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Fourth Covid jab can give higher immunity than initial booster, study finds
UK-based team finds antibodies peaked higher after fourth jab given after gap of more than six months than after third A fourth dose of a Covid vaccine can ramp up the body's immune defences beyond the peak achieved after a third dose, research suggests. A second booster – often a fourth dose of a Covid vaccine – is currently offered in the UK to those aged 75 or over , people living in care home
23h
James Webb Provides Dazzling New Image of Neighboring Galaxy
Sweet Space The James Webb Space Telescope is almost ready for scientific observations to begin. NASA's largest most powerful telescope ever built just captured a gigantic image of a neighboring galaxy and beamed it back to Earth as it settles into its new, deep space home. The Associated Press reported today that the $10 billion telescope should begin gathering scientific images in July. In the
23h
How to Quit Intensive Parenting
Intensive parenting—the dominant model of modern American child-rearing—is a bit like smoking: The evidence shows that it's unhealthy, yet the addiction can be hard to kick. I'd like to suggest strategies that could help society quit overparenting, and they require parents, policy makers, and even the childless to pitch in. But first, we need to understand why intensive parenting—whereby mothers
5h
NASA's InSight records monster quake on Mars
NASA's InSight Mars lander has detected the largest quake ever observed on another planet: an estimated magnitude 5 temblor that occurred on May 4, 2022, the 1,222nd Martian day, or sol, of the mission. This adds to the catalog of more than 1,313 quakes InSight has detected since landing on Mars in November 2018. The largest previously recorded quake was an estimated magnitude 4.2 detected Aug. 25
9h
On-chip circuit produces up to six microwave photons at the same time
A team of researchers with members from Universit´e Paris-Saclay, the University of Ulm and the Institute of Quantum Technologies has developed an on-chip circuit that produces up to six microwave photons at the same time. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review X, the group describes how they built the device, how well it worked, and its possible use as a more efficient way to pro
8h
Welp, Elon Musk Says He's Gonna Unban Trump on Twitter
Permabanned To the shock and awe of very few, SpaceX and Tesla CEO Elon Musk has announced that when — or if — he takes the reins of Twitter, he would reverse the ban on former president Donald Trump's account. "I think that was a mistake because it alienated a large part of the country," Musk said during remote remarks at the Financial Times ' Future of the Car summit , "and did not ultimately r
1h
Apple Staffers Quit Rather Than Return to Office
Forbidden Fruit A group of high-ranking Apple employees published an open letter to the company declaring their resignation in April after learning they'd need to commute to an office at least three days a week. Now, Apple's director of machine learning Ian Goodfellow has announced his decision to leave over the company's work-from-home policy as well. All of the above agreed that forcing a retur
2h
Analysis Finds That 40 Percent of Bitcoin Investors Have Lost Money
Crash and Burn Bitcoin is down horrendously — and it's losing money for many investors who thought it was a sure shot during balmier days. According to a new analysis from crypto analysis firm Glassnode , roughly 40 percent of Bitcoin holders have lost money on the world's most popular cryptocurrency. And that percentage is likely higher for those who invested over the past few years, when the cu
5h
Bill Gates Says He's Quite Concerned About the Global Economy
Bill Gates is reading the signs, and he says they don't point in a positive direction for the global economy. In an interview with CNN , Gates said he was worried about rising inflation. The billionaire investor and Microsoft cofounder said government debt levels were high before the pandemic, which then caused dramatic supply chain shortages that only made the economy worse. "It's likely to acce
7h
Powerful 'Machine Scientists' Distill the Laws of Physics From Raw Data
In 2017, Roger Guimerà and Marta Sales-Pardo discovered a cause of cell division, the process driving the growth of living beings. But they couldn't immediately reveal how they learned the answer. The researchers hadn't spotted the crucial pattern in their data themselves. Rather, an unpublished invention of theirs — a digital assistant they called the "machine scientist" — had handed it to them.
