adults, but non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (ibuprofen) may be more effective for spine-related pain. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatories should be used short-term in lower dose courses with gastrointestinal precaution while corticosteroids show the least evidence for treating nonspecific back pain.
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Highly effective memory B cells localized in the lungs
How can we increase the efficacy of vaccines used to protect against viral respiratory diseases such as influenza and COVID-19? Scientists are opening up new prospects in the field, with the triggering of memory B cells directly in the lungs looking to be a promising avenue. At present, the vaccines are administered intramuscularly and do not trigger the appearance of these cell populations.
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Study Finds That Weed Puts You at Higher Risk for Hospitalization
This one's a downer: getting high might also put you at a higher risk of landing in the emergency room. A study published Monday in the journal BMJ Open Respiratory Research found that cannabis consumers were 22 percent more likely to end up in the ER or be hospitalized than those who didn't smoke weed. The study, which examined the health records of over 35,000 people in Ontario, Canada, control
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Understanding how microbiota thrive in their human hosts
A research team lead by scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Biology, Tübingen, Germany, has now made substantial progress in understanding how gut bacteria succeed in their human hosts on a molecular level. They investigated how bacteria produce inositol lipids, substances vital for many cellular processes in humans and other eukaryotes but hitherto rarely observed in bacteria. The result
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Understanding how microbiota thrive in their human hosts
A research team lead by scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Biology, Tübingen, Germany, has now made substantial progress in understanding how gut bacteria succeed in their human hosts on a molecular level. They investigated how bacteria produce inositol lipids, substances vital for many cellular processes in humans and other eukaryotes but hitherto rarely observed in bacteria. The result
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Republicans and Democrats see their own party's falsehoods as more acceptable
Society recognizes that many politicians lie. In five new studies, researchers have examined how conservative and liberal Americans responded to media reports of politicians' falsehoods. Even accounting for partisan biases in how much people dismissed the reports as fake news and assumed the lies were unintentional, the studies consistently identified partisan evaluations in how much these falseho
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'How You React Is the Only Thing You Can Control'
This is an edition of Up for Debate, a newsletter by Conor Friedersdorf. On Wednesdays, he rounds up timely conversations and solicits reader responses to one thought-provoking question. Later, he publishes some thoughtful replies. Sign up for the newsletter here. In my last newsletter , I asked readers, "What norms should govern jokes in our society? What, if anything, makes a joke harmful? What
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Best Floor-Standing Speakers of 2022
Floor-standing speakers are a versatile addition to your home sound system. They have complete stereo output and can give you a full surround-sound experience. They cover the bass and trebles from high to low and handle everything in between without skipping a beat. If you're serious about your music or home theater, floor-standing speakers are an investment worth making. The kind of music you li
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Robotic Arms Allow Paralyzed Man to Eat Cake With Knife and Fork
A high tech pair of robotic arms allowed a partially paralyzed man to eat with a knife and fork, an impressive demonstration that could allow others with disabilities to regain a significant degree of autonomy. The arms, developed by a team of researchers at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (APL), work by reading its wearer's brain signals using a brain-machine interface (BMI). This i
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Physicists confront the neutron lifetime puzzle
To solve a long-standing puzzle about how long a neutron can "live" outside an atomic nucleus, physicists entertained a wild but testable theory positing the existence of a right-handed version of our left-handed universe. They designed a mind-bending experiment at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory to try to detect a particle that has been speculated but not spotted. If foun
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Role identified for key gene in developmental disability syndrome
A single gene that was previously found to be the driving force in a rare syndrome linked to epilepsy, autism and developmental disability has been identified as a linchpin in the formation of healthy neurons. Researchers say the gene, DDX3X, forms a cellular machine called a helicase, whose job it is to split open the hairpins and cul-de-sacs of RNA so that its code can be read by the protein-mak
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Maternal mortality jumped during COVID-19 pandemic
Researchers compared maternal mortality data from 2018-March 2020, when the pandemic began, to April-December 2020. Overall, they found large increases in maternal death (33%) and late maternal deaths (41%) after March 2020 compared with before the pandemic, and conspicuous increases among Black and Hispanic mothers.
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Participants needed: ASMR links to visual/sound sensitivity,
Hi all, I'm a research psychology master's student. For my dissertation project I am researching ASMR (Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response) and its links to visual sensitivity and migraines. ASMR, also known as 'brain tingles', is a pleasurable sensation activated by triggers such as whispering, delicate hand movements and personal attention. To find out more, follow the link https://youtu.be/Uf
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Study shows chemical's extent in the Fairbanks winter air
A chemical compound discovered in 2019 in the wintertime air of Fairbanks, Alaska accounts for a significant portion of the community's fine particulate pollution, according to new research that seeks to better understand the causes and makeup of the dirty air.
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Jeff Bezos Ditches Plan to Land Rockets on Ship Named for His Mom
Bezos, Son of Jacklyn Blue Origin CEO Jeff Bezos has cancelled plans to transform a secondhand ocean freighter — which he had already renamed after his mother, Jacklyn Bezos — into a seaborne rocket recovery site, CNN Business reports . Bezos, who originally purchased the 600 foot long cargo ship back in 2018 , announced in a very public December 2020 ceremony that the vessel would be converted i
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Huge Cloud of Toxic Yellow Gas Kills 13
Deadly Cloud A massive cloud of yellow gas took the lives of at least 13 people after a crane accidentally dropped a chlorine gas tank onto a ship at a south Jordanian port on Monday. A video shared by state-owned media shows a massive, yellow plume subsuming an entire cargo ship, a horrifying incident that shows the extraordinary danger of common chemicals. #عاجل | فيديو حادث تسرب غاز من صهريج ف
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Seat assignments drive friendships among elementary school children
Most teachers focus on academic considerations when assigning seats. A new study is the first to show that these classroom seat assignments also have important implications for children's friendships and the enormous influence that teachers wield over the interpersonal lives of children. Friendships reflect classroom seat assignments. Students sitting next to or nearby one another were more likely
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Tadpoles undergo surprising number of vision changes when becoming frogs
Tadpoles see well underwater, but what happens when they become frogs and live primarily on land? Researchers, curious about the answer, found the eyes of tadpoles undergo a surprising number of changes. It's already known that tadpoles go through a physical metamorphosis on their way to becoming a frog, but what wasn't known is how their vision adapts at a molecular level across the life stages t
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Strategies beyond recycling to bolster circular economy for solar and battery technologies
In a new comprehensive literature review, researchers have discovered that alternatives to recycling may have untapped potential to build an effective circular economy for solar photovoltaic (PV) and battery technologies. These alternative strategies, such as reducing the use of virgin materials in manufacturing, reusing for new applications, and extending product life spans, may provide new paths
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Scientists identify new brain mechanism involved in impulsive cocaine-seeking in rats
Researchers have found that blocking certain acetylcholine receptors in the lateral habenula (LHb), an area of the brain that balances reward and aversion, made it harder to resist seeking cocaine in a rat model of impulsive behavior. These findings identify a new role for these receptors that may represent a future target for the development of treatments for cocaine use disorder. There are curre
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How France ramped up its capacity to innovate
Nature, Published online: 28 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01803-y President Emmanuel Macron wants France to become a 'start-up nation', fuelled by industry–academia collaborations. How is it faring?
