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Nyheder2022maj03

Alito's Plan to Repeal the 20th Century
If you are an American with a young daughter, she will grow up in a world without the right to choose when and where she gives birth, and in which nothing restrains a state from declaring her womb its property, with all the invasive authorities that implies. That is the significance of the draft Supreme Court opinion leaked to Politico , which shows that the right-wing majority on the Court inten
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Skeletal remains in Bronze Age Orkney cemetery suggest large influx of women from continental Europe
A team of researchers affiliated with the University of Huddersfield in England reports evidence suggesting that large numbers of women from the European continent migrated to the Orkney Islands during the Bronze Age. In their paper published in the journal Antiquity, the group describes their study of the remains of people buried in a Bronze Age cemetery on the island of Westray, one of the north
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You Were Right About COVID, and Then You Weren't
I n the spring of 2020 , as Americans continued to proclaim their excitement for basketball games and parades, an ER doctor named Dylan Smith watched in dismay. Was everyone else ignoring reality? That March, New York City hesitated to close its schools during the city's first COVID wave. Smith was horrified. A major pandemic was arriving, and softening its blow would require closing schools, whi
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Brace for May 9
Sign up for Tom's newsletter, Peacefield, here. In the West, May 9 usually passes without much notice. In Russia, however, it marks the surrender of Nazi Germany and the end of World War II in Europe. Russia's Victory Day is a time for military parades and solemn remembrances, something like if the United States rolled Veterans Day and Memorial Day into one gigantic military-patriotic celebration
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Science has spoken: Tell the truth on Facebook or risk your reputation
Online social networks (OSN) like Facebook and Twitter have created a space for people to easily express their opinions, which can encourage open dialogue and stimulate plenty of disagreements. Research now reveals that just like in face-to-face relationships, intellectually humble behavior, like admitting when you are wrong, leads to better impression formation online.
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New control electronics for quantum computers that improve performance, cut costs
When designing a next-generation quantum computer, a surprisingly large problem is bridging the communication gap between the classical and quantum worlds. Such computers need a specialized control and readout electronics to translate back and forth between the human operator and the quantum computer's languages—but existing systems are cumbersome and expensive.
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My Mother Was Wrong
Sign up for Molly's newsletter, Wait, What?, here. We may have made a lot of mistakes, but at least we gave you Roe . I can't even count the number of times my mother said some version of this to me. It was her way of explaining an earlier generation's approach to feminism, and what she would say to me when she was trying to make sense of her own legacy. Maybe it wasn't a normal thing for a mothe
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Predicting how soon the universe could collapse if dark energy has quintessence
A trio of astrophysicists, two from Princeton, the other from New York University, has calculated estimations on how soon the universe could collapse if theories regarding dark energy as having quintessence are correct. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Cosmin Andrei, Anna Ijjas, and Paul Steinhardt suggest it could be as soon as 100 million years from no
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Scientists Say Key to Feeding World May Be Human Urine
Thirst for Knowledge An increase in water shortages and greenhouse gas emissions is a serious enough climate problem that scientists are willing to go to any lengths to save the world. One trick in our bioagricultural arsenal? Re-using human pee, they say. No, we're not talking about a Bear Grylls LARP club . Instead, a group of scientists told national French news service AFP today that human ur
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College Students Say Crying In Exams Activates "Cheating" Eye Tracker Software
Colleges and universities are increasingly using digital tools to prevent cheating during online exams, since so many people are taking class from home or their dorm rooms in the era of COVID-19. Needless to say, there are pain points. The programs — angry commenters namechecked software including Pearson VUE and Honorlock — track eye movements and even anxious sobbing during hard tests, one comm
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Covid hospitalisation may affect thinking similar to 20 years of ageing
Some people experience lingering cognitive decline, with degree of impairment linked to illness severity People who have been hospitalised with Covid may be left with difficulties in thinking comparable in magnitude to ageing 20 years, research suggests. As the pandemic swept the world it became apparent that coronavirus could not only cause immediate health problems but also leave some people wi
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Why is it so hard to control our appetites? A doctor's struggles with giving up sugar
We've become convinced that if we can eat more healthily, we will be morally better people. But where does this idea come from? Near the end of the hellish first year of the coronavirus pandemic, I was possessed by the desire to eliminate sugar – all refined sugar – from my diet. In retrospect, it probably wasn't the best time to add a new challenge to my life. My wife and I had been struggling t
