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Nyheder2022maj05

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Bill Gates Says It Was a Bad Idea to Pal Around With Jeffrey Epstein
Buddy Buddy Bill Gates now says he should've never been friends with the late Jeffrey Epstein. In a BBC interview released yesterda y, the former world's richest man and Microsoft co-founder responded to comments by ex-wife Melinda French Gates. In March, she called Gates out for his relationship with Epstein, a wealthy financier and convicted sex offender who died while in prison in 2019. Gates
5h
A Late-Night Show for Red America
This article was featured in One Story to Read Today, a newsletter in which our editors recommend a single must-read from The Atlantic , Monday through Friday. Sign up for it here. T he first thing you notice about Gutfeld! , Greg Gutfeld's ratings-gobbling, Colbert-battling, have-some-of- that -Don-Lemon phenomenon of a late-night political-satirical talk show on Fox News, is the silences. The p
11h
Copper, but not silver, is effective against SARS-CoV-2 on surfaces
As a result of corrosion, copper and silver release positively charged ions into their environment, which are harmful to bacteria in several ways and prevent their growth or kill them completely. This effect has long been exploited, for example by coating implants with these metals to prevent bacterial infections. There are some tricks that can be employed to release even more ions and intensify t
8h
Algorithm predicts which students will drop out of math courses
In the so-called MINT subjects—mathematics, computer science, natural sciences and technology—up to 40 percent of students drop out of their studies in the introductory phase. A research team from the Methods Center of the Faculty of Economics and Social Sciences at the University of Tübingen has now developed a statistical method with which students can predict on average eight weeks in advance w
7h
Bolivian river dolphins observed playing with an anaconda
A trio of scientists, one with Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, another from Museo Historia Natural Noel Kempff Mercado and a third independent researcher, report evidence of several Bolivian river dolphins playing with a Beni anaconda in the Tijamuchi River in Bolivia. In their paper published in the journal Ecology, Omar Entiauspe-Neto, Steffen Reichle and Alejandro dos Rios describe p
7h
Natural transformation allows transfer of SCCmec-mediated methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus biofilms
Nature Communications, Published online: 05 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-29877-2 SCCmec is a large mobile genetic element that confers resistance to β-lactam antibiotics in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Here, the authors show that biofilm growth conditions enhance the efficiency of natural transformation in S. aureus and allow the transfer of SCCmec to methicillin-sensitive str
12h
Can Covid Lead to Impotence?
Some studies find higher rates of erectile dysfunction among men recovering from the illness. But other factors related to the pandemic, like heightened anxiety, may also be to blame.
1h
In Test Tubes, RNA Molecules Evolve Into a Tiny Ecosystem
After a lengthy experiment with tantalizing implications for origin-of-life studies, a research group in Japan has reported creating a test tube world of molecules that spontaneously evolved both complexity and, surprisingly, cooperation. Over hundreds of hours of replication, a single type of RNA evolved into five different molecular "species" or lineages of hosts and parasites that coexisted in
8h
Treatment for finger-bending disease may be 'gamechanger'
Clinical trial seems to show Dupuytren's disease reversed by rheumatoid arthritis drug Researchers have hailed a breakthrough in the treatment of a common, incurable disease that causes hand deformities by bending the fingers firmly into the palm. A clinical trial at Oxford and Edinburgh Universities found that a drug used for rheumatoid arthritis appeared to drive Dupuytren's disease into revers
10h
Are nasal sprays the answer to stopping Covid transmission?
With the virus rampant despite jabs, trials are underway to create intranasal vaccines to block infections from the body The roaring success of Covid vaccines – in countries able to obtain them – has led to deaths and severe disease from the infection plummeting even as the virus evolved to sidestep immunity and rip through populations more swiftly. But while the rapid development of Covid shots
15h
Head of FDA Says Misinformation Is Now the Leading Cause of Death
The head of the US Food and Drug Administration, Robert Califf, says pandemic misinformation is now the country's leading cause of death. Following the Health Journalism 2022 conference in Austin, TX, Politico reporter Alice Miranda Ollstein reported about the remarks on the organization's blog . "I believe that misinformation is now our leading cause of death," Califf said, according to Ollstein
1h
How to Win the Abortion Argument
In May 2016, three women walked into a police station in Derry, Northern Ireland, and gave themselves up. They were unlikely criminals—all born in the 1940s, they arrived wearing warm coats and jeans. But Colette Devlin, Diana King, and Kitty O'Kane were deadly serious about their willingness to spend years in prison. Their offense: These three women had bought abortion pills on the internet. I w
10h
Poor sleep may hinder attempts to maintain weight loss, study finds
Trial seems to add to body of evidence about health risks of not getting enough sleep or poor quality sleep Poor sleep may undermine attempts to maintain weight loss, research has suggested. Millions of people who are overweight or obese manage to lose weight every year. But many often then face a struggle to keep the pounds creeping back. Continue reading…
23h
We Are in Awe of This Absolutely Horrifying Elon Musk Tattoo
Elon Devil A New York-based tattoo artist who goes by the moniker Mashkow has really outdone themselves with one of the most grotesquely fascinating Elon Musk tattoos we've ever seen. An image circulating online shows the billionaire CEO's face imprinted in full color on the forearm of the artist's client, throwing the Twitterverse into a fit of rage and confusion. The depiction is truly a sight