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Best Phone Sanitizers of 2022
By now you've probably read the statistic that your phone's screen is the dirtiest surface you touch every day, but the best phone sanitizers can change that in a matter of minutes. A phone sanitizer works by blasting a surface with UV (Ultraviolet light), which can kill germs (including some bacteria) without the use of a cleaning agent or liquid. In most cases, you place your phone into the san
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Software edits images via human 'mind control'
New software can perform computerized image editing with electric signals from human brains as the only input. "We can make a computer edit images entirely based on thoughts generated by human subjects. The computer has absolutely no prior information about which features it is supposed to edit or how. Nobody has ever done this before," says Tuukka Ruotsalo, an associate professor in the computer
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Seismic noise analysis could help monitor potential hazards in active mine
An active underground mine can be a seismically noisy environment, full of signals generated by heavy machinery at work and induced seismicity. Now, researchers working with data from a longwall coal mine demonstrate a way to extract and separate the signals generated from mining activity from the background seismic noise of the area.
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Microfluidic-based soft robotic prosthetics promise relief for diabetic amputees
Scientists reveal their development of a new type of prosthetic using microfluidics-enabled soft robotics that promises to greatly reduce skin ulcerations and pain in patients who have had an amputation between the ankle and knee. They started with a recent device that uses pneumatic actuators and miniaturized the actuators by designing a microfluidic chip with 10 integrated pneumatic valves to co
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Update noise regulations to protect seals, porpoises
Scientists review recent experiments and find noise regulations may need to be changed to protect porpoises, seals, and other sea-dwelling mammals. Current guidance for seals and porpoises is based on few measurements in a limited frequency range; the guidance is still valid for these frequencies, but investigators found substantial deviations in recent studies of the impact of low frequency noise
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Electrospinning promises major improvements in wearable technology
Researchers examine some of thelatest advances in wearable electronic devices and systems being developed using electrospinning — the fabrication of nanofibers with tunable properties from a polymer base — and showcase the many advantages electrospun materials have over conventional bulk materials. Their high surface-to-volume ratio endows them with enhanced porosity and breathability, which is
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How did vertebrates first evolve jaws?
Scientists reveal clues about the evolutionary origin of jaws by studying the embryonic development of zebrafish — an approach known as 'evo-devo.' Using imaging and cell tracing techniques in zebrafish, researchers who conducted the study conclusively showed that the pseudobranch originates from the same mandibular arch that gives rise to the jaw.
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Electrospinning promises major improvements in wearable technology
Researchers examine some of thelatest advances in wearable electronic devices and systems being developed using electrospinning — the fabrication of nanofibers with tunable properties from a polymer base — and showcase the many advantages electrospun materials have over conventional bulk materials. Their high surface-to-volume ratio endows them with enhanced porosity and breathability, which is
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Help NASA scientists find clouds on Mars
NASA scientists hope to solve a fundamental mystery about Mars' atmosphere, and you can help. They've organized a project called Cloudspotting on Mars that invites the public to identify Martian clouds using the citizen science platform Zooniverse. The information may help researchers figure out why the planet's atmosphere is just 1% as dense as Earth's even though ample evidence suggests the plan
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Who trusts gene-edited foods? New study gauges public acceptance
Through CRISPR and other gene-editing technologies, researchers and developers are poised to bring dozens—if not hundreds—of new products to grocery stores: mushrooms with longer shelf lives, drought-resistant corn and bananas impervious to a fungus threatening the global supply. A few, including a soybean variety that produces a healthier cooking oil, are already being sold commercially in the U.
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Who trusts gene-edited foods? New study gauges public acceptance
Through CRISPR and other gene-editing technologies, researchers and developers are poised to bring dozens—if not hundreds—of new products to grocery stores: mushrooms with longer shelf lives, drought-resistant corn and bananas impervious to a fungus threatening the global supply. A few, including a soybean variety that produces a healthier cooking oil, are already being sold commercially in the U.
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Are pockets of Covid in the gut causing long-term symptoms?
Scientists are investigating whether reservoirs of virus 'hiding' in the body are contributing to long Covid Since the early days of the pandemic it has been clear some people shed genetic material from the virus in their stools for months after catching Covid-19. The findings were initially regarded as a curiosity, but there is mounting evidence to support the idea that persistent pockets of cor
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Bacteria's shapeshifting behavior clue to new treatments for urinary tract infections
Urinary tract infections are both very common and potentially very dangerous. Around 80 per cent of UTIs are caused by uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC), which is increasingly resistant to antibiotics. E. coli-related death due to antimicrobial resistance is the leading cause of bacterial fatalities worldwide. New research examining bacterial behavior over the infection cycle is an important step towar
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Increasing heat waves affect up to half a billion people
Extremely high temperatures have been reported by India and Pakistan in the spring. In a new scientific journal article, researchers paint a gloomy picture for the rest of the century. Heat waves are expected to increase, affecting up to half a billion people in South Asia every year.
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How climate change is affecting extreme weather events around the world
For a long time, climate scientists have struggled to link extreme weather events to climate change. This has changed. The science of weather event attribution is now beginning to show the true costs and impacts that human-caused climate change is having today. This fast-growing body of research aims to disentangle the various drivers of extreme weather events from human-induced climate change and
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Prep yourself for another year of supply chain issues
George Alessandria has some answers about what's causing product shortages, how long problems with the supply chain could last, and why government intervention would be counterproductive. In the summer of 2021, Alessandria , a University of Rochester economist, wanted to buy his 12-year-old son a bicycle. They went to a store—then another, and another, and another—only to find a limited inventory
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New technology turns the whole fish into food
In the meat industry, it's common practice to turn the whole animal into food products. In the fish industry, over half of the weight of the fish ends up as side-streams which never reach our plates. This takes a toll on the environment and is out of step with Swedish food and fisheries strategies. Now, food researchers at Chalmers are introducing a new sorting technology that means we get five go
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Climate change is shrinking and fragmenting salmon habitat
Salmon famously travel hundreds of miles upstream to reach their home waters to spawn, but climate change is shrinking their destination. A new study offers high-resolution details on how Chinook salmon habitats are being lost on Bear Valley Creek, a headwater stream of the Salmon River in central Idaho.
