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Nyheder2022juni30

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The Summer of Our Discontent
This is an edition of The Atlantic Daily, a newsletter that guides you through the biggest stories of the day, helps you discover new ideas, and recommends the best in culture. Sign up for it here . I remember fondly the way Washington would shut down in the summer so that the city could give itself a breather, but that was before our politics went haywire. First, here's more from The Atlantic .
12min
Lost in space: returned astronauts struggle to recover bone density, study finds
Lack of gravity and weightlessness means the longer astronauts stay in space, the more bone mass they lose Astronauts lose decades' worth of bone mass in space that many do not recover even after a year back on Earth, researchers have found, warning that it could be a "big concern" for future missions to Mars. Previous research has shown astronauts lose between 1% and 2% of bone density for every
14min
VR Company Shows Off Full-Body Suit That Electrocutes You Everywhere
Pain Suit Last summer, VR social platform startup Somnium and VR suit maker Teslasuit unveiled a "human-to-digital interface designed in the form of a full-body XR suit" — a suit that can literally electrocute you all over the body. And according to a recent review by TechRadar , the experience sounds absolutely wild. The haptic suit's 90 electrodes are designed to fool its wearer into thinking t
29min
Can SCUBE3 get lost hair to grow again?
Researchers have discovered that a molecule called SCUBE3 potently stimulates hair growth. It may offer a therapeutic treatment for androgenetic alopecia, a common form of hair loss in both women and men. The study in Developmental Cell determined the precise mechanism by which the dermal papilla cells—specialized signal-making fibroblasts at the bottom of each hair follicle—promote new growth. A
37min
Developmentally arrested IVF embryos can be coaxed to divide
Why do two-thirds of in vitro fertilization (IVF) embryos go into developmental arrest? A new study shows that many embryos stored for IVF undergo characteristic genetic and metabolic changes that inhibit development. These results help explain the loss of developmental ability of many harvested embryos, and may point to strategies for increasing the proportion of developmentally competent embryos
1h
Germany Builds Colossal "Thermos" to Heat Countless Homes
Warming Up Countries reliant on Russia's fossil fuel industry for energy and utilities are starting to look for alternatives as President Vladimir Putin continues to wage bloody war on Ukraine . Today, the Associated Press reported that Germany is creating a giant thermos to heat homes in the winter, in just another example of a changing European energy landscape. The tower is nearly 150 feet tal
1h
Best Charging Stations in 2022
Sooner or later, you'll need a charging station to refuel your countless devices. Phones, tablets, portable gaming consoles, watches, gamepads, keyboards, cameras, remotes, and just about everything under the sun charges via USB nowadays. A dedicated charging station is perfect for topping off the battery on not only your devices, but anyone. Sharing is, after all, caring, and nothing says "I che
1h
Even Bored Ape NFT Prices Are Plummeting Now
BAYCrash Web3 assets continue their impressively catastrophic nosedive today, as NFTs — you know, those extremely expensive digital artworks that celebs have both loved and lost — reach remarkably new lows in value. Bloomberg reports that this will likely be the first month since June 2021 that NFT sales will have failed to reach $1 billion overall. Meanwhile, well known high-dollar NFTs, includi
1h
Active transportation projects offer solid returns on investment, economic study finds
Active transportation investments offer many types of benefits related to safety, reduced greenhouse gas emissions, physical activity and the economy. Metro, Oregon's regional government for the Portland metropolitan area, wants to better understand the role of these investments in building stronger communities in their region, and in implementing the Metro 2040 Growth Concept.
1h
Is Biden a Man Out of Time?
The White House's response to last week's Supreme Court decision overturning Roe v. Wade , which in 1973 established a constitutional right to abortion, once again has exposed the tension between the conciliatory instincts President Joe Biden developed during his long career in Washington, D.C., and the ferocity of the modern combat between the two major political parties. An array of frustrated
1h
Students seek to improve safety for houseless pedestrians in Portland
In 2022, a Portland State University Master of Urban and Regional Planning (MURP) team made headlines with their strategies to improve safety for houseless pedestrians. Cities across the U.S. are facing alarming increases in traffic fatalities, especially among the number of pedestrians who are struck and killed by drivers. In 2021, 70 percent of all pedestrian fatalities in Portland were of peopl
1h
Borrowed gene helps maize adapt to high elevations, cold temperatures
Researchers at North Carolina State University show that an important gene in maize called HPC1 modulates certain chemical processes that contribute to flowering time, and has its origins in "teosinte mexicana," a precursor to modern-day corn that grows wild in the highlands of Mexico. The findings provide insight into plant evolution and trait selection, and could have implications for corn and o
2h
Borrowed gene helps maize adapt to high elevations, cold temperatures
Researchers at North Carolina State University show that an important gene in maize called HPC1 modulates certain chemical processes that contribute to flowering time, and has its origins in "teosinte mexicana," a precursor to modern-day corn that grows wild in the highlands of Mexico. The findings provide insight into plant evolution and trait selection, and could have implications for corn and o
2h
Marcel the Shell Is the Hero the World Needs
This world was not built for the likes of Marcel, the stop-motion-animated minuscule shell who sports pink shoes. Riding in a car makes him vomit repeatedly, unreachable itches make him scream, and typing a single word using a laptop keyboard becomes a full-body workout. Marcel, voiced by the actor and comedian Jenny Slate, can be terribly naive and, given his predilection for corny one-liners, u
2h
Company Complains That Users Keep Thinking Its AI Has Come to Life
Eye of the Beholder AI chatbot company Replika has had enough of its customers thinking that its avatars have come to life. According to CEO Eugenia Kuyda, the company gets contacted almost every day by users who believe — against almost all existing evidence — that its AI models have become sentient. "We're not talking about crazy people or people who are hallucinating or having delusions," Kuyd
2h
When should U.S. research be stamped 'top secret'? NSF asks for a new look at the issue
The U.S. academic community is gearing up for a new effort to convince national policymakers that the benefits of keeping government-funded basic research out in the open—and not stamping it classified—far outweigh any threat to national security from sharing scientific findings. The National Science Foundation (NSF) has asked the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM)
2h
The Supreme Court's EPA Ruling Is Going to Be Very, Very Expensive
Today's major environmental ruling from the Supreme Court, West Virginia v. EPA , is probably most notable for what it did not do. It did not say that the Environmental Protection Agency is prohibited from regulating heat-trapping carbon pollution from America's existing power plants. It also did not strip the EPA of its ability to regulate climate pollution at all. In short, it did not, as some
2h
The blind spots of the green energy transition | Olivia Lazard
The world needs clean power, but decarbonization calls for a massive increase in the mining and extraction of minerals like lithium, graphite and cobalt. Environmental peacemaking expert Olivia Lazard sheds light on the scramble for these precious mineral resources — and how the countries that control their supply chains (including China and Russia) could find themselves at the center of the new
2h
Scientists engineer synthetic DNA to study 'architect' genes
Researchers have created artificial Hox genes — which plan and direct where cells go to develop tissues or organs — using new synthetic DNA technology and genomic engineering in stem cells. Their findings confirm how clusters of Hox genes help cells to learn and remember where they are in the body.
2h
Dissolving implantable device relieves pain without drugs
Researchers have developed a small, soft, flexible implant that relieves pain on demand and without the use of drugs. The first-of-its-kind device could provide a much-needed alternative to opioids and other highly addictive medications. It works by softly wrapping around nerves to deliver precise, targeted cooling, which numbs nerves and blocks pain signals to the brain. After the device is no lo
2h
Optical fiber imaging method advances studies of Alzheimer's disease
An optical fiber as thin as a strand of hair holds promise for use in minimally invasive deep-tissue studies of patients' brains that show the effects Alzheimer's disease and other brain disorders. The challenge is efficiently increasing image resolution at the subcellular level, because loss of information is inevitable from light scrambling.