7h
What We Keep Getting Wrong About Abortion
A fter the Supreme Court's stunning leak last week, it is finally dawning on the public that Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization will likely mark the end of constitutional protections for abortion rights. The Court's decision to take up the case, coupled with its failure to even temporarily protect Texas women from an unconstitutional post-six-week abortion ban last fall, clearly signale
11h
The Promising Treatment for Long COVID We're Not Even Trying
Updated at 2:55 p.m. on May 10, 2022 In the two years since she caught the coronavirus, 38-year-old Jessica McGovern has cycled through "well over 100 drugs, supplements, and therapies" to try to keep her long-COVID symptoms at bay. In almost all cases, she told me, the interventions were to no avail: Exhaustion, weakness, and aches still lashed her to the couch; she still felt suffocating chest
6h
The ACLU Has Lost Its Way
The lurid spectacle that is Johnny Depp's $50 million defamation lawsuit against his ex-wife Amber Heard hasn't just tarnished his star and hers with allegations that he beat her and violated her with a bottle or that she severed part of his finger and emptied her bowels in the marital bed. (Both deny wrongdoing, and Heard has countersued for $100 million.) Amid this grotesquerie, it might be pos
6h
Predictions for a Post-Roe America
Justice Samuel Alito's leaked draft majority opinion in Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health sent a shockwave across the country. After nearly a half century, it appears that the five-vote conservative majority on the Supreme Court is set to overturn Roe v. Wade . If the draft emerges as the Court's decision and abortion access is left up to the states, what could it mean in red and blue parts of the
11h
Please, For The Love Of God, Don't Let the Supreme Court Rush You Into a Vasectomy
With the likely demise of Roe v. Wade representing a death knell to abortion rights as we've known them, many penis-havers are considering vasectomies , with internet searches for the term spiking . But be aware that it's some pretty serious surgery, which involves the openings to the vas deferens being cut and sealed so that no sperm can travel through them, and it's not easily reversible. That'
1h
Covid vaccines safe for pregnant women and cut stillbirth risk, says review
Chance of stillbirth reduced by 15%, researchers find, after examining studies and trials that enrolled 117,552 women Doctors have stressed the importance of Covid vaccinations for pregnant women after a major review found the shots were not only safe, but reduced the risk of stillbirth by 15%. Researchers at St George's, University of London, and the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecolog
12h
'No end in sight': Shanghai residents chafe at harsh Covid measures
Tensions rise again as lockdowns grind on and the city's population tire of strict zero-Covid policy See all our coronavirus coverage Tensions between Shanghai residents and China's Covid enforcers are on the rise again, amid a new push to end infections outside quarantine zones to meet President Xi Jinping's demand for achieving "dynamic zero-Covid". Videos shared on China's social media platfor
20h
Russia hacked an American satellite company one hour before the Ukraine invasion
Just an hour before Russian troops invaded Ukraine, Russian government hackers targeted the American satellite company Viasat, officials from the US, EU, and UK said today. The operation resulted in an immediate and significant loss of communication in the earliest days of the war for the Ukrainian military, which relied on Viasat's services for command and control of the country's armed forces.
6h
More and More Tech Companies Offer to Help Employees Get Abortions
It looks like a few employers may be the last hope for those that need reproductive healthcare. Last Monday, Politico broke the news that the US Supreme Court was likely to overturn Roe v. Wade. That landmark 1973 ruling, of course, gave people the constitutional right to get an abortion, and has been legal precedent for nearly five decades. And because this cultural moment often encourages compa
3h
Highly circularly polarized and variable pulsar detected in the Large Magellanic Cloud
An international team of astronomers reports the finding of a new pulsar in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) as part of the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) Variables and Slow Transients (VAST) survey. The newly detected pulsar, designated PSR J0523−7125, turns out to be a highly circularly polarized and variable radio source. The discovery was detailed in a paper published May
8h
'It's a hellfire!': how are India and Pakistan coping with extreme heat?
India and Pakistan have experienced their hottest April in 122 years. Temperatures are nearing 50C. Such extreme heat dries up water reservoirs, melts glaciers and damages crops. It's also deadly. Ian Sample hears from Pakistan reporter Shah Meer Baloch about the situation on the ground, and speaks to Indian heat health expert Abhiyant Tiwari about what such temperatures do to the body and how so
17h
The Seminal TV Series That Changed How We See
The BBC miniseries Ways of Seeing opens with a close-up shot of the British art critic John Berger standing in front of a large framed painting—Botticelli's Venus and Mars— hanging in a museum. "This is the first of four programs in which I want to question some of the assumptions usually made about the tradition of European painting," Berger intones in voice-over. On-screen, he pulls a box cutte
10h
Chore apps were meant to make mothers' lives easier. They often don't.
A few years ago, Jamie Gravell needed help. She was working full time as a research assistant while finishing her dissertation, her son had just turned two, and the housework was piling up, even after she'd repeatedly asked her husband to do more. So she downloaded Cozi. It's one example of an increasingly popular solution: chore apps designed to help families split housework more fairly. Gravell
12h
The Essential Sophie Gilbert Reading List
For her witty and clear-eyed writing on pop culture and literature, Sophie Gilbert has been named a finalist for the 2022 Pulitzer Prize in Criticism. A staff writer at The Atlantic since 2016, Gilbert has explored gender norms, feminism, beauty culture, motherhood, and more with moral clarity and an inimitable voice. Revisiting Game of Thrones 10 years after it debuted, she argued that the show'
8h
People overestimate the presence of minorities around them, impeding equity and inclusion
Attempts to build a more equitable and inclusive society has taken a step forward with the discovery of a "diversity illusion" by a team of researchers at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU). Their findings clearly show that within a social setting most people significantly overestimate the presence of a minority—and this overestimation is made not only by the majority but also by the minority
9h
The J. D. Vance I Knew
Last week, Politico reported on a strange leak from the J. D. Vance campaign. A super PAC supporting the Ohio Republican—who won the party's nomination for Senate on May 3—had commissioned opposition research to help Vance defend against his vulnerabilities. The super PAC discovered that a decade ago, the now staunchly pro-Trump Vance had written a half dozen articles for a website run by a futur
2h
Plenity – A New Weight Loss Pill
Plenity is a new weight loss pill designed to create a sense of fullness. It is backed by a single study where users had an average weight loss of 22 pounds. Not an effective way to achieve ideal weight, but may help some people when combined with diet and exercise. The post first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .
