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Nyheder2022maj04

Fecal transplants reverse hallmarks of aging
In the search for eternal youth, fecal transplants may seem like an unlikely way to reverse the aging process. However, scientists have provided evidence, from research in mice, that transplanting fecal microbiota from young into old mice can reverse hallmarks of aging in the gut, eyes, and brain. In the reverse experiment, microbes from aged mice induced inflammation in the brain of young recipie
5h
Transition from predictable to variable motor cortex and striatal ensemble patterning during behavioral exploration
Nature Communications, Published online: 04 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30069-1 It is not fully understood how behavioral flexibility is established in the context of automatic performance of a complex motor skill. Here the authors show that corticostriatal activity can flexibly transition between two modes during a reach to-grasp task in rats: reliable neural pattern generation for precise,
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LATEST

Scientists Claim New Enzyme Can Break Down Plastic in a Single Week
Chad Enzyme Scientists used machine learning to discover what they say could be a new way to speed up the process of breaking down plastic significantly, Vice reports . As detailed in a new paper published in the journal Nature , a research team from the University of Texas at Austin modified an enzyme to break down the individual components of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), a commonly used pl
3h
What Alito Got Right
Sign up for David's newsletter, The Third Rail, here. We do not know if Justice Samuel Alito's leaked draft majority opinion in Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health represents the current consensus of a majority of the Supreme Court. We certainly don't know yet if it's a preview of the Court's actual ruling. Decisions are not final until opinions are issued, and dramatic history exists of a Supreme Co
1h
Building a better quantum bit: New qubit breakthrough could transform quantum computing
You are no doubt viewing this article on a digital device whose basic unit of information is the bit, either 0 or 1. Scientists worldwide are racing to develop a new kind of computer based on the use of quantum bits, or qubits, which can simultaneously be 0 and 1 and could one day solve complex problems beyond any classical supercomputers.
4h
Famous NFT Hater Elon Musk Changes Profile Picture to Stolen Apes
In spite of being a fan of Dogecoin , SpaceX and Tesla CEO Elon Musk is a noted hater of NFTs . And now a characteristically cryptic Musk has changed his profile picture to what appears to be a stolen collage of Bored Ape NFTs, inviting drama with the infamously irascible NFT community . "I dunno… seems kinda fungible," Musk tweeted , in an apparent mockery of the tech. The image appears to have
5h
Piece Falls Off Boeing Starliner as It Trundles Toward Launchpad
Oops! After years of setbacks, Boeing is finally rolling out its Starliner spacecraft to the launchpad today for its second attempt to rendezvous with the International Space Station. Doing no favors for the spacecraft's reputation for jankiness , it ran into yet another mishap along the way. While strapped to the back of a large truck, a piece of the capsule's window appeared to pop off, tumblin
2h
Cosmonaut Quits Because He Doesn't Want to "Work for the Americans"
So Long Russian cosmonaut Alexander Skvortsov, whom Russian news outlet Moskovskii Komsomolets describes as the "hero of Russia," gave the outlet a short interview explaining his departure from the space program earlier this week. He says there wasn't enough to keep him busy on the International Space Station — and, pushing him over the edge, Skvortsov doesn't want to collaborate with the America
3h
Biden Is Rightsizing the COVID Crisis
This past weekend, Anthony Fauci bailed on the White House Correspondents' Dinner. President Joe Biden's chief medical adviser concluded that the indoor event, though open only to vaccinated attendees who tested negative for COVID-19 the same day, was too risky for his own taste. Biden himself split the difference and showed up only for the speeches , not for the meal. Asked to explain this turn
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America Is Starting to See What COVID Immunity Really Looks Like
I, as far as I can tell, have not yet been infected by the virus that causes COVID-19. Which, by official counts, makes me an oddball among Americans. Granted, I could be wrong. I've never had a known exposure or symptoms, but contact tracing in the United States is crummy and plenty of infections are silent. I've taken many coronavirus tests, but not that many coronavirus tests, and it's always
3h
If Biden Forgives Student Loans, Voters Won't Forget It
"The main thing is to keep the main thing the main thing." This was the advice that Haley Barbour, the Republican National Committee chair, former governor, and onetime presidential candidate, liked to give to colleagues. It's easy to say, but hard to do. Look at Governor Ron DeSantis in Florida. His main thing should be delivering a strong economy and keeping schools open. Instead, he's let the
9h
The Art of the Dealer