2h
Hooray! Scientists Say They Can Reverse Signs of Aging Using Poop Transplants
Forget blood showers , putting snail slime on your face , or bathing in antler blood to regain that youthful glow. The next big age-defying trend? According to scientists, it might just be poop transplants. A new study published in the journal Microbiome this week claims to have found improvements in gut health in mice following transplants from younger to older mice of fecal microbiota. Accordin
21min
Ancient Russian Rocket Debris Suddenly Explodes in Orbit
Time Bomb A Russian rocket part, which has spent more than a decade drifting around the Earth, suddenly exploded into many potentially dangerous pieces of space debris that could end up threatening the lives of astronauts and satellites. This week, the US Space Force confirmed the part, a zero-g ullage motor of a Russian rocket, broke up on April 15. Experts at the Space Force are now tracking at
6h
'Better Than Omicron' Is Still Pretty Bad
On the topographical map of the coronavirus pandemic, it would not be unfair to call America's recent winter wave an Everest among a series of rolling bunny slopes. At the zenith of the peak, the nation was clocking, scientists estimate, multiple millions of new infections each day; the portion of Americans ever infected by the virus may have doubled in the span of just a few weeks . It was the s
9h
America's Blue-Red Divide Is About to Get Starker
The draft Supreme Court opinion overturning the constitutional right to abortion presents a major setback for reproductive freedom in America and offers a potential jolt to the upcoming midterm elections. But it also illuminates another, deeper phenomenon in American politics: the urgency and ambition of the Republican drive to lock into law the cultural priorities of its preponderantly white, Ch
10h
Ben Franklin's Radical Theory of Happiness
" How to Build a Life " is a weekly column by Arthur Brooks, tackling questions of meaning and happiness. Click here to listen to his podcast series on all things happiness, How to Build a Happy Life . M ost of the happiness scholars I cite in this column are living and active, because the scientific study of human happiness, relying as it does on social psychology, behavioral economics, and neur
11h
Senior NASA Official Fears Getting "Stuck" on the Moon
During today's Lunar Surface Innovation Consortium meeting, NASA's associate administrator Bob Cabana reiterated that the space agency is still very much intending to go far beyond taking astronauts to the Moon, with the ultimate goal still being "going to Mars." When asked what NASA's definition of a "sustainable" presence on the Moon is, Cabana said that it's not necessarily about "permanently
1d
A thermal superconducting quantum interference proximity transistor
Superconductors are materials that can achieve a state known as superconductivity, in which matter has no electrical resistance and does not allow the penetration of magnetic fields. At low temperatures, these materials are known to be highly effective thermal insulators and, due to the so-called proximity effect, they can also influence the density of states of nearby metallic or superconducting
8h
Senators Reportedly Annoyed With Military for Not Taking UFOs Seriously
Do Look Up Apparently, some legislators are mad that the military isn't taking UFO sightings more seriously. According to a new report in Politico , Senator Kirsten Gillibrand, of New York State, publicly voiced her disappointment at how UFO reports are being handled by the US government and said lawmakers need to learn more about the context behind what the government has worked to rebrand as "u
21h
DNA analysis of remains found in Norman Neolithic monumental cemetery suggest a patrilineal community
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in France and Germany has conducted a DNA analysis of remains found at the Neolithic cemetery Fleury-sur-Orne near Caen and found that it likely represents evidence of a patrilineal community. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their analysis of tissue recovered from bones in th
7h
China's Troubling New Military Strategy Is Coming Into View
The last time the outside world paid much attention to the Solomon Islands was in 1943: More U.S. troops lost their lives in the six-month Battle of Guadalcanal there than in the deadliest four-year period of the Afghan War. Since World War II, this remote chain of South Pacific islands has gone from occupied territory to colony to frequently chaotic independent state, all without the great power
12h
'Medical tourists' are travelling the world in search of the elixir of life | Peter Ward
There have always been charlatans offering a cure for ageing, and cheap travel and lax laws have made it even easier for them Every year millions of people cross borders to undergo medical treatments that are either unavailable in their home country or too expensive. For many, this is a last resort to ease the pain of a debilitating disease or defy a terminal diagnosis; for others the goals are p
10h
We're a Bit Confused by the Vatican's NFT Plans
The Vatican is trying to jump on the latest trend: a digital art gallery for NFTs in the metaverse, a "public-private partnership" aimed at extending "the availability of the Vatican's heritage," according to a press release . But the project's rollout has been mired in confusion. The press release provided minimal details, and even though a spokesperson approached numerous publications over the
3h
Scientists invent topological-cavity surface-emitting laser
Semiconductor lasers are the most widely used lasers due to their compact size, high efficiency, low cost and wide spectra. But they suffer low output power and low beam quality—two specifications difficult to improve simultaneously. For example, although a larger cavity increases power, it supports more modes to lase which decreases beam quality.
7h
Researchers investigate 'the Goose' pulsar wind nebula
Using NASA's Chandra X-ray observatory and Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), astronomers have investigated a pulsar wind nebula, dubbed "the Goose," powered by a young pulsar known as PSR J1016–5857. Results of the study, published April 27 on the arXiv pre-print server, deliver important insights into the nature of this nebula.