2h
New flood maps clarify the risk homeowners face
Flooding in urban areas cost Americans more than $106 billion between 1960 and 2016, damaging property, disrupting businesses and claiming lives in the process. Now, new research outlines a simplified, cost-effective method for developing flood maps that reflects the uncertainty in flood predictions.
2h
'Amazing development': fossil finds show how panda's false thumb evolved
Fossils of Ailurarctos, an extinct panda relative, are oldest known evidence for the radial sesamoid Ancient fossils discovered in China have helped researchers get a grip on the enduring mystery of the panda's false thumb. Modern giant pandas sport a thumb-like sixth digit on their wrists, which scientists believe was pivotal in their transition from omnivores to bamboo-munching vegetarians. Con
3h
Where France Differs on Abortion
When the United States Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade last week, a quote attributed to Simone de Beauvoir quickly circulated on French social media. "Never forget that all it takes is a political, economic or religious crisis for women's rights to be called into question," it said. "These rights are never fully acquired. You must remain vigilant your whole life." The French are feeling vigi
3h
Comparative analyses of American and Asian lotus genomes
Nelumbo is a unique genus of Nelumbonaceae (lotus), which comprises two extant species: N. nucifera Gaertn. widely distributed in Asia and northern Australia, and N. lutea Pers. which is distributed in America. These two species exhibit differences in morphology, such as plant size, leaf shape, petal shape and petal color, but share the same chromosome number.
3h
Comparative analyses of American and Asian lotus genomes
Nelumbo is a unique genus of Nelumbonaceae (lotus), which comprises two extant species: N. nucifera Gaertn. widely distributed in Asia and northern Australia, and N. lutea Pers. which is distributed in America. These two species exhibit differences in morphology, such as plant size, leaf shape, petal shape and petal color, but share the same chromosome number.
3h
Female lineages anchored Pacific islands for 2000 years
Some 3000 years ago, people sailed toward the sunrise—and the last swatch of our planet uninhabited by humans: remote islands of the Pacific. By 1200 C.E. societies flourished from the Marianas to Rapa Nui, more than 12,000 kilometers apart. How the Pacific gradually became home to these groups—and just where they came from—has long been a mystery . Some answers and twists are emerging, thanks to
3h
News at a glance: Polio in London sewage, U.S. science spending bills, and new medical citations leader
CONSERVATION Native tribes and United States enter park management deal The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the U.S. Forest Service signed a first-of-its-kind agreement last week to comanage Bears Ears National Monument in southeastern Utah with five Native American tribes. The five tribes have long wanted to help oversee this culturally significant monument , a 550,000-hectare expanse pocked
3h
Ignorant Scientists Keep Citing Papers That Were Retracted for Fraud
Fraud Peddlers For an industry so obsessed with peer review, it appears that academic journals are mighty reticent to retract or even warn readers about fraudulent articles. As Science magazine reports in a fascinating story , a recent study found that although journals were made aware of nearly 90 instances of papers that had cited work that was documented to be fraudulent in the field of nutrit
3h
The Creator of That Viral Image Generating AI Loves All Your Weird Creations
For the vast majority of people who tinker with machine learning technology, the best they can hope for is that others in their community will recognize their work. Which was why it was so shocking to Boris Dayma, the creator of the AI formerly known as "DALL-E Mini," when his went viral. Now, a chaotic few weeks and one name change later — Dayma changed the name to Craiyon after OpenAI, the crea
3h
CEO Quits $68 Billion Firm to "Sit at the Beach and Do Nothing"
Anti-Productivity Icon As of October 1st, 2022, please do Jupiter Fund Management CEO Andrew Formica a favor and leave him alone! He's quitting his job and logging off, thank you very much. "I just want to go sit at the beach and do nothing," Formica told Bloomberg in an interview this week. "I'm not thinking about anything else." Company Troubles As far as CEOs and investors go, Formica, at 51,
3h
Two Seattle startups racing to transform next-gen space travel
The phrase "nuclear energy" conjures images of large steaming towers or Tony Stark's arc reactor from the iconic "Iron Man" movies. But two Seattle-based startups are designing nuclear technologies small enough to pick up and carry that, thanks in part to buy-in from the Defense Department, they hope will fuel a new generation of spaceships.
3h
Earliest Pacific seafarers were matrilocal society, study suggests
DNA analysis of 164 individuals from 2,800 to 300 years ago shows men would move to be with their wives The world's earliest seafarers who set out to colonise remote Pacific islands nearly 3,000 years ago were a matrilocal society with communities organised around the female lineage, analysis of ancient DNA suggests. The research, based on genetic sequencing of 164 ancient individuals from 2,800
3h
Nerve-cooling implant could offer pain relief alternative to opioids, say researchers
Device which can dissolve in the body represents an 'engineering approach to treating pain' An implant which can cool nerves to block pain signals has been unveiled by researchers who say the device could offer an alternative to drugs such as opioids. The team behind the device say it could bring benefits for management of acute pain such as that experienced after amputations, nerve grafts or spi
3h
Breaking AIs to make them better
Current AIs are very accurate but inflexible at image recognition. Exactly why this is remains a mystery. Researchers have developed a method called 'Raw Zero-Shot' to assess how neural networks handle elements unknown to them. The results have the potential to help researchers identify the common features that make neural networks 'non-robust,' and develop methods to make AIs more reliable.
4h
Advanced technology allows automated 3D tracking of leaked gas
Researchers have developed a way to create a 3D image of a leaked gas cloud that provides detailed information about the leak such as location, volume and concentration. The new automated detection approach could be used to provide early warnings, assess risk or determine the best way to fix the leak.
4h
New flood maps clarify the risk homeowners face
Flooding in urban areas cost Americans more than $106 billion between 1960 and 2016, damaging property, disrupting businesses and claiming lives in the process. Determining which areas are most likely to flood amid ever-changing land use and shifting rainfall and climate patterns can be expensive and complicated—and past methods of drawing flood maps fail to capture the inherent uncertainty in flo
4h
Scientists Say New James Webb Images Are So Powerful That It Was Emotional Just Looking at Them
First Light While we await the ceremonial release of the first official images taken by NASA's uber-expensive James Webb Space Telescope , early reactions to the long-awaited shots are already sounding pretty promising. "The images are being taken right now," NASA's scientific missions lead Thomas Zurbuchen told reporters on Wednesday. "There is already some amazing science in the can, and some o
4h
How to track your period safely post-Roe
As soon as Roe v. Wade was overturned on Friday, June 24, calls for people to delete their period-tracking apps were all over social media. These apps gather extremely personal data that could pinpoint a missed period. The fear is that in the hands of law enforcement, this data could be used to bolster a criminal case against a person who attempts to get an abortion in a state where it is restric
4h
A closer look into the emergence of antibiotic resistance in bioaerosols
Bioaerosols, or airborne biological particles containing viruses, fungal spores, bacteria, and pollen, play a key role in public health. Antibiotic resistance (AR), caused by antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), could potentially cause global public health crises owing to horizontal gene transfer between same or similar bacterial bioaerosols. AR in microbes in soil and water environments have been
4h
A closer look into the emergence of antibiotic resistance in bioaerosols
Bioaerosols, or airborne biological particles containing viruses, fungal spores, bacteria, and pollen, play a key role in public health. Antibiotic resistance (AR), caused by antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), could potentially cause global public health crises owing to horizontal gene transfer between same or similar bacterial bioaerosols. AR in microbes in soil and water environments have been
4h
Hidden in caves: Mineral overgrowths reveal unprecedented modern sea-level rise
The early 1900s were an exciting time across the world, with rapid advances in the steel, electric and automobile industries. The industrial changes also mark an inflection point in our climate. According to an international team of researchers led by the University of South Florida (USF), the sea level has risen 18 centimeters since the start of the 20th century.