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Chinese Nursing Home Brings Resident to Morgue While Still Alive
A new video circulating on Chinese social media shows workers in full protection gear unloading a yellow body bag from the back of a hearse in Shanghai — only to make the shocking discovery that the person was still alive and moving, CNN reports . The footage, which has gone viral on Weibo, shows the nursing home resident's head poking out of the bag, presumably scaring the bejesus out of the emp
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The Conservatives Aren't Just Ending Roe—They're Delighting in It
Something fundamental about the Supreme Court has changed in recent months. It is not simply that the Court has a conservative supermajority, although that is true enough . What is really striking is just how emboldened that conservative supermajority is—how willing to take on a number of deeply divisive culture-war issues; how blasé about making major decisions via the Court's shadow docket ; ho
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Vampire Association Warns Against Drinking Human Blood
Acclaimed actor Megan Fox likes to dabble the Dark Arts by drinking her boyfriend rapper Colson "Machine Gun Kelly" Baker's blood every once in a while , a detail about their relationship that has led to countless tabloid headlines. "So, I guess to drink each other's blood might mislead people or people are imagining us with goblets and we're like Game of Thrones, drinking each other's blood," Fo
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Pfizer accused of Covid profiteering as first-quarter sales hit $26bn
Pharma firm criticised over pricing and for keeping monopoly control over vaccine and new Paxlovid pill See all our coronavirus coverage Pfizer has made nearly $26bn (£21bn) in revenues in the first three months of the year, the bulk from its Covid-19 vaccine and new pill to treat the virus, prompting fresh accusations of pandemic profiteering. Covid vaccines have saved many lives around the worl
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Scientists Propose Planet-Sized Telescope
Megascope A team of researchers suggest we could use existing quantum computing methods to build massive telescope arrays the size of entire planets. These theoretical observatories could allow us to peek even further into deep space and resolve faraway targets in much higher resolution, something that could "revolutionize astronomical imaging," the team led by Zixin Huang at Macquarie University
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Terrifying Footage Shows Epic Destructive Power of Tornado
Terrifying Tornado Terrifying new drone footage shows a massive tornado leaving a devastating trail of debris behind in Andover, Kansas. The crisp high-definition video , making the rounds on social media today, shows the hurricane first form in spectacular detail — and then show off its horrifying destructive power. "Note how the tornado propagates via vortex dynamics and likely terrain," meteor
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Physicists Pin Down How Quantum Uncertainty Sharpens Measurements
Scientific progress has been inseparable from better measurements. Before 1927, only human ingenuity seemed to limit how precisely we could measure things. Then Werner Heisenberg discovered that quantum mechanics imposes a fundamental limit on the precision of some simultaneous measurements. The better you pin down a particle's position, for instance, the less certain you can possibly be about it
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The New Doctor Strange Is Not Just Another Marvel Movie
The last time Sam Raimi made a comic-book movie, nobody had ever heard of the Marvel Cinematic Universe. That film was Spider-Man 3 , in 2007, the final entry in his trilogy of adventures starring Tobey Maguire as the hero. It seemed like a story at war with itself; the director's earnest zaniness was bumping up against studio demands for more villains, more plot twists, and more money on the scr
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JJ Da Boss Returns from Crash and Steals a Win | Street Outlaws: America's List
Stream Street Outlaws: America's List on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/street-outlaws-americas-list #StreetOutlaws #StreetRacing #Discovery Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter:
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Meta has built a massive new language AI—and it's giving it away for free
Meta's AI lab has created a massive new language model that shares both the remarkable abilities and the harmful flaws of OpenAI's pioneering neural network GPT-3 . And in an unprecedented move for Big Tech, it is giving it away to researchers—together with details about how it was built and trained. "We strongly believe that the ability for others to scrutinize your work is an important part of
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Will the Large Hadron Collider find a new fifth force of nature? – podcast
The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has recently been switched back on after a three-year hiatus to resolve a mysterious and tantalising result from its previous run. So far, everything discovered at the LHC has agreed with the standard model , the guiding theory of particle physics that describes the building blocks of matter, and the forces that guide them. However, recent findings show particles b
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Joe Biden Can Learn From My Mistakes
Despite all the criticism thrown at him, President Joe Biden is actually a very good messenger. He's likable, relatable, and reassuring. And as they used to say about George W. Bush, I'm pretty sure he'd be fun to have a beer with. Biden's also accomplished: He led an impressive vaccine rollout, brought the economy back, and passed the biggest infrastructure bill in generations. Not bad for a lit