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New technology turns the whole fish into food
In the meat industry, it's common practice to turn the whole animal into food products. In the fish industry, over half of the weight of the fish ends up as side-streams which never reach our plates. This takes a toll on the environment and is out of step with Swedish food and fisheries strategies. Now, food researchers at Chalmers are introducing a new sorting technology that means we get five go
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Human urine-derived stem cells have robust regenerative potential
The Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine (WFIRM) researchers, who were the first to identify that stem cells in human urine have potential for tissue regenerative effects, continue their investigation into the power of these cells. In their latest published study, they focus on how telomerase activity affects the regenerative potential of these and other types of stem cells.
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NASA Astronauts Harvest Delicious Space Vegetables, Sans Soil
Interstellar Salad Earthly space travelers have been trying to perfect orbital botany for a while now. Stable, sustainable off world agricultural practices are needed to make longer term exploration missions possible, and though the International Space Station (ISS) has seen a few successful low-orbit gardening endeavors, all have used some sort of soil or soil-replacing growth media. Now, thanks
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Human urine-derived stem cells have robust regenerative potential
The Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine (WFIRM) researchers, who were the first to identify that stem cells in human urine have potential for tissue regenerative effects, continue their investigation into the power of these cells. In their latest published study, they focus on how telomerase activity affects the regenerative potential of these and other types of stem cells.
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New study investigates the microbiomes of dogs around the world
Although the microbiome—the collection of all microbes that live in the body—in the fecal matter of dogs has been investigated extensively, those studies have mostly been limited to domesticated dogs. In a new study, researchers have sampled the fecal microbiomes across diverse geographical populations to better understand what they look like around the world.
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Valleytronics researchers fabricate novel 2D material enjoying long-life excitons
The emerging field of valleytronics, which exploits the momentum preference of excited electrons, or excitons, in a variety of optoelectronic devices, is closely tied to the fabrication of novel 2D materials just atoms thick. This month, a group of valleytronics researchers from Central South University in Changsha, China, have developed one such 2D material that significantly enhances the utility
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Understanding earthquakes triggered by wastewater injection
Since 2009, many central U.S. residents have faced increasing earthquake activity. Research has suggested that these tremors are linked to wastewater injection into deep wells by oil and gas companies. However, the precise dynamics of these earthquakes are still being revealed.
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New study investigates the microbiomes of dogs around the world
Although the microbiome—the collection of all microbes that live in the body—in the fecal matter of dogs has been investigated extensively, those studies have mostly been limited to domesticated dogs. In a new study, researchers have sampled the fecal microbiomes across diverse geographical populations to better understand what they look like around the world.
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Materials with nanoscale components will change what's possible
In the 24 years I've worked as a materials scientist, I've always been inspired by hierarchical patterns found in nature that repeat all the way down to the molecular level. Such patterns induce remarkable properties—they strengthen our bones without making them heavy, give butterfly wings their color, and make a spiderweb silk both durable and pliant. What if we could engineer such properties di
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AI's progress isn't the same as creating human intelligence in machines
The term "artificial intelligence" really has two meanings. AI refers both to the fundamental scientific quest to build human intelligence into computers and to the work of modeling massive amounts of data. These two endeavors are very different, both in their ambitions and in the amount of progress they have made in recent years. Scientific AI, the quest to both construct and understand human-le
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Rewriting what we thought was possible in biotech
Have you heard? The tech in biotech is nailing it. Machine learning (ML) and artificial intelligence (AI) can now figure out who has a condition (perhaps better than your doctor can), establish a medical checklist to diagnose you, and help target likely treatments. AI models can help design drugs or find a new purpose for existing ones. At home, just ask your AI assistant—Siri, Alexa, Cortana, or
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Computers will be transformed by alternative materials and approaches—maybe sooner than you think
In less than a century, computing has transformed our society and helped spur countless innovations. We now carry in our back pockets computers that we could only have dreamed of a few decades ago. Machine-learning systems can analyze scenes and drive vehicles. And we can craft extraordinarily accurate representations of the real world—models that can be used to design nuclear reactors, simulate
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The world will need dozens of breakthrough climate technologies in the next decade
We're living in a pivotal decade. By 2030, global emissions must fall by half, mostly through massive deployment of commercial solutions such as wind turbines, solar panels, and electric vehicles. But emerging climate technologies must come to market during this decade too, even if they don't make much of a dent in emissions right away. The International Energy Agency forecasts that roughly half
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Ten Years of CRISPR
This month marks ten years since CRISPR-Cas9 was repurposed as a gene editing system, so we're looking back at what has been accomplished in a decade of CRISPR editing.
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Best DJ Controllers for Beginners in 2022
DJs are a staple at clubs, parties, and special events like wedding receptions, and controllers help them bring the tunes. They set up in a corner or an out-of-the-way place and perch themselves behind an audio system delivering grooves that make people want to dance. The difference between a good DJ and a great one is how they mix tracks. It's easy to play one song after another, but a great DJ
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Elon Musk Is Missing
Where's Musko? It's been an entire week since Tesla CEO Elon Musk has last tweeted. While that might be normal for many executives, it's largely uncharacteristic for the billionaire executive, who typically tweets almost constantly, offering both wanted and unwanted opinions on practically any matter . It also happens to be Musk's 51st birthday today, coinciding with him passing the 100 million T
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Scientists Puzzled by Star That Exploded in Supernova But Somehow Survived
Maybe there is something to the legend of the phoenix. Scientists are perplexed by a mysterious star, believed to have been completely annihilated in a powerful supernova — only to be found still alive, burning brighter than ever before. According to a press release , the undead star in question was believed to have met its demise in a supernova back in 2012. And while there have been some cases
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Seismic noise analysis could help monitor potential hazards in active mines
An active underground mine can be a seismically noisy environment, full of signals generated by heavy machinery at work and induced seismicity. Now, researchers working with data from a longwall coal mine demonstrate a way to extract and separate the signals generated from mining activity from the background seismic noise of the area.