8h
The Holocaust Started With My Great-Uncle's Murder
Here is the foundational narrative on which I was raised: In March 1933, my great-uncle Arthur Kahn walked out of his apartment in Würzburg, Germany, for what was supposed to be a short Easter-break trip to see relatives. He was 21, training to be a doctor. He didn't know it, but his name had been placed on a list of students suspected of Communist ties. He had none, but he was arrested in Nuremb
7h
The Great Rage
By now, the stories are familiar. Most, though not all, start on social media: a post on Facebook or Twitter identifies a name, and then the threats begin. Shortly after the 2020 presidential election, conspiracy theorists focused on a video of a voting-machine technician at work in Gwinnett County, Georgia. One Twitter user published the young man's name, declaring him "guilty of treason," along
10h
Only 10 vaquita porpoises survive, but species may not be doomed
The vaquita porpoise, the world's smallest marine mammal, is on the brink of extinction, with 10 or fewer still living in Mexico's Gulf of California, their sole habitat. But a genetic analysis by a team of UCLA biologists and colleagues has found that the critically endangered species remains relatively healthy and can potentially survive—if illegal "gillnet" fishing ceases promptly.
3h
Please Enjoy This Cozy Video of an Astronaut Getting Ready to Slumber
Sleep Tight It looks pretty hard to wash your face when the cloth and water you're using keep floating away. But you can still watch astronaut Matthias Maurer, of the European Space Agency, conquer the challenge of a cozy nighttime routine while aboard the International Space Station. The ESA posted the 4-minute clip on its official YouTube channel this week, showing Maurer brushing his teeth, sq
21h
Study proposes method of identifying global poverty from space
Despite successes in reducing poverty globally in the last two decades, almost one billion people are still living without access to reliable and affordable electricity, which in turn negatively affects health and welfare, and impedes sustainable development. Knowing where these people are is crucial if aid and infrastructure are to reach them. A new International Institute for Applied Systems Ana
12h
Baby corals are just as susceptible as adults to deadly reef disease, study finds
Baby corals are just as susceptible as adults to a deadly disease that has been spreading across Florida's reefs since 2014, according to a new study led by scientists at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science. The findings showed that stony coral tissue loss disease (SCTLD) infects baby corals with similar severity and mortality that we see in adult colon
1d
The Download: A transplant disaster, and online abortion networks
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. The gene-edited pig heart given to a dying patient was infected with a pig virus The pig heart transplanted into an American patient earlier this year in a landmark operation was infected with a porcine virus that may have derailed the experiment and contribut
9h
New Mexico and Arizona facing a dangerously early fire season
New Mexico and Arizona are facing a dangerously early fire season. It has left neighborhoods in ashes and is having such devastating effects that the governor of New Mexico on May 3, 2022, urged President Joe Biden to issue a disaster declaration. Over 600 fires had broken out in the two states by early May, and large wildfires had burned through hundreds of homes near Ruidoso and Las Vegas, New M
8h
Kara Swisher's Take on Twitter
This week, the journalist and entrepreneur joins us to talk about the possible changes Elon Musk could bring to his new social network.
9h
A surging glow in a distant galaxy could change the way we look at black holes
Something strange is afoot in the galaxy known as 1ES 1927+654: In late 2017, and for reasons that scientists couldn't explain, the supermassive black hole sitting at the heart of this galaxy underwent a massive identity crisis. Over a span of months, the already-bright object, which is so luminous that it belongs to a class of black holes known as active galactic nuclei (AGN), suddenly grew a lot
2h
Single photon emitter takes a step closer to quantum tech
To get closer to quantum technology we need to develop non-classical light sources that can emit a single photon at a time and do so on demand. Scientists at EPFL have now designed one of these "single photon emitters" that can work at room temperature and is based on quantum dots grown on cost-effective silicon substrates.
2h
Breaking the shield that protects pancreatic cancer from immunotherapy
Scar-like cells that make up a sizable portion of malignant pancreatic tumors and shield these cancers from immune attack are derived from mesothelial cells that line tissues and organs, a new study suggests. The findings could offer a new strategy to fight pancreatic cancer, a deadly disease for which no truly effective treatments exist.
39min
Mechanism 'splits' electron spins in magnetic material
Holding the right material at the right angle, researchers have discovered a strategy to switch the magnetization in thin layers of a ferromagnet — a technique that could eventually lead to the development of more energy-efficient magnetic memory devices.
39min
Using AI to analyze large amounts of biological data
Researchers are applying a form of artificial intelligence (AI) — previously used to analyze how National Basketball Association (NBA) players move their bodies — to now help scientists develop new drug therapies for medical treatments targeting cancers and other diseases.
39min
Researchers investigate quantum network solutions, by ground and by air
While quantum computers represent a revolution in computation, they can't communicate with each other the way regular computers can—over the internet. If quantum computers could be connected through a quantum network, they could facilitate perfectly secure communication between more than two parties or combine computing power to solve much harder problems than one quantum computer could do alone.
42min
'Metalens' could disrupt vacuum UV market
Photonics researchers have created a potentially disruptive technology for the ultraviolet optics market. Solid-state 'metalens' transform long-wave UV into focused 'vacuum UV,' a type of light used in semiconductor manufacturing that is costly, in part because it is absorbed by almost all types of glass used to make conventional lenses.