Long ago, before J. D. Vance started doing his best to sound like every other MAGA candidate in the country, he had an ear for a metaphor. Reflecting on how heroin and prescription opioids had ravaged his home state of Ohio, Vance worried that a certain Republican candidate for president would have a similar effect. "[Donald] Trump is cultural heroin. He makes some feel better for a bit. But he c
15h
The Wackadoodle Wave
In November 2020, the Republican Derrick Van Orden narrowly lost his attempt to unseat Representative Ron Kind in Wisconsin's Third District, falling just 10,000 votes behind the veteran Democrat out of nearly 400,000 cast. But Van Orden insisted that voter fraud had tainted the election results. Two months later, the former Navy SEAL was in Washington, D.C., on January 6, "to stand for the integ
8h
Certain gut microbes may affect stroke risk and severity, scientists find
Studies of ischaemic stroke patients open up possibility of treatments to prevent condition and improve recovery Scientists have identified specific groups of gut microbes that could increase or decrease someone's risk of suffering the most common type of stroke. The research, presented at the European Stroke Organisation Conference (ESOC) in Lyon, France, adds to growing evidence that alteration
8h
The GOP's Strange Turn Against Rape Exceptions
Twenty-two states have abortion bans that would become law almost immediately if a leaked Supreme Court decision on abortion rights goes into effect. Many of these state bans contain no exceptions for rape or incest survivors. Not so long ago, such exceptions were regularly included in proposed abortion bans, in part because they're popular: For decades, about 75 percent of Americans have consist
9h
R2-D-Chew: robot chef imitates human eating process to create tastier food
Cambridge scientists say robot is capable of 'tasting' and checking whether balance of flavours is right The culinary robots are here. Not only to distinguish between food which tastes good and which doesn't, but also to become better cooks. A robot chef designed by researchers at Cambridge University has been trained to taste a dish's saltiness and the myriad of ingredients at different stages o
11h
Country diary: A living fossil with a tale to tell
Winlaton Mill, Gateshead: The landscape here is vast and exhilarating, but a close look reveals a curious plant with a link to the area's coal past When the 12th Earl of Strathmore, a 19th-century nimby who made an immense fortune from coal, refused to allow trains across his Gibside estate , the North Eastern Railway adopted an expensive alternative route via four viaducts and a cutting. After t
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The Man With a Penis on His Arm review – TV that makes you proud to be British
This fascinating, touching look at phalloplasty (and the ways having an arm-penis can make life tricky) has many moments of levity – and thankfully a happy ending If, when you saw the title of this documentary, The Man With a Penis on His Arm (Channel 4), your first thought was: "Wait – like the mouse with the ear on its back? But a man and a penis and an arm?" the answer is ineluctably: yes. Jus
21h
Wheat Can't Catch a Break Right Now
Sign up for The Weekly Planet, Robinson Meyer's newsletter about living through climate change, here. For the past few days, a heat wave of mind-boggling scale and intensity has gripped South Asia. More than 1 billion people in India and Pakistan have endured daytime highs of 40 degrees Celsius, or 104 degrees Fahrenheit. Delhi, the world's second-largest city, has suffered through back-to-back d
7h
Scientists Worried About Military Facility to Store NASA Mars Rocks
NASA's Mars Perseverance rover has been bagging up dirt and rocks in hopes that a future mission to the Red Planet will stop by, scoop them up, and bring them back to Earth for further study. But returning space rocks from an alien planet comes with inherent risks, NPR reports , potentially allowing dangerous microbes to come along for the ride. That's a huge if — despite our best efforts, we hav
1h
Amazing Footage Shows Inside of Space Station When It Fires Its Mighty Thrusters
Space Ride Charming footage from from the interior of the International Space Station shows what happens to the astronauts inside when the ship fires its thrusters. That's cool on its own, but it's also a terrific demonstration of Newtonian physics. Case in point, instead of the astronauts moving inside the ISS, the video that the European Space Agency posted to YouTube shows the ISS moving while
24min
The gene-edited pig heart given to a dying patient was infected with a pig virus
The pig heart transplanted into an American patient earlier this year in a landmark operation carried a porcine virus that may have derailed the experiment and contributed to his death two months later, say transplant specialists. David Bennett Sr. was near death in January when he received a genetically edited pig heart in a pioneering between-species transplant that has been hailed as a success
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New machine learning maps the potentials of proteins
The biotech industry is constantly searching for the perfect mutation, where properties from different proteins are synthetically combined to achieve a desired effect. It may be necessary to develop new medicaments or enzymes that prolong the shelf-life of yogurt, break down plastics in the wild, or make washing powder effective at low water temperature.