4h
Tight junction channel regulation by interclaudin interference
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31587-8 Tight junctions are formed by claudin proteins that can be classified as pore- or barrier-forming. Here, Shashikanth et al. report a third function, termed interclaudin interference, in which one claudin inhibits pore function of another claudin by disrupting its polymeric complexes.
4h
Researchers propose widespread banking of stool samples for fecal transplants later in life
Changes in the way that humans live and eat have resulted in tremendous alterations in the gut microbiome, especially over the past few decades. These changes have been linked to increased rates of asthma, allergies, diseases of the digestive system, type 2 diabetes, and other conditions. Scientists propose that we can combat these trends by having individuals bank samples of their own gut microbi
4h
Some viruses make you smell tastier to mosquitoes
Zika and dengue fever viruses alter the scent of mice and humans they infect, a team of researchers report. The altered scent attracts mosquitoes, which bite the host, drink their infected blood and then carry the virus to its next victim.
4h
Climate change in oceanwater may impact mangrove dispersal, study finds
Researchers examined 21st century changes in ocean-surface temperature, salinity, and density, across mangrove forests worldwide. Their study suggests that changes in surface-ocean density may impact the dispersal patterns of widely distributed mangroves species, and more likely so in the Indo-West Pacific region, the primary hotspot of mangrove diversity.
4h
Denmark's Covid mass mink cull had no legal justification, says report
The extermination of 15 million animals and unnecessary shutdown of an entire industry has cost taxpayers billions The Danish government lacked legal justification and made "grossly misleading" statements when it ordered a mass mink extermination two years ago, according to an official inquiry into Europe's first compulsory farm sector shutdown, which has cost taxpayers billions in compensation t
5h
Can Tylenol in wastewater help track COVID-19?
In a pilot project exploring ways to monitor COVID-19, scientists hunted for pharmaceuticals, such as Tylenol, and viral RNA at the same time in wastewater in Western New York. The results of their study, published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology Letters , suggest that measuring the concentrations of medicines in wastewater could add another layer to disease-monitoring efforts.
5h
Supreme Court Gives Power Plants Green Light to Pollute As Much As They Want
Moving Backwards Another week, another inconceivable and unconscionable decision by the US Supreme Court. After the court dealt a massive blow to reproductive rights last week, the it's now given power plants the ability to regulate their own carbon dioxide emissions, an irredeemable decision that's almost certain to have disastrous consequences for the environment. Power plants are the country's
5h
Climate change in ocean water may impact mangrove dispersal
International research led by Dr. Tom Van der Stocken of the VUB Biology Department examined 21st century changes in ocean-surface temperature, salinity, and density, across mangrove forests worldwide. The study suggests that changes in surface-ocean density may impact the dispersal patterns of widely distributed mangroves species, and more likely so in the Indo-West Pacific region, the primary ho
5h
Optical fiber imaging method advances studies of Alzheimer's disease
An optical fiber as thin as a strand of hair holds promise for use in minimally invasive deep-tissue studies of patients' brains that show the effects Alzheimer's disease and other brain disorders. The research could set the stage for minimally invasive in vivo brain imaging in lab studies and monitoring neuronal activity over time in patients with neurological disorders.
5h
Better living through multicellular life cycles
Cooperation is a core part of life for many organisms, ranging from microbes to complex multicellular life. It emerges when individuals share resources or partition a task in such a way that each derives a greater benefit when acting together than they could on their own. For example, birds and fish flock to evade predators, slime mold swarms to hunt for food and reproduce, and bacteria form biofi
5h
A comparison of two bio-geographical regions in Italy reveals differences in the perception of ecotourism
A new study led by the Landscape Ecological Forest Planning Lab at University of Tuscia (Viterbo, Italy) realized in cooperation with the alpine detachment of the University of Milan (UNIMONT) and published in the Journal of Ecotourism assessed similarities and differences in the environmental dimension of ecotourism in two different bio-geographical regions (Alpine temperate vs Mediterranean biom
5h
Common gene used to profile microbial communities
Computer scientists develop Emu, an algorithm that uses long reads of genomes to identify the species of bacteria in a community. The program could simplify sorting harmful from helpful bacteria in microbiomes like those in the gut or in agriculture and the environment.
5h
Better living through multicellular life cycles
Cooperation is a core part of life for many organisms, ranging from microbes to complex multicellular life. It emerges when individuals share resources or partition a task in such a way that each derives a greater benefit when acting together than they could on their own. For example, birds and fish flock to evade predators, slime mold swarms to hunt for food and reproduce, and bacteria form biofi
5h
A comparison of two bio-geographical regions in Italy reveals differences in the perception of ecotourism
A new study led by the Landscape Ecological Forest Planning Lab at University of Tuscia (Viterbo, Italy) realized in cooperation with the alpine detachment of the University of Milan (UNIMONT) and published in the Journal of Ecotourism assessed similarities and differences in the environmental dimension of ecotourism in two different bio-geographical regions (Alpine temperate vs Mediterranean biom
5h
Six guiding principles for the EU agricultural policy to halt biodiversity loss
To halt biodiversity loss, the future design of EU agricultural policy could be guided by six basic principles and accompanied by multi-annual agreements and progressive payment systems. These are at the core of recommendations made by more than 300 scientists from 23 EU member states who were consulted at the request of the European Commission. The process was coordinated by the German Centre for
5h
Six guiding principles for the EU agricultural policy to halt biodiversity loss
To halt biodiversity loss, the future design of EU agricultural policy could be guided by six basic principles and accompanied by multi-annual agreements and progressive payment systems. These are at the core of recommendations made by more than 300 scientists from 23 EU member states who were consulted at the request of the European Commission. The process was coordinated by the German Centre for
5h
Can former conservation 'pirates' help scientists study the oceans?
Laura Sánchez Alòs had been at sea for less than 20 minutes when the motorboats attacked. In late January 2019, the 24-year-old Spanish conservation biologist was on board the Farley Mowat , a former U.S. Coast Guard cutter, in Mexican waters in the northern Gulf of California. She was the ship's scientist, part of a campaign by the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society to study and protect the vaqui
5h
Quantifying global ocean inhomogeneity and exploring its evolution in climate change
The ocean is intrinsically inhomogeneous in temperature and salinity. This inhomogeneity fundamentally influences physical and biogeochemical processes of oceans, causing mixing of water masses, and shaping three-dimensional geostrophic circulations. The ocean inhomogeneity ultimately determines marine biodistribution, ecosystem structure and functioning, and marine biodiversity.
6h
Comparative genomics of Acinetobacter baumannii and therapeutic bacteriophages from a patient undergoing phage therapy
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31455-5 A patient with a multidrug-resistant bacterial infection was successfully treated in 2016 using phage therapy. Here, the authors sequence the genomes of the therapeutic phages and three bacterial strains isolated before and during treatment, and show that the same mutations conferring phage resistance are found
6h
Photonic synapses with low power consumption and high sensitivity
Neuromorphic photonics/electronics is the future of ultralow energy intelligent computing and artificial intelligence (AI). In recent years, inspired by the human brain, artificial neuromorphic devices have attracted extensive attention, especially in simulating visual perception and memory storage. Because of its advantages of high bandwidth, high interference immunity, ultrafast signal transmiss
6h
The principle of inkjet printing and its applications on AR/VR micro-displays
With the rapid development of artificial intelligence, image recognition and 5G communication technology, augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) technologies are developing at an alarming rate. Under the background of the COVID-19, the remote office and consumption interaction are increasing. The market once again turns its attention to AR/VR and increases its investment in technology app
6h
Zika, dengue viruses make victims smell better to mosquitoes
The viruses that cause Zika and dengue fever can't get from person to person on their own—they need to hitchhike inside a mosquito. A new study suggests how they hail these rides: They make their victims smell more attractive to the blood-sucking bugs. It's "a big advance," says mosquito neuroscientist Laura Duvall of Columbia University, who wasn't connected to the research. The work shows that
6h
Pioneering recycling turns mixed waste into premium plastics with no climate impact
Only a fraction of the material that could be turned into new plastic is currently recycled. Researchers have now demonstrated how the carbon atoms in mixed waste can replace all fossil raw materials in the production of new plastic. The recycling method is inspired by the natural carbon cycle and could eliminate the climate impact of plastic materials, or even clean the air of carbon dioxide.