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'You Cannot Host Guests Forever'
Photographs by Marcus Glahn O n February 24 , within hours of the start of Russia's invasion of Ukraine, Karolina Lewestam and her husband, Jakub Fast, saw on social media that Ukrainians were arriving at bus and train stations in Warsaw with no idea where they would sleep. Without even pausing to discuss it, the couple—a writer and a banker—jumped into group chats with neighbors whom they had ne
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Amazing Video Shows Helicopter Catching Falling Rocket
Yoink! New Zealand-based space startup Rocket Lab pulled off an amazing stunt on Tuesday: it caught the first stage of its Electron rocket with a helicopter as it made its parachute-aided descent after launching into space. The amazing stunt was caught from multiple angles, including a first-person view from inside the helicopter. A video shared on social media by Rocket Lab CEO Peter Beck shows
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The Brain Has a Built-in System to Keep Unwanted Memories Out, Study Finds
We all have memories we'd rather forget. Yet too often they bubble up into our consciousness. That gaffe at work or during an interview? A faceplant after slipping on ice on a first date? An accidental reply-all to the whole family? (Cringe). For most, a quick jab of embarrassment, anger, or fear is all we feel and it quickly dissipates. But for people with post-traumatic disorders (PTSD) or depr
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This company wants to use carbon dioxide to store renewable power on the grid
In the quest to find a better way to store power for the grid, an Italian startup is turning to an unlikely source: carbon dioxide. The company, called Energy Dome , has built a test facility to put the greenhouse gas to work in energy storage. Renewable power has been growing worldwide, but sources like wind and solar aren't available consistently, creating a need for storage solutions. Today, m
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Twitter Bots Love Tesla. Elon Musk Is Pledging to Destroy Them
It's apparently not just governments using bot networks to influence the conversation on social media. While researching Tesla's social media footprint in 2021, University of Maryland researcher David Kirsch and his associate Mohsen Chowdhury say they discovered something odd. In 2013, when Tesla stock plummeted following reports that one of the burgeoning electric vehicle maker's Model S Sedans
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Tasmania goes net carbon negative by reducing logging
Tasmania has become one of the first jurisdictions in the world to reduce their carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and increase removals to become net carbon negative, according to new research from The Australian National University (ANU) and Griffith University.
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Spacecraft navigation uses X-rays from dead stars
The remnants of a collapsed neutron star, called a pulsar, are magnetically charged and spinning anywhere from one rotation per second to hundreds of rotations per second. These celestial bodies, each 12 to 15 miles in diameter, generate light in the X-ray wavelength range. Researchers at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign developed a new way spacecraft can use signals from multiple pulsa
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'Supersonic ballet': helicopter briefly catches falling rocket
Rocket Lab test successfully hooks booster in midair before having to drop it into South Pacific A space company has briefly managed to catch a falling rocket using a helicopter and a hook in a test described by its chief executive as "something of a supersonic ballet". The test was part of Rocket Lab's attempts to find relatively low-cost ways of recovering rockets for multiple missions to space
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The Download: Storing renewable power with carbon dioxide, and Roe v Wade under threat
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. This company wants to use carbon dioxide to store renewable power on the grid Sourcing power: Renewable power has been growing worldwide, but sources like wind and solar aren't available consistently. In the quest to find a better way to store power for the gr
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Beetle iridescence a deceptive form of warning coloration, study finds
A new study published today in Animal Behaviour shows for the first time that brilliant iridescence and gloss found in some animals can have a protective function by working as a form of deceptive warning coloration, and that it is the key feature of iridescence, its changing colors, that is important for this effect.
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Seashell-inspired sugar shield protects materials in hostile environments
Word of an extraordinarily inexpensive material, lightweight enough to protect satellites against debris in the cold of outer space, cohesive enough to strengthen the walls of pressurized vessels experiencing average conditions on Earth and yet heat-resistant enough at 1,500 degrees Celsius or 2,732 degrees Fahrenheit to shield instruments against flying debris, raises the question: what single ma
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NASA's Mars Helicopter scouts ridgeline for Perseverance science team
NASA's Ingenuity Mars Helicopter recently surveyed an intriguing ridgeline near the ancient river delta in Jezero Crater. The images—captured on April 23, during the tiny helicopter's 27th flight—were taken at the request of the Perseverance Mars rover science team, which wanted a closer look at the sloping outcrop.
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who are the big hitters in cog sci today?