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Scottish medicines body to reassess menopause drug amid HRT shortage
Davina McCall documentary highlights benefits and postcode lottery of previously rejected utrogestan A sought-after hormone replacement therapy is being reassessed for use in Scotland after the TV presenter and menopause campaigner Davina McCall revealed a postcode lottery in its prescription across the UK. Amid an ongoing supply crisis of HRT products , McCall spoke to specialists about the bene
8h
Beijing reopens mass isolation centre in fight against Covid
Chinese capital ramps up efforts to control Omicron outbreak and avoid lockdowns See all our coronavirus coverage Beijing has reopened a mass isolation centre as authorities seek to contain an outbreak of Covid-19 in the city. The Xiaotangshan Fangcai hospital, which holds at least 1,200 beds and testing facilities, was first opened during the 2003 Sars epidemic, and used again in early 2020 to t
14h
Evidence that a DNA change made humans more susceptible to cancer
A team of researchers at the Sloan Kettering Institute working with a group at the American Museum of Natural History has found evidence of a change in human DNA after diverging from other primates that has made humans more susceptible to the development of cancerous tumors. In their paper published in the journal Cell Reports, the group compares human genes to those of other primates to learn mor
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Tethers bring distant genes together to coordinate embryo development
Organisms such as plants, mammals and insects undergo a carefully orchestrated developmental program as they transition from single-celled embryos to their multicellular adult forms. In a paper that appeared May 4, 2022 in the journal Nature, researchers at Princeton University demonstrate how specialized genetic sequences coordinate the exquisite choreography of gene expression required for norma
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Studying wealth inequality in animals can reveal clues about how their societies evolved
Wealth inequality is a research topic typically reserved for humans. Now, research from the Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior and the University of Nebraska-Lincoln suggests that studying wealth inequality in animals can help shed light on social evolution. Adapting approaches from the study of wealth inequality in humans, the researchers show how wealth—in the form of material goods, indivi
21h
The Right to Move Is Under Attack
For much of American history, freedom from an oppressive legal system could be found by picking up and leaving. During the Great Migration, millions of Black Americans abandoned the Jim Crow South for the North, Midwest, and West; at a smaller scale, LGBTQ people have long fled communities where they felt unwelcome for liberal cities. On some level, Americans—with our unique system of federalism—
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Think of a Number. How Do Math Magicians Know What It Is?
Math has a certain logic to it. If you use it to accurately describe a situation, sometimes you can predict the inevitable — for instance, the moment an eclipse will take place — centuries in advance. To those unfamiliar with the math behind the prediction, this outcome might seem like magic. Indeed, the science fiction author Arthur C. Clarke famously wrote… Source
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The Download: Meta's AI giveaway, and abortion clinic data tracking
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. Meta has built a massive new language AI—and it's giving it away for free Open to ideas: Meta's AI lab has created a massive new language model, and in an unprecedented move for Big Tech, it is giving it away to researchers—together with details about how it w
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Scientists discover comet's hourglass-shaped dust trail
Researchers from Finland, Canada, and Russia have discovered an unusual, hourglass-shaped dust trail of the comet 17P/Holmes. The particles that formed the dust trail were released by the most powerful of the thus-far documented outbursts by a comet. It happened in October 2007. Astronomers carried out observations of the cometary dust trail using telescopes in Australia, Finland, and the U.S. The
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The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna reaches a crucial milestone
LISA, the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna, has reached an important milestone: it has passed the comprehensive "Mission Formulation Review" (MFR) and now enters the next phase of development. The review team, consisting of experts from ESA, NASA, the scientific community and industry, identified no showstoppers and confirmed that LISA has successfully reached a maturity sufficient to proceed to
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New black hole sonifications with a remix are now available for listening
Since 2003, the black hole at the center of the Perseus galaxy cluster has been associated with sound. This is because astronomers discovered that pressure waves sent out by the black hole caused ripples in the cluster's hot gas that could be translated into a note—one that humans cannot hear, some 57 octaves below middle C. Now a new sonification brings more notes to this black hole sound machine
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NFT Thing Mocked for Ludicrously Incomprehensible Tweet
Ape Shit Imagine if all your favorite video games charged say, thousands of real dollars to customize your character. Every Sim's outfit, every Rocket League decal, every Among Us skin. Sure, plenty of games have microtransactions or in-app purchases, but you'd be hard pressed to find digital content that costs more than a few hundred dollars. Until now, that is, because in an absolutely incompre
24min
Best Parental Control Routers of 2022
The best parental control routers give parents the power to limit how long and what children can access online. The most robust parental controls let parents set use schedules, monitor activity, and use keywords to identify potentially harmful content. Your child's age, access to connected devices, and personality all factor into the type of parental controls you need in a router. If you have sev
24min
California's 2020 wildfire season
A new study summarizing the 2020 California wildfire year said just over 9,900 wildfires burned 4.3 million acres in 2020. That's twice the previous record but only average compared to burn rates before Euro-American settlement. Fire severity is the far greater concern.
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20 Bold Takes on the Roe Draft Opinion
This is an edition of Up for Debate, a newsletter by Conor Friedersdorf. On Wednesdays, he rounds up timely conversations and solicits reader responses to one thought-provoking question. Every Monday, he publishes some thoughtful replies. Sign up for the newsletter here. Question of the Week What are your views on abortion? Email your thoughts to conor@theatlantic.com . I'll publish a selection o
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Using GitHub to store projects?
I'm currently in the process of learning how to process/analyze neuroimaging data. Is it standard practice (or at least accepted) to store these projects in GitHub ? Could I send my GitHub portfolio to labs I want to join along with my CV in order to demonstrate my skills? I am using publicly available data. If GitHub isn't a good option, how could I demonstrate my technical skills to labs apart
59min
Where Do Space, Time and Gravity Come From?
General relativity and quantum mechanics are the two most successful conceptual breakthroughs of modern physics, but Einstein's description of gravity as a curvature in space-time doesn't easily mesh with a universe made up of quantum wavefunctions. Recent work that tries to bring those theories together is revealing some mind-bending truths. In this episode, the physicist and author Sean Carroll
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The quest for an ideal quantum bit
Scientists have developed a qubit platform formed by freezing neon gas into a solid, spraying electrons from a light bulb's filament onto it, and trapping a single electron there. This system shows great promise as an ideal building block for quantum computers.