6h
Researchers publish 'Guide to the Tadpoles of Borneo'
Important, yet often neglected, tadpoles play a critical role in the ecology of aquatic habitats. On 279 pages, a new book presents descriptions for 99 species from the southeast Asian island of Borneo, covering all species commonly found, as well as representatives of the more cryptic ones. LIB-scientist Alexander Haas and his team of international collaborators worked over 20 years on its comple
6h
The Sordid Past of the Cubic Formula
History is full of backstabbing rivalries: Edison and Tesla, Harding and Kerrigan, Tupac and Biggie. No less dramatic was a 16th-century conflict between Italian mathematicians Gerolamo Cardano, a brilliant but troubled polymath, and Niccolò Fontana, better known as Tartaglia (meaning "the stammerer," after a teenage facial injury from a French soldier's sword). The central issue: cubic equations
6h
Researchers publish 'Guide to the Tadpoles of Borneo'
Important, yet often neglected, tadpoles play a critical role in the ecology of aquatic habitats. On 279 pages, a new book presents descriptions for 99 species from the southeast Asian island of Borneo, covering all species commonly found, as well as representatives of the more cryptic ones. LIB-scientist Alexander Haas and his team of international collaborators worked over 20 years on its comple
6h
Miniaturized, highly sensitive ultrasound sensor for photoacoustic imaging
Photoacoustic imaging generates ultrasound waves by irradiating biological tissues with pulses or modulated continuous lasers. Ultrasound sensors are used to capture ultrasound signals in a distributed manner. Then, the light absorption distribution of biological tissues can be reconstructed with the help of image reconstruction algorithms. Compared with optical imaging, photoacoustic imaging prov
6h
NASA Needs Your Help Spotting Clouds On Mars
Outlook: Cloudy Find yourself with your head in the clouds often? Well, NASA has got a job for you! In the ongoing quest to solve the mystery of Mars' atmosphere, NASA is enlisting the help of the public on a new project called Cloudspotting on Mars. Using the citizen science web portal Zooniverse, anyone bored or enthusiastic enough can open up the portal , read the tutorial, and start spotting
6h
RadioShack Is Tweeting About Drugs and Unusual Sexual Acts, for Some Reason
RadioWhack RadioShack — the once-bankrupt strip mall electronics staple which was brought back from the dead and turned into a blockchain company for some reason — has chosen chaos for its social media strategy. A scroll through the device retailer's Twitter account reveals some shockingly profane — and absolutely NOT safe for work — tweets, in a somewhat bizarre attempt to revive a name that was
6h
Image: Tenoumer Crater, Mauritania
Deep within the Sahara Desert lies one of the best-preserved craters on Earth. On Asteroid Day, the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over the almost-perfectly circular Tenoumer Crater in Mauritania.
6h
Composable enterprise spurs innovation
In March 2020, when corporate offices shuttered in the face of the coronavirus pandemic and employees began working from home, companies were forced to find more efficient ways to do business. Call it "The Great Digital Transformation." Before the pandemic, the average company estimated that transitioning to remote work would take 454 days, according to the "McKinsey Global Surveys, 2021: A year
6h
FEMA releases largest update to its mobile app in a decade
The Federal Emergency Management Agency is releasing the largest update to its mobile application in a decade, the agency announced today. FEMA is releasing the app at the beginning of a hurricane season that experts predict will be above average and a wildfire season that's already devastating, for example, In New Mexico.
6h
Pioneering recycling turns mixed waste into premium plastics with no climate impact
Only a fraction of the material that could be turned into new plastic is currently recycled. Researchers have now demonstrated how the carbon atoms in mixed waste can replace all fossil raw materials in the production of new plastic. The recycling method is inspired by the natural carbon cycle and could eliminate the climate impact of plastic materials, or even clean the air of carbon dioxide.
6h
Brain practices new info while we sleep
Why do people sleep? Scientists have debated this question for ages, but a new study adds fresh clues for solving this mystery. The findings, published in the Journal of Neuroscience , may help explain how humans form memories and learn, and could eventually aid the development of assistive tools for people affected by neurologic disease or injury. Scientists studying laboratory animals long ago
6h
A giant black hole that spins slower than its peers
Astronomers have made a record-breaking measurement of a black hole's spin, one of two fundamental properties of black holes. NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory shows this black hole is spinning slower than most of its smaller cousins.
6h
Powerful links between methane and climate change
Using data gathered over the last four decades to study the effects of temperature changes and rain on the atmospheric concentration of methane, scientists have concluded that Earth could be both delivering more, and removing less, methane into the air than previously estimated, with the result that more heat is being trapped in the atmosphere. The study, published in the scientific journal Nature
6h
Laser creates a miniature magnetosphere
Magnetic reconnections in laser-produced plasmas have been studied to understand microscopic electron dynamics, which is applicable to space and astrophysical phenomena. Osaka University researchers, in collaboration with researchers at the National Institute for Fusion Science and other universities, have reported the direct measurements of pure electron outflows relevant to magnetic reconnection
6h
Rapid seed dispersal by hornets facilitates reproduction of agarwood plants
Aquilaria sinensis (family Thymelaeaceae) is the principal source of Chinese agarwood. It is a vulnerable evergreen tree native to lowland forests in southern China. Its fruit matures during the June-August hot season. However, most of its fruit dehisces on sunny hot-dry afternoons, exposing the seeds under the canopy. Due to this exposure, the seeds desiccate in four hours and lose viability with
6h
Vision and vocal communication guide three-dimensional spatial coordination of zebra finches during wind-tunnel flights
Many bird species fly together with conspecifics in flocks to safely cover flight distances. To avoid collisions with each other and head in the same direction, flock members have to communicate and coordinate their flight positions. Researchers led by Susanne Hoffmann from Manfred Gahr's department at the Max Planck Institute for Biological Intelligence investigated how this communication takes p
6h
As these bacteria eat, they generate an unusual triangular molecule that can be used to make jet fuel
Aircrafts transport people, ship goods, and perform military operations, but the petroleum-based fuels that power them are in short supply. In research publishing on June 30 in the journal Joule, researchers at the Lawrence Berkeley Lab have found a way to generate an alternative jet fuel by harvesting an unusual carbon molecule produced by the metabolic process of bacteria commonly found in soil.
6h
Rapid seed dispersal by hornets facilitates reproduction of agarwood plants
Aquilaria sinensis (family Thymelaeaceae) is the principal source of Chinese agarwood. It is a vulnerable evergreen tree native to lowland forests in southern China. Its fruit matures during the June-August hot season. However, most of its fruit dehisces on sunny hot-dry afternoons, exposing the seeds under the canopy. Due to this exposure, the seeds desiccate in four hours and lose viability with
6h
Vision and vocal communication guide three-dimensional spatial coordination of zebra finches during wind-tunnel flights
Many bird species fly together with conspecifics in flocks to safely cover flight distances. To avoid collisions with each other and head in the same direction, flock members have to communicate and coordinate their flight positions. Researchers led by Susanne Hoffmann from Manfred Gahr's department at the Max Planck Institute for Biological Intelligence investigated how this communication takes p
6h
As these bacteria eat, they generate an unusual triangular molecule that can be used to make jet fuel
Aircrafts transport people, ship goods, and perform military operations, but the petroleum-based fuels that power them are in short supply. In research publishing on June 30 in the journal Joule, researchers at the Lawrence Berkeley Lab have found a way to generate an alternative jet fuel by harvesting an unusual carbon molecule produced by the metabolic process of bacteria commonly found in soil.