Im new to the field with a background in philosophy, and Ive read Bermúdez's Cognitive science and The mind's new science , but Im still kinda confused on where to go from there.Are the early cog scientists still relevant? should I bother with Miller? If not, how should I research current position on lets say preception, is Gibson still relevant and how could I view criticism of his works. Philos
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Student satisfaction in flipped classroom is built on guidance, pedagogy, and a safe atmosphere
Students are satisfied with flipped classroom when they have systematic guidance on the teaching approach in use, comprehensive understanding of both the content being taught and the discipline more generally, and a safe learning atmosphere conducive to conversation. Teachers also need to pay attention to the students' technological skills and their own contact teaching skills, according to a new
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How the black rat colonized Europe in the Roman and Medieval periods
New ancient DNA analysis has shed light on how the black rat, blamed for spreading Black Death, dispersed across Europe — revealing that the rodent colonized the continent on two occasions in the Roman and Medieval periods. By analyzing DNA from ancient black rat remains found at archaeological sites spanning the 1st to the 17th centuries in Europe and North Africa, researchers have pieced togeth
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Beetle iridescence a deceptive form of warning coloration
A new study published today in Animal Behaviour shows for the first time that brilliant iridescence and gloss found in some animals can have a protective function by working as a form of deceptive warning coloration, and that it is the key feature of iridescence, its changing colors, that is important for this effect.
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Study develops framework for forecasting contribution of snowpack to flood risk during winter storms
In the Sierra Nevada, midwinter "rain-on-snow" events occur when rain falls onto existing snowpack, and have resulted in some of the region's biggest and most damaging floods. Rain-on-snow events are projected to increase in size and frequency in the coming years, but little guidance exists for water resource managers on how to mitigate flood risk during times of rapidly changing snowpack. Their m
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Experiments measure freezing point of extraterrestrial oceans to aid search for life
Researchers from the University of Washington and the University of California, Berkeley have conducted experiments that measured the physical limits for the existence of liquid water in icy extraterrestrial worlds. This blend of geoscience and engineering was done to aid in the search for extraterrestrial life and the upcoming robotic exploration of oceans on moons of other planets.
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Proposed spacecraft navigation uses x-rays from dead stars
The remnants of a collapsed neutron star, called a pulsar, are magnetically charged and spinning anywhere from one rotation per second to hundreds of rotations per second. These celestial bodies, each 12 to 15 miles in diameter, generate light in the x-ray wavelength range. Researchers have developed a new way spacecraft can use signals from multiple pulsars to navigate in deep space.
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Best Cameras for Music Videos in 2022
The best cameras for music videos are perfect for any musician trying to make their music cinematic. Don't believe a word "The Buggles" said back in 1980: video did not in fact, kill the radio star. Music videos are on occasion, as iconic as songs themselves. But no matter how good a song is, you're simply not going to capture all that pathos on video without the right equipment. Luckily, not all
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New research demonstrates cognitive training improves student learning
New research from Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas demonstrates that professional development with a focus on neuroscience equips teachers with the tools and confidence to reduce learning gaps in eighth grade students, as measured by State of Texas Assessment of Academic Readiness (STAAR) performance.
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'Tax haven' companies may be less risky than investors think
Companies incorporated in tax havens are often considered more opaque regarding their finances, which could make them risky investments. But a recent study from North Carolina State University finds that many of these companies are actually more transparent than their counterparts in countries that are not tax havens.
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Name that animal: my DNA detector
Nature, Published online: 03 May 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01206-z Kristine Bohmann has invented a sampler that collects genetic information from the air.
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Health data for all
Nature, Published online: 03 May 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01205-0 Medical records can be tricky to access because of privacy and variability, but data-sharing efforts are unlocking their potential.
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Daily briefing: Why video calls are bad for brainstorming
Nature, Published online: 29 April 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01228-7 Virtual meetings can limit creative ideas. Plus, a dog's personality has little to do with its breed and that climate change increases the risk of cross-species viral transmission.
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What happens when traits jump between branches of the tree of life
We all must play the game of life with the cards we're dealt, so the common aphorism goes. In biology, this means organisms must compete through natural selection with the genes and anatomy they were born with. But the saying is a lie. Okay, it's not exactly a lie, but modern research suggests that the game of life is far more complicated than we had anticipated. There are opportunities to swap ca
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Lost value of landfilled plastic in US
With mountains of plastic waste piling up in landfills and scientists estimating that there will be more plastics by weight than fish in the ocean by 2050, the growing environmental challenge presented to the world by plastics is well understood. What is less well understood by the scientific community is the lost energy opportunity. In short, plastic waste is also energy wasted.