56min
Why hungry worms take risks
Whether it's making rash decisions or feeling grumpy, hunger can make us think and act differently — 'hangry,' even. But little is known about how hunger signals in the gut communicate with the brain to change behavior. Now, scientists are using worms as a model to examine the molecular underpinnings and help explain how hunger makes an organism sacrifice comfort and make risky decisions to get a
56min
Active brown adipose tissue protects against 'pre-prediabetes'
In a prospective study of young, lean adults, PET/CT imaging revealed that higher levels of active brown adipose tissue (also known as 'brown fat') are more prevalent in individuals who exhibit very early indications of metabolic disorders. The study suggests that active brown fat is recruited to counteract 'pre-prediabetic' states, potentially serving as a first-line protective mechanism against
56min
David Lynch's Unfathomable Masterpiece
One day, deep into production on David Lynch's 2006 film, Inland Empire , a producer approached the actor Laura Dern in a panic, trying to parse a strange request from the director. "He took me aside and said, 'Laura, David called me this morning, and I can't figure out if it's a joke,'" Dern, the movie's lead, recalled in an interview . "'He said, "Bring me a one-legged woman, a monkey, and a lu
1h
Newly proposed search strategies improve computational cost of the bicycle-sharing problem
Bicycle sharing is an attractive zero-carbon transportation option for a world that is being increasingly disrupted by climate change. But bikes need to be restored at bike ports every now and then. Calculating the optimal way to restore bicycles is time consuming and computationally expensive. Recently, researchers have built upon their previous optimization algorithm to propose two strategies to
1h
Small changes — but essential! How peptides are recognized in receptors
The human body consists of trillions of cells that constantly communicate with each other. A central role in this communication process is played by receptor proteins on the cell surface. Since they often serve as drug targets, they have been the subject of intensive research. Often there are whole families of receptors. The signal messengers as well as the receptors are very similar to each other
1h
How the brain says 'oops!'
Researchers have uncovered how signals from a group of neurons in the brain's frontal lobe simultaneously give humans the flexibility to learn new tasks — and the focus to develop highly specific skills.
1h
Only 10 vaquita porpoises survive, but species may not be doomed, scientists say
The world's smallest marine mammal — the critically endangered vaquita porpoise, which lives only in Mexico's Sea of Cortez — is believed to have only 10 living members, if that, of the species. The vaquita is widely thought to be on the verge of extinction, but a new scientific analysis by a team of biologists concludes the species remains relatively healthy and can survive — if the illegal us
1h
Understanding how sunscreens damage coral
Researchers reveal a mechanism by which oxybenzone, a common sunscreen component, damages corals. The surprising findings could help guide the development and marketing of effective, coral-safe sunscreens.
1h
Paxlovid Mouth Is Real—and Gross
More than two years into this pandemic, we finally have an antiviral treatment that works pretty darn well. Paxlovid cuts a vulnerable adult's chances of hospitalization or death from COVID by nearly 90 percent if taken in the first few days of an infection. For adults without risk-heightening factors, it reduces that likelihood by 70 percent. Also, it might make your mouth taste like absolute ga
1h
Best Gaming Mouse Pads in 2022
The best gaming mouse pads may be the missing piece of your gaming rig. After spending thousands on a curved monitor, a programmable keyboard, and enough RAM to run "Crysis 3" in the middle of summer, it's easy to forget a crucial element of the gaming setup. A good gaming mouse pad makes every drag, scroll, and click on your mouse as responsive as possible, so you're never caught off guard when
2h
New shape memory alloy discovered through artificial intelligence framework
Researchers from the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Texas A&M University have used an Artificial Intelligence Materials Selection framework (AIMS) to discover a new shape memory alloy. The shape memory alloy showed the highest efficiency during operation achieved thus far for nickel-titanium-based materials. In addition, their data-driven framework offers proof of concept for f
2h
Hubble reveals surviving companion star in aftermath of supernova
It's not unheard of to find a surviving star at the scene of a titanic supernova explosion, which would be expected to obliterate everything around it, but new research has provided a long-awaited clue to a specific type of stellar death. In some supernova cases, astronomers find no trace of the former star's outermost layer of hydrogen. What happened to the hydrogen? Suspicions that companion sta
2h
Cybernetic biologist Michael Levin on the scaling problem of collective intelligence, consciousness, and the risks of humans becoming nodes in larger planetary systems of collective intelligence
Recently had a wonderful conversation with Michael Levin about how evolution integrates little 'selves', like cells, into larger collective intelligences, like humans, and whether this process extends beyond humans. We covered specifics, including his theory on how gap junctions are the primary mechanism that binds little agents into bigger ones, which I found phenomenally interesting. Also explo
2h
Arcade Fire's Cringeworthy Dystopia
The love song, the breakup song, the party song—all are excellent pop traditions, but a good doomsday song can do the work of all three. What connects David Bowie's "Five Years" to Prince's "1999" to Lana Del Rey's "The Greatest" aren't just visions of civilizational collapse. All summon a sense of final-prom-before-the-bomb yearning through celebratory arrangements, impressionistic lyrics, and d
2h
How our brains influence language change
Our language is changing constantly. Researchers of the University of Vienna found that, over centuries, frequently occurring speech sound patterns get even more frequent. The reason for this development is that our brain can perceive, process and learn frequent, and thus prototypical sound patterns more easily than less frequent ones. The results of the study were published in the journal Cogniti
2h
Misperceptions can threaten scientific advancement
Misperceptions of marginalized and disadvantaged communities' level of concern regarding COVID-19, as well as other issues such as climate change, constitutes a form of social misinformation that may undermine cooperation and trust needed to address collective problems, according to new Cornell-led research.