6h
The path of most resistance could help limit bone loss during spaceflight
Astronauts that have returned after spaceflights over three months may show signs of incomplete bone recovery even after one year on Earth, but adding in more resistance-based exercises during spaceflight may help limit bone loss. The small study, published in Scientific Reports, on 17 international astronauts found that while the shinbone partially recovers, the sustained bone losses after one ye
6h
Pandas gave bamboo the thumbs up at least six million years ago
When is a thumb not a thumb? When it's an elongated wrist bone of the giant panda used to grasp bamboo. Through its long evolutionary history, the panda's hand has never developed a truly opposable thumb and instead evolved a thumb-like digit from a wrist bone, the radial sesamoid. This unique adaptation helps these bears subsist entirely on bamboo despite being bears (members of the order Carnivo
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Algorithm predicts crime a week in advance, but reveals bias in police response
Advances in machine learning and artificial intelligence have sparked interest from governments that would like to use these tools for predictive policing to deter crime. Early efforts at crime prediction have been controversial, however, because they do not account for systemic biases in police enforcement and its complex relationship with crime and society.
6h
Dengue and Zika viruses make infected hosts more delicious to mosquitoes
A study published in the journal Cell on June 30 shows that when humans and mice are infected with dengue or Zika viruses, they secrete a chemical that may make them more attractive to mosquitoes, the vector that transmits the virus. Almost half of the world's population lives in an area at risk of dengue fever, and with a lack of treatments, many dengue-affected regions see high morbidity and mor
6h
Pandas gave bamboo the thumbs up at least six million years ago
When is a thumb not a thumb? When it's an elongated wrist bone of the giant panda used to grasp bamboo. Through its long evolutionary history, the panda's hand has never developed a truly opposable thumb and instead evolved a thumb-like digit from a wrist bone, the radial sesamoid. This unique adaptation helps these bears subsist entirely on bamboo despite being bears (members of the order Carnivo
7h
Dengue and Zika viruses make infected hosts more delicious to mosquitoes
A study published in the journal Cell on June 30 shows that when humans and mice are infected with dengue or Zika viruses, they secrete a chemical that may make them more attractive to mosquitoes, the vector that transmits the virus. Almost half of the world's population lives in an area at risk of dengue fever, and with a lack of treatments, many dengue-affected regions see high morbidity and mor
7h
The US Supreme Court just gutted the EPA's power to regulate emissions
The Environmental Protection Agency's ability to regulate carbon dioxide and other greenhouse-gas emissions was dealt a massive blow by the US Supreme Court today. Coming less than a week after it overturned the landmark abortion case Roe v. Wade , the court's decision in West Virginia v. EPA could have far-reaching results for US climate policy as the world continues to set new records for emiss
7h
Perching behavior of hawks suggests ways to improve perching by drones
A quartet of researchers at the University of Oxford's Department of Zoology has found that a careful look at the way large birds perch could perhaps lead to improvements in the ways that drones are programmed to land. In their paper published in the journal Nature, Marco KleinHeerenbrink, Lydia France, Caroline Brighton and Graham Taylor describe their close analysis of perching by Harris hawks a
7h
Perching behavior of hawks suggests ways to improve perching by drones
A quartet of researchers at the University of Oxford's Department of Zoology has found that a careful look at the way large birds perch could perhaps lead to improvements in the ways that drones are programmed to land. In their paper published in the journal Nature, Marco KleinHeerenbrink, Lydia France, Caroline Brighton and Graham Taylor describe their close analysis of perching by Harris hawks a
7h
Could a Neanderthal meditate?
Emiliano Bruner, a paleoneurologist at the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH), has led a study published in the journal Intelligence on how attention evolved in the human genus, which analyzes the paleontological and archaeological evidence that might shed light on the attentional capacity of extinct hominins.
7h
Two transcription factors play important roles in fish sex phenotype formation
Forkhead transcription factor 2 (Foxl2) and doublesex and mab-3-related transcription factor 1 (Dmrt1) have been proved to be the key factors in fish gonadal differentiation. Foxl2 is one of the earliest discovered ovarian differentiation markers in fish, while Dmrt1 can activate testis-specific genes and inhibit ovarian-specific genes.
7h
'Shadow pandemic' of domestic violence
Violence against women increased to record levels around the world following lockdowns to control the spread of the COVID-19 virus. The United Nations called the situation a "shadow pandemic" in a 2021 report about domestic violence in 13 nations in Africa, Asia, South America, Eastern Europe, and the Balkans. In the United States, the American Journal of Emergency Medicine reported alarming trend
7h
Adapting to climate change may put some animals in a 'trap'
A new study finds that a species of large carnivore has made a major change to its life history in response to a changing climate—and may be worse off for it. As climate change alters environments across the globe, scientists have discovered that in response, many species are shifting the timing of major life events, such as reproduction. "It is an unfortunate 'out of the frying pan, into the fir
7h
The mere sight of a meal triggers an inflammatory response in the brain
Even before carbohydrates reach the bloodstream, the very sight and smell of a meal trigger the release of insulin. For the first time, researchers have shown that this insulin release depends on a short-term inflammatory response that takes place in these circumstances. In overweight individuals, however, this inflammatory response is so excessive that it can impair insulin secretion.
7h
Two transcription factors play important roles in fish sex phenotype formation
Forkhead transcription factor 2 (Foxl2) and doublesex and mab-3-related transcription factor 1 (Dmrt1) have been proved to be the key factors in fish gonadal differentiation. Foxl2 is one of the earliest discovered ovarian differentiation markers in fish, while Dmrt1 can activate testis-specific genes and inhibit ovarian-specific genes.
7h
WHO monkeypox decision renews debate about global alarm system for outbreaks
The World Health Organization (WHO) may have very high aspirations—"the attainment by all peoples of the highest possible level of health"—but when a new human disease begins to spread, or a known one behaves in unusual, threatening ways, it has few levers to pull. One important decision it can make, however, is declaring a Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC), a designation t
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Show Your Love for Our National Parks With These Gifts
Our national treasure isn't whatever Nick Cage was searching for — it's the 52 million acres of preserved, natural, and wild spaces we call our national parks. If you long for our oldest park (Yellowstone), dream about our biggest park (Wrangell-St. Elias), or pine for our newest park (New River Gorge), these National Park-themed goodies will shout your love from your coffee table, your walls, an
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Even temporarily overshooting 2°C would cause permanent damage to Earth's species
The history of climate change is one of people slowly coming to terms with the truth. None but a small minority still question whether it's real and caused by humans. Now most grapple with the reality of trying to slow down catastrophic warming, and the difference between solutions and false hope. The concept of climate overshoot is the next thing we will need to get to grips with.
