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Nyheder2022maj11

How Politics Poisoned the Evangelical Church
Photographs by Jonno Rattman "B efore I turn to the Word," the preacher announces, "I'm gonna do another diatribe." "Go on!" one man yells. "Amen!" shouts a woman several pews in front of me. Between 40 minutes of praise music and 40 minutes of preaching is the strangest ritual I've ever witnessed inside a house of worship. Pastor Bill Bolin calls it his "diatribe." The congregants at FloodGate C
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Elon Musk Says Americans Are Super Lazy Compared to People in China
Burn Baby Burn It appears that Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk may be enamored of a totalitarian communist state. And no, we're not talking about California. In a wide-ranging appearance at the Financial Times ' Future of the Car summit yesterday , Musk told the crowd that he believes the Chinese workforce is harder working than Americans — a complex admission, because while China hosts some of Te
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Coinbase Says If It Goes Bankrupt, It Might Seize Users' Crypto
Failsafe The crypto wallet company Coinbase appears to have quietly snuck a mutually-assured destruction clause into its latest earnings report. As Fortune observed , the fine print in Coinbase's quarterly earnings report — which details both a $430 million loss and a 19 percent drop in users per month — explains that if the company goes bankrupt, it could possibly take all the crypto in its user
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The Democrats Really Are That Dense About Climate Change
Sign up for The Weekly Planet, Robinson Meyer's newsletter about living through climate change, here. MIAMI BEACH, Fla.—On Monday night, I saw one of the most despair-inducing performances about the hope of climate action that I've witnessed in years. Nancy Pelosi, the speaker of the House, took the stage here at the Aspen Ideas: Climate festival to discuss what congressional Democrats are doing
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The Calamity of Unwanted Motherhood
The protagonist of Penelope Mortimer's 1958 novel, Daddy's Gone a-Hunting , is a 37-year-old housewife named Ruth, who is sliding into a madness of midlife suffocation and despair. Alone in her kitchen early in the novel, Ruth drinks gin and tentatively confesses to an imagined listener the source of all her angst. When she married Rex, her trivial bully of a husband, at 18, she was three months
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World War II Is All That Putin Has Left
In Soviet films, on Soviet posters, in Soviet poetry and songs, the typical Red Army soldier was hale and hearty, simple and straightforward, untroubled by trauma or fear. He cheerfully marched all day, slept on the ground at night, never complained, and never even used swear words. When the British historian Catherine Merridale was collecting the lyrics of Red Army songs for her 2005 book, Ivan'
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Another ivermectin-COVID-19 paper is retracted
A paper on the potential use of ivermectin to treat Covid-19 has been retracted for a litany of flaws, joining at least 10 other articles on the therapy some liked to promote without evidence to fall. The article was part of a special issue of Toxicology Reports on Covid-19 that has received an expression of … Continue reading
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A nontoxic glue for plywood—from glucose, citric acid
The go-to materials for building home furniture, décor and floors are composite wood products that come in large sheets. But the glues and resins holding together particleboard, fiberboard and plywood usually contain formaldehyde and could release this probable carcinogen into the air. To develop a nontoxic adhesive, researchers reporting in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces have combined glucose
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As much pressure as Uranus' core: The first materials synthesis research and study in the terapascal range
Jules Verne could not even dream of this: A research team from the University of Bayreuth, together with international partners, has pushed the boundaries of high-pressure and high-temperature research into cosmic dimensions. For the first time, they have succeeded in generating and simultaneously analyzing materials under compression pressures of more than one terapascal (1,000 gigapascals). Such
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For the first time, researchers have observed an X-ray explosion on a white dwarf
When stars like our sun use up all their fuel, they shrink to form white dwarfs. Sometimes such dead stars flare back to life in a super-hot explosion and produce a fireball of X-ray radiation. A research team from several German institutes including Tübingen University, and led by Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), has now been able to observe such an explosion of X-ray ligh
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Migrating turtles don't really know where they're going, study shows
Hawksbill turtles often travel circuitous routes for short distances – one swam 1,306km to reach an island just 176km away Follow our Australia news live blog for the latest updates Get our free news app ; get our morning email briefing How migrating animals like sea turtles navigate hundreds to thousands of kilometres across the open ocean has intrigued biologists since Charles Darwin. But some
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China Says It's 3D Printing a 590-Foot Hydroelectric Dam With Zero Human Labor
Here's a riddle for you. How can a country with enough resources to 3D print a new hydroelectric dam using artificial intelligence, driverless trucks and seemingly the best construction equipment money can buy still somehow lack the ability and resources to deliver food to starving residents trapped in a COVID-19 lockdown ? While you're mulling that one, we're willing to admit China's newest cons
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SpaceX Starship Spotted With What Looks Like a Janky Payload Door
Payload Prototype Something interesting has been spotted on Ship 24, a prototype of SpaceX's Mars-bound Starship rocket. A tweet posted yesterday by superfan Starship Gazer showed a wide, odd-looking hatch on the side of the ship as it sits on the launch pad at SpaceX's Boca Chica, Texas test site. Starship Gazer's photo shows the side of Starship as it's being built. The payload door — if that's
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The Forgotten Stage of Human Progress
Sign up for Derek's newsletter here . What if we invented a technology to save the planet—and the world refused to use it? This haunting hypothetical first popped into my head when I was reading about Paxlovid, the antiviral drug developed by Pfizer. If taken within a few days of infection with COVID-19, Paxlovid reduces a vulnerable adult's chance of death or hospitalization by 90 percent. Two m
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Watch an Entire House Suddenly Fall Into the Ocean
So Long Erosion, storms and climate change — oh my! The perfect combination is likely what's behind two North Carolina houses that collapsed into the ocean less than 24 hours apart. The most recent of the two homes was located in Rodanthe, NC, and wasn't occupied when it was destroyed. The Cape Hatteras National Seashore tweeted video yesterday that shows the moment the house falls off its stilts
