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Nyheder2022maj09

Energy researchers invent chameleon metal that acts like many others
A team of energy researchers led by the University of Minnesota Twin Cities have invented a device that electronically converts one metal so that it behaves like another for use as a catalyst in chemical reactions. The device, called a "catalytic condenser," is the first to demonstrate that alternative materials that are electronically modified to provide new properties can yield faster, more effi
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T cell behavior determines which tumors respond to treatment
Immunotherapy unleashes the power of the immune system to fight cancer. However, for some patients, immunotherapy doesn't work, and new research may help explain why. When immune cells called T lymphocytes infiltrate malignant tumors, the genetic program of those T cells and the developmental path they then follow, may affect their response to immunotherapy and predict overall patient survival, ac
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LATEST

Environmental Champion Elon Musk Flies Private Jet 31 Miles Instead of Driving
Elon's Jet The infamous Twitter account ElonJet —which Tesla CEO Elon Musk already tried to bribe into shutting down just before he purchased the whole social media platform — just ratted him out for a super short and eco un-friendly flight on his private jet. The flight left San Jose, California Friday morning and landed in San Francisco just 9 minutes later, according to the automated public fl
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Elon Musk Alarmed by Threat From Russian Space Program Chief
Finger Pointing Elon Musk has enemies in high places — and they're not afraid to let him know it. In a tweet last night , the SpaceX and Tesla CEO pointed to a media statement from Russian space chief Dmitry Rogozin . The statement, which has been picked up by the Russian media , accuses Musk of providing SpaceX's Starlink internet equipment to the Azov Special Operations Detachment, a part of th
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SNL's Sharp, Frustrated Take on Abortion Rights
In seeking historical precedence for the upcoming Supreme Court decision in Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization , Justice Samuel Alito stretched far beyond the ideology of originalism —the guiding precept among a certain conservative faction that constitutional law should not stray far from the Constitution. His leaked 98-page opinion , intent on revoking , at the federal level, women's
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The standard model of particle physics may be broken, expert says
As a physicist working at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at Cern, one of the most frequent questions I am asked is "When are you going to find something?" Resisting the temptation to sarcastically reply "Aside from the Higgs boson, which won the Nobel Prize, and a whole slew of new composite particles?" I realize that the reason the question is posed so often is down to how we have portrayed prog
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The Overlooked Reason Russia's Invasion Is Floundering
Airpower should have been one of Russia's greatest advantages over Ukraine. With almost 4,000 combat aircraft and extensive experience bombing targets in Syria, Georgia, and Chechnya, Russia's air force was expected to play a vital role in the invasion, allowing the Russian army to plunge deep into Ukraine, seize Kyiv, and destroy the Ukrainian military. But more than two months into the war, Vla
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A new method to synchronize devices on Earth makes use of cosmic rays
Various technologies, networks and institutions benefit from or require accurate time keeping to synchronize their activities. Current ways of synchronizing time have some drawbacks that a new proposed method seeks to address. The cosmic time synchronizer works by synchronizing devices around cosmic ray events detected by those devices. This could bring accurate timing abilities to remote sensing
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British scientist says US anti-abortion lawyers misused his work to attack Roe v Wade
Giandomenico Iannetti, a pain expert at UCL, angrily denies that his research suggests foetuses can feel pain before 24 weeks A University College London scientist has accused lawyers in the US of misusing his groundbreaking work on the brain to justify the dismantling of Roe v Wade , the landmark ruling that legalised abortion nationally in America. Giandomenico Iannetti said his research, which
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Magnets made by soil bacteria offer hope for breast and prostate cancer
Scientists at Sheffield University have found a novel way of guiding anti-tumour viruses to their target Scientists are developing magnetically guided microscopic projectiles that can be injected into patients' blood to attack breast, prostate and other tumours. The project – led by researchers at Sheffield University – builds on progress in two key medical fields. The first involves viruses that
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Scientists Say They've Figured Out How to Turn Moon Soil Into Spaceship Fuel and Oxygen
Survival 101 A team of researchers from Nanjing University in China say lunar soil could be used to support long-term human survival on the Moon because it provides extraterrestrial survival resources like oxygen and fuel. The scientists published their research Friday in the journal Joule , analyzing samples collected during China's 2021 Chang'e-5 mission. It was the first to bring back fresh lu
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'Mom Brain' Isn't a Joke
You may have seen it on TV, in your workplace, or at school drop-off. Maybe you've had firsthand experience, been warned of its impending arrival, or met someone who's had it themselves. It's both a neurobiological phenomenon and an institutional failure. I'm talking about the malady—and the misconception—of "mom brain." When women invoke " mom brain ," they're typically describing the experience
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This Really Is a Different Pro-Life Movement
When the Supreme Court issued its landmark abortion-rights decision, Roe v. Wade , in 1973, the most intransigent opponents of the decision were not the legislatures of southern Bible Belt states such as Mississippi and Oklahoma. Indeed, doctors in many southern states—including Arkansas, Georgia, North and South Carolina, and Virginia—had been performing legal hospital abortions for at least a f
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Scientists Suggest Editing Human Genetic Code to Prevent Heart Attacks
Heart attacks are the world's leading cause of death, yet the few treatments available are often expensive and inaccessible. Although that's been the case for years, the World Health Organization warned back in 2020 heart disease numbers were still on the rise. Verve Therapeutics says altering human genomes to prevent the buildup of bad cholesterol might be the answer, and is creating what CEO Se
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Stora klimatvinster om var femte biff försvinner
Ganska små förändringar i vad vi äter kan ändå leda till stora vinster för klimatet visar en ny studie. Skulle vi alla byta ut var femte biff mot ett klimatvänligt växtbaserat alternativ skulle det halvera avskogningen, gynna biologisk mångfald och minska utsläppen av växthusgaser, visar ny forskning.