7h
Review discusses using nonlinear optics with structured light
Light can be tailored, much like cloth, weaving and stitching a pattern into the very fabric of light itself. This so-called structured light allows us to access, harness and exploit all light's degrees of freedom, for seeing smaller in imaging, focusing tighter in microscopy and packing more information into light for classical and quantum communications. In their study published in Opto-Electron
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Carbon capture potential of agroforestry and trees on farms
Increased use of trees in agriculture can pave the way toward a transformation of the global food system, according to a new study released in May. Scientists have found that even small incremental increases in global tree cover on agricultural land could provide short-term respite to carbon accumulation in the atmosphere, benefiting the livelihoods of small landholder farmers, biodiversity, ecosy
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Carbon capture potential of agroforestry and trees on farms
Increased use of trees in agriculture can pave the way toward a transformation of the global food system, according to a new study released in May. Scientists have found that even small incremental increases in global tree cover on agricultural land could provide short-term respite to carbon accumulation in the atmosphere, benefiting the livelihoods of small landholder farmers, biodiversity, ecosy
7h
Google's AI Spotlights a Human Cognitive Glitch: Mistaking Fluent Speech for Fluent Thought
When you read a sentence like this one, your past experience tells you that it's written by a thinking, feeling human. And, in this case, there is indeed a human typing these words: [Hi, there!]. But these days, some sentences that appear remarkably humanlike are actually generated by artificial intelligence systems trained on massive amounts of human text. People are so accustomed to assuming th
7h
The rings of Uranus and Neptune could help map their interiors
Mapping the interior of the ice giants is difficult, to say the least. Not only are they far away and therefore harder to observe, but their constant ice cover makes it extremely hard to detect what lies underneath. So scientists must devise more ingenious ways to see what's inside them. A team from the University of Idaho, Cal Tech, Reed College, and the University of Arizona think they might hav
8h
Surrounded by Massive Bugs and Spiders! | Naked and Afraid
Stream Naked and Afraid on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/naked-and-afraid #NakedAndAfraid #Discovery #Survival Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discover
8h
'Perception and Recognition of Objects and Scenes' – Cyriel Pennartz and Angelica da Silva Lantyer
Whiskeye, the rodent-inspired robot capable of exploring the world by using two camera eyes and 24 artificial whiskers arranged in a mechanical nose, has now developed a cognitive model that is also inspired by organic brains. Human Brain Project researchers have now collaborated to build three new coding models of perception capable of performing prediction and learning, in a way that's similar
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TSMC's N2 Node to Use GAAFET First, Backside Power to be Added Later
(Photo: TSMC) TSMC revealed its plans for its N2 2nm silicon production earlier this month, and has now revealed more details about it. In addition to switching from FinFET to a gate-all-around (GAA) design using nanosheets, it also talked about introducing backside power delivery. This is notably similar to Intel's GAA plans with its PowerVia delivery system. However, TSMC has confirmed it won't
8h
How technology allows us to reveal secrets of Amazonian biodiversity
Tropical forest covers 12% of the planet's land surface yet hosts around two thirds of all terrestrial species. Amazonia, which spans the vast Amazon River basin and the Guiana Shield in South America, is the largest extent of remaining tropical forest globally, home to more species of animal than any other terrestrial landscape on the planet.
8h
Bite marks on ancient sperm whale relatives suggest sharks used them as fat sources
A small team of researchers from Switzerland, the U.S., Italy and Peru reports evidence that suggests ancestors of modern sperm whales were used as fat sources by ancient sharks. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their study of physeteroid fossil bones dated to the late Miocene and found in Peru, and what it showed them about the feeding habits of
8h
Metal nanoparticles serves as plant growth regulators
Engineered nanomaterials (EMs) negatively or positively affect plant growth and development attributed to their physiochemical properties, application, and concentrations. Previous studies have shown that ferroferric oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles affect tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) seed germination in size- and dosage-dependent manners. However, little attention has been paid to EMs mediated tobacco
8h
How technology allows us to reveal secrets of Amazonian biodiversity
Tropical forest covers 12% of the planet's land surface yet hosts around two thirds of all terrestrial species. Amazonia, which spans the vast Amazon River basin and the Guiana Shield in South America, is the largest extent of remaining tropical forest globally, home to more species of animal than any other terrestrial landscape on the planet.
8h
Bite marks on ancient sperm whale relatives suggest sharks used them as fat sources
A small team of researchers from Switzerland, the U.S., Italy and Peru reports evidence that suggests ancestors of modern sperm whales were used as fat sources by ancient sharks. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their study of physeteroid fossil bones dated to the late Miocene and found in Peru, and what it showed them about the feeding habits of
8h
Ways to synthesize stable diamane at high pressure
A research team led by Prof. Wang Xianlong from the Hefei Institutes of Physical Science of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) has discovered a new method to improve the stability of diamane synthesized by-high pressure methods. By introducing boron (B) and nitrogen (N) dopants into diamane, they found that the diamane's structure and electronic properties could be regulated. Related results we
8h
Magnetic nanoparticles can release anti-cancer microRNA on command
Researchers are pursuing ever-more sophisticated treatments to tackle lung cancer. Traditional chemotherapy can have serious side-effects throughout the body, so many new treatments are highly targeted. These methods allow controlled release directly at the tumor using selective agents that are less likely to produce off-target effects.
8h
Converting sunlight into fuel: Developing more efficient photocathodes
Photoelectrochemical cells are promising tools for the conversion of sunlight into fuel, for example, water into hydrogen, or CO2 into organic molecules. To realize this, a higher efficiency of the photocathode, often based on NiO, is needed. An important question is the role of water molecules adsorbed on the NiO surface. Research on the effects of this adsorption has been carried out by Kaijian
8h
Cultivating seaweed for carbon removal in California: Barriers and recommendations
Growing interest in using the oceans to enhance removal of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere has in turn spurred more interest in seaweed cultivation. A recent report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine concluded that the "ocean holds great potential for uptake and longer-term sequestration" of carbon dioxide. The report analyzed a number of ocean-based techniques and
8h
The vicious cycle of extreme weather and biomass burning
There is a downward spiral of extreme weather and pollution from wildfires, domestic heating and energy production in the New York and New Jersey area, according to a new study by CUNY SPH Professors Ilias Kavouras and Glen Johnson and 2022 DPH graduate Subraham Singh, in collaboration with Professor David DuBois, director of the New Mexico Office of Climate.
8h
Red wolf genes found in coyote hybrids may be the key to preserving the endangered species
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in the U.S. reports a high percentage of red wolf genes in the genomes of coyote hybrids living in some parts of southwest Louisiana and eastern Texas. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes the find as a possible means of saving red wolves from extinction.
8h
Facile and general electrochemical deuteration of unactivated alkyl halides
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31435-9 Deuterium-labelled compounds are useful for mechanistic studies and pharmaceutical science, but syntheses are not trivial. Here, the authors report deuteration of unactivated alkyl (pseudo)halides driven by electrochemical force, using deuterium oxide as the source of the isotope.
8h
Study reveals powerful links between methane and climate change
Scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have shown that recent record-breaking increases in the atmospheric concentration of greenhouse gas methane can be explained by year-on-year changes in the climate. They show that climate change is a stronger driver of increasing atmospheric methane than expected, causing the Earth to heat up more and faster than anticipat
8h
Independent reanalysis of the M87 galactic center radio observational data
An independent reanalysis of the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT)'s observational data for the center of the elliptical galaxy M87 has produced images with different features, according to a new study. This study is part of the research process in modern science, in which observational data and analysis methods are open to the public and reviewed and discussed in various communities of researchers to
8h
Expert: End of Roe endangers health and democracy
The Supreme Court's decision allowing many states to end or sharply curtail abortion rights will have profoundly harmful effects on those who are forced to continue unwanted pregnancies and on democracy itself, says legal scholar Khiara M. Bridges . The court, carried by its conservative majority, voted 6-3 to overturn Roe v. Wade and Planned Parenthood v. Casey , historic decisions that enshrine
8h
Promising uses of non-destructive sensors to aid food security and enhance sustainable agriculture
Researchers from the Disruptive & Sustainable Technologies for Agricultural Precision (DiSTAP) Interdisciplinary Research Group (IRG) at the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART), MIT's research enterprise in Singapore, and their local collaborators from the Institute of Materials Research and Engineering (IMRE), Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR) as well as
9h
What a Story of 1970s Abortion Activism Can Teach Us Today
Since Friday, when the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade , I've been grappling with a sense of gnawing disbelief at how instantaneously the contours of reality can change. The fact that the seismic change in protections for women in America could easily be seen coming didn't make its arrival any less destabilizing. On Thursday, we had a constitutional right to abortion. On Friday, we didn't. I
9h
Karriereskift: Børnelæge skal lede akutafdelingen i Horsens
Efter sommeren skal speciallæge i pædiatri Klaus Birkelund Johansen stå i spidsen for Akutafdelingen på Regionshospitalet Horsens. Det er et valg, der både for hospitalsledelsen og den nye cheflæge handler om at fokusere på de ledelsesmæssige kompetencer frem for det lægefaglige speciale. For den kommende cheflæge er der fokus på samarbejde i løsningen af en kompleks opgave.