16h
The FBI's Next Set of Crime Data Is Going to Be a Big Mess
Crime—particularly the spike in murder that the country has seen over the past two years—is thought to be weighing heavily on the minds of voters , with November's midterm elections no longer all that far away . When the FBI reports national crime estimates for 2021 this fall, they have the potential to be a Big Deal, politically speaking. If murders are still way up relative to a few years ago,
10h
Blocking spike captors to counter COVID
Despite the effectiveness of vaccination campaigns worldwide, the threat posed by COVID-19 still exists. First of all, a new SARS-CoV-2 variant could very well emerge that may not respond to current vaccines. Secondly, the efficacy of the vaccines in the long term remains unknown. Lastly, cases of acute infection are continuing to be reported. And yet, there is no effective treatment to date.
5h
What makes some creatures more afraid of change than others?
Humans are undoubtedly altering the natural environment. But how wild animals respond to these changes is complex and unclear. In a new study published today, scientists have discovered significant differences in how the brain works in two distinct personality types: those who act fearless and those who seem afraid of new things. Being fearless can help wildlife, specifically birds, find new food
2h
Only 3% of potential bacterial drug sources known
The emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens and the increasing difficulty in developing new drugs has contributed to global challenges in combating infectious diseases. An extensive bioinformatics survey of around 170,000 bacterial genomes indicates that only three percent of the genomic potential for microbial natural products—chemically diverse bacterial metabolites that form the basis of an
9h
Systematic review and meta-analysis of the effectiveness and perinatal outcomes of COVID-19 vaccination in pregnancy
Nature Communications, Published online: 10 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30052-w Pregnant women have been disproportionately under-vaccinated against COVID-19, partly because they were excluded from initial trials. This systematic review and meta-analysis supports efficacy of vaccination in pregnancy, and finds no evidence of adverse maternal or perinatal outcomes.
11h
4D composite printing can improve the wings of drones
The aviation industry faces multiple pressures from higher fuel costs and increased scrutiny over the environmental and quality-of-life impacts from its aircraft. Researchers are looking for new methods of keeping expenses down while improving overall efficiency, and the relatively new market of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) — or drones — is no exception.
10min
Machine learning framework IDs targets for improving catalysts
Chemists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory have developed a new machine-learning (ML) framework that can zero in on which steps of a multistep chemical conversion should be tweaked to improve productivity. The approach could help guide the design of catalysts—chemical "dealmakers" that speed up reactions.
37min
Strong solar flare erupts from sun
The Sun emitted a strong solar flare on Tuesday, May 10, 2022, peaking at 9:55 a.m. EDT. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, which watches the sun constantly, captured an image of the event.
45min
New Podcast How to Start Over with Olga Khazan––Launching May 30
The Atlantic is following the launch of its How to Build a Happy Life podcast, hosted by the renowned social scientist Arthur C. Brooks, with a second season about navigating the challenges of changing your life. In How to Start Over , Atlantic staff writer Olga Khazan analyzes what it takes to change our relationships, our work, and our perspective—with a practical approach to one of life's grea
48min
Spintronics: How an atom-thin insulator helps transport spins
An intermediate layer consisting of a few atoms is helping to improve the transport of spin currents from one material to another. Until now, this process involves significant losses. A team from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU), the Max Planck Institute (MPI) for Microstructure Physics, and the Freie Universität Berlin reports in the ACS scientific journal Nano Letters on how this
57min
Machine learning improves Hawai'i rainfall mapping
Rainfall map accuracy is vital in climate and hydraulic modeling and supports environmental management decision making, water resource planning and weather forecasting. University of Hawaiʻi and East-West Center researchers have developed more accurate monthly rainfall maps by using machine learning. They used a machine learning technique to detect erroneous rainfall maps. The results of this stud
57min
Superconducting X-ray laser reaches operating temperature colder than outer space
Nestled 30 feet underground in Menlo Park, California, a half-mile-long stretch of tunnel is now colder than most of the universe. It houses a new superconducting particle accelerator, part of an upgrade project to the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) X-ray free-electron laser at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.
1h
Study finds that air pollution dropped during pandemic lockdowns
As vehicle traffic lightened and industry slowed during the COVID-19 stay-at-home period in 2020, a University of Houston study by the air quality forecasting group led by Yunsoo Choi, associate professor in the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, estimated levels of potentially-dangerous air pollutants simultaneously decreased in major cities across the country.
