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Nyheder2022maj12

Planetary scientists suggest a solution to the Fermi paradox: Superlinear scaling leading to a singularity
A pair of researchers, one with the Carnegie Institution for Science, the other with California Institute of Technology, has developed a possible solution to the Fermi Paradox. In their paper published in Journal of the Royal Society Interface, Michael Wong and Stuart Bartlett suggest that the reason that no aliens from other planets have visited us is because of superlinear scaling, which, they c
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Scientists Release Image of Black Hole at Center of Our Galaxy
Scientists from the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) initiative, an international effort to link radio dishes across the world to study black holes, have shown off the first image of the supermassive black hole lurking at the center of our galaxy, called Sagittarius A*. It's a groundbreaking moment in astrophysics, as their results confirm the black hole's existence once and for all, and provide sup
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Black Hole Image Reveals the Beast Inside the Milky Way's Heart
Today, more than three years after the release of the first-ever image of a black hole, scientists from the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) shared an image of Sagittarius A* (pronounced A-star) — the supermassive specimen sitting at the center of our own Milky Way galaxy. "It is a dream that comes true after decades of work," said Heino Falcke, an astrophysicist at Radboud University in the… Sour
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Supermassive black hole at centre of Milky Way seen for first time
Event Horizon telescope captures image giving a glimpse of the turbulent heart of our galaxy An image of the supermassive black hole at the heart of the Milky Way has been captured, giving the first direct glimpse of the "gentle giant" at the centre of our galaxy. The black hole itself, known as Sagittarius A*, cannot be seen because no light or matter can escape its gravitational grip. But its s
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Cress seeds grown in moon dust raise hopes for lunar crops
Thale cress seeds survived but grew more slowly than those planted in volcanic ash, developing stunted roots The prospect of growing crops on the moon has edged a little closer after researchers nurtured plants – some more successfully than others – in lunar soil for the first time. Scientists planted thale cress seeds in moon dust brought back by three Apollo missions and watched them sprout and
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Behold, the Bottomless Pit Holding Everything Together
We live in the inner rim of one of the Milky Way's spiral arms, a shimmery curve against inky darkness. Travel for thousands of light-years in one direction, past countless stars, countless planets, and countless moons, and you'd reach the outer edge of the Milky Way, where the last bits of our galaxy give way to the sprawling stillness of the intergalactic medium. Travel about the same distance
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This is the first image of the black hole at the center of our galaxy
The supermassive black hole at the heart of our Milky Way galaxy has been photographed for the first time, giving astronomers invaluable insight into how black holes interact with their surroundings. The object, known as Sagittarius A*, was captured by the Event Horizon Telescope Collaboration, the same global team that took the famous first-ever picture of a black hole inside the Messier 87 (M87
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Chinese rover finds evidence that water was present on Mars more recently than thought
A team of researchers at the Chinese Academy of Sciences, working with a colleague from the University of Copenhagen, has found evidence that water was present on Mars more recently than has been thought. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their analysis of data from China's Zhurong rover and what it showed them about ice in hydrated minerals.
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Coinbase Founder's Wealth Shrinks From $13.7 Billion to $2.2 Billion
Wealth Wipeout Crypto execs are losing billions of dollars in wealth amid an implosion of the value of nearly every mainstream cryptocurrency, alongside shares of exchanges, Bloomberg reports . Crypto wallet company Coinbase saw an astonishing 19 percent drop in monthly users, according to its recent quarterly report. And while the company's leaders claim bankruptcy is out of the question , Coinb
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What's Behind America's Shocking Baby-Formula Shortage?
Sign up for Derek's newsletter here . America's baby-formula shortage has gone from curious inconvenience to full-blown national crisis. In many states, including Texas and Tennessee, more than half of formula is sold out in stores. Nationwide, 40 percent of formula is out of stock—a twentyfold increase since the first half of 2021. As parents have started to stockpile formula, retailers such as
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Half of Covid-hospitalised still symptomatic two years on, study finds
Research on Wuhan patients reveals effects of long Covid, with 11% still not having returned to work More than half of people hospitalised with Covid-19 still have at least one symptom two years after they were first infected, according to the longest follow-up study of its kind. While physical and mental health generally improve over time, the analysis suggests that coronavirus patients discharg
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A Startup Is Renting Tiny Bay Area "Pods" for $800 Per Month
Bunko Pop It's no secret that housing in the Bay Area is beyond unaffordable right now, and companies are on a race to the bottom by offering up the smallest conceivable spaces for still-considerably-steep rent. For instance, local startup Brownstone Shared Housing is now offering miniature bunk bed pods for $800 a month, in a space you'll also have to share with 13 other roommates, Insider repor
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Ending England's Covid restrictions was divisive – but the data shows we were right | Raghib Ali
Despite Omicron worries, England has fared no worse than other nations that kept restrictions in place Raghib Ali is a clinical epidemiologist It is now five months since the Omicron variant was first detected in the UK – and although its impact was less severe than many initially feared , it's estimated that more than 30 million people in England have been infected, with 200,000 hospitalised and
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The Key to a Good Parent-Child Relationship? Low Expectations.