2h
New research on Pacific climate pattern may lead to improved cyclone forecasting
El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), the climate pattern involving warming or cooling sea surface temperatures in the Pacific, has immense influence on the formation of tropical cyclones globally. A new study involving Florida Tech shows that in the Bay of Bengal, that influence is geographically confined, a discovery that should help extend the lead time of seasonal predictions for cyclones that
2h
Global bird populations steadily declining
Staggering declines in bird populations are taking place around the world. So concludes a study from scientists at multiple institutions. Loss and degradation of natural habitats and direct overexploitation of many species are cited as the key threats to avian biodiversity. Climate change is identified as an emerging driver of bird population declines.
2h
Researchers create flat magic window with liquid crystals
Researchers have used liquid crystals to create a flat magic window — a transparent device that produces a hidden image when light shines on it. The process for creating transparent liquid crystal magic windows can produce any desired image. The process can also be used to create magic mirrors that reflect, rather than transmit, light to create an image. The technology represents a new twist on a
2h
New method makes traffic prediction faster
A new method reduces the computational complexity of traffic models to make them operate more efficiently, according to a new study. Models that predict traffic volume for specific times and places are used to inform everything from traffic-light patterns to the app on your phone that tells you how to get from Point A to Point B. "We use models to predict how much traffic there will be on any giv
3h
How to make a fruitier, more floral chocolate
Nature, Published online: 05 May 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01225-w An unconventional method promises to ease chocolate-making — and to turn out a product that's less astringent than the ordinary stuff.
3h
Scientists define molecular movement that connects gut to brain to behavior in worm models
Whether it's making rash decisions or feeling grumpy, hunger can make us think and act differently—"hangry," even. But little is known about how hunger signals in the gut communicate with the brain to change behavior. Now, Salk scientists are using worms as a model to examine the molecular underpinnings and help explain how hunger makes an organism sacrifice comfort and make risky decisions to get
3h
Researchers unravel the active phase in catalytic carbon dioxide reduction to methanol
Researchers at Stockholm University have for the first time been able to study the surface of a copper-zinc catalyst when carbon dioxide is reduced to methanol. The results are published in the scientific journal Science. A better knowledge of the catalytic process and the possibility of finding even more efficient materials opens the door for a green transition in the chemical industry.
3h
Land-building marsh plants are champions of CO2 capture
It is well known that CO2 emissions from burning fossil fuels underlie the havoc being wrought by climate change. Stemming further emissions through innovations in sustainable energy production is certainly part of the solution. However, slowing global warming also hinges upon our ability to capture and retain CO2 from the atmosphere. In a study published today in the journal Science, a team of re
3h
Investigating glowing glass droplets on the ISS
Researchers will soon be studying materials samples on the ISS. The materials in question are super-hard and corrosion-resistant alloys of palladium, nickel, copper and phosphorus—also known as metallic glasses. A high-tech company from La Chaux-de-Fonds, which produces materials for the watch industry, is also involved.
4h
How MRI could revolutionize heart failure diagnosis
Until now, the best way of diagnosing heart failure has been an invasive assessment, but it carries risks for patients. Non-invasive echocardiogram, which is based on ultrasound, are usually used instead, but they are wrong in up to 50 per cent of cases. The new study shows how magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is superior to echocardiography for diagnosing heart failure, as well as being a powerfu
4h
Daily steroids are safe for kids with Duchenne muscular dystrophy
New research recommends daily steroid doses for children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, marking a significant change in how the disease is treated. "Corticosteroids are likely to remain the main treatment for DMD worldwide for the foreseeable future, so it is critical that we establish a standard of care that is backed by scientific evidence," says Robert Griggs, a neurologist at the Universit
4h
Tracking agricultural-related deforestation
The global trade in agricultural commodities provides food, fuel and fiber to consumers around the world. Commodity production, however, is also linked with negative environmental impacts, including the loss and degradation of forested land.
4h
'Lost' coral species resurrected
With about one-third of the world's corals currently under threat of extinction due to climate change, researchers have made the encouraging discovery of a 'lost' species of coral that had been hidden for more than 50 years.
4h
Highest degree of purity achieved for polarized X-rays
A research team was able to generate polarized X-rays with unprecedented purity at the European XFEL in Hamburg. The experiments involved scientists from the Helmholtz Institute Jena, a branch of GSI, Friedrich Schiller University Jena and the Helmholtz Center Dresden-Rossendorf. The method is supposed to be used in the coming years to show that even vacuum behaves like a material under certain ci
4h
Craft products are experiencing soaring growth: Here's how firms are cashing in
Researchers from Concordia University and HEC Montreal published a new paper in the Journal of Marketing that explains how the development of markets towards greater concerns for esthetics and craft—whether it be the search for the perfect espresso shot or the creation of a visually complex tattoo—results from interactions between craft and commercial firms.
4h
Green space may cut dementia risk for middle-aged women
Living in an area bursting with green space is associated with higher overall cognitive function in middle-aged women, as well as better mental processing speed and attention, according to a new study. Cognitive function at middle age is considered a strong predictor of whether a person may develop dementia later in life. According to the researchers, who studied nearly 14,000 women with an avera
5h
Resurrecting a 'lost' coral species
With about one-third of the world's corals currently under threat of extinction due to climate change, Curtin researchers have made the encouraging discovery of a "lost" species of coral that had been hidden for more than 50 years.