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Researchers use silicon nanoparticles to visualize coalescence of quantized vortices that occur in superfluid helium
Scientists from the Graduate School of Engineering Science at Osaka University have shown how silicon nanoparticles can become trapped inside the vortices that form inside superfluid helium. This work opens up new possibilities in optical research for other quantum properties of superfluid helium, such as the optical manipulation of quantized vortices due to the strong interaction between light an
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When families can't afford diapers, children sleep worse
Children whose parents cannot afford diapers do not get quality sleep, according to a new study. The study in the Journal of Developmental Behavioral Pediatrics is the first to examine the relationship between diaper need and sleep. "Sleep promotes brain development and solidifies learning and memory," says coauthor Sallie Porter, an associate professor at Rutgers University School of Nursing. "C
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The Fight for Roe
Abortion-rights supporters gathered and marched in cities across America following the leak of a draft majority opinion by U.S. Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito, which suggests that the court intends to overturn the landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that gives Americans the right to have abortions. Though the document, published by Politico , has been confirmed as authentic in a statement by Chief Ju
2h
A new 225-million-year-old reptile from Brazil
Maehary bonapartei represents a small reptile that is considered to be the most basal of the evolutionary lineage that gave rise to pterosaurs. A study in PeerJ focuses on this latest find while also demonstrating that Faxinalipterus minimus is not a winged reptile, contrary to what was previously supposed.
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The lifesaving Covid-19 treatments offering hope amid Australia's high case numbers
With Australia's Covid cases per capita among the highest in the world, new antivirals such as Paxlovid and Lagevrio as well as intravenous treatments like sotrovimab are offering some hope for the severely ill, elderly and immunocompromised. However Australia's peak body for GPs says some people at greatest risk of dying from Covid are being prevented from accessing these treatments. Medical edi
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Sun releases moderate solar flare
The Sun emitted a moderate solar flare on May 4, 2022, peaking at 5:00 a.m. ET. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, which watches the Sun constantly, captured an image of the event.
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Advance in understanding cell division could lead to new cancer treatments
A protein called CDC7, long thought to play an essential role early in the cell division process, is in fact replaceable by another protein called CDK1, according to a study by investigators at Weill Cornell Medicine and the Dana Farber Cancer Institute. The finding represents a fundamental advance in cell biology and may lead to new cancer therapies, since cancers frequently alter the molecular m
2h
Americans Are Missing a Key Stratum of Modern Knowledge
There are three things that I remember from my high-school Earth-science class: the swirling pink cover of the study book designed to help us pass New York State's year-end test, the football player who seemed more intent on torturing me than on learning, and a nagging sense that what I was taking wasn't "really" science. The idea that Earth science barely counts as science is so woven into the e
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Benefits of exercise may vary greatly in primary mitochondrial disease
Researchers demonstrated that the benefits of endurance exercise can vary based on the type of mutation involved in mitochondrial disease, and while the benefits of exercise tend to outweigh the risks, the mitochondrial genetic status of patients should be taken into consideration when recommending exercise as therapy.
3h
Gene expression in the nervous system: Mechanism for its targeted stimulation discovered
Genes are the carriers of our genetic information. They are read in our cells and used to produce ribonucleic acids (RNAs). During this process, termed transcription, the enzyme RNA polymerase II has a decisive influence on the exact time at which genes are read and on the intensity with which this happens. In their recent article, researchers have shown exactly how RNA polymerase II is activated
3h
Daily briefing: The case for parasite conservation
Nature, Published online: 29 April 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01241-w They might be hard to love, but parasites are pivotal parts of the natural world. Plus, how language-generation AIs could transform science and the month's best science images.
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Remote programming of cardiac implantable devices is safe for MRI scan, study suggests
More than 60 million magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans are performed worldwide each year, but imaging for the millions of patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) such as pacemakers is a logistical challenge, because of concerns with how the magnetic field affects the implants. Now, a newly published study reveals safe and effective reprogramming of these devices is possib
3h
Flood risk reduction confers multiple benefits
Ecological flood control, i.e., measures that restore floodplains, is effective, technically possible and economically efficient. Yet, this approach is not consistently implemented worldwide because of the high administrative and legal hurdles. This is shown in a study by scientists from the Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) who, together with other research instit
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International team releases first panoramic atlases of life in cells
International scientists led by China's BGI-Research today published panoramic spatial atlases of life, examining the cellular dynamics of organisms at different developmental stages and providing potentially significant new information for disease treatment, development and aging as well as an improved understanding of biological evolution.
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Study finds that landslides can have a major impact on glacier melt and movement
A team led by University of Minnesota Twin Cities researchers has revealed, for the first time, that landslides can have a major impact on the movement of glaciers. Using satellite imagery to study the effects of a 2019 landslide that occurred on the Amalia Glacier in the Patagonia region of Chile, the researchers found that the landslide caused the glacier to grow in size and has since slowed dow
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The women scientists forgotten by history
French doctor and researcher Marthe Gautier, who died over the weekend, was one of a long line of women scientists who greatly contributed to scientific discovery only to see the credit go to their male colleagues.