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The Sports-Betting Boom Is a Moral Disaster
About five years ago, I traveled for work to Las Vegas, where, at the behest of a friend who would almost certainly fit the New York State Office of Addiction Services' definition of a problem gambler, I collected on a bet. My friend had placed the wager at a somewhat down-market sportsbook the last time he had been in town—a frequent occurrence, from what I gather—but for one reason or another,
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Nothing Beautiful Survives the Culture War
Updated at 12:06 p.m. ET on May 9, 2022. America is a much harder place to be a child than it has any excuse to be, and a much harder place to have and raise a child than it has any possible reason to be: It's hard to find a politician who'll disagree with either proposition, and harder yet to find one with any intention of doing anything about it. When it comes to the crucial business of caring
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CDC Mocked for Bizarre Tweet About Cancer Causing Cancer
The US Center for Disease Control (CDC) is getting clowned on Twitter for sending out a bizarre tweet that as of this writing has yet to be deleted. Dr. Fumiko Ladd Chino joked about the gaffe online, telling followers that as a cancer doctor, the CDC's newest conclusion was certainly news to her. She posted a screenshot of the tweet for safekeeping, pictured below. "Cancer is the 2nd leading cau
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In the Hospital Rooms of My Country
Translated by Ilya Kaminsky and Katie Farris Letters of the alphabet go to war clinging to one another, standing up, forming words no one wants to shout, sentences that are blown by the mines in the avenues, stories shelled by multiple rocket launches. A Ukrainian word is ambushed: Through the broken window of the letter д other countries watch how the letter і loses its head, how the roof of the
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The World Has No Choice but to Care About India's Heat Wave
CHANDIGARH, India—Soon after I arrived in the eastern megacity of Kolkata in February, temperatures began climbing. They always do when India's short winter turns into an early spring. But then they kept rising. After the hottest March in 122 years of record keeping, the scorching temperatures continued through April, with the nationwide high averaging more than 95 degrees Fahrenheit. During my r
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The "12% efficacy" myth from the "Pfizer data dump": The latest slasher stat about COVID-19 vaccines
Last week, a claim that Pfizer's own documents demonstrate that the efficacy of its COVID-19 vaccine was only 12% (not the 95% reported) went viral. This is a slasher stat, so-named because it is not new and, like the killers in slasher movie series, even when it appears to be dead it always appears in another installment of the misinformation franchise to kill again. The post first appeared on
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Total lunar eclipse 2022: when, where and what to look out for
The moon passes through the shadow of the Earth next weekend, begins at 0232 BST on 16 May This is advance notice of a total lunar eclipse that takes place next weekend. A total lunar eclipse is when the moon passes through the shadow of the Earth. It happens in several stages, the first being the penumbral phase. This begins at 0232 BST on 16 May. The penumbral eclipse means that although most o
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On Trying to Create Art When the Baby's Crying
While still a student in the late 1960s, the artist Mierle Laderman Ukeles, pregnant with her first child, encountered a famous sculptor. S he recalls him declaring , upon seeing her round belly, "Well, I guess now you can't be an artist." He wasn't, she later realized, entirely wrong; once she had a baby, Ukeles found herself trapped in the kind of mindless automated work that defines early moth
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Woman Scammed for $8 Million in Crypto, Sues Exchanges
Total Nightmare A young woman in Texas must feel like she's living in a horror movie. The 25-year-old Divya Gadasalli told Bloomberg last week that a man she met on Tinder had stolen $8 million inheritance in an incredibly bold crypto scam that could test the legal recourse of similar victims in the little-regulated space. Gadasalli is from Texas and inherited some of her father's estate after he
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NASA Is Now Running Into Serious Issues With Its Mars Helicopter
Off and On Again NASA's plucky little Mars helicopter is once again having issues — and though an ingenious workaround may have given it an extended lifespan, its days are likely numbered. In an update about the Ingenuity helicopter , NASA noted that its Jet Propulsion Laboratory out of CalTech lost contact with the chopper last week when dust buildup on its solar arrays made it difficult for the
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Car T-cell therapy shows early promise in treating gastric cancers
Chinese researchers say interim trial results suggest approach could be important for those with advanced tumours An experimental cancer therapy that infuses designer immune cells into patients has shown early promise in a clinical trial by shrinking tumours in the digestive system. Interim results from the first phase of the clinical trial found that the tumours in nearly half – 48.6% – of the 3
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Climate crisis: what lessons can we learn from the last great cooling-off period?
The 'little ice age' of the 14th to the 19th centuries brought cold winters to Europe and unusual weather globally. Studying how humans adapted could be valuable In early February 1814, an elephant walked across the surface of the Thames near Blackfriars Bridge in London. The stunt was performed during the frost fair , when temperatures were so cold that for four days the top layers of the river
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Affordable Covid drugs kept out of reach by sluggish WTO
Analysis: EU and US pharma giants' intellectual property rights stop poorer countries accessing vital medication – despite WTO claims of progress There is still a long way to go before South Africa and other developing countries can manufacture Covid vaccines and treatments quickly and without paying the huge charges demanded by the big US and European drug companies. Last week, the World Trade O
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Why 'De-Extinction' Is Impossible (But Could Work Anyway)
For scientists studying de-extinction — the ambitious effort to resurrect extinct species — a paper that appeared in Current Biology in March was a sobering reality check. Thomas Gilbert, a genomics researcher and professor at the University of Copenhagen, led a team of researchers who tested the feasibility of de-extinction by sequencing the genome of the Christmas Island rat, a species that wen
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Europe's first psychedelic drug trial firm to open in London
Startup Clerkenwell Health hopes to help make UK a world leader in psychedelics research Europe's first commercial facility for psychedelic drug trials is to open in London, with the goal of making the UK a global leader in psychedelics research and innovation. The British startup Clerkenwell Health aims to begin trials in its central London facility in August, initially focusing on the use of ps
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'We're Not Going to Make That Mistake Again'
W ith Russian President Vladimir Putin's forces bogged down in Ukraine, apparently unable to defeat one of the poorest nations in Europe, and China locking up millions of people in a seemingly never-ending battle to contain COVID-19, the once-ubiquitous idea of inevitable Western decline has suddenly been called into question. Out of nowhere, the free world once again stands for something, and is
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POV: You're Watching the first TikTok Made in Space
FYP The for you page is getting a little more far out than usual with the European Space Agency celebrating the first TikTok ever made in space. ESA astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti posted the 90-second clip Thursday and walked viewers through life on the International Space Station. She even showed off the stuffed animals she brought along for the 6-month flight with rocket manufacturer SpaceX.