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The New Jane Crow
With the Supreme Court poised to overturn Roe v. Wade , abortion access for tens of millions of women and girls across the nation may soon be a matter of the past. For many women of means, who can travel and pay for child care, the loss of Roe will be disruptive. For many poor women—particularly poor women of color—the loss will be deadly. This is the coming of the new Jane Crow. Certain aspects
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How Affluence Pulls People Away From Their Families
M y kids love my mom, but they haven't spent much time with her—at least not in person. They videochat with Gramma about once a week. We Zoomed into her 65th birthday party in March, and the girls held the pictures they'd colored for her up to the camera. But they've never actually been to her house. I can count on one hand the number of times she's babysat either of my kids. (It's one time.) Tha
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Injecting Spinal Fluid From Younger Mice Improves Memory in Elders, Scientists Say
In a mildly vampiric finding, spinal fluid from young mice appears to make their elders smarter. A new study published in the journal Nature details how, when injected with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from their younger counterparts, older mice appear to gain better memory recall — an experiment that could also have great implications for human memory improvement as well. Conducted by Stanford medi
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Computer Scientists Prove That Certain Problems Are Truly Hard
Last summer, three researchers took a small step toward answering one of the most important questions in theoretical computer science. To paraphrase Avi Wigderson of the Institute for Advanced Study, that question asks something simple but profound: Can we solve all the problems we hope to solve? More precisely, computer scientists want to know whether all the problems we hope to solve can be…
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Crypto Fans Are So Dumb They're Clicking .EXE Files Disguised as NFTs
Somehow, NFTs are even worse than we realized. A report from cybersecurity firm Malwarebytes found that there's been a marked increase in malware campaigns geared towards the NFT community, where enthusiasts seem to be the perfect marks, not only because they're often technically naïve enthusiasts but also because they often have high value digital assets on their computers. In other words, total
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The Democrats' Midterm Identity Crisis
President Joe Biden arrived in office with a throwback theory of how to expand his party's support. He sought to focus his presidency on delivering kitchen-table benefits to low- and middle-income families—for example, with stimulus checks and an expansive child tax credit—while downplaying his involvement in high-profile cultural disputes and emphasizing bipartisanship. Harry Truman or Hubert Hu
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What Victory Will Look Like in Ukraine
Staff officers often seethe quietly at an absence of precise political objectives for a war. After all , they frequently think, the really hard part is the marshaling and direction of air, land, and sea forces against a reacting enemy. Surely politicians could make that task easier by providing clear and constant purposes . Alas, the officers are invariably disappointed, and the war in Ukraine sh
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Why It's Good That Americans Don't Dominate Basketball
During the 1996 NBA All-Star Game, the commentators on the television broadcast began discussing the chances that Jason Kidd, then a second-year guard for the Dallas Mavericks, would make that year's U.S. men's Olympic basketball team. Kidd was a prodigious young talent, the commentators agreed, but his outside shooting remained a problem. "It might be the one thing that could keep him off," Matt
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How do octopuses change color?
Octopuses are one of the most successful camouflaging animals in the world. But exactly how they pull off their rapid, high-resolution color changes is still a mystery.
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Can Social Media Be Redeemed?
WIRED's spiritual advice columnist on Jack Dorsey's remorse for his role in creating a centralized internet and what it signals for the rest of us.
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Boeing Reportedly Melting Down Over Disastrous Spacecraft
A Curse Upon You Boeing's Starliner, it seems, may be cursed. As Reuters reports , Boeing and its supplier, Aerojet Rocketdyne, are playing the blame game as the May 19 launch date for Starliner approaches swiftly — even as the rocket itself continues to have major issues. Just a week after a part appeared to fall off of Starliner as it was being taken to the launchpad for tests, this latest trou
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NeuroMechFly: A digital twin of Drosophila
EPFL scientists have developed a digital model of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, that realistically simulates the movements of the animal. The twin is a big step towards reverse engineering the neuromechanical control of animal behavior, and developing bioinspired robots.
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Flight Cancelled After Passengers Start Receiving Photos of Plane Crashes
Plane Punked A Turkish flight aborted takeoff yesterday after passengers on board starting receiving creepy photos of plane crashes on their phones. According to a BBC report , AnadoluJet passengers with iPhones started getting AirDrop requests, which is a pretty common prank to pull when you're in public with a bunch of strangers. Most of the time, though, the prank doesn't seem to threaten dead
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How do genomes evolve between species? Team explores the key role of 3D structure in male germ cells
A study led by scientists at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB) and University of Kent uncovers how the genome three-dimensional structure of male germ cells determines how genomes evolve over time. Published in Nature Communications and carried out in rodent species, the study shows that the distinctive events occurring during egg and sperm cell production have a different impact on geno
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Is Gen Z Coddled, or Caring?
This is an edition of Up for Debate, a newsletter by Conor Friedersdorf. On Wednesdays, he rounds up timely conversations and solicits reader responses to one thought-provoking question. Every Monday, he publishes some thoughtful replies. Sign up for the newsletter here. Question of the Week This week's question is an experiment for me and a creative challenge for you: In two paragraphs or less,
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European astronomers discover four new brown dwarfs
Astronomers from the Astronomical Observatory of Padova, Italy, and elsewhere have conducted observations of 25 stars as part of the COPAINS Pilot Survey. As a result, they detected four new brown dwarfs that received designations HIP 21152 B, HIP 29724 B, HD 60584 B and HIP 63734 B. The finding is reported in a paper published May 4 on the arXiv pre-print server.