9h
Promising uses of non-destructive sensors to aid food security and enhance sustainable agriculture
Researchers from the Disruptive & Sustainable Technologies for Agricultural Precision (DiSTAP) Interdisciplinary Research Group (IRG) at the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART), MIT's research enterprise in Singapore, and their local collaborators from the Institute of Materials Research and Engineering (IMRE), Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR) as well as
9h
Couples can sway each other's views on climate change
There's potential for couples to influence each other through conversations on climate change, research finds. "We wanted to see if there's potential for couples to increase support for pro-climate policies and behaviors through more conversations about climate change," says Matthew Goldberg, associate research scientist at the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication at the Yale School of th
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Daily briefing: Researchers warn of impacts after Roe v. Wade
Nature, Published online: 27 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01801-0 Scientists renew their warning about the public-health impacts of restricting access to abortion. Plus, mysterious cases of hepatitis seem to be striking young children, and a step-by-step guide to Twitter for scientists.
9h
The Download: Algorithms' shame trap, and London's safer road crossings
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. How algorithms trap us in a cycle of shame Working in finance at the beginning of the 2008 financial crisis, mathematician Cathy O'Neil got a firsthand look at how much people trusted algorithms—and how much destruction they were causing. Disheartened, she mov
9h
The Metaverse is Still Messy
This week, we talk with author and venture capitalist Matthew Ball about the metaverse and whether this next generation of the internet will ever really materialize.
10h
Is Music Universal?
From a neurological and evolutionary perspective, music is fascinating. There seems to be a deeply rooted biological appreciation for tonality, rhythm, and melody. Not only can people find certain sequences of sounds to be pleasurable, they can powerfully evoke emotions. Music can be happy, sad, peaceful, foreboding, energetic or comical. Why is this? Music is also deeply cultural, with different
10h
An essential role for tungsten in the ecology and evolution of a previously uncultivated lineage of anaerobic, thermophilic Archaea
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31452-8 Trace metals have been an important ingredient for life throughout Earth's history. Here, the authors show that a member of an elusive archaeal lineage (Caldarchaeales or Aigarchaeota) requires tungsten for growth, and provide evidence that tungsten-dependent metabolism played a role in the origin and evolution
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Simple synthesis of massively parallel RNA microarrays via enzymatic conversion from DNA microarrays
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31370-9 RNA microarrays have many potential applications, but are difficult to produce. Here, the AUs present a method for converting commercial, customizable DNA microarrays into RNA microarrays using an accessible three-step process involving primer photocrosslinking, extension, and template degradation.
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Knips en spøjs teknisk løsning og vind en bagsidekop
Når du måske lige om lidt lukker computeren for sidste gang i et stykke tid, hilser af med kollegerne og drager af sted på en tiltrængt sommerferie, så hav lige Bagsiden i tankerne. For skulle du på din vej i det danske sommerland eller på dit skumle hotel i Langbortistan falde over en kuriøs teknisk løsning, som du vil dele med Bagsidens læsere, så husk at sende det til bagsiden@ing.dk. De bedste
10h
Scientists Achieve Photosynthesis Without Sunlight
(Photo: Clay Banks/Unsplash) Scientists have found a way to boost the efficiency of photosynthesis by forcing it to occur without sunlight. A team of biologists and engineers at the University of California, Riverside and the University of Delaware created an artificial photosynthesis system as a way of brainstorming solutions to increasing global food demand. While organic photosynthesis has alw
10h
Yes, the number of Covid cases in the UK is rising – but that is no cause for alarm | Matt Hancock
With vaccines preventing most serious illness and death, any talk of bringing back restrictions is pure scaremongering Four months ago, the UK took the decision to end all remaining legal Covid-19 restrictions , becoming the first major country in the world to do so. While some said it was too soon and that it would lead to a surge in cases, hospitalisations and deaths, this has thankfully not be
10h
You Can Now Help NASA Hunt For Martian Clouds
Some of the images beamed back to Earth by robotic explorers like Perseverance can make Mars look almost familiar, in an arid desert sort of way. The conditions on the surface are completely alien, though. It's frigid, and the atmosphere is so thin that clouds are rare, but NASA believes understanding more about the red planet's cloud cover could help us understand how it got that way. Enter, you
10h
Transforming waste into soap
Nature, Published online: 30 June 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01817-6 Pharmacologist Janetti Francischi drew on folk wisdom and chemistry to turn used cooking oil into microbe-fighting soap during the COVID-19 pandemic.
11h
Mercedes Concept EV Travels Almost 750 Miles on One Charge
(Photo: Mercedes-Benz) The Mercedes-Benz VISION EQXX concept car has beaten its own single-charge range record, thanks to a 747-mile trip last week. In April, the company's stab at "the silver bullet to the electric road trip" completed a 626-mile trip on a single charge. But after driving from Stuttgart, Germany to Cassis, France, the electric vehicle's battery sat at about 15 percent capacity.
11h
Optimised weight programming for analogue memory-based deep neural networks
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31405-1 Device-level complexity represents a big shortcoming for the hardware realization of analogue memory-based deep neural networks. Mackin et al. report a generalized computational framework, translating software-trained weights into analogue hardware weights, to minimise inference accuracy degradation.
11h
86Kr excess and other noble gases identify a billion-year-old radiogenically-enriched groundwater system
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31412-2 Noble gases confirm billion-year groundwater residence times and external fluxes in deep crustal settings globally with implications for subsurface habitability and economic reservoir formation over planetary timescales both on Earth and beyond
11h
Effect of vaccination on household transmission of SARS-CoV-2 Delta variant of concern
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31494-y COVID-19 vaccines may reduce the susceptibility of an individual to infection and/or the infectiousness of breakthrough infections. Here, the authors use data from Denmark and estimate that vaccine effectiveness was 61% for susceptibility and 31% for infectiousness during a period of Delta variant dominance.
11h
Reconstruction of a catalogue of genome-scale metabolic models with enzymatic constraints using GECKO 2.0
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31421-1 Genome-scale metabolic models have been widely used for quantitative exploration of the relation between genotype and phenotype. Here the authors present GECKO 2, an automated framework for continuous and version controlled update of enzyme-constrained models of metabolism, producing an interesting catalogue of
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Don't Surround Yourself With Admirers
" How to Build a Life " is a weekly column by Arthur Brooks, tackling questions of meaning and happiness. Click here to listen to his podcast series on all things happiness, How to Build a Happy Life . W hen you're admired and well known, "people are always nice to you," the actor Robert De Niro once confessed to Esquire magazine. "You're in a conversation, and everybody's agreeing with what you'
11h
Endowing universal CAR T-cell with immune-evasive properties using TALEN-gene editing
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30896-2 Host versus graft reaction is a major impediment to CAR-T cell immune therapy in allogeneic settings. Authors show here that CAR-T cells, engineered to be deficient in MHC I expression but to express the NK inhibitor HLA-E, are resistant to destruction by both T and NK cells of the host.
12h
On-chip bacterial foraging training in silicon photonic circuits for projection-enabled nonlinear classification
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30906-3 On-chip training of machine learning algorithms is challenging for photonic devices. Here, the authors construct nonlinear mapping functions in silicon photonic circuits, and experimentally demonstrate on-chip bacterial foraging training for projection-based classification.
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Associations between long-term drought and diarrhea among children under five in low- and middle-income countries
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 June 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31291-7 Increased droughts are associated with climate change. Here, the authors reveal an association between long-term drought and an elevated risk of diarrhea in children under five in low- and middle income countries, and suggest that improving water quality, sanitation, and hygiene practices might reduce the risk.