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How New York's COVID War Spun Out of Control
Day after day, NYPD officers sit outside the house, waiting. Most nights you'll notice two of them in the front of a cruiser, chatting with the windows rolled down. Some afternoons one cop leans against the front hood, peering up and down the block. Each morning when Ashwin Vasan, New York City's health commissioner, emerges from his home, additional officers trail him to work. "I had no idea I w
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Why the Puzzle-Box Sci-Fi of Severance Works
At a time when the American office is anywhere a Zoom window can be opened, the notion of truly separating work and home is an alluring one. Take that thought to its furthest extreme and you have the Apple TV+ thriller Severance . The dystopian sci-fi starring Adam Scott makes "work-life balance" an actual divide in its characters' consciousnesses; a special surgery allows them to switch between
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Monday briefing: Where we are in the fight to end the pandemic
In today's newsletter: It might feel like the pandemic is over, but is it too early to pretend the virus has disappeared? Nimo Omer speaks with the Guardian's Hannah Devlin to find out Sign up here for our new daily newsletter, First Edition Good morning. It never feels like a quiet time in the news at the moment, and today is no exception: ongoing atrocities in Ukraine, the fallout from an unpre
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Catalytic synthesis of phenols with nitrous oxide
The emission of greenhouse gases threatens the global environment, and scientists around the world are increasingly committed to addressing this issue. While many research groups focus on carbon dioxide (CO2) or methane (CH4) revalorization strategies, a team led by Dr. Josep Cornellà at the Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung has focused on a lesser-known gas that also contributes significant
11h
Collisions with electrons cool molecular ions
A lone molecule free in cold space will cool by slowing down its rotation—it will spontaneously lose its rotational energy in quantum transitions, typically only once in many seconds. This process can be accelerated, slowed down, or even inverted by collisions with surrounding particles.
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Sweden? Japan? UK? Debates over who had a 'good' Covid won't end | Francois Balloux
The WHO has spoken but even its huge new report will not settle arguments about pandemic strategies National Covid death rates are, inevitably, political. How could they not be when they are viewed as evidence for good or bad government on matters of life or death? How did the UK fare compared with, say, Germany? Should both countries have been more like Sweden? However, when new data arrives, far
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Cynics masquerade as wise, but they're doing everyone a disservice | Torsten Bell
Their world-weary attitude deceives others into believing they're better at their jobs than they are Being cynical about other people's motivations – assuming that everyone acts only out of self-interest – is all the rage these days. But, let's be honest, people who are universally cynical are also tiresome and dull. No one wants a colleague, let alone a friend, who can't really trust you because
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Minerals can be key to healing damaged tissue
Every species, from bacteria to humans, is capable of regeneration. Regeneration is mediated by the molecular processes that regulate gene expression to control tissue renewal, restoration and growth.
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A zero-cost way to improve neutron scattering resolution by 500%
Scientists pushing the limits of the world's most advanced neutron scattering instruments know that a small amount of distortion in their measurements is inevitable. For some experiments, this distortion is easily accounted for, but in other types of research it can cause inaccurate findings.
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Where the Language of Democracy Is a Cover
On Friday afternoon, supporters of John Lee gathered for what his adviser described as a preelection rally , a final push in Lee's campaign to secure victory in the election to be Hong Kong's next chief executive. Don't let the vocabulary fool you. No members of the general public attended Lee's event, a stage-managed flourish to a weeks-long show masquerading as a contest. He didn't actually hav
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Så ska astronauter kunna andas på månen
Flera länder har idag långtgående planer på att bygga en bas på månen. Där ska astronauter kunna bo och arbeta flera dagar i sträck. Men en förutsättning för att det ska kunna fungera är att månkolonin är självförsörjande på syre. Spela videon för att se hur kinesiska forskare vill producera syre på månen.
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User Discovers That Google Docs Crashes When You Type a Specific Phrase
No Fun Google Docs apparently has a problem with repetition. At least, that seems to be the implication after users discovered a genuinely puzzling bug last week that caused the browser-based word processor to crash when confronted with repeated instances of the same word, like "and," "but," or "however." The original glitch was discovered when a user, who later posted on Google Support about it
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A new window into the world of attosecond phenomena
They are everywhere, around us and within us. Phenomena lasting trillionths of a second form the core of chemistry and biology. It is only recently that we have begun to try to accurately record their actual course, with moderate success. However, physicists from Cracow have proven that the new window to the world of attophysics can be built, offering a very promising view.
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Trolling's Surprising Origins in Fishing
Sign up for Caleb's newsletter here. Four hundred years ago, trolls haunted the dark forests of Scandinavia looking for lost humans to club on the head with trees, drag back to the depths of their caves, and eat. Now they haunt the dark forests of social media looking for lost posters to goad with inflammatory comments, drag into the depths of a pointless passionate argument, and enrage for as lo
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A new method for exploring the nano-world
Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light (MPL) and Max-Planck-Zentrum für Physik und Medizin (MPZPM) in Erlangen present a large step forward in the characterization of nanoparticles. They used a special microscopy method based on interfereometry to outperform existing instruments. One possible application of this technique may be to identify illnesses.
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Climate Change Exposing Murdered Bodies in Dried-Out Lakebed
Dried Up In an unusually grisly side effect of climate change, a lake in Nevada is giving up its dead because of an ongoing draught that's causing record-low water levels. According to a press release by the National Parks Service (NPS), rangers received a witness report of human skeletal remains at the Lake Mead National Recreation Area over the weekend. Officers recovered the remains and the co
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Photos From Russia's Ongoing Invasion of Ukraine
Some 75 days since the start of the Russian invasion of Ukraine , fighting continues in eastern Ukraine, while Russian missiles still sporadically strike major cities. In areas where Russian forces have withdrawn or been pushed out, some residents are attempting to return to their old lives, clearing debris and rebuilding. The United Nations now estimates that nearly 5.9 million refugees have fle
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Dynamics of ocean worlds likely controlled by their rotation
Discovering that many of the large moons in the outer solar system may host significant subsurface oceans of liquid water has been a key advance in planetary science. These moons represent some of the most promising habitats for life beyond Earth, but their hidden nature makes direct study difficult.
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Shipping poses significant threat to the endangered whale shark
Marine biologists from the Marine Biological Association (MBA) and the University of Southampton have led ground-breaking research which indicates that lethal collisions of whale sharks with large ships are vastly underestimated, and could be the reason why populations are falling.
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Bolder marmoset monkeys learn faster than shy ones
Individual traits seem to drive our learning success: for instance, conscientious individuals often show higher academic performance. A group of cognitive and behavioral biologists from University of Vienna conducted personality assessments and a battery of learning tests with common marmosets and found that such a link, intertwined with family group membership, exists in these monkeys, too. The s
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New electrocatalysts herald carbon neutrality
A team of researchers at the University of Adelaide is undertaking fundamental research into new types of high-performance low-cost metal-based electrocatalysts that are the key to the development of sustainable energy solutions and help to achieve carbon neutrality. They are developing catalysts that can be "tailored" to different uses.
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Using bioenergy crops versus reforesting shows crop expansion could lead to water shortages
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in the U.S. and Singapore has found that adding bioenergy crops or reforestation would both substantially increase CO2 sequestration, but the former would lead to major water shortages. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their analyses and comparison of the two climate mitigation strategies.