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Improving hydrogen peroxide production through sustainable photocatalysis
Hydrogen peroxide is used in many industries for a variety of purposes, including bleaching, sewage treatment, sterilization, and even as rocket fuel. Because hydrogen peroxide's byproduct is water, it has been lauded as a "green," environmentally friendly chemical, but a closer look at hydrogen peroxide's production process reveals a more complicated story. Problems like the amount of energy used
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Machine learning could find new uses for old drugs
A new machine learning method to model gene expression levels might improve the identification of genes that cause human diseases, according to a new study. Through information from the three-dimensional (3D) structure of genomes and epigenetics—how genes and environment jointly influence diseases—the investigators were able to identify genes associated with complex traits and diseases. These ide
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Metasurfaces Open the Door to Telekinesis and Telepathy With Technology
Stranger Things fans will be familiar with this scene: Eleven, a girl with telekinetic powers, stares intently at a Coke can. Without physically touching the can, she completely crushes it using her mind alone. Changing objects with the mind has long been a trope in science fiction. Now, thanks to metasurfaces, two studies just showed that it's potentially possible. Metamaterials are artificial c
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Novel catalyst radically enhances rate of conversion of carbon dioxide into solar fuels
Carbon dioxide or CO2 can potentially be used as a feedstock to be converted into carbon-neutral "solar fuels" that store energy from the sun. But for them to be competitive with fossil fuels, the chemical reaction that performs this conversion needs much more efficient catalysts. Researchers have recently come up with a photocatalyst structure involving isolated single atoms of copper in a polyme
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The Conservative Women Radicalizing Amish Literature
On a chilly morning this past January, the writer Lucinda J. Kinsinger strapped her baby daughter into her car seat and drove two-plus hours from her home in rural Oakland, Maryland, to Waynesboro, Pennsylvania. She was headed to a day-long women writers' gathering at a private residence, where the atmosphere ended up being part networking event, part craft workshop, part casual mom hang (a trio
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Exploring nature's own assembly line
Today the raw ingredients for virtually all industrial products, ranging from medicines to car tires, come from non-renewable chemical feedstocks. They are produced in fossil fuel refineries that emit greenhouse gases, such as carbon dioxide. However, future chemical factories might invert this dynamic, manufacturing some compounds using plants that naturally construct complex chemicals by drawing
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Exploring nature's own assembly line
Today the raw ingredients for virtually all industrial products, ranging from medicines to car tires, come from non-renewable chemical feedstocks. They are produced in fossil fuel refineries that emit greenhouse gases, such as carbon dioxide. However, future chemical factories might invert this dynamic, manufacturing some compounds using plants that naturally construct complex chemicals by drawing
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California's Dixie Fire shows impact of legacy effects, prescribed burns
The 2021 Dixie Fire burned over nearly 1 million acres in California and cost $637 million to suppress, making it the largest and most expensive wildfire to contain in state history. Fire history largely determined how severely the wildfire burned, and low-severity fire treatments had the largest impact on reducing the worst effects of the fire, according to a Penn State-led research team.
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Tesla Demanded Workers Come Back to Office, Then Realized It Didn't Have Enough Desks
Small Desk Energy Tesla CEO Elon Musk made a big deal earlier this month about forcing employees to return to work — or else face the consequences — shortly before announcing he had a "super bad feeling" about the economy and firing ten percent of the company's workforce. But in spite of that bluster, the logistics of actually getting workers back on site is proving tricky. The company's offices
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Update noise regulations to protect seals, porpoises: study
Noise produced by pile drivers building offshore wind turbines can damage the hearing of porpoises, seals, and other marine life. Regulations are in place, but guidance on this difficult topic requires regular revisits to incorporate results from new experiments.
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School-based intervention aims to reduce behavioral health impact for LGBTQ+ youth
An estimated 83% of the 20 million LGBTQ+ people in the United States have experienced abuse or significant adverse childhood experiences (ACE) that have significantly impacted their mental health as adults compared to their heteronormative peers. This is associated with significantly higher rates of depression, anxiety, substance abuse and suicidal ideation and attempt, making the social and emot
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Why I'm Talking About My Abortion
I had an abortion when I was 26 years old. I was not raped. I wasn't the victim of incest. I was not in the midst of a life-threatening medical emergency. I simply had no desire to give birth to a child. I've never shared my abortion story publicly until now. I describe this time in my life in detail in my forthcoming memoir, Uphill , which will be released in October . I know that I'm likely to
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An invitation to reexamine your familiar world | Gillian Tett
Before entering the world of financial journalism, Gillian Tett was a cultural anthropologist who studied how the past influences our present thoughts and behaviors. In an entertaining talk, she shows how you can use an anthropological outlook to see the world with fresh eyes and welcome new and different cultural truths into your life.
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Screen both parents for depression past baby's first year
Screening both mothers and fathers for depression beyond their child's first birthday in pediatric offices could identify families in need of mental health and other critical resources, according to new research. "Pediatric professionals can play an important role in detecting parental depression," says lead author Ava Marie Hunt, who performed the research while a student at Rutgers Robert Wood
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Exploiting symmetries: Speeding up the computational study of solid solutions
Symmetry is a prevalent feature of nature at all scales. For example, our naked eyes can easily identify symmetries in the bodily shape of countless organisms. Symmetry is also very important in the fields of physics and chemistry, especially in the microscopic realm of atoms and molecules. Crystals, which are highly ordered materials, can even have multiple types of symmetry at the same time, suc
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Exotic carbon microcrystals in meteorite dust
Unusually shaped microcrystals formed of pure, graphite-like carbon were discovered in the dust of the 21st-century's largest meteorite. They are likely to have grown in layers from complex carbon nuclei such as fullerene.
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Insights into Cenozoic environmental change and ecosystem evolution
The growth of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP) during the Cenozoic drove dramatic climate and environmental change in this region. However, there has been a limited amount of research on long-term climate change on QTP. Therefore, the long-term paleoclimatic evolution of the Tibetan Plateau and its main driving mechanisms are poorly understood.
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Climate protection: CO2 turned into methanol
For reasons of climate protection, carbon dioxide must not be released into the atmosphere. Wherever the formation of carbon dioxide cannot be prevented, it should be captured and converted into other substances.