6h
Pentax K-1 Mark II review
The powerhouse Pentax K-1 Mark II shoots for the stars, and proves that there's still a lot of life left in DSLRs – especially for astrophotographers.
6h
Cell division in moss and animals more similar than previously thought
For a new plant to grow from a seed, cells need to divide numerous times. Daughter cells can each take on different tasks and sometimes vary in size. How plants determine the plane of cell division in this process, known as mitosis, is being researched by Prof. Dr. Ralf Reski and Dr. Elena Kozgunova from the University of Freiburg in a joint effort with Prof. Dr. Gohta Goshima from Nagoya Universi
6h
The fungal effector Rip 1 suppresses maize host defense responses
Plant colonization by biotrophic pathogens requires sophisticated strategies for tissue invasion, defense suppression and metabolic manipulation to loot nutrients necessary for their growth and reproduction. The biotrophic fungus Ustilago maydis secretes a multifaceted effectome during maize plant colonization to achieve the abovementioned tasks. Effectors are microbial secreted manipulative molec
6h
Best Golf GPS Watches in 2022
While we may not be able to afford our own caddy, we can attach a virtual one to our wrist with the best GPS golf watches. The timepieces can improve your golf game by providing accurate distances to hazards, doglegs, and the front, middle, and back of the green. These devices use GPS satellites coupled with a database of tens of thousands of golf courses from around the world to provide distance
6h
Quantum mechanics could explain why DNA can spontaneously mutate
The molecules of life, DNA, replicate with astounding precision, yet this process is not immune to mistakes and can lead to mutations. Using sophisticated computer modelling, a team of physicists and chemist have shown that such errors in copying can arise due to the strange rules of the quantum world.
6h
Nanoscale currents improve understanding of quantum phenomena
Besides charge, subatomic particles like electrons also carry a property called spin, which is responsible for magnetism. Novel proposals to use spin to store information have emerged in recent years with the promise to be more energy efficient and to bring new functionalities to devices of communication and sensing. For his Ph.D. research, Adonai Rodrigues Da Cruz studied the spin dynamics in mor
6h
Double agents: How stomach stem cells change allegiance upon injury
A stomach adult stem cell population can fulfill two distinct functions: either help with digestion under normal conditions or take the lead on injury response. Scientists at IMBA, Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, demonstrate that these functions are two sides of the same coin. Upon injury, one molecular switch is enough to propel the stem cells from one st
6h
Baby corals are just as susceptible as adults to deadly reef disease
Baby corals are just as susceptible as adults to a deadly disease that has been spreading across Florida's reefs since 2014, according to a new study. The findings showed that stony coral tissue loss disease (SCTLD) infects baby corals with similar severity and mortality that we see in adult colonies. This is the first study to show the impacts of any coral disease on baby corals.
7h
NASA Will Send Female Manikins to Space to Study Radiation
(Photo: NASA/Lockheed Martin/DLR) Two new manikins will be joining NASA's upcoming Artemis I mission to help the agency measure the effects of radiation on the female body. Helga and Zohar are a part of the Matroshka AstroRad Radiation Experiment (MARE), which aims to assess the effects of space radiation on astronauts' bodies. The manikins are made from "materials that mimic the human bones, sof
7h
NASA and Boeing Say Starliner Is Finally Ready for Another Test Flight
Boeing has been working with NASA to explore space for decades, which is why it was so surprising to see the company's much-lauded CST-100 Starliner crew capsule stumble on numerous occasions. After last year's canceled test flight, NASA and Boeing confirm Starliner is ready to take another swing at the validation mission it failed way back in 2019, reports Ars Technica . The Starliner is part of
7h
How mechanical ventilation affects the trajectories of aerosols that may carry viral particles
We have known for a longtime now that the COVID-19 virus, SARS-CoV-2 is a mostly airborne disease. Ventilation of indoor spaces is therefore one of the most useful ways in which we can keep people safe. Research in the International Journal of Simulation and Process Modelling, has investigated the fluid dynamics of how mechanical ventilation affects the trajectories of aerosols that might be carry
7h
Scientists reveal the neurocircuitry essential for animals to sense environmental cues of imminent danger
Inborn defensive behaviors, such as flight, freeze and fight, are crucial for animals to survive in a dangerous environment. Neuroscientists from City University of Hong Kong (CityU) recently revealed the essential neurocircuitry that is fundamental for animals to perceive and integrate environmental cues to initiate defensive behavior. The findings suggest a new direction for further investigatio
7h
Astronomers Discovered the Brightest Radio Pulsar Outside Our Galaxy
When a star explodes and dies in a supernova, it takes on a new life of sorts. Pulsars are the extremely rapidly rotating objects left over after massive stars have exhausted their fuel supply. They are extremely dense, with a mass similar to the sun crammed into a region the size of a large city. Pulsars emit beams of radio waves from their poles. As those beams sweep across Earth, we can detect
7h
Surrounded By Leopards and Hyenas | Naked and Afraid
Stream Naked and Afraid on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/naked-and-afraid #NakedAndAfraid #Discovery #Survival Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discover
7h
Tests gauge the freezing point of water in icy moons
Researchers have conducted experiments that measured the physical limits for the existence of liquid water in icy extraterrestrial worlds. They aim to aid the search for extraterrestrial life and the upcoming robotic exploration of oceans on moons of other planets. The results appear in the journal Cell Reports Physical Sciences . "The more a liquid is stable, the more promising it is for habitab
7h
A new 225-million-year-old reptile from Brazil
A reassessment of Faxinalipterus minimus, a purported Triassic pterosaur from southern Brazil resulted in the description of a new taxon — researchers present Maehary bonapartei a small reptile that is considered to be the most basal of the evolutionary lineage that gave rise to pterosaurs. The study also demonstrates that Faxinalipterus minimus is not a winged reptile, contrary to what was previ
7h
Correct dosage for ultraviolet disinfection against COVID
When the COVID-19 pandemic emerged, ultraviolet radiation became one of the go-to methods for preventing the spread of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, along with facemasks, hand sanitizer and social distancing. The problem: There was little research showing what UV dosage kills the virus. In a new study, researchers lay the foundation for health standards about what offers true disinfection.