" How to Build a Life " is a weekly column by Arthur Brooks, tackling questions of meaning and happiness. Click here to listen to his podcast series on all things happiness, How to Build a Happy Life . Y oung people "are high-minded, for they have not yet been humbled by life nor have they experienced the force of necessity," Aristotle wrote in Rhetoric . "They think they know everything, and con
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G-strings in the mist: 'You wouldn't expect Jane Goodall to be fronting a campaign for underwear'
Renowned primatologist 'had a laugh' at the idea she'd be surrounded by models wearing Australian bamboo fabric brand Boody Get our weekend culture and lifestyle email and listen to our podcast Underwear-clad models stand in a rainforest, surrounded by ferns. Sunlight shines through the morning mist. "Humans," intones renowned primatologist Dr Jane Goodall. "What unusual animals we are." As the c
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Scientists Say Space Is Filled With Invisible Walls
Scientists' current best theories about the arrangement of the cosmos suggest that small galaxies should be distributed around their host galaxies in seemingly random orbits. But observations have found that these smaller galaxies arrange themselves in thin disks around their hosts, Vice reports , not unlike Saturn's rings. Needless to say, that represents a puzzling gap between knowledge and the
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Team Claims to Have Found Chunk of Asteroid That Killed the Dinosaurs
Die Hard Scientists say they've figured out what happened the day an apocalyptic asteroid crashed into Earth and annihilated the dinosaurs. Naturalist Sir David Attenborough and paleontologist Robert DePalma filmed a documentary about the 66-million-year old rock fragment they found in North Dakota. The film, "Dinosaur Apocalypse," debuts on PBS this week, but yesterday's CNN report on the pair e
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What Do Female Incels Really Want?
This article was featured in One Story to Read Today, a newsletter in which our editors recommend a single must-read from The Atlantic , Monday through Friday. Sign up for it here. "We were all ugly," Amanda, a 22-year-old student from Florida told me, recalling the online community she found when she was 18. "Men didn't like us, guys didn't want to be with us, and it was fine to acknowledge it."
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Here's another reason to donate blood: it reduces 'forever chemicals' in your body | Adrienne Matei
While the $4tn global wellness industry bends over backwards to sell us dubious detox products, there is an accessible, easy, and free way to genuinely rid our bloodstreams of toxins Among all the toxins in the Pandora's Box of chemical pollutants that humans have released upon the world, PFAS are particularly disturbing. PFAS – per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances – are nicknamed "forever chemica
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What's the Point of Going to Brett Kavanaugh's House?
CHEVY CHASE, Md.—A few of Justice Brett Kavanaugh's neighbors were visibly annoyed last night as a dozen abortion-rights protesters marched down their tree-lined street, blaring music and chanting, "We are not your incubators!" A middle-aged couple in jogging suits scoffed and yanked their goldendoodle to the other side of the road. One woman driving an SUV pulled up dangerously close to a demons
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Facebook Reportedly Already Running Out of Money for Metaverse
Tick Tick Boom It looks like Facebook's Metaverse gambit may be showing more signs of implosion. This week, a Facebook — okay, fine, Meta — executive told the company's Reality Labs division to expect a cutback announcement soon, per documents reviewed by Reuters , due to no longer being able to afford some of its hardware projects. A spokesperson confirmed to Reuters that Chief Technology Office
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Astronaut Compares the SpaceX, NASA and Russian Spacecraft He's Flown In
Leave a Review After 177 days in space, SpaceX's Crew-3 astronauts Raja Chari, Tom Marshburn, Kayla Barron, and Matthias Maurer returned to Earth aboard one of the company's Crew Dragon spacecraft. Marshburn was part of a panel for Crew-3 members that just splashed down last week following their stay on the International Space Station as part of a joint NASA and SpaceX mission . During the live c
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College Survivalists Try to Avoid Flash Floods | Naked and Afraid
Stream Naked and Afraid on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/naked-and-afraid #NakedAndAfraid #Discovery #Survival Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discover
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Did James Parsons Kill His Wife?