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Gåtfulla asteroider kan bära på tunga skatter
Hur har livet uppstått? Vad händer vid en planets födelse? Att besöka en asteroid kan ge svar på en mängd existentiella frågor. Och mer praktiska. Som den här: finns det verkligen en metallskatt vid slutet av den långa rymdresan? Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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Optimera din digitala läsning i sommar
Kanske ser du fram emot att spendera semestern läsande på surfplattan i hängmattan, eller att ta dig an en podcast du blivit tipsad om. Men att läsa digitalt kräver mer av dig än du kan tro. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
7h
Determining the structure of small RNAs could inform future therapeutics
A new method allows researchers to determine the structure and abundance of "transfer RNAs" (tRNA)—small, highly structured and chemically modified RNAs involved in protein production—in living cells. Misfolding of tRNAs has been linked to human diseases ranging from cancer to type 2 diabetes and neurological disorders. The new method, which also shows how tRNA structure can change when the cells
7h
A pro-China online influence campaign is targeting the rare-earths industry
An online influence campaign carried out by a group that promotes China's political interests is targeting Western companies that mine and process rare-earth elements, according to a new report from cybersecurity firm Mandiant. The campaign, which is playing out in Facebook groups and micro-targeted tweets, is trying to stoke environmentalist protests against the companies in the US. The operatio
7h
Increasing heat waves affect up to half a billion people
Climate change is a reality and extremely high temperatures have been reported by India and Pakistan in the spring. In a new scientific journal article, researchers from the University of Gothenburg, amongst others, paint a gloomy picture for the rest of the century. Heat waves are expected to increase, affecting up to half a billion people every year. In turn, they can lead to food shortages, dea
7h
Determining the structure of small RNAs could inform future therapeutics
A new method allows researchers to determine the structure and abundance of "transfer RNAs" (tRNA)—small, highly structured and chemically modified RNAs involved in protein production—in living cells. Misfolding of tRNAs has been linked to human diseases ranging from cancer to type 2 diabetes and neurological disorders. The new method, which also shows how tRNA structure can change when the cells
7h
Protein Blobs Linked to Alzheimer's Affect Aging in All Cells
The aging brains of people with Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and other neurodegenerative diseases are suffused with telltale aggregates of proteins in or around their neurons. How these protein clumps might be harming the neurons is often still unclear, but they are hallmarks of the conditions — and until now, they have been associated almost exclusively with elderly brains. But a recent study by a..
8h
Unprecedented drought conditions projected to be more frequent and consecutive in certain regions
A new study presents the future periods for which aberrant drought conditions will become more frequent, thereby creating a new normal. The projected warming impacts show significant regional disparities in their intensity and the pace of their growth over time. In approximately 30–50 years, unprecedented drought conditions are projected to be more frequent and consecutive in certain regions even
8h
COVID was twice as deadly in poorer countries
Nature, Published online: 28 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01767-z Study looking at death rates early in the pandemic confirms that low-income nations have born the brunt of the global disaster.
8h
Final Race! Ryan Martin Challenged for Number 1 Spot | Street Outlaws: America's List
Stream Street Outlaws: America's List on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/street-outlaws-americas-list #StreetOutlaws #StreetRacing #Discovery Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter:
8h
Protect Yourself On The Road or Trail
Bicycle helmets are not only an extremely practical accessory to wear while riding a bike, motorcycle, or scooter, they're required by law in some places. Preventable fatal bike accidents have increased by 44 percent since 2010 to a staggering 1,260 in 2020, according to the National Safety Council . A helmet can help reduce your odds of becoming a statistic. The good thing is that helmets have g
8h
Virus discovery offers clues to the start of complex life
For the first time, researchers have found viruses infecting a group of microbes that may include the ancestors of all complex life. The discovery offers tantalizing clues about the origins of complex life and suggests new directions for exploring the hypothesis that viruses were essential to the evolution of humans and other complex life forms. There is a well-supported hypothesis that all compl
8h
Human-robot-AI teamwork accelerates regenerative medicine
A joint research group led by Genki Kanda at the RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research (BDR) has developed a robotic artificial intelligence (AI) system for autonomously determining the optimal conditions for growing replacement retina layers necessary for vision. The AI controlled a trial and error process spanning 200 million possible conditions that succeeded in improving cell culture r
8h
Human-robot-AI teamwork accelerates regenerative medicine
A joint research group led by Genki Kanda at the RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research (BDR) has developed a robotic artificial intelligence (AI) system for autonomously determining the optimal conditions for growing replacement retina layers necessary for vision. The AI controlled a trial and error process spanning 200 million possible conditions that succeeded in improving cell culture r
8h
New kirigami-inspired models predict how new metamaterials behave
A traditional paper crane is a feat of artistry. Every fold in origami leads to the transformation of a single square sheet of paper into a bird, a dragon, or a flower. Origami discourages gluing, marking or cutting the paper, but in the art of kirigami, strategically placed cuts can transform the shape of the paper even further, creating complex structures from simple slits. A well-known example
8h
A suite of models for visual perception and invariant object recognition
Whiskeye, the rodent-inspired robot capable of exploring the world by using two camera eyes and 24 artificial whiskers arranged in a mechanical nose, has now developed a cognitive model that is also inspired by organic brains. Two HBP focus areas (Work Package 2, 'Networks underlying brain cognition and consciousness' and Work Package 3, 'Adaptive networks for cognitive architectures: from advanc
8h
A sanitizer in the galactic center region
An international group of researchers led by Arnaud Belloche (MPIfR, Bonn, Germany) reports the first identification of iso-propanol in interstellar space, a substance which is used as a sanitizer on Earth. Iso-propanol is the largest alcohol detected so far, demonstrating the increasing complexity of members of one of the most abundant classes of molecule that can be found in space. The identific
8h
Long-term study suggests climate-friendly practices could increase crop yields and improve farm ecosystems
An international team of researchers conducting a long-term study has found that climate-friendly farming practices could lead to higher crop yields, reduced costs and improved local ecosystems. In their paper published in the journal Nature Sustainability, the group describes 30 long-running farming experiments designed to improve farming practices in Europe and Africa.
9h
Soft 'NeuroString' could probe brain and gut
A new invention called "NeuroString" is a soft implantable probe that lets researchers study the chemistry of brain and gut health. "The mainstream way people are trying to understand the brain is to read and record electric signals," says Jinxing Li, the paper's first author and an assistant professor in Michigan State University's College of Engineering. "But chemical signals play just as signi
9h
Gaia could detect free-floating black holes passing near stars in the Milky Way
The thing with black holes is they're hard to see. Typically we can only detect their presence when we can detect their gravitational pull. And if there are rogue black holes simply traveling throughout the galaxy and not tied to another luminous astronomical, it would be fiendishly hard to detect them. But now we have a new potential data set to do so.