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Tracy Flick vs. Toxic Masculinity
E lection , the satirical movie directed by Alexander Payne, met with critical euphoria when it opened in 1999. Election the satirical novel had occasioned less fuss when it came out the year before; indeed, its then-unknown author, Tom Perrotta, had barely managed to get it published. ("People don't know whether it's YA or adult," his agent had told him . "They don't know what to do with it.") B
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The case for a 4-day work week | Juliet Schor
The traditional approach to work needs a redesign, says economist Juliet Schor. She's leading four-day work week trials in countries like the US and Ireland, and the results so far have been overwhelmingly positive: from increased employer and customer satisfaction to revenue growth and lower turnover. Making the case for a four-day, 32-hour work week (with five days of pay), Schor explains how th
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The Download: Russia's satellite hack, and Shanghai's intensifying lockdown
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. Russia hacked a US satellite company one hour before the Ukraine invasion What happened: Just an hour before Russian troops invaded Ukraine, Russian government hackers targeted the American satellite company Viasat, officials from the US, EU, and UK have confi
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Novel supramolecular CRISPR–Cas9 carrier enables more efficient genome editing
CRISPR-Cas9 is considered a revolutionary gene editing tool, but its applications are limited by a lack of methods by which it can be safely and efficiently delivered into cells. Recently, a research team from Kumamoto University, Japan, have constructed a highly flexible CRISPR-Cas9 carrier using aminated polyrotaxane (PRX) that can not only bind with the unusual structure of Cas9 and carry it in
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Suicidal Posts Spike After Crypto Project Crashes
Be advised: This story contains mention of suicidal thoughts and ideations. If you are in danger because of similar thoughts, you can call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline for free at 800-273-8255 . Posts on a Reddit forum dedicated to cryptocurrency token LUNA have skyrocketed as the coin has fallen into crisis over the past day — and gotten very dark in tone, once again illustrating the
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The Email That Shows the Absurdity of the Paperwork Coup
One of the most dangerous elements of Donald Trump's attempt to steal the 2020 election is how it collapsed the gap between two distinct functions: electioneering and election administration. Both are political, insofar as elected officials oversee elections, but they begin from different premises. Election administration starts out with rules for the election and then uses those rules to determi
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The looming threat for Maine's iconic potato industry
By Lori Valigra (Bangor Daily News) and Caitlin Looby (Climate Central) with Jen Brady (Climate Central) contributing to data reporting Maire Lenihan coaxes organic Keuka Gold potatoes into a washing machine at Goranson Farm in Dresden on Wednesday, April 20, 2022. Credit: Troy R. Bennett / BDN Maine farmer Ryan Guerrette irrigated his 1,200 acres of potatoes in Caribou more often in the past few
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Flu causes cardiac complications by directly infecting the heart
Researchers have shown for the first time in mice that heart problems associated with the flu are not caused by raging inflammation in the lungs, as has long been predicted. Instead, the electrical malfunctions and heart scarring seen in some of the sickest flu patients are caused by direct influenza infection of cardiac cells.
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Designer neurons offer new hope for treatment of Parkinson's disease
Scientists describe a process for converting non-neuronal cells into functioning neurons able to take up residence in the brain, send out their fibrous branches across neural tissue, form synapses, dispense dopamine and restore capacities undermined by Parkinson's destruction of dopaminergic cells.
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Multiple sclerosis: Glatiramer acetate compatible with breastfeeding, study suggests
For patients suffering from multiple sclerosis (MS), becoming a mother is fraught with difficult questions: is it acceptable to continue disease modifying treatment during pregnancy and breastfeeding to keep the disease at bay, or does this put the child at risk? A study on the drug glatiramer acetate can relieve mothers of this concern during the breastfeeding period. A comparative study between
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Can Anyone Out-Plan a Pandemic?
In this, the season of Bill Gates's atonement, the billionaire is willing to acknowledge that things don't always turn out as they should have, and that—at least in some cases—that's on him. There was the high-profile divorce from his wife of 27 years, Melinda French Gates (" definitely a sad thing ," he said); allegations of an affair and inappropriate flirting at work ("false, recycled rumors,"
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A promising solution to improve the surface hydrophobicity of hydrophobic membranes
As many chemists know, the membrane distillation (MD) process has gained increasing popularity and attention for saline treatment, especially because of its extremely high salt rejection (the theoretical value up to 100%). In MD, the hydrophobic membrane serves as a core and significant part of realizing two-phase separation. However, the existing membrane wetting phenomenon always restricts the l
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Heartstopper and the Era of Feel-Good, Queer-Teen Romances
When the producer Patrick Walters first read the romance comic Heartstopper , he knew it had to be a TV show. There was something about the way the author, Alice Oseman, had illustrated the story that gave him "butterflies," he told me over Zoom. The characters—a pair of teen boys falling in love—were adorably expressive, all wide eyes and furtive glances captured in fine strokes. Their dialogue
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Scientists study links between obesity, age and body chemistry
A team of scientists is making inroads in understanding the relationship between certain enzymes that are normally produced in the body and their role in regulating obesity and controlling liver diseases. Researchers studied male mice that lacked the Cyp2b enzyme and how the lack of the enzyme affected the mice's metabolism.