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As oceans warm will the methane 'Kraken' be released?
A vast amount of the powerful greenhouse gas is sequestered as frozen crystals in the world's oceans. Of great concern among experts is the growing risk that, as the Earth warms and ocean temperatures rise, these highly disruptive, potent greenhouse gases will "flee" their frozen confinement.
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Fungi-based meat alternatives could help save Earth's forests
Market-ready fungi-based meat alternatives are similar to meat in taste and texture. They involve reduced land resources and greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture and land-use change. This goes under the assumption of a growing world population's increasing appetite for beefy bites, and it is the first time researchers have projected the development of these market-ready meat substitutes into
4h
Unique machine-learning model predicts homelessness among US soldiers before their transition to civilian life
Researchers led by Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and Harvard Medical School (HMS) have found that lifetime depression, trauma of having a loved one murdered, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are the three greatest predictors of homelessness among U.S. Army soldiers after transitioning to civilian life. Their study, published in American Journal of Preventive Medicine, used an innov
4h
Activating a Clean Air Act provision could deliver major climate, health, and economic benefits
The most recent United Nations climate change report indicates that without significant action to mitigate global warming, the extent and magnitude of climate impacts—from floods to droughts to the spread of disease—could outpace the world's ability to adapt to them. The latest effort to introduce meaningful climate legislation in the United States Congress, the Build Back Better bill, has stalled
4h
A space telescope could reveal a black hole's photon ring
Despite decades of study, black holes are still among the most powerful and mysterious celestial objects ever studied. Because of the extreme gravitational forces involved, nothing can escape the surface of a black hole (including light). As a result, the study of these objects has traditionally been confined to observing their influence on objects and spacetime in their vicinity. It was not until
4h
Why sending money to the neediest can boost the US economy
In response to the shock of the COVID-19 pandemic, Congress pumped trillions of dollars into the economy in the form of stimulus checks, expanded unemployment benefits, and targeted spending to bolster specific industries such as airlines. The massive package apparently staved off a long, deep recession. But which elements were the most effective in the complicated, intertwined modern American eco
4h
Victorian medicine shaped modern concepts of race
Charles Darwin raised the question of whether darker skin is correlated with immunity to certain diseases in his 1871 book "The Descent of Man," an erroneous claim that reflected beliefs about the reality and fixity of race that were widespread in the mid-19th century, according to new Cornell research.
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Gene expression in the nervous system: Researchers discover a mechanism for its targeted stimulation
Genes are the carriers of our genetic information. They are read in our cells and used to produce ribonucleic acids (RNAs). During this process, termed transcription, the enzyme RNA polymerase II has a decisive influence on the exact time at which genes are read and on the intensity with which this happens. In their recent Nature Communications article, researchers from the University of Bayreuth
4h
A new wearable technology — for plants
Plants can't speak up when they are thirsty. And visual signs, such as shriveling or browning leaves, don't start until most of their water is gone. To detect water loss earlier, researchers have created a wearable sensor for plant leaves. The system wirelessly transmits data to a smartphone app, allowing for remote management of drought stress in gardens and crops.
4h
Best Apple Watch Accessories in 2022
The Apple Watch may not have replicated the runaway success of the iPhone or iPad, but it's steadily grown into the best smartwatch available today. Apple has iterated on the hardware, designing custom processors that balance performance and battery life, while updating the software to add key features like the ability to run third-party apps, automatically track your exercise, and work more auto
4h
Fungi-based meat alternatives to help save Earth's forests
Substituting 20 % of meat from cattle with microbial protein — a meat alternative produced in fermentation tanks — by 2050 could halve deforestation, a new analysis finds. The market-ready meat alternative is very similar in taste and texture, but is a biotech product which — by replacing beef — involves much less land resources and greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture and land-use change
4h
Organocatalytic stereoselective cyanosilylation of small ketones
Nature, Published online: 04 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04531-5 The development of confined organocatalysts for the enantioselective cyanosilylation of small, unbiased substrates, including 2-butanone, is shown to lead to catalysts that are as selective as enzymes, with excellent levels of control.
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Nonlinear mechanics of human mitotic chromosomes
Nature, Published online: 04 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04666-5 A method that uses a combination of optical trapping, fluorescence microscopy and microfluidics to analyse the internal structure of chromosomes shows that there is a distinct nonlinear stiffening of the chromosome in response to tension.
4h
Single electrons on solid neon as a solid-state qubit platform
Nature, Published online: 04 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04539-x A solid-state single-electron qubit platform is demonstrated based on trapping and manipulating isolated single electrons on an ultraclean solid neon surface in vacuum, which performs near the state of the art for a charge qubit.
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Molecular basis for the initiation of DNA primer synthesis
Nature, Published online: 04 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04695-0 The molecular determinants for primer synthesis are identified within the catalytic domain of primase-polymerase enzymes, elucidating the mechanisms underlying initiation of primer synthesis.