2h
Best Shower Speakers in 2022
It's Sunday morning and you just can't get that Bedouine song out of your head as you're hopping into the shower. With the best shower speakers, you'll be singing along, whether your idea of a shower is a poolside garden hose or the shared bathroom in your fifth-floor walk-up. The best shower speakers are water-resistant, will easily link up to your smartphone via Bluetooth, and have great sound
2h
Clues narrow down timing in Thera volcano mystery
Researchers are closer than ever to pinning down the date of the infamous Thera volcano eruption. A new study combines a mosaic of techniques to confirm the source of a volcanic eruption in 1628 BCE. While the eruption was previously thought to be Thera on the Greek island of Santorini, Charlotte Pearson, an associate professor in the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research at the University of Arizona,
2h
As the Climate Changes, So Does Fiction
Our stories about environmental catastrophe used to be set in distant futures: the desolate endlessness of The Road , or the hopeless, cutthroat scrounging in the Parable of the Sower . But that kind of far-off storytelling feels like it was made for a time when the repercussions of changing climate and the inequity of natural-resource use were, in fact, far off. Must have been nice. Ecological d
3h
Cells take out the trash before they divide
Researchers have discovered that before cells start to divide, they toss waste products. Using a new method they developed for measuring the dry mass of cells, the researchers found cells suddenly lose mass as they enter cell division.
3h
Scientists advance renewable hydrogen production method
Perovskite materials may hold the potential to play an important role in a process to produce hydrogen in a renewable manner, according to a recent analysis. Hydrogen has emerged as an important carrier to store energy generated by renewable resources, as a substitute for fossil fuels used for transportation, in the production of ammonia, and for other industrial applications.
3h
At home, do-it-yourself fluid mechanics
Scientists describe their work on an at-home study of rheology, which is used to study the way non-Newtonian liquids or semisolid substances flow. The projects assigned to students had two parts: gathering qualitative visual evidence of rheological properties and taking quantitative measurements. The students checked for four behaviors — shear thinning viscosity, viscoelasticity, shear normal str
3h
Exploring dynamics of blood flow in vascular, atherosclerotic diseases
Researchers present clinicians with information about the risk factors for atherosclerotic plaque formation from a mechanical point of view. The scientists are exploring whether it is possible to screen and intervene early for people at risk for atherosclerotic disease from the perspective of hemodynamics, using color Doppler ultrasound, coronary computed tomography angiography, and other screenin
3h
Diets high in fiber associated with less antibiotic resistance in gut bacteria
Healthy adults who eat a diverse diet with at least 8-10 grams of soluble fiber a day have fewer antibiotic-resistant microbes in their guts, according to a new study. The results lead directly to the idea that modifying the diet has the potential to be a new weapon in the fight against antimicrobial resistance. And this does not require eating some exotic diet, but eating a diverse diet, adequate
3h
There are reasons girls don't study physics, and they don't include not liking math
"From my own knowledge of these things, physics is not something that girls tend to fancy. They don't want to do it … There's a lot of hard math in there that I think that they would rather not do," Katharine Birbalsingh, chair of the U.K. government's Social Mobility Commission and a secondary school head teacher, told the Commons Science and Technology Committee on April 27 2022.
3h
The role of changing dietary habits in mitigating global warming
When we think of tools to achieve climate goals such as limiting the average temperature increase to 1.5 degrees above that of the pre-industrial age, most of us visualize wind turbines, solar panels and electric cars. Even the climate policy models currently in use, the so-called Integrated Assessment Models (IAMs), which aim to borrow and combine insights from climate science, engineering, and e
3h
Scientists show reduced heavy metal toxicity in goldfish using hard water
When industrial effluents containing high levels of heavy metals are discharged into fish bodies, they pose a serious threat to aquatic ecosystems. One such heavy metal, zinc, is required by organisms in miniscule amounts, but if it accumulates in higher concentrations, zinc can trigger oxidative stress in the fish body. This causes metabolic, physiological, and cellular damage, including protein
3h
Watch: When will food prices go back down?