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Hepatitis: 3D structure determination of the 'gateway' to the liver
Scientists have published a ground-breaking study of the structure and function of a central protein in the liver: NTCP, a cellular-entry pathway for bile salts, but also for certain hepatitis viruses. These results reveal the 3D structure of NTCP and two architectures it can adopt. One may be helpful in the development of therapeutic tools against hepatitis viral infection.
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Scientists show how to store liquid fuels in polymeric gels to prevent explosions and fires
Liquid fuels with high energy density are essential in many applications where chemical energy is converted into controlled motion, such as in rockets, gas turbines, boilers, and certain vehicle engines. Besides their combustion characteristics and performance, it is also important to guarantee the safety and stability of these fuels when in use as well as during transport and storage.
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Ancient microorganisms found in halite may have implications for search for life
Primary fluid inclusions in bedded halite from the 830-million-year-old Browne Formation of central Australia contain organic solids and liquids, as documented with transmitted light and UV-vis petrography. These objects are consistent in size, shape, and fluorescent response to cells of prokaryotes and algae, and aggregates of organic compounds. This discovery shows that microorganisms from salin
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Shells reveal tropical heat in American West 95 million years ago
The shallow sea that covered much of western North America 95 million years ago was as warm as today's tropics, according to a new study that used fossil oyster shells as paleothermometers. The study provides the first direct temperature data from that vast mid-latitude sea during the height of the Cretaceous Thermal Maximum, one of the planet's hottest climate intervals of the past several hundr
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Hybrid school took a toll on parent mental health during COVID
Hybrid school during the COVID-19 pandemic—and working from home—were both associated with worse parental mental health, a new study finds. Having a child attend a private school or school with above-average instructional quality was associated with better mental health of parents, according to the study, among the first to present the interaction of school and workplace policies and other enviro
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Key protein identified for brain stem cell longevity
A receptor that was first identified as necessary for insulin action, that also is located on the neural stem cells found deep in the brains of mice, is pivotal for brain stem cell longevity, according to a new study, a finding that has important implications for brain health and future therapies for brain disorders.
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For outdoor workers, extreme heat poses extreme danger
Scientists explore the growing threat that extreme heat poses to workforce health in three of the hottest cities in North America — Las Vegas, Los Angeles, and Phoenix. Their study results hold important findings for outdoor workers, their employers, and policymakers across the Southwestern U.S.
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How a leaky gut leads to inflamed lungs
In addition to increased morbidity and impaired lung function after a Streptococcus pneumoniaeinfection in older mice, the researchers also found elevated levels of gut-derived bacteria in the lungs, suggesting that bacteria that migrate from the intestine to the lungs may partially be responsible for the poor outcomes in older individuals.
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Byte-Sized Review: I Made Some Truly Unhinged DIY Projects Using Cricut EasyPress 3
Cricut, the go-to name in DIY tech, has released the third iteration of its popular shirt press, the Cricut EasyPress 3 . It works in conjunction with its line of popular vinyl cutters to personalize canvas bags, coasters, pillows, and of course, every kind of T-shirt. Just like the Cricut vinyl cutters, EasyPress 3 is incredibly user-friendly, and you don't have to have any serious crafting back
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One particle on two paths: Quantum physics is right
The famous double slit experiment shows that particles can travel on two paths at the same time — but only by looking at a lot of particles and analysing the results statistically. Now a two-path-interference experiment has been designed that only has to measure one specific particle to prove that it travelled on two paths.
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When eyes meet, brains get to work
New research charts the surprisingly widespread response in multiple brain areas when the eyes of two individuals meet and social gaze interaction happens. "There are strong robust signals in the brain that are signatures of an interactive social gaze," says Steve Chang, associate professor of psychology and neuroscience at Yale University, a member of the Wu-Tsai Institute and the Kavli Institut
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10-minute meditation could help reduce Brexit polarization
In a new study, a brief, audio-guided, befriending-themed meditation reduced affective polarization between people on the "Remain" versus "Leave" sides of the U.K.'s Brexit referendum. Otto Simonsson of the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden, and colleagues present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on May 11, 2022.
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Restaurant menu design could impact carbon footprint of dining
A study employing hypothetical restaurant menus suggests that climate-friendly default options and labels indicating the carbon footprint of each dish may influence diners' dish selections and the resulting environmental effects. Ann-Katrin Betz and colleagues at Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg, Germany, present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS Climate.