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Observation of chiral and slow plasmons in twisted bilayer graphene
Nature, Published online: 04 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04520-8 Two new plasmon modes are observed in macroscopic twisted bilayer graphene with a highly ordered moiré superlattice, the first being the signature of chiral plasmons and the second a slow plasmonic mode around 0.4 electronvolts.
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Phytocytokine signalling reopens stomata in plant immunity and water loss
Nature, Published online: 04 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04684-3 A plant endogenous peptide-receptor signaling pathway termed SCREW–NUT is described; it counteracts microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP)- and abscisic acid-induced stomatal closure to regulate the reopening of stomata after biotic and abiotic stresses.
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The initiation of DNA synthesis in molecular detail
Nature, Published online: 04 May 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01141-z Life on Earth depends on the ability of cells to duplicate their genetic material, encoded in DNA molecules, and pass this information on to the next generation. Elucidation of the molecular mechanism underlying the priming step of this copying process provides insights into how DNA replication begins.
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Light moves artificial cilia to a complex beat
Nature, Published online: 04 May 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01080-9 The beating of hair-like structures that enable microorganisms to swim has been replicated in a polymer material that bends and twists with the help of light-sensitive molecular machines.
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A rethink about enzymes that drive DNA replication
Nature, Published online: 04 May 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01128-w It has long been thought that two enzymes, the kinases CDC7 and CDK2, are both needed to trigger DNA replication in mammalian cells. This view is challenged by evidence that offers a revised view of which kinases are essential.
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Climate simulations: recognize the 'hot model' problem
Nature, Published online: 04 May 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01192-2 The sixth and latest IPCC assessment weights climate models according to how well they reproduce other evidence. Now the rest of the community should do the same.
4h
B12 deficiency harms kids. Food aid isn't helping
Vitamin B12 deficiency in infants leads to poor motor development and anemia, according to a study from Burkina Faso. B12 deficiency is an enormous yet overlooked problem and the current food relief is not helping. According to the researchers, the problem calls for new solutions. In Denmark, cases of poor psychomotor development are regularly seen in young children raised on vegan diets, though
5h
Older adults aren't more likely to fall for fake news
Older adults are no more likely to believe fake news than younger adults, with age-related susceptibility to deceptive news evident only among those categorized as the "oldest old." Not being able to distinguish fake news from real news can have serious consequences for a person's physical, emotional, and financial well-being—especially for older adults, who in general have more financial assets
5h
3D photogrammetry reveals ancient Native American artwork in Alabama cave
An independent researcher and one scientists from the University of Tennessee and one from Ancient Art Archive have revealed ancient Native American artwork inscribed on cave walls and ceilings in Alabama using 3D photogrammetry. In their paper published in the journal Antiquity, Alan Cressler, Jan Simek and Stephen Alvarez describe their work in documenting the ancient artwork.
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Urbanization linked to poor ecological knowledge, less environmental action
A new study highlights a sharp contrast between urban and suburban ways of thinking about coastal ecosystems. The authors of the study used statistical and cognitive science techniques to analyze data from a survey of 1,400 residents across the U.S. East Coast. Their results showed that surveyed residents of urban centers often held a more simplistic, and less realistic, understanding of coastal e
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Ancient cave art: How new hi-tech archaeology is revealing the ghosts of human history
New details of our past are coming to light, hiding in the nooks and crannies of the world, as we refine our techniques to go looking for them. Most lauded is the reconstruction of the evolution of humanity since our African origins around 300,000 years ago, by analyzing our living and fossil DNA. Replete with the ghosts of African and Eurasian populations of the deep past, these have been resurre
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Reactive microscopy with MicroMator software
Microscopic imaging analysis is a crucial component of biochemistry and medicine, with significant progress in accuracy and speed made due to machine learning methods and improved computation. These technical advances can assist researchers adapt microscopy experimental plans online for real-time information of experimental observations. In a new study now published in Nature Communications, Zacha
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How burying the dead keeps the living human
Olena Koval found out that her husband was dead via text message. He was shot by Russian soldiers inside their home in Bucha while she was sheltering nearby, their neighbors told Human Rights Watch. In the days that followed, despite the brutal cold and her spinal disability, she made repeated attempts to recover his body but was turned back each time by the soldiers' threats.
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Imaging chemical kinetics at liquid-liquid interfaces
Scientists led by EPFL have developed a new method to measure chemical kinetics by imaging progress of a reaction at a liquid-liquid interface embedded in a laminar-flow liquid microjet. This method is ideal for studies of dynamics on the sub-millisecond timescale, which is very difficult to do with current applications.
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Squid and octopus genome studies reveal how cephalopods' unique traits evolved
Squid, octopus, and cuttlefish — even to scientists who study them — are wonderfully weird creatures. Known as the soft-bodied or coleoid cephalopods, they have the largest nervous system of any invertebrate, complex behaviors such as instantaneous camouflage, arms studded with dexterous suckers, and other evolutionarily unique traits. Now, scientists have dug into the cephalopod genome to under
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Children's products labeled water- or stain-resistant may contain PFAS
Seems like kids are always getting into something, so products marketed toward them often claim to repel liquids. Some items contain potentially harmful per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) to accomplish this feat, but companies aren't required to disclose these 'forever chemicals' on labels. Now, researchers show that some children's products advertised as water- or stain-resistant contain
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A simpler approach for creating quantum materials
Since graphene was first isolated and characterized in the early 2000s, researchers have been exploring ways to use this atomically thin nanomaterial because of its unique properties such as high tensile strength and conductivity.