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Tropical dry forests disappearing rapidly around the globe
Dry tropical forests are important ecosystems, yet these forests are increasingly threatened, a new study discovers. An innovative approach to characterize how deforestation took place since 2000 showed that more than 71 million hectares of tropical dry forests were lost, particularly in South America and Asia. Even more worrisome, one third of remaining forests are under threat as they are locate
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Se de mytomspunna "pyromanfåglarna"
De har länge kallats "eldfåglar" av Australiens ursprungsbefolkning. Fåglarna utnyttjar skogsbränder för att jaga föda. Men det verkar även som att alla bränder inte är en olyckshändelse. – När man är och filmar en brand, och så plötsligt är branden på andra sidan vägen, då tar man för givet att det är en eldfågel som gjort det, säger naturfilmaren Mark Lamble i Vetenskapens värld – Katastrofernas
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The Download: China is sticking to its zero-covid plan, and how Ukraine is rebuilding its destroyed cities
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. China is sticking to its zero-covid lockdown policy Shanghai and Beijing, China's two largest cities, are tightening covid restrictions on residents as part of the country's continued commitment to its zero-covid strategy, despite growing public anger. Despite
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From data and AI aspirations to sustainable business outcomes
There are 3 common challenges that organizations face while transforming AI aspirations into scalable and intelligent solutions. Get an insider's view of use case scenarios that illustrate real business and functional value through a proven framework and process toward sustainable digital transformation. About the speaker Vishal Kapoor, Vice President, Data and AI, Kyndryl Vishal Kapoor is the Ky
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Ultrafast 'camera' captures hidden behavior of potential 'neuromorphic' material
Imagine a computer that can think as fast as the human brain while using very little energy. That's the goal of scientists seeking to discover or develop materials that can send and process signals as easily as the brain's neurons and synapses. Identifying quantum materials with an intrinsic ability to switch between two distinct forms (or more) may hold the key to these futuristic sounding "neuro
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Bittersweet by Susan Cain review – a mawkish manifesto for the happy-sad
The author of Quiet again bangs the drum for the world's sensitive souls, but her unflagging earnestness is depressingly short of nuance and humour Now then, on a scale of 0 to 10: do you seek out beauty in your everyday life? Do you know what CS Lewis meant when he described joy as a "sharp, wonderful stab of longing"? Do you react intensely to music or art or nature? Are you moved by old photog
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Introducing How to Start Over
Listen and subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Googl e | Pocket Casts In this series, Atlantic staff writer Olga Khazan analyzes what it takes to change our relationships, our work, and our perspective—with a practical approach to one of life's greatest mysteries: how to start over. Change can be really hard. Inertia is powerful, mortgages and marriages are long-term, and personality
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Dangers of species to species transplants | Letter
Dr Julia Baines of Peta argues that advanced computer modelling and engineered human and plant tissues are far more accurate than these experiments Peta scientists have consistently warned that animal-to-human transplants risk transmitting dangerous viruses, so the news that a pig virus may have contributed to the death of David Bennett, the world's first human recipient of a pig heart, was sadly
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Methylation of tRNA-derived fragments regulates gene-silencing activity in bladder cancer
Researchers describe a novel form of gene regulation that is altered in bladder cancer, leading to the boosting of a gene pathway that helps the cancer cells survive during rapid growth. The work focuses on a 22-base fragment of transfer RNA, tRF-3b, which is modified by the enzyme complex TRMT6/61A. In bladder cancer, the levels of TRMT6/61A — a methyltransferase — are elevated. The methylation
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Whatafit Resistance Bands review
We break down whether Whatafit's 16-piece resistance band set is worth the investment, or if fitness fans should opt for other bands when working out at home
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Citizen science study detects vast amount of microplastics in Catalan bathing areas
The presence of microplastics in the oceans is widely documented/reported by oceanographic research, but data on the pollution in the nearshore regions are scarce due to access difficulties faced by scientific boats. Researchers from the Consolidated Research Group on Marine Geosciences of the Faculty of Earth Sciences of the UB, in collaboration with the Spanish delegation of the NGO Surfrider Fo
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How do water mold spores swim?
Oomycetes, also known as water moulds, are pathogenic microorganisms that resemble fungi and are responsible for a group of diseases affecting several plant species. To reach and infect plants, the spores swim to their target. Physicists and biologists have now precisely measured the movement of each flagellum while a zoospore follows a linear trajectory and when it is turning.
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Drugs showing promise in cancer trials reduce scarring for scleroderma
Epigenetic drugs that have shown promise in cancer trials significantly reduce scarring in the cells of patients with scleroderma, a new study shows. Results reveal that drugs that inhibit BRD4, known to play a role in cancer, also affect fibrosis in scleroderma. Researchers tested BRD4 inhibitors on the skin fibroblasts of scleroderma patients and in mouse models of skin fibrosis, finding that th
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Researchers identify key factors impacting adaptive therapy
Researchers have been investigating an alternative treatment approach called adaptive therapy that focuses on maintaining disease control instead of complete tumor cell elimination. Researchers used mathematical modeling to reveal that the spatial organization of a tumor is an important factor that governs how cells compete with one another and the effectiveness of adaptive therapy.