The war in Ukraine, the COVID-19 pandemic, and climate change have halted food production worldwide and have led to large price increases that are affecting average families, says David Ortega. Ortega is a food economist and associate professor in the agricultural food and resource economics department at Michigan State University. Watch Ortega explain what's behind the rise in food prices below:
4h
Common gene variant in three seemingly unrelated gynecologic disorders suggests new options for screening for CVD and cancers
It's always rewarding when what started out as largely an academic endeavor turns out to impact a lot of people — in this case women. Women suffering from endometriosis, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and preeclampsia may be protected from future heart disease if they carry a specific common genetic variant on the surface of cells (insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor, or IGF1R). The research
4h
Silky 'tattoo' under skin glows to reveal blood oxygen
Researchers have created a silk-based material they can place under the skin that glows brighter or dimmer under a lamp when exposed to different levels of oxygen in the blood. Imagine a tattoo that could be functional—telling you how much oxygen you are using when exercising, measuring your blood glucose level at any time of day, or monitoring a number of different blood components or exposure t
4h
Micro- and nanoplastic from the atmosphere is polluting the ocean
According to estimates, by 2040 the level of plastic pollution could reach 80 million metric tons per year. Plastic particles have now been detected in virtually all spheres of the environment, e.g. in water bodies, the soil and the air. Via ocean currents and rivers, the tiny plastic particles can even reach the Arctic, Antarctic or ocean depths. A new overview study has now shown that wind, too,
4h
Complex human childbirth and cognitive abilities a result of walking upright
Childbirth in humans is much more complex and painful than in great apes. It was long believed that this was a result of humans' larger brains and the narrow dimensions of the mother's pelvis. Researchers have now used 3D simulations to show that childbirth was also a highly complex process in early hominins that gave birth to relatively small-brained newborns — with important implications for th
4h
Immune to frustrations
Nature, Published online: 10 May 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01302-0 Mercedes Segovia researches the role of dendritic cells in organizing the immune system.
4h
New report highlights issues surrounding the future of the care economy.
As society continues to emerge from COVID-19 into a recovery economy, questions about the future of care also emerge. In Canada, the pandemic revealed existing problems with the care economy such as the poor conditions in long-term care homes and the dearth of affordable and high-quality early childhood education as well as the low pay and poor working care workers face on a daily basis.
4h
Photosynthesis unaffected by increasing carbon dioxide channels in plant membranes
Modifying photosynthesis has increasingly been a research target to improve crop yields to feed a growing global population in the face of climate change and other environmental factors. In a recent study, published in the Journal of Experimental Botany, a team from the Australian National University (ANU) investigated the effects of increasing the number of carbon dioxide channels in plant membra
4h
Engineers develop fast and accurate COVID-19 sensor
Engineers at Johns Hopkins University, supported in part by the U.S. National Science Foundation, have developed a COVID-19 sensor that addresses the limitations of the two most widely used types of COVID-19 tests: PCR tests that require sample preparation, and the less accurate rapid antigen tests.
4h
Research on the raw materials dilemma: High-tech metals germanium and gallium from the deep sea?
Germanium and gallium are two metals that are of great importance for modern high technologies. Both are important raw materials for the semiconductor industry, for fiber optic cables and for photovoltaics. They are thus essential components for shaping electromobility and the energy transition. Using new analytical methods, the research group led by Michael Bau, Professor of Geochemistry at Jacob
5h
China announces its new flagship space telescope mission
Distant galaxies, dark matter, dark energy and the origin and evolution of the universe itself are some of the many scientific goals of China's newly announced space telescope. If all goes according to plan, the China Space Station Telescope (CSST) will blast off atop a Long March 5B rocket sometime in late 2023. Once in a safe orbit, CSST should begin observations in 2024. Judging by these resear
5h
Head, body, eye coordination conserved across animal kingdom, researchers find
Fruit flies synchronize the movements of their heads and bodies to stabilize their vision and fly effectively, according to Penn State researchers who utilized virtual-reality flight simulators. The finding appears to hold true in primates and other animals, the researchers say, indicating that animals evolved to move their eyes and bodies independently to conserve energy and improve performance.
5h
Environmental education and advocacy strategy for rural development and conservation
The two mountains theory and its slogan, "lucid waters and lush mountains are invaluable assets," have been promoted in China for 15 years. This slogan aims to increase social perception of ecosystem services, promote the achievement of sustainable development goals, and has increased individual knowledge and awareness of environmental conservation under local community policy initiatives.
5h
Eocene ungulates were very selective in their feeding
A study by the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country into the paleodiet of extinct paleotheriidae (or pseudo horses) provides information about their feeding strategy and the environment they inhabited at the end of the Eocene. Plagiolophus was a highly selective perissodactyl and fed on tough foliage.
5h
Novel tool targeting unusual RNA structures for potential therapeutic applications
Ribonucleic acids (RNAs), which decode the genetic code stored in DNA and produce proteins, fold into diverse structures to govern fundamental biological processes in all life forms, including humans. Targeting disease-associated RNA structures with drug-like small molecules has been one of the gold standards for developing RNA-targeting drugs in the scientific field. Recently, a research team has
5h
Chagas disease: Hybrid strains make insidious parasite more dangerous
Researchers have mapped how the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi forms new variants that are more effective at evading the immune system and causing disease. Their findings can give rise to new methods for diagnosing, preventing and treating Chagas disease, which affects millions of people in Central and South America, causing thousands of deaths every year.
6h
What benefits nutrition in Africa the most?