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China's segregated school system hinders migrants
When Eli Friedman set out to write his second book, he intended to focus on the segregated education system in China and how it affected teachers' work, but quickly found that the project moved in an unexpected direction.
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A species of mouthbrooding male fish in Australia carries wildly different egg parentage in its mouth
A team of researchers at Charles Darwin University, in Australia, has found that male fish that mouth-brood are not always guaranteeing that the eggs they carry were fertilized by them. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the group describes their study of the eggs brooded in the mouths of males of two species and what it taught them about monogamy in certain fish.
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The US Just Put $3 Billion Towards Securing Its Battery Supply Chain
In the coming years and decades, critical minerals will start to rival oil and gas as the world's most sought-after commodities, and the US is currently not very well-positioned to compete in this new arena. China, on the other hand, has the minerals market pretty well cornered, from mining raw materials to refining and processing them. This week the Biden administration made a move to approach t
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Incredible Rescue! Helicopter Lifts Deckhand from the Patricia Lee | Deadliest Catch
Stream Deadliest Catch on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/deadliest-catch #DeadliestCatch #Discovery #DiscoveryPlus Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Disco
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Heart attacks more likely among marijuana users
Marijuana use and heart attack risk were correlated in a large human study, researchers report. A molecule in soybeans may counteract these effects. The study also shows that the psychoactive component of the drug, known as THC, causes inflammation in endothelial cells that line the interior of blood vessels, as well as atherosclerosis in laboratory mice. "As more states legalize marijuana use, I
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Family network
Nature, Published online: 04 May 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01207-y The art of staying in touch.
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In 20 years, sleep apnea deaths have only risen for Black men
Over the past two decades, more Black men have died from obstructive sleep apnea than have white people or Black women, a new study shows. Further, deaths of Black men from sleep apnea have continued to rise, in contrast to rates that have flattened for white people and Black women. The study in Sleep Medicine identifies for the first time this significant racial health disparity in mortality res
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Landsbygdsskolor blev stabil punkt för flyktingar
Ett stort engagemang. Men också ett stort tomrum när de nya eleverna försvann lika plötsligt som de kom. Så kan en del av landsbygdsskolors erfarenheter från flyktingvågen 2015 sammanfattas enligt en studie från Göteborgs universitet. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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Ny teknik utmanar synen på det mänskliga
Vad innebär det egentligen att vara människa i en tid som präglas av teknik som blir allt mer människolik – och som även tar allt större plats i vår vardag? Svaret söks i en ny avhandling från Umeå universitet. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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Hjälp forskare att fånga hummer
För andra året i rad efterlyser SLU hummerfiskare som kan hjälpa till att öka forskarnas kunskap om hummerbeståndens utbredning och status på västkusten. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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Unga män lättast att vilseleda med finansiellt "skitsnack"
Unga män med högre inkomster och som överskattar sina finansiella kunskaper har lättare för att gå på finansiellt "skitsnack". Äldre kvinnor med lägre inkomst – som inte överskattar sina kunskaper i ekonomi – är inte lika mottagliga. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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Cannabis ökar risken för annan droganvändning
Cannabisbruk kopplas till en ökad risk för annan droganvändning. Risken ökar också att drabbas av ångest och depression. Det visar en ny avhandling som även sett en rejäl ökning av cannabisrelaterade diagnoser inom sjukvården, särskilt hos yngre. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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Children's products labeled water- or stain-resistant may contain PFAS, study says
Seems like kids are always getting into something, so products marketed toward them often claim to repel liquids. Some items contain potentially harmful per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) to accomplish this feat, but companies aren't required to disclose these "forever chemicals" on labels. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology show that some children's prod
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Økonomisk straf rammer udbudsklinik i Tønder
For stor udskiftning i lægebemandingen fik sidste år Region Syddanmark til, ad to omgange, at opkræve en bod af det firma, som driver regionens udbudsklinik i Tønder. Og sådan vil det formentlig fortsætte indtil udgangen af 2023.