12h
Tätare värmeböljor i Sydasien kan slå hårt mot befolkningen
Extrema temperaturer i klimatförändringarnas spår har redan drabbat Indien och Pakistan. I en studie bedömer forskare att värmeböljorna framöver kommer att bli fler med svåra konsekvenser för miljontals människors liv och försörjning – om inte åtgärder sätts in för att nå målen i Parisavtalet. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
12h
Computational tools and new strategies make drug discovery more efficient
The chemical industry has only scratched the surface of possible molecules that could be used as drugs, which is unimaginably greater than the number of stars in the universe. To make navigating this vast chemical space more manageable, researchers are using new computational tools that make the process cheaper and more efficient, according to a cover story in Chemical & Engineering News.
13h
Wildfires may have sparked ecosystem collapse during Earth's worst mass extinction
Researchers at University College Cork (UCC) and the Swedish Museum of Natural History examined the end-Permian mass extinction (252 million years ago) that eliminated almost every species on Earth, with entire ecosystems collapsing. The researchers discovered a sharp spike in wildfire activity from this most devastating of mass extinctions. Promoted by rapid greenhouse gas emissions from volcanoe
13h
The art of getting DNA out of decades-old pickled snakes
Two levels underground, Chicago's Field Museum has a secret bunker. The sub-basement Collections Resource Center houses millions of biological specimens for scientists around the world to use in their research, including countless bottles and jars containing pickled fish, lizards, and snakes, arranged like a library. Many of these specimens are decades or even centuries old, near-perfectly preserv
14h
The art of getting DNA out of decades-old pickled snakes
Two levels underground, Chicago's Field Museum has a secret bunker. The sub-basement Collections Resource Center houses millions of biological specimens for scientists around the world to use in their research, including countless bottles and jars containing pickled fish, lizards, and snakes, arranged like a library. Many of these specimens are decades or even centuries old, near-perfectly preserv
14h
Skeptical Science New Research for Week #26 2022
Looking into a distant mirror The academic publishing process is notoriously stately. Events in the rest of the world happen at their own swift pace as a given article makes its way through the publication pipeline. In the case of Russian climate scepticism: an understudied case , authors Teresa Ashe & Marianna Poberezhskaya submitted their work in April of last year, in what is beginning to seem
14h
How to stay cool in hot weather
This is a re-post from Yale Climate Connections by Neha Pathak When spring creeps around the corner, pediatrician Aaron Bernstein starts counseling his Boston-area patients and their families about extreme heat action plans. "The first heat wave of the year is routinely the most harmful," says Bernstein, who also directs Harvard's Center for Climate, Health, and the Global Environment. He wants p
14h
Is polio in our sewage as worrying as it sounds?
Last week, public health officials declared a 'national incident' after they found vaccine-derived poliovirus in London sewage samples. No cases of polio symptoms have been reported but there is evidence the virus is spreading. So what does it mean to have found the virus almost 20 years after the UK was declared polio-free? Ian Sample speaks to epidemiologist Nicholas Grassly to find out how wor
17h
Is polio in our sewage as worrying as it sounds?
Last week, public health officials declared a 'national incident' after they found vaccine-derived poliovirus in London sewage samples. No cases of polio symptoms have been reported but there is evidence the virus is spreading. So what does it mean to have found the virus almost 20 years after the UK was declared polio-free? Ian Sample speaks to epidemiologist Nicholas Grassly to find out how worr
17h
Shining some light on the obscure proteome
Mass-spectrometry based proteomics is the big-data science of proteins that allows the monitoring of the abundance of thousands of proteins in a sample at once. Therefore, it is a particularly well-suited readout for discovering which proteins are targeted by any small molecule. An international research team has investigated this using chemical proteomics.
21h
Immune cells anchored in tissues offer unique defenses against pathogens and cancers
Researchers have gained ground in understanding unique immune cells equipped to remember the identities of malicious invaders. The researchers developed a new atlas that describes tissue-resident memory T cells in diverse tissue settings, boosting the prospects of the development of immune defense strategies to enhance immunity at sites vulnerable to infection.
21h
Space Travel Will Absolutely Gut the Environment, Scientists Warn
Space travel is undoubtedly one of the most exciting frontiers in science, especially now that there's significant private investment from companies like SpaceX — but it comes at a significant cost as well. With launch rates in recent decades tripling according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), as well as significant investments in space tourism, the damage space trav
22h
Doctors treat first UK patient in Covid 'super donor' blood trial
Reopened trial to look at whether plasma with high levels of antibodies can help save lives of immunosuppressed Doctors have treated the first UK patient in a reopened clinical trial that will explore whether blood plasma from "super donors" can help fight Covid in those with weakened immune systems. Super donors produce exceptionally high levels of antibodies after infection and vaccination, and
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Board game developed by scientists is winning plaudits for inspiring students to consider STEM careers
A team of scientists and a games specialist have designed "Diamond: The Game," a board game developed to give secondary school students a chance to explore a broad range of STEM scientific careers and subjects. This is achieved through firsthand experience of the different aspects of working in scientific research and life as a scientist and shows how research at a facility like Diamond underpins
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New clues on unsolved genetic diseases in children
Scientists have discovered a new way to interpret unsolved Mendelian diseases — diseases inherited from either parent due to gene mutations in the developing egg or sperm — through studying the inheritance of a protein known as SMCHD1 which is coded by the SMCHD1 gene.
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Norovirus and other 'stomach viruses' can spread through saliva
A class of viruses known to cause severe diarrheal diseases — including the one famous for widespread outbreaks on cruise ships — can grow in the salivary glands of mice and spread through their saliva, scientists have discovered. The findings show that a new route of transmission exists for these common viruses, which afflict billions of people each year worldwide and can be deadly.
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Best Vintage Turntables in 2022
Interest in vintage turntables has risen steadily in recent years despite streaming's reign as the medium of choice for listening to music. The trend follows the resurgence of vinyl records, which reached a new high in 2021 when vinyl outsold compact discs for the first time since 1991. Clearly, consumers still place a high value on the listening experience, especially at home where audiophiles c
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Someone Slipped Hundreds of Fake Articles About Things That Never Happened Onto Wikipedia
Totally Made Up A mysterious Chinese Wikipedia contributor who goes by the alias "Zhemao" spent ten years making up fictional accounts of Russian history, writing over 200 articles, and contributing to hundreds of others, Chinese English-language publication Sixth Tone reports . Wikipedia editors have since noticed the falsified accounts — after ten years of unknowingly hosting their contribution
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Bad news for Paxlovid? Coronavirus can find multiple ways to evade COVID-19 drug
Prescriptions for Pfizer's blockbuster drug Paxlovid have skyrocketed in recent weeks. That's good news for many COVID-19 patients, as the pill has been proven to reduce severe disease from SARS-CoV-2 infections. But a bevy of new lab studies shows the coronavirus can mutate in ways that make it less susceptible to the drug, by far the most widely used of the two oral antiviral drugs authorized t
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Capturing an elusive shadow: State-by-state gun ownership
In a new study, researchers describe a spatio-temporal model to predict trends in firearm prevalence on a state-by-state level by fusing data from two available proxies — background checks per capita and suicides committed with a firearm in a given state. Calibrating their results with yearly survey data, they determined that the two proxies can be simultaneously considered to draw precise inform
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Helping babies to sleep more
Researchers have trained new mothers in skills that help newborns sleep more during the night. New research shows that second children in these families also slept longer.
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The Domino Effects of New Anti-abortion Laws
This is an edition of Up for Debate, a newsletter by Conor Friedersdorf. On Wednesdays, he rounds up timely conversations and solicits reader responses to one thought-provoking question. Later, he publishes some thoughtful replies. Sign up for the newsletter here. Question of the Week Should Americans have a right to privacy and/or bodily autonomy? If so, what should those rights encompass and ex
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Can Computers Be Mathematicians?
How do you teach mathematics to an artificial intelligence? AI has already bested humans at problem-solving tasks that include games like chess and Go. But before any task can be tackled by a machine, it must be reinterpreted as directions in a language that computers can understand. For the last few years, researchers and amateurs all over the world have worked together to translate the essentia
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