9h
Bioengineering technology keeps track of living cells and tissues
Cells in complex organisms undergo frequent changes, and researchers have struggled to monitor these changes and create a comprehensive profile for living cells and tissues. Historically researchers have been limited to only 3-5 markers due to spectral overlaps in fluorescence microscopy, an essential tool required for imaging cells. With only this small handful of markers, it is difficult to moni
9h
Research investigates variability of the ultraluminous X-ray source NGC 925 ULX-3
Astronomers from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) and elsewhere have observed an ultraluminous X-ray source known as NGC 925 ULX-3 using NASA's Swift and NuSTAR spacecraft, as well as ESA's XMM-Newton satellite. Results of this observational campaign, published June 16 on arXiv.org, deliver important insights into variability behavior of this source.
9h
New method to study cellular behavior using smart materials
Scientists from 4D-BIOMAP, an ERC research project at the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M), have developed a new experimental method, based on magneto-active polymers, to study cellular behavior. These compounds, which consist of a polymeric matrix (e.g., an elastomer) containing magnetic particles (e.g., iron), mechanically react by changing their shape and stiffness. This system could be
9h
Getting more information by measuring faster and averaging less
For signals barely larger than the noise in a system, measurement is generally a trade-off between speed and precision. Averaging over several measurements reduces the influence of noise but takes (a lot of) time. That could change with a revolutionary new measurement method, devised by AMOLF researchers Kevin Peters and Said Rodriguez. Their idea is based on a non-linear optical resonator, explai
9h
Lava ejected during Cumbre Vieja eruption was unusually fluid
The Cumbre Vieja eruption in 2021 was the most protracted and disruptive volcanic eruption in the recent history of the Canary Island of La Palma. More than 1,600 structures, including about 1,300 residential buildings, were destroyed or damaged. Pictures of lava flowing through settlements and out into the sea were seen around the world. Researchers at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in
9h
Bioengineering technology keeps track of living cells and tissues
Cells in complex organisms undergo frequent changes, and researchers have struggled to monitor these changes and create a comprehensive profile for living cells and tissues. Historically researchers have been limited to only 3-5 markers due to spectral overlaps in fluorescence microscopy, an essential tool required for imaging cells. With only this small handful of markers, it is difficult to moni
9h
New method to study cellular behavior using smart materials
Scientists from 4D-BIOMAP, an ERC research project at the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M), have developed a new experimental method, based on magneto-active polymers, to study cellular behavior. These compounds, which consist of a polymeric matrix (e.g., an elastomer) containing magnetic particles (e.g., iron), mechanically react by changing their shape and stiffness. This system could be
9h
Colonizing sea urchins in the Mediterranean can withstand hot, acidic seas
A species of sea urchin in the Mediterranean will be able to live in our future climate-changed seas — while other animals will die as waters become hotter and more acidic. Added to this, urchins generally are known to destroy ecosystems as their numbers swell (largely due to rising sea temperatures) and are currently doing so worldwide.
9h
Vegetation declining on elephants' migration routes in Namibia
A study based on extensive remote sensing data indicates that vegetation near the migration routes of elephants in Namibia has decreased. Human habitation and fences as well as artificial obstacles of other kinds affect the movements of wild animals, helping to accelerate the decline in vegetation.
9h
Bacteria species found in glacial ice could pose disease risk as glaciers melt from global warming
A team of researchers at the Chinese Academy of Sciences has found nearly 1,000 species of bacteria in snow and ice samples collected from Tibetan glaciers. In their paper published in the journal Nature Biotechnology, the group describes collecting and studying the bacteria and their concerns about the spread of disease as the glaciers melt.
9h
The Download: Big Tech's post-Roe silence, and the US EV charging landscape
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. Big Tech remains silent on questions about data privacy in a post-Roe world In the days after the US Supreme Court overturned the constitutional right to abortion, tech companies rushed to show their support for employees living in states where the procedure i
9h
The 10-Year-Old Tweet That Still Defines the Internet
This article was featured in One Story to Read Today, a newsletter in which our editors recommend a single must-read from The Atlantic , Monday through Friday. Sign up for it here. Though everybody complains about Twitter, no one can deny that it has brought some amazing phrases into our lives—things we can't imagine having read in any other place, or at any other time in history. Near the top of
10h
Simultaneous extreme weather created dangerous cascades in US
Intense heat in the southwestern United States broke records last summer partly because it hit in tandem with an unusually severe drought, finds a new Johns Hopkins study measuring for the first time how the two extreme weather events dangerously interacted in real time.
10h
How did vertebrates first evolve jaws?
Five-hundred million years ago, it was relatively safe to go back in the water. That's because creatures of the deep had not yet evolved jaws. In a new pair of studies in eLife and Development, scientists reveal clues about the origin of this thrilling evolutionary innovation in vertebrates.
10h
When Is A Fetus A Person?
Often, contentious political and social questions have a scientific question in the middle of them. Resolving the scientific question will not always resolve the political ones, but at least it can properly inform the debate. The recent overturning of Roe v Wade has supercharged the debate about when human life begins. It may seem, then, that what science has to say about this question is importa
10h
Arbejdsgruppe til Heunicke og regeringen: Husk høreområdet i ny digitaliseringsstrategi
Høreapparatsbehandling og hørerehabilitering er et af de sundhedsområder, hvor der er størst behov og potentiale for digitale løsninger. Alligevel omtales høreområdet ikke i regeringens nye digitaliseringsstrategi. Hvis vi skal imødegå den demografiske udfordring, kræver det et fokus på og prioritering af digitale løsninger – inddragelse af høreområdet i digitaliseringsstrategien vil være et vigti
11h
Lessons From 40 Men in Egalitarian Relationships
One of the exasperating features of everyday gender inequality is that couples can be aware of imbalances in doing housework, state a dislike of them, and yet fall right into them anyway. The discrepancy shows up most obviously in the amount of time men and women spend on tasks such as cleaning and caregiving, including when both work full-time . Yet even many couples who pride themselves on a fa
11h
Viruses Extend Their Lives by Hitching a Ride On Microplastics
(Photo: Oregon State University) Humankind has spent a lot of time worrying about microplastics and virus transmission as of late, and for good reason. Now the two concerns have converged to create a problem only this decade could devise: microplastic-riding viruses. A new study out of the United Kingdom has found that viruses are capable of catching a ride on microplastics in bodies of freshwate
11h
How green steel made with electricity could clean up a dirty industry
When you climb up a set of stairs to look over Boston Metal 's newest project, it becomes clear just how big a job it is to cut steel's climate impact. The impressive new installation is a pilot reactor that the startup will use to make emissions-free steel. It's about the size of a school bus, set down into the floor of the research facility; the stairs, with freshly painted yellow railings, lea
12h
Daily briefing: See the largest bacterium ever discovered
Nature, Published online: 24 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01784-y A newly discovered bacterium is up to a centimetre long. Plus, monkeypox insights from Africa and the public-health consequences of a US Supreme Court ruling on Roe v. Wade.