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somebody elses sensory input feeded to my perceptual areas
So like..here's the main idea..what would happen if my higher perceptual areas receive input from somebody elses sensory input. I do not have a concrete answer and so would love to have a stimulating discussion on this. What could be the consequences? submitted by /u/confused_8357 [link] [comments]
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Traveling to the centre of planet Uranus: Materials synthesis research and study in terapascal range
Jules Verne could not even dream of this: A research team has pushed the boundaries of high-pressure and high-temperature research into cosmic dimensions. For the first time, they have succeeded in generating and simultaneously analyzing materials under compression pressures of more than one terapascal (1,000 gigapascals). Such extremely high pressures prevail, for example, at the center of the pl
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Copying others can lead to greater comfort with riskier behavior
The best things in life are unlikely to occur. In many situations, taking at least moderate risks yields higher expected rewards. Yet many people struggle with taking such risks: they are overly cautious and forego high payoffs. "However, we are not alone in this struggle, but we can observe and learn from others," says Wataru Toyokawa. "We therefore wanted to find out whether social learning can
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Developing an efficient production technique for a novel 'green' fertilizer
A purely mechanical method can produce a novel, more sustainable fertilizer in a less polluting way. That is the result of a method optimized at DESY's light source PETRA III. An international team used PETRA III to optimize the production method that is an adaptation of an ancient technique: by milling two common ingredients, urea and gypsum, the scientists produce a new solid compound that slowl
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Living near wildfires ups cancer risk
People exposed to wildfires have a higher incidence of lung cancer and brain tumors, a new study finds. Researchers tracked over two million Canadians over a period of 20 years. They say the study is the first to examine how proximity to forest fires may influence cancer risk. " Wildfires tend to happen in the same locations each year, but we know very little about the long-term health effects of
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Investigating mercury contamination in freshwater lakes in Korea
During the 1950s and 1960s, Minamata Bay in Japan was the site of widespread mercury poisoning caused by the consumption of fish containing methylmercury—a toxic form of mercury that is synthesized when bacteria react with mercury released in water. Mercury poisoning caused deaths and widespread neurological disorders, as well as intergenerational harm as many of the survivors had children with bi
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Exploring how forest restoration affects water cycles
How would afforestation and restoration of large areas worldwide affect water-fluxes world wide? A new study led by Wageningen University researcher Anne Hoek van Dijke with contributions from Martin Herold, GFZ, has interesting answers. Impacts on precipitation reach far beyond country or even continent level: Tree restoration in the Amazon can, for example, affect rainfall in Europe and Eastern
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New research finds that preference for remaining is key to successful immigration
New research finds that policies granting permanent residency to immigrants conditional on acquiring host country skills—like language—are most likely to generate higher fiscal contributions to the host country through income taxes. In fact, immigrants with a preference for remaining in the host country develop social contacts and other specific skills that allow them to find better paid jobs and
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UK company reveals micro-launcher rocket
Orbex's Prime rocket reaching technical readiness represents a significant achievement that brings together key elements of the ground infrastructure and prototype launch vehicle for the first time and is a major step forward for the company and for the U.K. launch industry.
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Study identifies barriers for women returning to work after breast cancer
Occupational therapy researchers find women living with and beyond breast cancer in Ireland are not aware of their employment entitlements and in response to findings have developed the occupational therapy-led "Work and Cancer" program that focuses on these entitlements and strategies for managing physical and psychological health in the workplace.
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Holding multiple ideas or data in your mind simultaneously
Is there a proper name for the ability to hold multiple ideas, data, abstractions, etc. in one's mind simultaneously? And is there evidence that it is a skill that can be developed? For example, let's say I'm working on a multi-step math problem in my head. Arrival at the solution requires the successful execution of 5+ consecutive operations. At present, I find that as soon as I am holding 3+ pi
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Seeing more species at the coast improves wellbeing: Yet another benefit of biodiversity
Seeing a larger number of species on urban coastlines — from marine animals to seaweed — is likely to improve the wellbeing of local people and visitors, new research has revealed. The findings provide further evidence that biodiversity brings wide-ranging benefits. Studies of land-based environments such as meadows, woodlands, and city parks have shown that people often find places that contain
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'Barcodes' reveal a cancer's life story
Nature, Published online: 11 May 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01279-w Technique allows scientists to follow evolution in subpopulations of tumour cells — including those that spread in the body.
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Best Smart Scales in 2022
The best smart scales available right now don't simply tell you your weight — though, they do that pretty well. They can also give you a peek into your body fat percentage, BMI, muscle mass, and in some cases, even how much water weight you're carrying. Even better, you won't have to catalog these health metrics in an old-fashioned notebook. Smart scales usually come with companion apps, so you c
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This Mini Portable Wind Turbine Is the Size of a Water Bottle and Charges Devices in Under an Hour
Five years ago, a startup called Semtive Energy took the concept of a wind turbine, shrank it down to the size of a garden shrub, and started marketing it directly to households; much like rooftop solar panels, the mini turbine is intended to help homeowners rely less on the grid and produce their own clean energy. Now another startup has taken a wind turbine, shrunk it down even more, and is mar
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Copying others to dare
Learning from others can mitigate harmful risk aversion, even if the others we learn from tend to avoid risky, but profitable decisions themselves. This is shown in mathematical modelling and large-scale online experiments by social psychologists.
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Effects of stress on adolescent brain's 'triple network'
Stress and trauma during adolescence can lead to long-term health consequences such as psychiatric disorders, which may arise from neurodevelopmental effects on brain circuitry. A new study has used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine the effects of acute stress and 'polyvicitimization,' or repeated traumas, on three brain networks in adolescents.
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Efficient production technique for a novel 'green' fertilizer
A purely mechanical method can produce a novel, more sustainable fertilizer in a less polluting way. Scientists have optimized a production method that is an adaptation of an ancient technique: by milling two common ingredients, urea and gypsum, the scientists produce a new solid compound that slowly releases two chemical elements critical to soil fertilization, nitrogen, and calcium. The milling
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Small, mini, nano: Gear units created from a few atoms
Ever smaller and more intricate — without miniaturization, we wouldn't have the components today that are required for high-performance laptops, compact smartphones or high-resolution endoscopes. Research is now being carried out in the nanoscale on switches, rotors or motors that comprise of only a few atoms in order to build what are known as molecular machines.