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Freshwater habitats have super high biodiversity for tiny area
Ponds, lakes, rivers, and streams cover only a tiny fraction of Earth's surface, yet they are home to a comparatively large number of different species, according to a study. The findings have implications for conservation efforts around the globe. While much research has focused on the striking differences in biodiversity between tropical and temperate regions, another equally dramatic pattern h
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Please Ignore My Last 577 Tweets
Updated at 5:38 p.m. on May 3, 2022. If you had told me last Wednesday afternoon, when my Twitter account had a grand total of three tweets and 200-something followers, that roughly 24 hours later the account would have tweeted 577 times and boosted its follower count to 42,000, I would not have believed you. And if you had further told me that this unfathomable ascent was all part of a massive s
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Anti-idling campaign reduces idling time at elementary schools
An anti-idling campaign at elementary schools was effective in reducing idling time by 38%, and an air monitoring experiment found that air quality around schools can vary over short distances. These findings can help schools and school districts plan to protect students, staff and the community from unhealthy air pollution both indoors and outdoors.
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Research Study: The REACT Study (Boston, MA)
Hi everyone! My name is Meghan and I am a researcher at Mass General. I'm writing to share some information about a study in my unit that's currently recruiting. If you or someone you know are interested, please feel free to share this info and/or PM me. Thank you. REACT is a 12-week study for females ages 14- 35 who have missed their period in the past 6 months because of exercise activity or re
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Collective Field Index
Readers discover the positive and negative influence of dominant/submissive brain regions correlating the social, emotional, and political attributes in word populations of trending narratives. Visualize the activity of the field and its reflection of collective brain regions dominating the conversation. Compare news articles and trending narratives to track & visualize the collective mind. Image
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Blood clot expert working with NASA to study blood flow, clot formation in zero gravity
Are astronauts more likely to develop blood clots during space missions due to zero gravity? That's the question NASA is trying to answer with help from UNC School of Medicine's Stephan Moll, MD, professor in the UNC Department of Medicine. A new publication in Vascular Medicine shows the results of an occupational surveillance program spurred by the development of a deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in
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Podcast: What will 'free speech' mean on Elon Musk's Twitter?
With Elon Musk purchasing controlling interest in Twitter for $44 billion, the big question now remains, "what is he going to do with it?" Musk already says he wants to take the company private and promote "free speech." But what does that mean? There is considerable legitimate concern over having one man—and especially one as controversial as Musk—determine what is "free speech" to the 300 milli
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Punishments for violating supervised release may violate constitutional rights
People who violate their supervised release—a period of community supervision after release from prison—by committing new crimes are punished not only for their crimes, but also for violating their supervision. In a new paper to be published in the Virginia Law Review, Jacob Schuman, assistant professor of law, Penn State, conducted the first comprehensive examination of how revocation of supervis
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Which parts of Mars are the safest from cosmic radiation?
In the coming decade, NASA and China plan to send the first crewed missions to Mars. This will consist of both agencies sending spacecraft in 2033, 2035, 2037, and every 26 months after that to coincide with Mars opposition (i.e., when Earth and Mars are closest in their orbits). The long-term aim of these programs is to establish a base on Mars that will serve as a hub that accommodates future mi
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Physicists develop ideal testing conditions of solar cells for space applications
Researchers at the University of Oklahoma, with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, the University of North Texas, the NASA Glenn Research Center and several collaborators within the space power community, have recently published a paper in the journal Joule that describes the optimal conditions for testing perovskite solar cells for space.
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Theraband review
We dive into the world of gym equipment to decide if Theraband resistance bands are a worthwhile investment for fitness fans and recovering patients
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Apple Watch SE review
The Apple Watch SE might not have all the features available in the newer models, but this is a great Apple Watch for most
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Researchers discover new species of salamander from Gulf Coastal plains hotspot
There are approximately 750 species of salamander known to science, a third of which reside in North America. Now, a team of researchers led by R. Alexander Pyron, the Robert F. Griggs Associate Professor of Biology at the George Washington University, has discovered a new species of swamp-dwelling dusky salamander from the Gulf Coastal Plain of southeastern Mississippi and southwestern Alabama.
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Corn genetic heritage the strongest driver of chemical defenses against munching bugs
Plants release chemical distress signals when under attack from chewing insects. These "911 calls," as entomologist Esther Ngumbi refers to them, alert other bugs that dinner or a nice place to lay their eggs is available nearby. If predatory or parasitic insects detect the right signal, they swoop in like saviors to make a meal out of—or lay their eggs in—the bodies of the herbivore insects.
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Untrained 9/11 first responders are 5X more likely to have considered suicide
Untrained first responders who helped after the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, are more than five times more likely than traditional first responders to have considered suicide. Those responders who assisted in recovery efforts include construction workers, clean-up staff, and other untrained nontraditional emergency employees. In an analysis of more than 30,000 World Trade Center emerg
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Gum inflammation can raise arthritis risk
Inflammation in the gums can increase susceptibility to other forms of inflammation, such as arthritis, through changes to immune cell precursors in the bone marrow, according to new research. The immune system remembers. Often this memory, primed by past encounters with threats like bacteria or viruses, is an asset. But when that memory is sparked by internal drivers, like chronic inflammation,
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What is the universe?