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Ice-capped volcanoes slower to erupt, study finds
The Westdahl Peak volcano in Alaska last erupted in 1992, and continued expansion hints at another eruption soon. Experts previously forecasted the next blast to occur by 2010, but the volcano — located under about 1 kilometer of glacial ice — has yet to erupt again. Using the Westdahl Peak volcano as inspiration, a new volcanic modeling study examined how glaciers affect the stability and short
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The Atlantic's Jennifer Senior Wins 2022 Pulitzer Prize for Feature Writing
The Atlantic staff writer Jennifer Senior has won the 2022 Pulitzer Prize for Feature Writing. She was awarded journalism's top honor for her remarkable September 2021 cover story, " What Bobby McIlvaine Left Behind ," which looked at one family's heartbreaking loss in the 9/11 attacks and their struggle to move on. This is The Atlantic 's second Pulitzer Prize, following Ed Yong's 2021 Pulitzer
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Progress made in construction of Fred Young Submillimeter Telescope
An enormous hole 22 meters in diameter has been dug near the summit of Cerro Chajnantor in Chile's Atacama Desert, at an elevation of 18,400 feet. The hole stands ready for the cement foundation on which the Fred Young Submillimeter Telescope (FYST, pronounced "feest") will one day rest. The foundation, which was designed in Chile, began construction in the fall of 2021 and is scheduled to be inst
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Powering the next generation of AI
Ubiquitous computing has triggered an avalanche of data that is beyond human processing capabilities. AI technologies have emerged as the only viable way to turn this data into information. As more computing produces more data, more computing power is needed to power AI. Next generation AI will soon look to planetary-scale computing systems to further fuel AI's computational requirements. We'll e
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'I'm Very Conflicted': Readers Share Complex Views on Abortion
This is an edition of Up for Debate, a newsletter by Conor Friedersdorf. On Wednesdays, he rounds up timely conversations and solicits reader responses to one thought-provoking question. Every Monday, he publishes some thoughtful replies. Sign up for the newsletter here. In the last Up for Debate I asked readers, "What are your views on abortion?" Joey shares a personal story: I am a 78-year-old
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NASA Suspended Perseverance Operations to Save Mars Helicopter
It's hard to overstate the importance of NASA's Perseverance rover, which is only beginning its exploration of the red planet. This robot is bristling with advanced instruments that could help reveal evidence of past Martian life, but this has almost been overshadowed by a mere technology demonstration that was along for the ride. NASA's Ingenuity helicopter has exceeded all expectations, but its
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Best Bose Speakers in 2022
If you asked the average person to name a company that makes great speakers, there's a fair chance they'd respond with "Bose." The company has enjoyed continued success in an ever-changing market by showing its willingness to embrace new technology. Its line of Quiet Comfort over-ear headphones helped popularize active noise cancellation, a feature that has become enormously popular. Bose has exp
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'Keto' molecule may hamper colorectal cancer growth
A molecule produced in the liver in response to low-carb "ketogenic" diets has a powerful effect in suppressing colorectal tumor growth and may be useful as a preventive and treatment of such cancers, according to a new study with mice. In the study in Nature researchers initially found that mice on low-carb, high-fat ketogenic diets have a striking resistance to colorectal tumor development and
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It's all in the wrist: A portable MRI system for early detection of sports injuries
To provide a convenient tool for the early detection of injuries, researchers have developed a portable MRI device for diagnosing cartilage damage in the wrist. Using this device, the researchers imaged the wrists of tennis players at a tennis school. Several athletes were found to have cartilage damage without any other symptoms of an injury. Thus, this device provides a convenient early screenin
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Uncovering the key to safer energy storage devices that avoid thermal runaway
Modern energy storage devices, such as supercapacitors and batteries, have highly temperature-dependent performance. If a device gets too hot, it become susceptible to "thermal runaway." Thermal runaway—or uncontrolled overheating—can ultimately result in explosions or fires. Adopting a well-informed thermal management strategy is necessary for the stable and safe operation of devices. To do this,
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Working while in school has long-lasting effects on human capital formation
A well-designed work-study program can boost human capital accumulation, with long-lasting, positive effects on participants' labor market outcomes, according to a study that analyzed "Yo Estudio y Trabajo" (YET), a program which provides students in Uruguay aged 16 to 20 with a first formal part-time work experience in state-owned companies for up to one year.
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Taiwan's crust is moving at 'extreme' speed
A new study finds evidence of surprisingly rapid upward movement of Earth's crust on the island of Taiwan. Over roughly half a million years, the Coastal Range of east Taiwan was rising at a rate of 9 to 14 millimeters (0.35 to 0.55 inches) per year, the research shows While this seems imperceptibly slow by human standards, it's quite fast for mountains. Much of the dramatic topography on the sur
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A design-based activity to enhance students' understanding in electrochemistry
The electrochemistry designette is a purposefully developed design activity which allows students to demonstrate complex concepts and for instructors to impart a set of core skills to foster innovation. Developed by researchers from the Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD), this pedagogical tool was first introduced and published in 2019. It now has proven to be highly effective in
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What is a lunar eclipse?
Lunar eclipses occur when the moon falls into Earth's shadow, creating a blood moon, and can be total, partial or penumbral. Here's when one will happen next.
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New method to synchronize devices on Earth makes use of cosmic rays
Various technologies, networks and institutions benefit from or require accurate time keeping to synchronize their activities. Current ways of synchronizing time have some drawbacks that a new proposed method seeks to address. The cosmic time synchronizer works by synchronizing devices around cosmic ray events detected by those devices. This could bring accurate timing abilities to remote sensing
4h
Failed eruptions are at the origin of copper deposits
Copper is one of the most widely used metals on the planet today due to its electrical and thermal conduction properties. The greatest natural resources of this metal are the so-called 'porphyry' deposits that come from magmas deep in the Earth. In recent research, scientists demonstrate that these deposits are largely produced by mechanisms similar to those causing large volcanic eruptions. At a
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Dietary fiber doesn't affect everyone the same way
Not all dietary fiber is created equal, according to a new study. The new study dug into two types of common digestive fiber supplements. It shows stark differences in how we react to them, and it's not always good. The study also reveals insights into how one type of fiber reduces cholesterol—a mystery scientists have been chasing for years. "We all know that high-fiber diets are good for us , b
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Study reveals network of energy reallocation in Litopenaeus vannamei responsive to heat-stress
High economic value and excellent characteristics for breeding have enabled the Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei to become one of the major aquaculture species in the world. However, in summer, continuous hot weather or periodic temperatures above 35 degrees Celsius leads to high mortality rates of the shrimp. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the mechanisms of L. vannamei in resp
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How physics can help us make sense of multiverse madness
If you're a fan of science fiction films, you'll likely be familiar with the idea of alternate universes—hypothetical planes of existence with different versions of ourselves. As far from reality as it sounds, it is a question that scientists have contemplated. So just how well does the fiction stack up with the science?
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Development of bacteriocins from dairy wastes
Scientists are investigating the potential of microbial chemical weapons for use in various industries, such as horticulture, the food industry, veterinary medicine, and even in cancer treatment. A new promising source for extracting such chemicals from dairy waste is reported in the International Journal of Environmental Technology and Management.
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Studying the pseudogap in superconducting cuprate materials
Over three decades since the discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in ceramic cuprate materials, investigating the electronic states in cuprate materials to advance the understanding of the superconducting phase and related phenomena has developed incredible importance.
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Opinion: Environmental justice delayed has been justice denied
It has taken a very long time, but environmental justice has moved to the center of the environmental policy agenda. Here in New York City, the environmental justice movement spent decades fighting the siting of the North River sewage treatment plant in West Harlem. Having lost the siting battle, activists pushed to improve the treatment plant and reduce its environmental impact. They worked to de
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Temperature affects fig wasp community structure by changing strength of competitive interactions
Species interactions, including trophic associations, play an important role in shaping ecological communities and their outcome and intensity can be influenced by changing abiotic conditions. However, it is often difficult to accommodate different types of species interactions and evaluate the response of those interactions to climate change due to the inherent complexity of species interaction n
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Cost of living crisis means winter is already worrying Londoners, research shows
Just 7% of more than 1,000 Londoners polled had no concerns about heating their homes this winter, while around two-thirds (65%) said they were very or fairly concerned. When asked what puts most pressure on their living costs, almost half (48%) said energy bills and a quarter (23%) rent or mortgage payments, while others cited household expenses like food and petrol.