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Frozen testicular tissue can still make viable sperm 20 years later
Male testicular tissue that is cryopreserved can be reimplanted after more than 20 years and will go on to make viable sperm, according to a new study with rats. The findings hold implications for childhood cancer survivors, researchers say. The rate of survival for childhood cancers has increased dramatically in the last several decades, but a serious side effect of treatment is diminished ferti
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10,000 observations: Mountain Rain or Snow citizen scientists hit milestone
When the 10,000th observation was submitted to Mountain Rain or Snow on the morning of March 15th, wet snow was falling on much of the Sierra Nevada. The National Weather Service was predicting slick mountain passes and possible delays due to rain for commuters in the city, but Mountain Rain or Snow observers were eager to share real-time updates of precipitation. What is falling from the sky righ
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Materials synthesis at terapascal static pressures
Nature, Published online: 11 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04550-2 Pressures of up to 900 gigapascals (9 million atmospheres) are achieved in a laser-heated double-stage diamond cell, enabling the synthesis of Re7N3, and materials characterization is performed in situ using single-crystal X-ray diffraction.
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Structural basis of NPR1 in activating plant immunity
Nature, Published online: 11 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04699-w Cryo-electron microscopy and crystal structures of Arabidopsis NPR1—a bird-shaped homodimer—and its complex with the transcription factor TGA3 provide an explanation for a direct role of salicylic acid and enhanceosome assembly in regulating NPR1-dependent gene expression.
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X-ray detection of a nova in the fireball phase
Nature, Published online: 11 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04635-y Novae are caused by runaway thermonuclear burning in the hydrogen-rich envelopes of accreting white dwarfs, which leads to a rapid expansion of the envelope and the ejection of most of its mass1,2. Theory has predicted the existence of a 'fireball' phase following directly on from the runaway fusion, which should be observable
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Genetic and chemotherapeutic influences on germline hypermutation
Nature, Published online: 11 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04712-2 A study of 21,879 families with rare genetic diseases identifies 12 with 2- to 7-fold excess of germline mutations, most of which are due to DNA repair defects or exposure to mutagenic chemotherapy, although most individuals with a hypermutated genome will not have a genetic disease.
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Transitioning organizations to post-quantum cryptography
Nature, Published online: 11 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04623-2 Standards and recommendations for transitioning organizations to quantum-secure cryptographic protocols are outlined, including a discussion of transition timelines and the leading strategies to protect systems against quantum attacks.
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Young cerebrospinal fluid improves memory in old mice
Nature, Published online: 11 May 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-00860-7 Infusion of cerebrospinal fluid from young mice into old mice restores memory recall in the aged animals by triggering production of the fatty myelin sheath that insulates neurons in the brain.
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Chance discovery sheds light on exploding stars
Nature, Published online: 11 May 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01255-4 A rare event has been identified in a brief detection of X-rays. Serendipity only pays off when you know what to do with it, and researchers have used the finding to verify a long-standing theory about a class of exploding star.
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NASA should lead humanity's return to the Moon
Nature, Published online: 11 May 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01250-9 The Artemis mission plans to send astronauts to the Moon in 2025 — a worthy goal for science and humanity in bleak times. The US Congress should cough up the cash.
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Tumour driver mutations compromise between cancer growth and immune responses
Nature, Published online: 11 May 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01138-8 Various theories have tried to explain the frequency and consistency of 'hotspot' mutations in many tumour-driving genes across different cancers. A model of the fitness benefit of these mutations shows that fundamental trade-offs occur between a tumour's growth and its visibility to the immune system, with potential therapeuti
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A possible path towards encoded protein synthesis on ancient Earth
Nature, Published online: 11 May 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01256-3 How did the biological machinery for protein synthesis evolve from simple chemicals on ancient Earth? Experiments suggest an intriguing role for modified RNA nucleotides in directing stepwise peptide synthesis.
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AMD Launches New Radeon 6000 Refresh, Raise the Game Bundle
This week, AMD is officially announcing its refreshed family of RDNA2 GPUs. The Radeon 6950 XT, Radeon 6750 XT, and Radeon 6650 XT are replacements and/or additions to the Radeon 6900 XT, 6700 XT, and 6600 XT. Minimum prices for each card are $1099, $549, and $399 each. The Radeon 6800 XT isn't being refreshed, but it isn't being replaced either and will remain in-market, as will the Radeon 6700
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Multiple diagnoses are the norm for mental illness; A new genetic analysis helps explain why
An analysis of 11 major psychiatric disorders offers new insight into why comorbidities are the norm when it comes to mental illness. The study suggests that while there is no single gene or set of genes underlying risk for all of them, subsets of disorders — including bipolar disorder and schizophrenia; anorexia nervosa and obsessive-compulsive disorder; and major depression and anxiety –s hare
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How 'calming' our spinal cords could provide relief from muscle spasms
Poor sleep, difficulty moving and injuries from hitting something accidentally are just some of the challenges faced by suffers of often-painful involuntary muscle spasms. However, a new study investigating motoneurons in the spine has revealed two methods can make our spinal cords less 'excitable' and could potentially be used to treat muscle spasms.
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Novel tool targets unusual RNA structures for potential therapeutic applications
Ribonucleic acids (RNAs), which decode the genetic code stored in DNA and produce proteins, fold into diverse structures to govern fundamental biological processes in all life forms, including humans. Targeting disease-associated RNA structures with drug-like small molecules has been one of the gold standards for developing RNA-targeting drugs in the scientific field. Recently, a research team at
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Discovering new properties of magnetism that could change our computers
Modern computers use electrons to process information, but this design is starting to reach theoretical limits. However, it could be possible to use magnetism instead and thereby keep up the development of both cheaper and more powerful computers, thanks to work by scientists from the Niels Bohr Institute (NBI) and University of Copenhagen. Their study is published in the journal Nature Communicat
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D-peptide ligand of Y1 receptor developed for targeting gliomas
A research group led by Prof. Wu Aiguo at the Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering (NIMTE) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), in cooperation with Prof. Dan Larhammar's group at Uppsala University, has proposed a D-peptide ligand of neuropeptide Y receptor Y1, which can serve as nanocarriers to facilitate the traversal of the blood brain barrier (BBB) and thus targets gli
7h
What's the best way to build landing pads on the moon?