Malnutrition in developing countries is best addressed not by increasing the variety of crops grown on smallholder farms, but by improving access to markets. More variety in animal production, however, does show positive effects.
6h
Soil microbes use different pathways to metabolize carbon
Much of what scientists think about soil metabolism may be wrong. New evidence suggests that microbes in different soils use different biochemical pathways to process nutrients, respire, and grow. The study upends long-held assumptions in the field of soil ecology and calls for more investigation and higher-resolution methods to be applied to what has been a black box for the field.
6h
AI predicts infant age, gender based on temperament
A new study used machine learning to classify infants as either male or female at 0-24 weeks of age, 24-48 weeks of age and older than 48 weeks based off 14 temperament dimensions. Accuracy rates increased with age, ranging from a low of 38% for age group one, to 57% for age group three.
6h
Best AirPrint Printers in 2022
Printers act as a link between the digital and physical worlds. Documents, webpages, and photos that start on your phone, computer, or tablet, end up on a slice of paper you can hold in your hands. If you've ever been frustrated by a printer — beyond the fact that toner is somehow the most expensive substance on Earth — it's because this transmutation from digital to physical is really hard. For
6h
Time to end this right royal charade | Brief letters
The so-called Queen's speech | Animal-to-human transplants | Parliamentary seating | Dress sense | Teaspoon treat If the Queen doesn't write her own speech and is no longer able to read it ( Report, 9 May ), isn't it time to stop the charade and call things by their accurate names? The prime minister disguises his autocratic powers under the royal prerogative. If it's his speech, let's say so and
6h
Head, body, eye coordination conserved across animal kingdom
Fruit flies synchronize the movements of their heads and bodies to stabilize their vision and fly effectively, according to researchers who utilized virtual-reality flight simulators. The finding appears to hold true in primates and other animals, the researchers say, indicating that animals evolved to move their eyes and bodies independently to conserve energy and improve performance. This unders
6h
Joubert Syndrome: Intellectual disability and defects in the hippocampus
An important link has been found between the intellectual disability experienced by children with the rare disease Joubert Syndrome (JS) and defects in the hippocampus. The hippocampus is the part of the brain associated with learning and memory. It also plays a role in various neurological and psychiatric disorders. Joubert Syndrome is a rare childhood disease that leads to poor muscle coordinati
6h
Exposure to wildfires increases risk of cancer
A new study finds higher incidence of lung cancer and brain tumors in people exposed to wildfires. The study, which tracks over two million Canadians over a period of 20 years, is the first to examine how proximity to forest fires may influence cancer risk.
6h
Bolder marmoset monkeys learn faster than shy ones
Individual traits seem to drive our learning success: for instance, conscientious individuals often show higher academic performance. A group of cognitive and behavioral biologists conducted personality assessments and a battery of learning tests with common marmosets and found that such a link, intertwined with family group membership, exists in these monkeys, too.
6h
My long walk across India for women's freedom | Srishti Bakshi
There are 600 million women in India — yet they are rarely seen outdoors after sunset because of safety concerns like harassment and catcalls. On a mission to create safer public spaces, women's rights advocate Srishti Bakshi talks about how she embarked on a 2,300-mile walk across the length of India (a distance equivalent to traveling from New York City to Los Angeles), conducting driving works
6h
Different social posts engage loyalty program members
The social media messages that resonate best with loyalty program members differ from the posts that work best with other customers, research shows. The finding could inform how best to craft social media campaigns aimed at either segment of a company's customer base. "Loyalty programs and social media are both important tools in contemporary marketing, but there's very little research into how t
7h
Climate change is pushing the pine beauty moth northward 50 years ahead of earlier predictions
In Finland, climate change is causing the pine pest Panolis flammea, or pine beauty moth, to shift its range northward 50 years ahead of predictions. Changes in both the distribution and size of the pine beauty moth population are linked to higher temperatures, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows. The findings were reported in the Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research.
7h
NASA Releases First Gorgeous Images as Webb Telescope Snaps Into Focus
James Webb Space Telescope observes the Large Magellanic Cloud. Credit: NASA/ESA/CSA/STScI Since its launch in 2021, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) has knocked out every objective NASA set up for it. It's fully unfolded, fully aligned, and patrolling the Sun-Earth L2 point at a balmy 6K. Now, NASA has released the first gorgeous, crystal-clear images from Webb. They compare what the Spitze
7h
Book examines scope of political and social attitudes among devout Muslims
Public concerns about the influence of religion on politics have garnered much attention in recent years. These concerns have been particularly evident in regard to the intertwining of religion and politics for devout Muslims. But whether that's a fair assessment when compared to other religions—or even when measured against fellow Muslims—remains one of the many questions tackled by a new book.
7h
If there are Dyson spheres around white dwarfs, we should be able to detect them
Searching for Dyson spheres, rings or swarms remains a preoccupation of many astronomers. If there are any out there, they will eventually be found, and the person or research team to do so will go down in history for making one of the most momentous discoveries in the history of humanity. If you're interested in claiming that accolade for yourself, an excellent place to look may be around white d
7h
How to detect your weak spots and adequately compensate.