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Sale of donkey skins linked to trade in illegal wildlife products
Research published in Conservation Science and Practice has revealed novel links between the global trade in donkey skins and the wildlife trade. The study by an interdisciplinary team from the University of Oxford's Saïd Business School and Wildlife Conservation Research Unit (WildCRU) and supported by The Donkey Sanctuary suggests that these trades operate in parallel, creating new avenues and t
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How food choices can help the planet
A new book published by researchers at the University of Sydney and Curtin University explores how global food production and consumption are impacting the environment and contributing to emissions, offering a positive, sustainable way forward.
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Hidden energy poverty revealed by energy equity gap
Destenie Nock and Shuchen Cong are unveiling hidden energy poverty and insecurity. Their new metric, developed with collaborators at the University of Maryland and the Salt River Project, illustrates what they've termed the "energy equity gap."
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These bats deter predators by buzzing like hornets
In Batesian mimicry, a harmless species imitates a more dangerous one in an evolutionary 'ruse' that affords the mimic protection from would-be predators. Now, researchers have discovered the first case of acoustic Batesian mimicry in mammals and one of very few documented in any species: greater mouse-eared bats imitate the buzzing sound of a stinging insect to discourage predatory owls from eati
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Parker Counts His Total Gold for the Season | Gold Rush
Stream Gold Rush on discovery+: https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/gold-rush #GoldRush #ParkerSchnabel #Discovery Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery From: Discove
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Remote work may actually be good for business
Employee and company resiliency may be enhanced through the opportunity for employees to work remotely during natural disasters and other events that cause workplace displacement, a new study shows. Researchers worked with a large oil and gas company in Houston, Texas, to analyze ergonomic software data from 264 employees. During the study period, the company was forced to close its offices becau
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Food insecurity risk related to diabetes later in life
Young adults who were at risk of food insecurity had increased incidence of diabetes 10 years later, according to a new study. While previous research has associated food insecurity with a range of health issues including diabetes, obesity and hypertension, this study showed a connection over time, suggesting a causal relationship. Researchers analyzed data on nearly 4,000 people from the National
6h
Best Smoke Detectors of 2022
Every home should be equipped with one of the best smoke detectors. Smoke is a silent killer. By the time it creeps into bedrooms the house could be ablaze, and the chances of survival dramatically reduced. Figures from the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) tell us that two-thirds of fire deaths happen in homes with no functioning smoke detector. Fortunately, it's an easy problem to fix
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A novel molecular mechanism that regulates secretion of the sonic hedgehog signaling molecule
Research led by Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) has revealed a novel mechanism that regulates secretion of sonic hedgehog (Shh), a key signaling molecule that plays an important role in cancer progression in mammals, opening the door to novel therapeutic strategies for cancer induced by the hedgehog signaling pathway.
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Landscapes with higher proportions of forest maintain more diverse pollinator communities
About 75% of food crops and more than 80% of wild plants require pollination by insects. The value of crop pollination alone is estimated at up to 577 billion US dollars per year worldwide. The best-known pollinators are bees, but these are by no means the only insects that provide this service for humans and nature—flies, wasps, beetles, butterflies and moths also play important roles.
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Getting sticky with it: Phospholipid found to play a key role in epithelial cell adhesion
Cells have certain proteins that help them adhere to each other while covering body surfaces and organs. Loss of these identifying proteins could result in cellular progression towards cancer and, subsequently, metastasis. However, lipids may play a role in maintaining cellular identity as well. Japanese scientists have now identified the role of PIP2, a phospholipid, in maintaining epithelial cel
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50 years of traditional crop conservation a success, but some crops still lack protection
A global analysis of the representation of traditional farmer varieties (often called landraces) of 25 major crops in gene banks around the world has shown that tremendous progress has been made over more than a half-century toward their conservation, while also identifying the most important gaps remaining to be filled. Their global study "State of ex situ conservation of landrace groups of twent
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New review highlights innovative catalysts: Design and application
Nano-catalysis provides many opportunities for chemical transformations, ranging from chemical manufacturing to energy conversion and storage. By far, mainly due to the recovery aspect, heterogeneous catalysis has received significant research attention, with its application covering approximately 80% of all catalytic processes.
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How does history suggest that work will change following the COVID-19 pandemic?
The COVID-19 pandemic made clear the enormity of inequalities in the workplace and the value of essential workers, whose jobs put them at greater risk of being infected. Many workers left their jobs as part of the Great Resignation. Others are unwilling to give up the flexibility of working from home. Starbucks and Amazon workers voted to unionize. Carol Symes, a professor of history who specializ
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Making chemical separation more eco-friendly with nanotechnology
Chemical separation processes are essential in the manufacturing of many products from gasoline to whiskey. Such processes are energetically costly, accounting for approximately 10–15 percent of global energy consumption. In particular, the use of so-called "thermal separation processes," such as distillation for separating petroleum-based hydrocarbons, is deeply ingrained in the chemical industry
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Self-regulation of an enzyme with critical cellular functions
The lab of Kathy Gould, Louise B. McGavock Professor and professor of cell and developmental biology, used a multi-disciplinary approach that included structural biology, biochemistry, and molecular biology to investigate the regulation of the CK1 enzyme family. The research, led by Sierra Cullati, a postdoc in the Gould lab, and carried out in conjunction with Jun-Song Chen, research assistant pr
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Mapping the effects of mutations in antibiotic-resistant bacteria
When a bacterium becomes more resistant to one antibiotic, it sometimes becomes more sensitive to another. To better understand this interaction, researchers from the Leiden Institute of Biology (IBL) and the Leiden Academic Center for Drug Research (LACDR) under supervision of Daniel Rozen and Coen van Hasselt mapped the effects of mutations in antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Their findings have b
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The future of the food ecosystem — and the power of your plate | Ndidi Okonkwo Nwuneli
Many people across the world don't have access to healthy food — while in other places tons of food go to waste. Social entrepreneur Ndidi Okonkwo Nwuneli thinks we can take bold steps to fix this problem. She lays out what it would take to build a more equitable, sustainable food system that nourishes all people and asks us to widen our perspectives before eating our next meal.