12h
Irish Unity Is Inevitable. We Should Get on Board.
I n July 1996, I climbed onto my muddy pony in our small farm in County Armagh and headed down the road. It was a rare sunny and warm day in Northern Ireland. I didn't get far before I was blocked by a large tree that had been felled over my path. A farmer living nearby had taken his chainsaw and cut it down, closing the rural road in protest. That summer, men fiercely attached to unity with Brit
12h
A Rescue Package for Joe Biden
Inflation is surging, a recession is looming, the culture war is raging, Republican gains in Congress are surely coming, and Joe Biden's poll numbers are slumping. The Biden presidency began with Plan A: campaign from the center, govern from the left. That plan has now exhausted whatever potential it had. On his present course, President Biden is in danger of being remembered as the intermission
12h
Valve Designer Warns Against Dangerous Steam Deck Mod
Valve has fiddled with its own gaming hardware over the years, but neither the Steam Boxes, nor the Steam Controller, nor the Index VR headset have garnered the same praise as the Steam Deck. Even in the era of the Nintendo Switch, the Steam Deck is back-ordered into next year. One of the oft-cited advantages of the Deck is its high repairability and modding potential. However, one of its designe
12h
Touren baner vejen for dansk eksporteventyr
Når verdens største cykelløb Tour de France kommer til Danmark på fredag, baner cyklerne vejen for en mindst lige så vigtig event med stort potentiale for dansk life science-eksport: Tour de Health. Danske sundhedsløsninger har for længst erobret den gule førertrøje, og det er en position, som vi skal sikre, at Danmark bevarer og styrker.
12h
The U.S. only has 6,000 fast charging stations for EVs. Here's where they all are.
The United States has around 150,000 fuel stations to refill its fleet of fossil-fuel-burning vehicles. Despite the rapid growth of all-electric vehicles in America—400,000 of them were sold in 2021 , up from barely 10,000 in 2012 —the country has only 6,000 DC fast electric charging stations , the kind that can rapidly juice up a battery-powered car. (It has more than 48,000 charging stations of
12h
Sabrent's New Rocket 4 Plus Destroyer 2 Delivers 64TB of PCIe 4.0 Storage
Right now the sweet spot for price and performance with SSDs is 1TB, as these drives are fast and affordable. That's clearly not enough storage for some people though. ( Definitely not – Ed) To answer the needs of those with projects as large as their bank accounts, Sabrent has announced the Rocket 4 Plus Destroyer 2. It's the second iteration of the company's add-in PCIe hardware RAID solution.
13h
Big Tech remains silent on questions about data privacy in a post-Roe world
In the hours and days after the US Supreme Court announced its ruling overturning the constitutional right to abortion, tech companies rushed to show their support for employees living in states where the procedure is now outlawed. Meta, Facebook's parent company, promised to pay expenses for staffers who need to travel out of their home state for an abortion. Alphabet, Google's parent company, t
13h
In Permafrost Thaw, Scientists Seek to Understand Radon Risk
An estimated 3.3 million people live on permafrost that will have completely melted away by 2050. Not all of these areas are prone to radon, but parts of Canada, Alaska, Greenland and Russia could be at risk. Permafrost layers are complex and irregular, however, and field measurements are lacking.
14h
Learning representations of chromatin contacts using a recurrent neural network identifies genomic drivers of conformation
Nature Communications, Published online: 28 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31337-w Despite the availability of chromatin conformation capture experiments, discerning the relationship between the 1D genome and 3D conformation remains a challenge. Here, the authors propose a method that produces low-dimensional latent representations that summarize intra-chromosomal Hi-C contacts.
14h
How to inoculate yourself against misinformation
This is a re-post from the Thinking is Power website maintained by Melanie Trecek-King where she regularly writes about many aspects of critical thinking in an effort to provide accessible and engaging critical thinking information to the general public. Please see this overview to find links to other reposts from Thinking is Power. We are drowning in misinformation. From celebrities selling thei
14h
Climate change role clear in many extreme events but social factors also key, study finds
Professor says link to extreme weather sometimes overestimated but climate costs underestimated Climate change is to blame for the majority of the heatwaves being recorded around the planet but the relation to other extreme events and their impacts on society is less clear, according to a study. "I think on the one hand we overestimate climate change because it's now quite common that every time
15h
Network-based machine learning approach to predict immunotherapy response in cancer patients
Nature Communications, Published online: 28 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31535-6 Identifying biomarkers for response to immunotherapy in cancer remains challenging. Here, the authors develop an approach based on network biology and machine learning -NetBio- to identify molecular biomarkers of response to immunotherapy across different cancer types and cohorts.
15h
Lsm7 phase-separated condensates trigger stress granule formation
Nature Communications, Published online: 28 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31282-8 Stress granules are non-membranous organelles connected to stress responses and age-related disease. Here, the authors identify a conserved yeast protein, Lsm7, that facilitates stress granule formation through dynamic liquid-liquid phase separation condensates upon 2-deoxy-D-glucose-induced stress.
16h
Structural basis for mitoguardin-2 mediated lipid transport at ER-mitochondrial membrane contact sites
Nature Communications, Published online: 28 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31462-6 The ER-mitochondria contact sites are crucial for exchanging phospholipids. Here, Kim et al. present crystal structures of mitoguardin-2 (MIGA2) which reveal that MIGA2 directly binds phospholipids and transfers them between the ER and mitochondria.
16h
Do we need a new theory of evolution?
A new wave of scientists argues that mainstream evolutionary theory needs an urgent overhaul. Their opponents have dismissed them as misguided careerists – and the conflict may determine the future of biology Strange as it sounds, scientists still do not know the answers to some of the most basic questions about how life on Earth evolved. Take eyes, for instance. Where do they come from, exactly?