Recentlry I stumbled upon info about SOI (structure of intellect) test and found out, that weakness in only one of many basic cognitive abilities can crucially impare your whole thinking capacity. Also, I found out that there are several US based centres that provide testing and training on that part, and there is no way to take that test on your own and for free, as well to find proper excercice
7h
Amputationsskandalen: »Karkirurgien går en betydelige lysere tid i møde, men det er tragisk, at dette er forudsætningen«
Mandag mødtes Region Midtjyllands hospitalsudvalg med regionens koncerndirektør, hospitalsledelsen og overlæge Kim Houlind, der har forfattet en ekstern analyse, som kaster lys over karkirurgiens mørke sider i Midtjylland. Denne første politiske behandling af amputationssagen stiller allerede karkirurgien et bedre sted, mener to regionspolitikere.
7h
A Virus Just Wiped Out Antibiotic-Resistant Infection in an Immunocompromised Patient
When Dr. Jessica Little laid eyes on the 56-year-old man, Mr. M, she immediately knew he was in bad shape. Striking, painful red welts dotted his entire arm. He knew the cause of his rashes: an infection by Mycobacterium chelonae, a bacteria that eats away at the skin and soft tissue. Yet despite multiple antibiotic treatments over six months, his arm continued to disintegrate. Even worse, the an
7h
Ryan Martin Loses the Number 2 Spot | Street Outlaws: America's List
Stream Street Outlaws: America's List on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/street-outlaws-americas-list #StreetOutlaws #StreetRacing #Discovery Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter:
7h
Mechanism revealed for spread of antibiotic resistance among bacteria
A bacteria called Staphylococcus aureus is widespread and generally harmless, but can cause infections known as "opportunistic infections." These occur when the bacteria take advantage of certain situations, such as a weakened immune system or the presence of an open wound, to cause a harmful infection. These infections become particularly dangerous when the bacterial strain is resistant to treatm
7h
A highly sensitive SERS substrate for gas sensing
Trace gas sensing is critical for monitoring environmental pollution and detecting volatile organic compounds released from the human body. As a powerful analytical tool for identifying trace molecules, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) enables remarkable amplification of normal Raman signals by using the surface plasmon resonance effect and charge-transfer effect with excellent sensitivi
8h
New understanding of key fuel cell catalyst
Research between the University of Liverpool and University of Alicante Spain, has identified the surface species at low potentials on the leading fuel cell catalyst, platinum (Pt), which is significant to the development of hydrogen fuel cells technology.
8h
Distantly related mushrooms gained the ability to make toxin via horizontal gene transfer
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in China and the U.S. has found evidence that suggests three distantly related types of mushrooms gained their ability to produce a dangerous toxin via horizontal gene transfer sometime in their past. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their genetic analysis of multiple species
8h
Tests track cognitive decline in dogs
A suite of complementary tests can quantify changes in dogs suspected of having cognitive decline, report researchers. The approach could not only aid owners in managing their elderly canine's care, but also serve as a model for evaluating cognitive decline progression in—and treatments for—humans with Alzheimer's disease. Canine cognitive dysfunction syndrome (CCDS) is similar to Alzheimer's dis
8h
Credibility labels don't do much to shift news diets
Credibility labels don't shift news diets away from low-quality sources or reduce belief in widely circulated inaccurate claims among average internet users, research finds. The findings do indicate that providing an indicator of sources' quality may improve the news diet quality of the heaviest consumers of misinformation, however. Notably, the researchers also found that a majority of people re
8h
Daily briefing: How sunscreen turns into a coral killer
Nature, Published online: 09 May 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01296-9 How a common sunscreen ingredient turns toxic in the sea, how renewable technologies are being developed in one of the northernmost towns in the world and how tree-ring scientists find old growth trees in New York City.
9h
Därför kan djurens päls lysa i rosa
Flygekorren, fjällräven och igelkotten är några däggdjur vars päls kan få ett rosa skimmer i ultraviolett ljus. Forskare har spårat källan till ljuseffekten – som visar sig vara ett vanligt fenomen. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
9h
Vad krävs för att fler ska välja vegoburgare?
Fler köttätare kan tänka sig en vegetarisk burgare om den är billigare än hamburgaren. Laboratorietillverkat kött väljs dock bort av många, även om burgaren skulle vara gratis. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
9h
The Download: Unhelpful chore apps, and bitcoin's plummeting value
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. Chore apps were meant to make mothers' lives easier. They often don't. A few years ago, Jamie Gravell needed help. She was working full time while finishing her dissertation, her son had just turned two, and the housework was piling up, even after she'd repeat
9h
Is breakfast important?
Some say it's the most important meal of the day. But is breakfast important or can you get away with skipping your morning cereal?