It's quite a big question and a lot is still unknown about the universe, but we'll tell you everything that we do know, from how the universe was created, how old it is and what it's even made of.
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Face shape influences mask fit, suggests problems with double masking against COVID-19
In a new study, researchers used principal component analysis along with fluid dynamics simulation models to show the crucial importance of proper fit for all types of masks and how face shape influences the most ideal fit. They modeled a moderate cough jet from a mouth of an adult male wearing a cloth mask over the nose and mouth with elastic bands wrapped around the ears and calculated the maxim
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Best Mother's Day Gifts in 2022
If you're still scrambling to figure out what to get the mom in your life, this selection of the best Mother's Days Gifts will please any and all mommies, aunties, grandmas, and any other configuration of maternal figures. I don't mean to get all Fred Rogers on you, but imagine for a second all the times that mom was there for you, in good times and bad, going the extra mile to make you smile. No
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Indigenous peoples have shucked billions of oysters around the world sustainably
A new global study of Indigenous oyster fisheries shows that oyster fisheries were hugely productive and sustainably managed on a massive scale over hundreds and even thousands of years of intensive harvest. The study's broadest finding was that long before European colonizers arrived, the Indigenous groups in these locations harvested and ate immense quantities of oysters in a manner that did not
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Bacteriophage treatment of disseminated cutaneous Mycobacterium chelonae infection
Nature Communications, Published online: 03 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-29689-4 Increasing rates of multidrug-resistant bacterial infections has renewed interest in the therapeutic use of phages. Here the authors report an individual with cutaneous M. chelonae infection, and the improvement of disease upon treatment with a bacteriophage in combination with antimicrobial therapy.
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Triplewise information tradeoff in quantum measurement has been proved
Schrödinger's cat is a thought experiment designed to explain quantum superposition and quantum measurement, which are the core characteristics of quantum physics. In this experiment, the cat inside the box can be both alive and dead at the same time (quantum superposition), and its state (dead or alive) is decided the moment the box is opened (measured). Such quantum superposition and measurement
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Plastic-eating enzyme could gobble up tons and tons of waste
Researchers have created an enzyme variant that can break down environmentally damaging plastics, which typically take centuries to degrade, in just a matter of hours to days. This discovery could help solve one of the world's most pressing environmental problems: what to do with the billions of tons of plastic waste piling up in landfills and polluting our natural lands and water. The enzyme has
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New technology offers fighting chance against grapevine killer
CRISPR gene-editing technology represents hope for controlling the grapevine-killing glassy-winged sharpshooter. Scientists have demonstrated that this technology can make permanent physical changes in the insect. They also showed these changes were passed down to three or more generations of insects.
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Tired Australian magpies sing less, sing later and are less motivated
Sleep deprived Australian magpies are tired and unmotivated, just like humans, according to new research from La Trobe University in Melbourne which has found that, after a poor night's sleep, the common black and white songbird shifts their normal singing from twilight to midday, have a reduced song bandwidth and struggle with cognitive tasks.
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Investigating Earth's interior using the distribution of electrical conductivity and density in the crust
Knowledge about the structure and composition of the Earth's crust is important for understanding the dynamics of the Earth. For example, the presence or absence of melt or fluids plays a major role in plate tectonic processes. Most our knowledge in this area comes from geophysical surveys. However, the relationship between measurable geophysical parameters and the actual conditions in the Earth's
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Metamaterial significantly enhances chiral nanoparticle signals
The left hand looks like the right hand in the mirror but the left-handed glove does not fit on the right hand. Chirality refers to this property where the object cannot be superimposed on to the mirror image. This property in molecules is an important factor in pharmaceutical research as it can turn drugs toxic.
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Hubble views a galactic oddity
The ultra-diffuse galaxy GAMA 526784 appears as a tenuous patch of light in this image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. This wispy object resides in the constellation Hydra, roughly four billion light-years from Earth. Ultra-diffuse galaxies such as GAMA 526784 have a number of peculiarities. For example, they can have either very low or high amounts of dark matter, the invisible substanc
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Image: Tantalus Fossae on Mars
This network of long grooves and scratches forms part of a giant fault system on Mars known as Tantalus Fossae, and is shown here as seen by ESA's Mars Express. At first glance, these features look as if someone has raked their fingernails across the surface of the Red Planet, gouging out lengthy trenches as they did so.