17h
Immunogenicity and reactogenicity of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines BNT162b2 and CoronaVac in healthy adolescents
Nature Communications, Published online: 28 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31485-z There are adverse events associated with COVID-19 vaccines, such as myocarditis for adolescents following receipt of SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccines. Here the authors compare the immunogenicity and reactogenicity of two widely available SARS-CoV-2 vaccines (BNT162b2, an mRNA vaccine, and CoronaVac, a whole-virus inacti
17h
Shitcoins: are pointless cryptocurrencies a scam or a gamble?
When the Guardian's UK technology editor Alex Hern was contacted on Twitter to ask if he was involved in a new cryptocurrency called Tsuka, he assumed they just wanted him to buy it. He ignored the messages. But soon after Alex realised that, without knowing it, he was already involved. What happened next reveals a lot about the strange world of 'shitcoins' – cryptocurrencies with no reason for ex
18h
Shitcoins: are pointless cryptocurrencies a scam or a gamble? – podcast
When the Guardian's UK technology editor Alex Hern was contacted on Twitter to ask if he was involved in a new cryptocurrency called Tsuka, he assumed they just wanted him to buy it. He ignored the messages. But soon after Alex realised that, without knowing it, he was already involved. What happened next reveals a lot about the strange world of 'shitcoins' – cryptocurrencies with no reason for e
18h
Free will is not a mystery, to me.
We're pre-programmed to keep ourselves alive, therefor – to adapt to our environment. Above all, we will make sure we're alive . Any choice or decision beyond that, is free for us to explore. As long as the choice doesn't interfere with our survival, we can do what we want. What we want to do, is very much determined by our genetics and our upbringing, reducing the overall pie chart of 'what this
19h
New way in which T cells learn to tell friend from foe
Researchers identify new mechanism that teaches immune cells-in-training to spare the body's own tissues while attacking pathogens. As part of this early education, specialized thymus cells 'pose' as different tissues, teaching the immune system how to recognize both friend and foe. Immune cells that mistakenly react to the body's own proteins are eliminated or reassigned to other jobs. The findin
22h
Byte-Sized Review: LG CineBeam Is a Premiere-Worthy But Pricey Home Projector
Something happened a couple of years back (won't say what), that made going to the movie theater an incredibly daunting prospect. Luckily, this coincided with some serious advancements in home projector technology, including the LG CineBeam. Instead of casting its image from a distance, the projector image shoots up, which makes home projection far easier than it's ever been before. Here's a thor
23h
Best Drones Under $100 in 2022
The best drones for under $100 are ideal for beginners looking to try flying a drone for the first time or parents purchasing a drone as a gift for their child. With their low price and features designed to make them easy to fly, these drones are often the best choice for learning to fly a drone before advancing to more complex and pricier models. In fact, many drones at this price point have but
23h
Roe Was Flawed. Dobbs Is Worse.
This is an edition of The Atlantic Daily, a newsletter that guides you through the biggest stories of the day, helps you discover new ideas, and recommends the best in culture. Sign up for it here . I'm a conservative (or what used to be called a conservative) who always thought Roe v. Wade was the product of judicial activism. But overturning it is even worse. But first, here's more from The Atl
23h
Johnson issues open invitation to Russian scientists 'dismayed by Putin's violence'
Prime minister asks disaffected Russian academics to defect to the UK alongside Ukrainian colleagues Russia-Ukraine war: latest updates Boris Johnson has issued an open invitation for disaffected Russian scientists to defect to the UK, as he used the G7 summit to argue that allowing Russia to prevail in Ukraine would usher in a highly damaging era of global instability. As part of an expansion to
1d
Top predators could 'trap' themselves trying to adapt to climate change
Over a 30-year period, African wild dogs shifted their average birthing dates later by 22 days, an adaptation that allowed them to match the birth of new litters with the coolest temperatures in early winter. But as a result of this significant shift, fewer pups survived their most vulnerable period because temperatures during their critical post-birth 'denning period' increased over the same time
1d
Structural racism drives higher COVID-19 death rates in Louisiana, study finds
Higher COVID-19 mortality rates among Black communities in Louisiana can be linked to pervasive health vulnerabilities associated with racism, including the location of many Black neighborhoods near industrial facilities and the higher likelihood among Black families of being uninsured, researchers found. The team identified the spatial distribution of social and environmental stressors across Lou
1d
Fossils in the 'Cradle of Humankind' may be more than a million years older than previously thought
For decades, scientists have studied these fossils of early human ancestors and their long-lost relatives. Now, a dating method developed by geologists just pushed the age of some of these fossils found at the site of Sterkfontein Caves back more than a million years. This would make them older than Dinkinesh, also called Lucy, the world's most famous Australopithecus fossil.
1d
Southern resident killer whales not getting enough to eat since 2018
The endangered southern resident killer whale population isn't getting enough to eat, and hasn't been since 2018, a new study has determined. The animals have been in an energy deficit, averaged across spring, summer and fall, for six of the last 40 years — meaning the energy they get from food is less than what they expend. Three of those six years came in the most recent years of the study, 201
1d
Amazon landscape change study highlights ecological harms and opportunities for action
A major study into landscape changes in the Brazilian Amazon sheds new light on the many environmental threats the biome faces — but also offers encouraging opportunities for ecological sustainability in the world's most biodiverse tropical forest. The study's findings are critical because as the Amazon moves closer towards a 'tipping point', they provide a robust evidence base to inform urgently
1d
Single-atom tractor beams power chemical catalysis
By trapping light into tiny gaps only a few atoms wide, a team from the NanoPhotonics Center at the Cavendish Laboratory at the University of Cambridge has magnified optical forces a thousand-fold, strong enough to force atoms into positions that drive chemical reactions more efficiently.
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In non-volatile memory technologies, 2D materials may drive a major leap forward
Non-volatile memories—which are able to retain information even when power is removed—are largely employed in computers, tablets, pen drives and many other electronic devices. Among the various existing technologies, magnetoresistive random-access memories (MRAM), currently used only in specific applications, are expected to expand considerably on the market in the decade to come.
1d
Studying galaxy growth spurts in the early universe with NASA's Roman
In the American Wild West, high noon was a time for duels and showdowns. When it comes to the history of the universe, cosmic noon featured fireworks of a different sort. Some 2 to 3 billion years after the big bang most galaxies went through a growth spurt, forming stars at a rate hundreds of times higher than we see in our own galaxy, the Milky Way, today. When it launches by May 2027, NASA's Na
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