7h
Nearly 13 percent of COVID-19 hospitalized patients had serious neurologic symptoms, study finds
To describe the prevalence, associated risk factors and outcomes of serious neurologic manifestations among patients hospitalized with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection, researchers studied 16,225 patients from 179 hospitals in 24 countries as part of the Society for Critical Care Medicine's Viral Infection and Respiratory Illness University Study.
7h
Sleep neuron activity boosts protective gene expression and safeguards survival
Sleep refreshes the brain and the body by inducing protective changes in gene expression. Sleep disturbance triggers a stress response that also turns on protective genes. It was unclear how sleep or sleep deprivation can lead to these changes in gene expression. Scientists led by Prof. Henrik Bringmann from the Biotechnology Center (BIOTEC) of TU Dresden used the C. elegans worm to show that the
8h
Post-Roe, could states outlaw abortion pills?
This week, we learned that the U.S. Supreme Court is poised to overturn Roe v. Wade, the 1973 case that guaranteed a person's right to have an abortion in the United States. If this happens, 23 states could institute bans on abortion, NBC News reports, leaving people in those states with few options.
8h
What cattle conflicts say about identity in South Sudan
In March 2022, violent clashes between farming communities and cattle herders broke out in Eastern Equatoria State, South Sudan. It was the latest incident in months of cattle-related violence in the area, which is in the country's southern region.
8h
New tool to create hearing cells lost in aging
Hearing loss due to aging, noise and certain cancer drugs has been irreversible, because scientists have not been able to reprogram existing cells to develop into the outer and inner ear sensory cells — essential for hearing — once they die. But scientists now have discovered a single master gene that programs ear hair cells into either outer or inner ones, overcoming a major hurdle that had pre
8h
This 'extreme' plant thrives in conditions that would kill others
One "extreme" plant that has evolved to handle, or even thrive, in harsh conditions could help researchers engineer climate-resistant crops. When faced with conditions that are too dry, salty, or cold, most plants try to conserve resources . They send out fewer leaves and roots and close up their pores to hold in water. If circumstances don't improve, they eventually die. But some plants, known a
8h
Deep learning model to predict adverse drug-drug interactions
The intake of multiple drugs can result in adverse health effects due to unexpected drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Now, researchers have developed a deep learning model that predicts DDIs based on their effects on gene expression. Their new model is accurate and outperforms conventional prediction models. It can also predict DDIs between developmental drugs and may be useful for detecting DDIs ear
9h
Bukfetma kopplas till inflammation hos äldre kvinnor
En ny avhandling visar att överskott av fettvävnad, särskilt i buken, kan leda till kronisk inflammation hos äldre kvinnor. Men ökad fysisk aktivitet kan vara ett sätt att minska inflammationens skadliga effekt i kroppen. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
9h
Survey finds ironic aspect of melanoma over-diagnosis
Although a survey of pathologists who diagnose melanoma say the skin cancer is over-diagnosed, that view doesn't affect their behavior, research finds. As the most serious type of skin cancer, a melanoma diagnosis carries emotional, financial , and medical consequences. "Over-diagnosis is the diagnosis of disease that will not harm a person in their lifetime. If melanoma is being over-diagnosed ,
9h
Should Courts Assess the Sincerity of Religious Beliefs?
I t was no surprise back in March when the Supreme Court ruled that Texas had to oblige a death-row inmate's wish for the company of a pastor who would pray with him and touch him as the lethal cocktail dripped into his veins. Such execution-chamber companionship was "part of my faith," the inmate claimed, and if anything could penetrate the Court's wall of indifference toward the death penalty,
10h
Daily briefing: How to shore up Africa's Great Green Wall
Nature, Published online: 04 May 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01247-4 How to support one of the world's most ambitious ecological projects. Plus, opera-inspired breathing can help with long COVID and the brightest extra-galactic pulsar ever seen was spotted by radio 'sunglasses'.
11h
Regio- and enantioselective remote hydroarylation using a ligand-relay strategy
Nature Communications, Published online: 05 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30006-2 Migratory alkene isomerizations and cross-coupling reactions are both possible under nickel catalysis, but usually require different conditions. Here the authors show a combined protocol to isomerize a double bond and then, via an in-situ exchange of ligands, perform an enantioselective C(sp2)–C(sp3) cross-coupli
12h
Synergistic Pd/Cu-catalyzed enantioselective Csp2–F bond alkylation of fluoro-1,3-dienes with aldimine esters
Nature Communications, Published online: 05 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30152-7 Due to high bond dissociation energies of C(sp2)–F bonds, using fluorinated compounds in C(sp2)–C(sp3) cross-coupling is difficult. Here the authors report a protocol for enantioselective C(sp2)–C(sp3) coupling of dienyl fluorides with aldimine esters, enabled by synergistic copper and palladium catalysis.