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Tree sensors track urban growth, flowering and more
Low-cost "tree fitbits" can pinpoint the precise timing of tree activities, like spring bloom or autumn leaf change, according to a new CU Boulder study. Researchers outfitted two East Boulder ash trees with high-resolution accelerometers, efficiently tracking how the trees responded to changing seasons. And in the coming years, arborists could efficiently monitor trees by the thousands with this
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DLR provides female measuring mannequins for the NASA Artemis I mission
In 2022, NASA's Artemis I mission will send a spacecraft capable of supporting a human crew to the moon for the first time in almost 50 years. On this uncrewed test flight, it will be the twin measuring mannequins Helga and Zohar on board the Orion capsule. The MARE experiment devised by the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR), will use two identical "phantoms"
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Building nanoalloy libraries from laser-induced thermionic emission reduction experiments
High-entropy nanoalloys (HENA) have widespread applications in materials science and applied physics. However, their synthesis is challenging due to slow kinetics that cause phase segregation, sophisticated pretreatment of precursors, and inert conditions. In a new report now published in Science Advances, Haoqing Jiang and a team of scientists in industrial engineering, nanotechnology and materia
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Author Correction: AMMI and GGE biplot analysis for yield performance and stability assessment of selected Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea L. Verdc.) genotypes under the multi-environmental trials (METs)
Scientific Reports, Published online: 03 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41598-022-11781-w Author Correction: AMMI and GGE biplot analysis for yield performance and stability assessment of selected Bambara groundnut ( Vigna subterranea L. Verdc.) genotypes under the multi-environmental trials (METs)
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City living may set kids up for more psychotic-like experiences
The more urban of an environment a child lives in—road proximity, houses with lead paint, families in poverty, and income disparity—the greater number of psychotic-like experiences they may have over a year's time. It has long been understood that environmental and socio-economic factors, including income disparity, family poverty, and air pollution , increase young adults' risk of developing psy
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New Brain Implant Reverses Parkinson's Symptoms
(Photo: Natasha Connell/Unsplash) A patient in the United Kingdom is the first to receive a new brain implant that appears to "reverse" the symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Tony Howells, who was diagnosed with Parkinson's nine years ago, received the experimental implant in 2019 at Southmead Hospital in Bristol. Howells says the impact the implant has had on his life since then has been "amazing.
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Risk för lägre grundvattennivåer i norra Sverige
När vintrarna blir varmare i norra Sverige finns en risk att grundvattnet sjunker, trots riklig nederbörd. Boven i dramat är kvardröjande tjäle som hindrar smältande snö och regn att fylla på magasinen i jorden. Det visar en ny avhandling från Göteborgs universitet. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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Våren är sen i år – björk och hägg tvekar
Våren dröjer ovanligt länge i år, visar den årliga medborgarforskningen Vårkollen. Det innebär att björklöven dröjer och häggen tvekar att blomma. Men några arter som brukar vara sena har däremot haft lite mer bråttom i år. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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Enklare hälsokontroller med ny teknologi
En testbädd med ny medicinsk teknik kan vara ett steg mot enklare hälsokontroller. Det går åt mindre resurser och ingen kroppskontakt behövs, något som ibland är ett problem med anledning av till exempel religion. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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Ryttare vill ha Wikipedia om hästar
Många ryttare vänder sig till sociala medier för att dela tips och få svar på frågor. Samtidigt tycker de att informationen på nätet kan vara problematisk och efterfrågar faktabaserad kunskap. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
10h
Using the Sun as a Lens
Is it even theoretically possible to image in any detail the surface of an exoplanet light years away? An optical telescope would need to be many times the diameter of the Earth to produce such images. This "brute force" method of just building a giant telescope is probably never going to happen. Instead we need to find a more clever way, a method of exploiting the laws of physics to magnify dist
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US Military's Next-Gen Fighter Expected to Cost Hundreds of Millions Each
The Lockheed-Martin F-35 Lightning II is the US military's current top-of-the-line fighter aircraft, but its history of cost overruns and technical issues has made it a poster child for government waste. And that may be nothing compared to the next generation of air combat technology. At a recent House Armed Services Committee hearing, Air Force Secretary Frank Kendall claims the so-called Next-G
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Rapid access to polycyclic N-heteroarenes from unactivated, simple azines via a base-promoted Minisci-type annulation
Nature Communications, Published online: 03 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30086-0 The functionalisation of unactivated azines has been restricted because of their intrinsic low reactivity. Here the authors show a transition-metal-free, radical relay π-extension approach to produce N-doped polycyclic aromatic compounds directly from simple azines and cyclic iodonium salts.