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Asian elephant cured of tuberculosis developed from long-term latency
Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). It was the leading cause of human death due to a single pathogen before the emergence of SARS-CoV-2. In elephants, infections and deaths from TB have been reported worldwide, and elephant-to-human transmission has also been reported. Therefore, elephant TB is a concern for both conservation of this endangered an
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Bird brains shed light on Parkinson's voice issues
A specific protein in the brain could be behind changes in voice production associated with Parkinson's disease, a study with zebra finches shows. Parkinson's disease is perhaps best known for its movement-related symptoms, particularly tremors and stiffness. But the disease is also known to hinder vocal production, giving those with Parkinson's a soft monotonous voice. Those symptoms, research h
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Why can't we predict volcanic eruptions like we do hurricanes?
While the Cumbre Vieja eruption in La Palma, Spain, is said to have cost EUR 843 million, thankfully, only one casualty was reported. While the emergency response is celebrated, the event has sparked questions about how much advance warning is possible for this type of natural disaster.
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What causes repeat urinary tract infections?
A new study suggests that women who get recurrent UTIs may be caught in a vicious cycle in which antibiotics meant to eradicate one infection predispose them to develop another. One of the greatest frustrations regarding urinary tract infections (UTIs) is that they so often recur. UTIs are caused by bacteria in the urinary tract and characterized by frequent and painful urination. A round of anti
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Nanomagnetic Computing Could Drastically Cut AI's Energy Use
As the Internet of Things expands, engineers want to embed AI into everything, but the amount of energy it requires is a challenge for the smallest and most remote devices. A new "nanomagnetic" computing approach could provide a solution. While most AI development today is focused on large, complex models running in huge data centers, there is also growing demand for ways to run simpler AI applic
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Can algae unlock the secrets of photosynthesis?
A team led by current and former Carnegie plant biologists has undertaken the largest ever functional genomic study of a photosynthetic organism. Their work, published in Nature Genetics, could inform strategies for improving agricultural yields and mitigating climate change.
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Even stars doomed to die as supernovae can have planets
Ninety percent of all exoplanets discovered to date (there are now more than 5,000 of them) orbit around stars the same size or smaller than our sun. Giant stars seem to lack planetary companions, and this fact has serious implications for how we understand solar system formation. But is the dearth of planets around large stars a true reflection of nature, or is there some bias inherent in how we
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Hjertekirurgiens historie gentager sig … åbenbart
Det er ikke korrekt, at Rigshospitalet er de første og eneste til at udføre en bestemt type bypass på bankende hjerte, som det fremgår af en artikel i Dagens Medicin nr. 7/22. Det har man gjort i Aalborg siden 2018, skriver en række hjertelæger fra Aalborg UH i denne kommentar.
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The Pantanal, the world's largest wetland, is at risk of collapse
The world's largest wetland, known as the Pantanal, in South America is at risk of collapse due to a series of local and seemingly minor decisions that fail to account for their cumulative impact on one of Earth's most biodiverse ecosystems, according to a letter published in BioScience. Authors of the letter titled, "The tragedy of the commons: How subtle and 'legal' decisions threaten one of the
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Hubble's double take on a spiral galaxy
The magnificent spiral galaxy M99 fills the frame in this image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. M99—which lies roughly 42 million light-years from Earth in the constellation Coma Berenices—is a "grand design" spiral galaxy, so-called because of the well-defined, prominent spiral arms visible in this image. Hubble's Wide Field Camera 3 captured M99 on two separate occasions, helping astro
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Medicine in the blood
Nature, Published online: 09 May 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01259-0 Marcelo Hill works to understand the body's immune system and how it responds to cancer.
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Making Better Self-Driving Cars
Human behavior is complex and can be very difficult to predict. This is one of the challenges of safe driving – what to do when right of way, for example, is ambiguous, or there are multiple players all interacting with each other? When people learn to drive they first master the rules, and learn their driving skills in controlled situations. As they progress they gain confidence driving in more
10h
Diversity in brain research: Does it matter? – Join us on 18 May!
Join us on 18 May for the 'Diversity in brain research: Does it matter?' webinar! Register here: https://www.humanbrainproject.eu/en/follow-hbp/news/2022/05/09/webinar-18-may-2022-diversity-brain-research-does-it-matter/ In this webinar, the Human Brain Project encourages scientists to consider sex, gender and additional diversity factors in neuroscience and related fields: because biology, socia
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The Human Brain Project & EBRAINS
The Human Brain Project is a global, collaborative effort for neuroscience, medicine, and computing to understand the brain, its diseases, and its computational capabilities. EBRAINS is a digital infrastructure for brain research being developed by the Human Brain Project. From: HumanBrainProject
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Seattle PD Is Testing a Brain Stimulation Device For Mental Wellness
(Photo: Michael Förtsch/Unsplash) The Seattle Police Department is testing a brain stimulation device to see if it has a positive effect on employees' mental wellbeing. The device is a part of a larger effort to promote wellness across the organization as well as "normalize access to self-care," according to Loren Atherly, SPD's director of performance analytics and research. While SPD has histor
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Daily briefing: Most US children have been infected with SARS-CoV-2
Nature, Published online: 05 May 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01286-x Antibodies from more than 86,000 children in the United States show that reported infections are only the tip of the iceberg. Plus, WHO estimates of COVID deaths are almost triple official figures and how to remedy mental-health care in the United States.
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Pandemic Brings New Hardships to India's Domestic Workers
In India, live-in domestic workers — who often come from marginalized communities — toil in conditions that some advocates liken to modern-day slavery. Public health measures intended to fight the Covid-19 pandemic, workers and advocates say, have sometimes made the situation even worse.
12h
Author Correction: Modulation of thermometric performance of single-band-ratiometric luminescent thermometers based on luminescence of Nd3+ activated tetrafluorides by size modification
Scientific Reports, Published online: 09 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41598-022-11989-w Author Correction: Modulation of thermometric performance of single-band-ratiometric luminescent thermometers based on luminescence of Nd 3+ activated tetrafluorides by size modification
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Spending Time in Space May Change Astronauts' Brains Forever
Until a few decades ago, no human being had ever been away from gravity's loving embrace. As the era of space exploration dawns, it's still unclear how long stretches without gravity will affect the body. A new analysis of astronauts from Oregon Health & Science University shows that their brains go through structural changes from exposure to microgravity, and those changes can persist long after
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Structural complexity in ramp-compressed sodium to 480 GPa
Nature Communications, Published online: 09 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-29813-4 The properties of materials can be drastically modified under extreme pressure. Here the authors investigate ramp-compressed sodium to 5 million atmospheres with in situ X-ray diffraction and optical reflectivity, revealing a complex temperature-driven polymorphism and suggesting the formation of a previously pre
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A negative-solvatochromic fluorescent probe for visualizing intracellular distributions of fatty acid metabolites
Nature Communications, Published online: 09 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30153-6 Metabolic distribution of fatty acids to organelles is an essential biological process for energy homeostasis. Here the authors report a fluorescent probe that allows multicolour visualisation of the intracellular distribution of exogenous fatty acids, metabolically incorporated as lipid components.