In the near future, NASA, the European Space Agency (ESA), China, and Roscosmos all mount crewed missions to the moon. This will constitute the first time astronauts have walked on the lunar surface since the Apollo era. But unlike the "race to the moon," the goal of these programs is not to get there first and leave only a few experiments and landers behind (i.e., "footprints and flags" missions)
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Neoliberalism creates appetite for inequality
Neoliberalism has resulted in both preference and support for greater income inequality over the past 25 years, research finds. Neoliberalism calls for free-market capitalism , regressive taxation, and the elimination of social services . The findings, which appear in the journal Perspectives on Psychological Science , stem from an analysis of attitudes in more than 160 countries. "Our institutio
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Empty Pots Cause a Fight on Sig's Boat | Deadliest Catch
Stream Deadliest Catch on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/deadliest-catch #DeadliestCatch #Discovery #DiscoveryPlus Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Disco
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Hawksbill turtles have relatively crude navigational skills
A small international team of researchers has found that hawksbill turtles take a circuitous route during migration, suggesting they have relatively crude navigational skills. In their paper published in Journal of the Royal Society Interface, the group describes tagging multiple turtle specimens and tracking their movements to better understand their navigational skills.
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Non-invasive imaging of atomic arrangement at the sub-angstrom scale in 2-D hybrid perovskites
Materials scientists aim to identify the atomic arrangement of 2D Ruddlesden-Popper hybrid perovskites (RPP) using non-invasive imaging; however, the process is challenging due to the insulating nature and softness of the organic layers. In a new report now published in Science Advances, Mykola Telychko, Shayan Edaltmanesh, and Kai Leng, and a team of scientists in physics, chemistry, and material
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Coworking with their spouses helps women to improve earnings
Women and men in coworking couples are disproportionately more likely to have similar earnings, new research finds. Existing research believed that the reason for an apparently excessive number of couples where women earn just a bit less than their partners is the existence of gender norms according to which women should avoid earning more than their partners.
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Study shows how people perceive gender through speech
Using terminology such as "female" and "male," or "feminine" and "masculine" affects how people perceive gender when hearing someone's voice, according to a study from researchers at the Acoustic Phonetics and Perception Lab (APPL) at NYU.
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Single cell RNA sequencing uncovers new mechanisms of heart disease
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a heart disease that leads to a stressed, swollen heart muscle. Due to a poor understanding of underlying mechanisms, effective clinical treatments are not available. Patients receive generic heart medication and sometimes need open-heart surgery to remove excess tissue. Researchers have now successfully applied a new revolutionary technology (scRNA-seq) to uncover u
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Brain searches for the best way to move the body
Research that examines how the body adapts to new movements is shedding new light on how the nervous system learns, and could help to inform a wide range of applications, from customized rehabilitation and athletic training to wearable systems for healthcare.
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Wildlife: What makes some animals more afraid of change than others?
Humans are undoubtedly altering the natural environment. But how wild animals respond to these changes is complex and unclear. Scientists have now discovered significant differences in how the brain works in two distinct personality types: those who act fearless and those who seem afraid of new things. Being fearless can help wildlife, specifically birds, find new food sources, explore new nesting
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Light-emitting electrochemical cells for recyclable lighting
A low-cost and easy-to-manufacture lighting technology can be made with light-emitting electrochemical cells. Such cells are thin-film electronic and ionic devices that generate light after a low voltage is applied. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the University of Turin have now used extensive data analysis to create first-class electrochemical cells from copper comple
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Best Samsung TVs of 2022
The South Korean tech giant makes everything from refrigerators to soundbars, the best Samsung TVs are big enough to turn heads. Admit it: when you're inside an electronics store, your eyes tend to gravitate towards Samsung models, even if those price tags may make you settle for one of the more affordable brands. Samsung makes televisions for every room, every lighting situation, and every lifes
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Modeling how a bird's individual speed is regulated within a flock, such as during murmurations
A team of researchers at Istituto Sistemi Complessi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, UOS Sapienza and a colleague from IMT Institute for Advanced Studies has created a model that demonstrates how flocking birds regulate their speed. In their paper published in the journal Nature Communications, the group describes their mathematical model and its performance when compared against video of real
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Smoke from wildfires ages in the atmosphere
Emissions, like smoke from wildfires and exhaust from vehicles, go through chemical changes when they enter the atmosphere. New research from the University of Georgia shows, for the first time, that these changes may affect what kind of treatment patients need to combat exposure to such pollutants.
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Antikropp öppnar för framtida behandling av sorkfeber
En speciell sorts antikroppar visar lovande resultat för att bekämpa infektioner som orsakas av virusfamiljen hantavirus, där bland annat sorkfeber ingår. Det visar en studie av forskare vid Umeå universitet. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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Korsningar gör parasit bakom dödlig sjukdom farligare
Forskare har kartlagt hur parasiten Trypanosoma cruzi lurar immunförsvaret genom att bilda nya varianter som är blandningar av olika stammar. Kunskapen kan leda till nya metoder för att diagnostisera, förebygga och behandla den tropiska sjukdomen Chagas. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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Life pay
Nature, Published online: 11 May 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01263-4 Family matters.