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Dihydroquinazolinones as adaptative C(sp3) handles in arylations and alkylations via dual catalytic C–C bond-functionalization
Nature Communications, Published online: 03 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-29984-0 Although derived from feedstock chemicals and therefore in principle abundant, ketones are not widely used as cross-coupling partners in organic synthesis. Herein, the authors use ketone derivatives as one-electron handles for forging C(sp3) architectures via dual photo- and nickel catalysis.
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CNPY4 inhibits the Hedgehog pathway by modulating membrane sterol lipids
Nature Communications, Published online: 03 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30186-x Although lipids are known to affect Hedgehog (Hh) signalling, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here, the authors show that Canopy4 regulates membrane sterol lipid levels, with knockout mouse embryos exhibiting digit number changes and other Hh signalling-related developmental defects.
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Simultaneous stabilization of actin cytoskeleton in multiple nephron-specific cells protects the kidney from diverse injury
Nature Communications, Published online: 03 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30101-4 A common cellular manifestation for diverse kidney diseases is dysregulated actin cytoskeleton in distinct cell types that include glomerular podocytes and tubular epithelial cells. Here, authors pharmacologically activate dynamin and this results in polymerization and crosslinking of actin filaments to establish
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Ambient-pressure hydrogenation of CO2 into long-chain olefins
Nature Communications, Published online: 03 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-29971-5 The conversion of CO2 by renewable power-generated hydrogen is a promising approach to a sustainable production of long-chain olefins. Here the authors report a Cu-Fe catalyst which achieves the hydrogenation of CO2 into long-chain olefins under ambient pressure via the synergy of carbide mechanism and CO inserti
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DNA methylation signature of chronic low-grade inflammation and its role in cardio-respiratory diseases
Nature Communications, Published online: 03 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-29792-6 Chronic inflammation, marked by C-reactive protein, has been associated with changes in methylation, but the causal relationship is unclear. Here, the authors perform a Epigenome-wide association meta-analysis for C-reactive protein levels and find that these methylation changes are likely the consequence of infl
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UPenn prof retracts three papers for 'substantive questions'
A pharmacology researcher at the University of Pennsylvania is up to four retractions for problems with the data in his articles after a neurology journal pulled three papers late last month. According to the Journal of Neurotrauma, a Mary Ann Liebert title, William Armstead – who holds a research professorship in Anesthesiology and Critical Care … Continue reading
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Fitbit Inspire 2 review
The Fitbit Inspire 2 is a simple, passive health tracker that's inexpensive – and ideal for those just getting into activity
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Dr. Andrew Huberman Tickets!!! 5/17 in Seattle!
Hey there! In case there are any fans of his out there! I've got front row meet and greet tickets for Andrew Huberman on May 17th in Seattle. Unfortunately I had to cancel my trip up there 🙁 They were originally $390, but I'm happy to take half price, or the best offer. If anyone is interested in these shoot me a message! Cheers! submitted by /u/Johnny_WakeUp [link] [comments]
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Will the Large Hadron Collider find a new fifth force of nature?
The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has recently been switched back on after a three-year hiatus to resolve a mysterious and tantalising result from its previous run. So far, everything discovered at the LHC has agreed with the standard model, the guiding theory of particle physics that describes the building blocks of matter, and the forces that guide them. However, recent findings show particles beh
18h
Why do hugs feel good? This chemical messenger
New research indicates why hugs and other varieties of "pleasant touch" feel good. The study in mice identifies a chemical messenger that carries signals between nerve cells that transmit the sensation known as pleasant touch from skin to brain. Such touch—delivered by hugs, holding hands, or caressing, for example—triggers a psychological boost that's important to emotional well-being and health
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Can the warming ocean supply the world's meat?
Currently supplying only 17% of the world's protein supply, most of it wild-caught, the ocean holds great potential to help satisfy the global demand for meat, a new study shows. The global population is expected to exceed 10 billion people in our grandchildren's lifetimes. That's a lot of people to feed. Traditional, land-based means of meat production are facing hard limits for expansion and ch
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Early Intervention for an At-Risk 16-Month Old Using Visual Communication Analysis (VCA) Leads to Gifted Performance.
This research and publication is dedicated to my beloved husband and Ethan's Dad – Gary Shkedy 📷 Dalia Many developmental screeners focus heavily on receptive and expressive language skills, and the extent to which an infant can maneuver their environment. Research with young children typically involve motor skills, language, and occasionally simple procedural or problem solving tasks. The curre
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