12h
Recycling of memory B cells between germinal center and lymph node subcapsular sinus supports affinity maturation to antigenic drift
Nature Communications, Published online: 05 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-29978-y Activated B cell enter germinal centers (GC) to become plasma cells and memory B cells. Here the authors show that some memory B cells recycle to GC via CCL-21 mediated chemotaxis to deliver antigens from the lymph node subcapsular sinus (SCS) to potentially contribute to affinity maturation and antigenic drift.
12h
Candida albicans evades NK cell elimination via binding of Agglutinin-Like Sequence proteins to the checkpoint receptor TIGIT
Nature Communications, Published online: 05 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30087-z Natural killer cells have emerged as critical immune cells in the response to fungal infection. Here the authors identify how Candida albicans evades the natural killer cell response via expression of ligands that directly modify the natural killer cell response and can be therapeutically targeted to restore the
12h
Atomistic mechanism of phase transformation between topologically close-packed complex intermetallics
Nature Communications, Published online: 05 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30040-0 It is challenging to study how topologically close-packed phases (TCPs) transform between one phase to another. Here the authors use atomic-resolved tools to look at the transformation between μ and P phases, revealing an intrinsic link between seemingly unrelated TCP configurations.
12h
Microwave assisted antibacterial action of Garcinia nanoparticles on Gram-negative bacteria
Nature Communications, Published online: 05 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30125-w Gram-negative bacteria are more resistant to antibacterial agents due to the outer membrane. Here, the authors use microwave irradiation to generate nanopores in the outer membrane allowing Garcinia nanoparticles to penetrate and damage the inner membrane leading to leakage and cell death.
12h
The Experiment Podcast: Judge Judy's Law
Listen and subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Podcasts Almost 30 years ago, a fed-up Manhattan-family-court judge named Judith Sheindlin was sitting in her chambers when she got a call from a couple of television producers. They pitched her the idea for a TV show with Judy at its center. The result was Judge Judy , one of the most popular and influential television series eve
13h
Skeptical Science New Research for Week #18 2022
Another gnawing warming worry Accidental outcomes of our engineering prowess are warming Arctic regions at a rapid pace. Another species of accomplished engineers is rapidly occupying and exploiting new territory we've thereby made more easily available, namely beavers ( Castor canadensis) . Beaver populations in affected Arctic regions have increased from "none" to "quite a few" in only a few de
14h
Why and How to Electrify Everything
This is a re-post from the Citizens' Climate Lobby blog Electrification is a hot topic right now, with many countries searching for ways to reduce their dependence on Russian oil and gas as Putin's war atrocities in Ukraine worsen by the day. Fortunately, many of the solutions to reduce long-term fossil fuel financial flows to the Russian government by pursuing an "electrify everything" strategy
14h
What you need to know about carbon dioxide removal
This is a re-post from Yale Climate Connections Carbon dioxide removal (CDR) from the atmosphere continues to be a hot topic. In its newest report, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) concluded that the Paris Climate Agreement targets cannot be met without substantial efforts to remove some of the more than three-trillion tons of carbon dioxide already in Earth's atmosphere, abou
14h
Why is the UK suffering HRT shortages?
From hot flushes and flooding to memory problems and depression, for many the menopause can be both distressing and debilitating. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) can alleviate some of these symptoms by boosting levels of hormones that wane as women get older. But the UK is experiencing an acute shortage of certain HRT products, leaving some without the medication they need. Madeleine Finlay hear
17h
Why is the UK suffering HRT shortages? – podcast
From hot flushes and flooding to memory problems and depression, for many the menopause can be both distressing and debilitating. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) can alleviate some of these symptoms by boosting levels of hormones that wane as women get older. But the UK is experiencing an acute shortage of certain HRT products, leaving some without the medication they need. Madeleine Finlay hea
17h
Are some sort of mental bookmarks that we have already made sense of and saved beforehand, which we use as active filtering tool while making sense of what we read in real time, usually kept as visuals or data with non-embedded visuals in our memory?
Assuming we amplify these bookmarks each time we use the logical or visual filter while active reading or daily cognitive processes, are there any studies that show that taking care of this habit can be beneficial? Is there a ranking of which kind of data contributes more to cognitive performance during the enrichment of these filters? Audio, visuals, math, logic etc.? or is it more about the ind
18h
A 'factory reset' for the brain may cure anxiety, drinking behavior, study suggests
Gene editing may be a potential treatment for anxiety and alcohol use disorder in adults who were exposed to binge drinking in their adolescence, according to the results of an animal study. The researchers used a gene-editing tool called CRISPR-dCas9 in their experiments to manipulate the histone acetylation and methylation processes at the Arc gene in models of adult rats.
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Hundreds of injured singers profiled
An analysis of more than 400 singers who sought treatment for vocal injuries provides a wealth of data on a topic that's often considered taboo to discuss in the singing community.
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Getting a better view of landslide risk with LiDAR
In the mountains of North Carolina, landslides are no joke. Triggered by heavy rains, mountainside soils can become saturated and "unstuck." As a result, what starts as a small landslide can quickly escalate into a huge debris flow that uproots trees and dislodges boulders, scouring everything in its path as it quickly flows downhill at speeds up to 30 mph. The cost—in both infrastructure and huma
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