10h
Researchers Use AI to Design Plastic-Eating Enzyme
Shredded recycled plastic pieces on display at the Minnesota State Fair. The accumulation of plastics in the environment is a problem that won't solve itself, at least not on any time scale relevant to humanity. These materials are designed to be durable and long-lasting, and current methods of recycling barely put a dent in the mountains of plastic produced every year. Researchers from the Unive
10h
Hum by Colgate review
The Hum by Colgate is an ultra-light electric toothbrush with a connected smart app that shows you every spot you've missed, guiding you to better brushing
11h
A genome-wide CRISPR-Cas9 knockout screen identifies essential and growth-restricting genes in human trophoblast stem cells
Nature Communications, Published online: 10 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30207-9 Here the authors perform a genome-wide CRISPR-Cas9 knockout screen to systematically identify and characterize essential and growth-restricting genes in human trophoblast cells. They identify TEAD1 as a key regulator that plays an important role in the specification, maintenance, and differentiation of the human
11h
Multivalent 9-O-Acetylated-sialic acid glycoclusters as potent inhibitors for SARS-CoV-2 infection
Nature Communications, Published online: 10 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30313-8 Cell surface attachment factors, such as glycans, play an important role in viral infection. Here, Petitjean et al. show that SARS-CoV-2 specifically binds to 9-Oacetylated sialic acid and have designed novel inhibitors based on multivalent derivatives.
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Profiling of hMPV F-specific antibodies isolated from human memory B cells
Nature Communications, Published online: 10 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30205-x Here, Xiao et al. isolate a large panel of antibodies against human metapneumovirus fusion protein from human B cells, and characterize their epitopes, neutralization activities, and antigen binding specificity, providing a useful framework for understanding the immune response against hMPV.
11h
Reversible morphology-resolved chemotactic actuation and motion of Janus emulsion droplets
Nature Communications, Published online: 10 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30229-3 Artificial microswimmers can emulate the autonomous regulation of chemotactic motility of living organisms. Frank et al. realize a chemotactic locomotion of emulsion droplets, composed of two phase-separated fluids, that can be reversibly directed up or down a chemical concentration gradient.
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Systematic and quantitative view of the antiviral arsenal of prokaryotes
Nature Communications, Published online: 10 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30269-9 Bacteria and archaea have developed multiple antiviral mechanisms. Here, Tesson et al. present a tool that automatically detects known antiviral systems in prokaryotic genomes, and show that variations in antiviral strategies correlate with genome size, viral threat, and lifestyle traits.
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Cumulative SARS-CoV-2 mutations and corresponding changes in immunity in an immunocompromised patient indicate viral evolution within the host
Nature Communications, Published online: 10 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30163-4 Variants of concerns arise from SARS-CoV-2 mutations poise as severe public health threats. Here the authors chronicle SARS-CoV-2 mutations onset and immune parameters in an immunocompromised patient with continuous virus-shedding, thereby hinting potential intra-host viral evolution and escape facilitated by ine
11h
Oral B Pro 1000 review
The Oral-B Pro 1000 is a cost-effective electric toothbrush, giving you the powerful clean of an electric toothbrush at more than half the price of most of Oral B's other options
12h
Automated Medication Dispensing May Cause Drug Mix-ups
Computerized cabinets are used to dispense medications in nearly all hospitals in the United States. But because health care workers can often search for a particular drug using three or fewer letters, safety advocates say the technology is primed for error — and can lead to potentially fatal mix-ups.
12h
Fecal Transplants Reverse Key Signs of Aging
(Photo: Yassine Khalfalli /Unsplash) We've collectively joked about the old using the blood of the young to rejuvenate their skin and extend their lives—but what if instead of blood, it were feces? Scientists from England's Quadram Institute and the University of East Anglia have found that transplanting fecal microbiota from young mammals into older ones may help reverse key signs of aging in th
12h
Earth given 50-50 chance of hitting key warming mark by 2026
The world is creeping closer to the warming threshold international agreements are trying to prevent, with nearly a 50-50 chance that Earth will temporarily hit that temperature mark within the next five years, teams of meteorologists across the globe predicted.
14h
Hidden distortions trigger promising thermoelectric property
In a world of materials that normally expand upon heating, one that shrinks along one 3-D axis while expanding along another stands out. That's especially true when the unusual shrinkage is linked to a property important for thermoelectric devices, which convert heat to electricity or electricity to heat.
14h
Two related questions. First: is it actually possible to verify consciousness of on AGI using for example the ACT test? And: does actual consciousness matter as to the behaviour of the AGI?
Here my thoughts: On the first question: as the AGI will have been trained with huge data sets of all kinds of information from the internet i.e. from humanity, would it not anyway argue in the same way as a self-aware human would argue and therefore pass also the ACT consciousness test without being necessarily actually conscious? On the second: given that the training data sets of the AGI will
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