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Gut microbiota regulates acute myeloid leukaemia via alteration of intestinal barrier function mediated by butyrate
Nature Communications, Published online: 09 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30240-8 The role of gut microbiota in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) remains unclear. Here, the authors show disordered gut microbiota and reduced butyrate cause intestinal barrier damage in AML mice, with increased plasma LPS that accelerates AML progression.
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Plasma membrane phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate is critical for determination of epithelial characteristics
Nature Communications, Published online: 09 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30061-9 Epithelial cells provide cell-cell adhesion to maintain the integrity of multicellular organisms. Here the authors show that phospholipid phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate is critical for the maintenance of epithelial characteristics.
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Moisture adsorption-desorption full cycle power generation
Nature Communications, Published online: 09 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30156-3 Reducing humanity's reliance on fossil fuels will require the development of alternative, renewable energy technologies. Here, authors prepare a moisture adsorption-desorption power generator that asymmetrically adsorbs and desorbs moisture at high and low humidity to provide an electric output.
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Double-tap gene drive uses iterative genome targeting to help overcome resistance alleles
Nature Communications, Published online: 09 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-29868-3 CRISPR gene drives are genetic elements capable of quickly spreading through populations and they offer promising solutions for curbing the spread of vector-borne diseases and controlling crop pest and invasive species populations. Here the authors present a method for overcoming resistance alleles "double-tap,"
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Contribution of rare whole-genome sequencing variants to plasma protein levels and the missing heritability
Nature Communications, Published online: 09 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30208-8 Despite the success of genome-wide association studies, much of the genetic contribution to complex traits remains unexplained. Here, the authors identify effects by rare variants on plasma proteins, and estimate the contribution of rare variants to the heritability.
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Oh, rats! As New Yorkers emerge from pandemic, so do rodents
They crawled to the surface as the coronavirus pandemic roiled New York City, scurrying out of subterranean nests into the open air, feasting on a smorgasbord of scraps in streets, parks and mounds of curbside garbage. As diners shunned the indoors for outdoor dining, so did the city's rats.
14h
Coral reefs provide stunning images of a world under assault
Humans don't know what they're missing under the surface of a busy shipping channel in the "cruise capital of the world." Just below the keels of massive ships, an underwater camera provides a live feed from another world, showing marine life that's trying its best to resist global warming.
14h
Metabolt BMI: att förutspå risken för typ 2-diabetes hos normalviktiga
Fetma och övervikt innebär en ökad risk för att utveckla typ 2-diabetes, men normalviktiga får också sjukdomen. Forskare vid Lunds universitet har upptäckt att det går att identifiera individer med normal vikt som är i riskzonen genom att mäta BMI på ett nytt sätt. De har kartlagt överviktsliknande förändringar i ämnesomsättningen som kan kopplas till en ökad risk för att utveckla typ 2-diabetes.
15h
Öronljus
in action, dock utan skyddande platta.(Man kan undra varför smink och bar överkropp krävs för proceduren) Så här går en behandling med öronljus till: Du lägger dig med huvudet … Continued Inlägget Öronljus dök först upp på Vetenskap och Folkbildning .
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(Proto) AGI is closer than it appears | The cold unyielding fact is that we're far closer than I previously thought
Let me explain. Not too terribly long ago, I outlined just what we'll need to get to proto-AGI . Now what is proto-AGI? I define proto-AGI as any computer system or model whose capabilities are spread across a wide domain, but critically is not conscious, sapient, or human-level at all tasks. It's a "general-purpose artificial intelligence" in the purest possible sense, a tool that can do a wide
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Best 70-Inch TVs of 2022
Invest in a TV the entire family can enjoy with one of the best 70-inch TVs. Ideal for the living room or media room, these broad screens create a cinematic experience at home, giving you the opportunity to enjoy popular movies that you may have missed while they were in theater. If you tend to use your TV more for gaming than binge watching, you should look for a 70-inch TV that has at least 4K
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The Ideal Qubit? Future Quantum Computers Could Crunch Data With Single Electrons on Neon Ice
The digital world—your laptop, the internet it's connected to, and the companies that make it all go—sits on a foundation of bits. These bits are the language digital computers speak. Bits come in two flavors: Numerically, these two states are represented as ones and zeroes. On computer chips they're made physical by miniature switches called transistors that are either on or off. Computer code c
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Journal retracts C-section paper with 'impossible' data
An ob-gyn journal has retracted a clinically influential 2016 paper on the use of steroids in women undergoing cesarean delivery, citing questions about the data. The article, "Antenatal corticosteroid administration before elective caesarean section at term to prevent neonatal respiratory morbidity: a randomized controlled trial," appeared in the European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and …
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2022 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming News Roundup #18
Listing of articles linked to on the Skeptical Science Facebook Page during the past week: Sun, May 1, 2022 through Sat, May 7, 2022. The following articles sparked above average interest during the week (bolded articles are from SkS authors): How a tech billionaire is forcing Australia's coal die-hards to face the future , Scorching Heatwave In India Reaches 115°F , IPCC Scientist Warns India-Pa
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Årets folkbildare 2021 får sina pris!
Tre glada Folkbildare vid cermonin i Uppsala igår. Från vänster: Jacob Gudiol, Maria Ahlsén och Jessica Norrbom Pristagarna från 2021 I samband med Vetenskap och Folkbildnings årsmöte i Uppsala … Continued Inlägget dök först upp på Vetenskap och Folkbildning .
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1999: Sådan bygger du din egen petanquebane
Hvis du ofrer 15 gange 4 meter af græsplanen til at anlægge en petanquebane, er en ekstra gevinst, at banen ikke skal slås. Sådan lød et af de gode argumenter for at komme i gang med det franske kuglespil i Ingeniøren, som i 1999 bragte en opskrift på, hvordan man anlægger en bane.
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Preventable by Devi Sridhar review – inside the fog of war on Covid
A survey of the global response to coronavirus draws together fascinating data but fails to construct a compelling narrative about the spread of the virus At the end of her wide-ranging analysis of the pandemic, Devi Sridhar, professor of global public health at the University of Edinburgh, Guardian columnist and Good Morning Britain contributor, raises the dark question of whether Covid-19 will
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Tre djur som kan förutspå naturkatastrofer
Många djur har utvecklat strategier för att hantera naturkatastrofer. Det finns fåglar som låter vulkanens värme ruva deras ägg, och myror som bygger flottar för att klara översvämningar. Men det finns också djur som verkar kunna förutspå katastrofen, innan den inträffar.
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