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River Ice break-up trends 2022
As in previous years, the spring break-up of river ice on the Tanana River at Nenana and the Yukon River at Dawson City in Canada (new! h/t Ed Wiebe), is a great opportunity to highlight phenology that indicates that the planet is in fact reacting to the ongoing global warming . This year, both rivers broke up on the same day (May 2nd) which is a little unusual. As we've done in previous years ,
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Rocket Lab Mostly Succeeds in Catching a Rocket With a Helicopter
After a series of delays, Rocket Lab has succeeded in catching one of its Electron rockets with a helicopter. While the operation was aborted before the booster could be landed safely, this is a big step toward a reusable launch system, something that has made Elon Musk's SpaceX a popular option for governments and industries. The Electron rocket is a much smaller vehicle than SpaceX's Falcon 9,
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New Solar-Powered System Produces Energy And Drinking Water
(Photo:Karsten Würth/Unsplash) A new solar-powered system out of Saudi Arabia is capable of producing two vital resources: energy and clean water. Peng Wang, an environmental scientist at the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), was working alongside a team of biologists and engineers to improve solar panels' efficiency when he thought of the idea for the system. Wang grew
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Doubly stereoconvergent construction of vicinal all-carbon quaternary and tertiary stereocenters by Cu/Mg-catalyzed propargylic substitution
Nature Communications, Published online: 04 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-29986-y The construction of vicinal, congested stereocenters with high selectivities is of general utility in chemistry. Here the authors report a doubly-stereoconvergent, Cu/Mg-catalyzed asymmetric propargylic substitution reaction to convert simple starting materials to products with vicinal tertiary and all-carbon qua
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Influence of nutrient supply on plankton microbiome biodiversity and distribution in a coastal upwelling region
Nature Communications, Published online: 04 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30139-4 Coastal upwelling sustains some of the most productive ocean regions. Here, the authors find that spatial patterns and temporal changes in nutrient supply explain marine microbial community structure and diversity in the Southern California Current region.
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Bilayer-folded lamellar mesophase induced by random polymer sequence
Nature Communications, Published online: 04 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30122-z Randomness is perceived in two different extremes, in macroscopic homogeneity and local heterogeneity, but apparently far away from order. Here, the authors show that a periodic order can spontaneously arise from an ensemble of binary random copolymer sequences to induce recurrent folding of a self-assembled bila
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Identification of DAXX as a restriction factor of SARS-CoV-2 through a CRISPR/Cas9 screen
Nature Communications, Published online: 04 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30134-9 Here, Mac Kain and Maarifi et al. perform a functional CRISPR/Cas9 screen to identify SARS-CoV-2 restriction factors in A549 cells. They identify DAXX, a scaffold protein of nuclear bodies with diverse functions, that has anti-viral activity post SARS-CoV-2 entry, while SARS-CoV-2 has evolved a mechanism to count
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Quaternary taphonomy: understanding the past through traces
Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41598-022-10473-9 Taphonomical analysis allows us to understand the processes that underlie site formation, as well as provide insights into the modification and composition of studied fossil materials. Taphonomy has become crucial to many scientific fields, providing conceptual advances through a renewal of models, protocols, and pa
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This California Greenhouse is Run by Robots
(Photo: Iron Ox) A farm technology startup is using robots and artificial intelligence to tackle sustainability concerns in agriculture. Northern California-based Iron Ox was born from the realization that conventional American agriculture negatively impacts the environment in a multitude of ways. The type of farming most of us are familiar with uses as much as 70 percent of the world's fresh wat
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In Farming, a Constant Drive For Technology
As farmers face changing weather patterns, environmental degradation, labor shortages, and the rising cost of key supplies, no segment of agriculture is without passionate advocates of robotics and artificial intelligence as solutions. But the promises of precision agriculture still haven't been met.
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New map may help conservation efforts for an endangered songbird
Researchers have developed and used a model to estimate the density of the golden-cheeked warbler, an endangered songbird that breeds in Ashe juniper and oak woodlands in central Texas. In a study published in the Journal of Wildlife Management, the team created a warbler distribution map that identifies areas important for conservation of the species, indicating places where improvement and resto
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Does the Earned Income Tax Credit encourage college enrollment?
The Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC)—a cash transfer program aimed at helping low to moderate income workers by giving them a break on their taxes—is not intended as a college subsidy, but the eligibility criteria for it incentivizes families sending children aged 19–23 years to college as this can increase EITC benefits by as much as $4,000 per year. An analysis in Economic Inquiry by researchers
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Survey of LA homeless finds few want group shelter beds
A unique study conducting counts and surveys of unsheltered people in three parts of Los Angeles found that nearly half had been offered housing in the past, but they cited the housing intake process, desires for privacy and concerns about safety as obstacles they face in efforts to get off the streets, according to a new RAND Corporation report.
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Why can't we get in touch with extraterrestrial civilizations
The absence of signals from other advanced civilizations is, in fact, very bad news for humanity and modern civilization. On Earth, civilizations are short-lived. The Roman Empire lasted less than a thousand years, while the Maya civilization lasted about two thousand years. And the more developed a civilization, the less it exists. How much is ours? With such irresponsibility and the pace of con
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Finding your car in a parking lot relies on this newly discovered brain circuit
When exploring a new environment, mice make use of a unique long-distance connection in the brain that prompts them to pay attention to the most salient features of the environment, according to new research. The link, originating in the prefrontal cortex and stretching to the hippocampus, provides evidence of how the brain's higher cognitive regions refine operations occurring in distant brain ar
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Want more students to learn languages? Win over the parents, research suggests
New research shows that children's willingness to study subjects like French, German or Spanish is shaped far more by the attitudes of their parents, than by their teachers or friends. The study's authors argue that efforts to reverse the steady decline in language-learning in the UK should target families rather than just children, because of the important role parents' beliefs play in shaping ch
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