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Expert: Anti-choice movement used suffrage strategy
The anti-choice movement has taken its playbook from the women's suffrage movement, says political scientist Dawn Teele. On May 2, Politico published a leaked draft of a Supreme Court majority opinion that would overturn two precedent-setting cases— Roe v. Wade and Planned Parenthood v. Casey —establishing the right to a safe, legal abortion in America. What comes next is unknown, but there's no
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Hi-Fi
As yet there was only one sister, still too young for school. We three brothers weren't much older. I suspect that what I say is more than a bit sentimental and may not have a basis in what was real back then. So be it but let me keep it, the four of us hearing the tune, the strings and horns so alive. It's good to be where we are, near our parents' new hi-fi, which spills into every corner. The
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Daily briefing: COVID surges might be becoming more predictable
Nature, Published online: 09 May 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01307-9 Scientists note that variants now seem to emerge roughly every six months — but say we shouldn't rule out more surprises from SARS-CoV-2. Plus, the hidden chokepoints in global financial systems and childcare crowdfunding campaigns for academic parents.
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Preventable by Devi Sridhar review – a resolutely global view of Covid
One of the best-known public intellectuals of the pandemic gives her account of two years that shook the world Professor Nabila Sadiq was only 38 when she died of Covid-19. Unable to find a hospital bed in her native India, which had been overwhelmed by the virulent new Delta variant, her heart-rending Twitter messages pleading for help were picked up around the world. The story clearly hit home
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Copper-catalysed asymmetric reductive cross-coupling of prochiral alkenes
Nature Communications, Published online: 11 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30286-8 Asymmetric construction of alkyl C–C bonds with good stereocontrol of the two connecting carbons, particularly when using alkenes as feedstocks, is challenging. Here, the authors show a catalytic method to form multiple adjacent carbon stereocentres in a single operation.
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Efficient preparation of unsymmetrical disulfides by nickel-catalyzed reductive coupling strategy
Nature Communications, Published online: 11 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30256-0 The preparation of disulfides mainly relies on oxidative couplings of two sulfur-containing compounds, a strategy which has side reactions and other shortcomings. In this work, the authors present a reductive nickel-catalyzed cross-electrophile coupling of unactivated alkyl bromides with symmetrical tetrasulfides
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Observation of spin-current striction in a magnet
Nature Communications, Published online: 11 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30115-y Manipulation of sample volume by spin current could lead to spintronics-based mechanical devices, such as actuators operating without electricity. Here, the authors report that the thickness of thin films of the ferromagnetic material Tb0.3Dy0.7Fe2 changes in response to a spin current injected by means of spin H
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Deep learning of a bacterial and archaeal universal language of life enables transfer learning and illuminates microbial dark matter
Nature Communications, Published online: 11 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30070-8 Computational methods to analyse microbial systems rely on reference databases which do not capture their full functional diversity. Here the authors develop a deep learning model and apply it using transfer learning, creating biologically useful models for multiple different tasks.
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Unlocking the functional potential of polyploid yeasts
Nature Communications, Published online: 11 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30221-x Domesticated industrial yeast strains are sterile, which hampers to breed strains with novel properties. Here, the authors employ the genetics paradigm return-to-growth to induce genome wide recombination in two sterile polyploid industrial yeasts and identify clones with superior biotechnological traits.
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Translaminar recurrence from layer 5 suppresses superficial cortical layers
Nature Communications, Published online: 11 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30349-w The role of translaminar feedback projections between layer 5 and layers 2/3 in sensory processing remains unclear. Here, the authors show that ascending projections from layer 5 suppress superficial layers, and that this translaminar feedback sharpens feature selectivity in the primary auditory cortex.
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The Race to Produce Green Steel
In a push to dramatically reduce its carbon footprint, the steel industry is testing new manufacturing technologies that don't rely on fossil fuels. Still, experts say transforming a global industry that turned over $2.5 trillion in 2017 and employs more than 6 million people will take enormous effort.
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Alternativa metoder för att upptäcka hudcancer
En tidig diagnos är avgörande för att kunna behandla hudcancer innan den sprider sig. Men finns det enklare metoder som inte kräver att man tar ett traditionellt vävnadsprov? Doktorander från Malmö universitet har testat och utforskat olika alternativa metoder i två nyligen presenterade avhandlingar.
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'Diversity in brain research: Does it matter?' – Meet Keynote Speaker Dr. Frances Quevenco
Join us on 18 May for the 'Diversity in brain research: Does it matter?' webinar! Register here: https://www.humanbrainproject.eu/en/follow-hbp/news/2022/05/09/webinar-18-may-2022-diversity-brain-research-does-it-matter/ In this webinar, the Human Brain Project encourages scientists to consider sex, gender and additional diversity factors in neuroscience and related fields: because biology, socia
13h
Eavesdropping on human thoughts
Hypothesis Humans are always transmitting our thoughts to outside world even without speaking. If we can make a device Which is able to listen in to those thoughts that would make lots of opportunities in the defence sector. Observation As per my experience, kids are highly receptiable to human thoughts. If you sit next to a child with lots of annoying thoughts, you can see changes in kids behavi
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California lays out plan to drastically cut fossil fuel use
New homes built in California starting in 2026 need to be powered by all-electric furnaces, stoves and other appliances if California is to meet its ambitious climate change goals over the next two decades, according to a state pollution-reduction plan released Tuesday.
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Computational sleuthing confirms first 3D quantum spin liquid
Computational detective work by physicists has confirmed cerium zirconium pyrochlore is a 3D quantum spin liquid, a solid material in which quantum entanglement and the geometric arrangement of atoms cause electrons to fluctuate between quantum magnetic states no matter how cold they become.
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