Illustrations by Isabel Seliger O n February 12, 1981 , 16-year-old Sherry Parsons returned home from high school in the small town of Norwalk, Ohio, and found a strangely quiet house. She called out for her mother, Barbara; hearing no response, she climbed the stairs and walked into her parents' bedroom. "Then my eyes focused on the blood on the bed," she recalled when I spoke with her recently.
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Google is failing to enforce its own ban on ads for stalkerware
Google Search displays advertisements for stalkerware services that boast real-time monitoring of romantic partners and spouses, despite the company's self-imposed ban on such ads. According to research by mobile security firm Certo Software and confirmed by MIT Technology Review, Google Search queries related to tracking partners such as a wife or girlfriend commonly return ads for software and
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How the moon influences temperatures on Earth
A study suggests lunar cycles can heat or cool the globe by 0.04C – enough to affect climate change modelling The moon does influence the temperature here on Earth, although the old belief that frost is more likely during a full moon is unfounded . New research by Prof Ed Hawkins and colleagues at the University of Reading looks at the regular 18.6-year cycle during which the moon's orbital plane
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Transforming the automotive supply chain for the 21st century
Geo-political tensions and digital transformation—which continue to reshape production and assembly processes across various industries—have exposed vulnerabilities in the traditional "just-in-time" (JIT) supply-chain model in the last few years. Pioneered in Japan and popularized by Toyota in the 1970s, the JIT method aims to avoid excess inventory by ordering products and raw materials only whe
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Four Years Among the NIMBYs
A heated community meeting—is there any other kind?—kicks off. A developer has bought a 1,200-square-foot single-family home in a transit-rich, highly desirable location and plans to turn it into a 19-unit building. Dozens of neighbors have banded together in opposition. The building would turn "day into night" with its shadows, they tell city officials, with one person worrying about the threat
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Ultrafast dynamics of topological material probed under pressure
A team led by Prof. Su Fuhai from the Hefei Institutes of Physical Science (HFIPS) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), together with researchers from the Aerospace Information Research Institute, and the Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research has investigated the nonequilibrium electron and phonon dynamics of the topological insulator Sb2Te3 under pressure and expl
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The future of desalination? A fast, efficient, selective membrane for purifying saltwater
Water scarcity is a growing problem around the world. Desalination of seawater is an established method to produce drinkable water but comes with huge energy costs. For the first time, researchers use fluorine-based nanostructures to successfully filter salt from water. Compared to current desalination methods, these fluorous nanochannels work faster, require less pressure and less energy, and are
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Optical cavities could provide new technological possibilities
A research team from NTNU is studying a topic called optical cavities and how the light trapped in them interacts with atoms, molecules and other particles. The technology could prove valuable for the development of energy-efficient chemical processes or drug synthesis, for example.
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Yes, We Want a Pixel Watch
This week, we discuss all the news from Google I/O, including Android 13, translation glasses, and that fancy new wearable.
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Genetic study confirms sarin nerve gas as cause of Gulf War illness
For three decades, scientists have debated the underlying cause of Gulf War illness (GWI), a collection of unexplained and chronic symptoms affecting veterans of the Persian Gulf War. Now researchers have solved the mystery, showing through a detailed genetic study that the nerve gas sarin was largely responsible for the syndrome.
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Knocked Up and the American Impulse to Edit Out Abortion
Early in Knocked Up , Ben Stone (played by Seth Rogen) tells his friends that a one-night stand has ended in pregnancy. Ben's friend Jonah (Jonah Hill) offers him advice on the matter. "It rhymes with shma-shmortion," Jonah says. "I'm just saying … you should get a shma-shmortion at the shma-shmortion clinic." Knocked Up is now 15 years old. It premiered in 2007, a product of raunch culture and o
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The Experiment Podcast: Teenage Life After Genocide
Listen and subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Podcasts At 19 years old, Aséna Tahir Izgil feels wise beyond her years. She is Uyghur, an ethnic minority persecuted in China, and few of her people have escaped to bear witness. After narrowly securing refuge in the United States, Aséna's now tasked with adjusting to life in a new country and fitting in with her teenage peers. T
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Discovery reveals blocking inflammation may lead to chronic pain
Using anti-inflammatory drugs and steroids to relieve pain could increase the chances of developing chronic pain. New research puts into question conventional practices used to alleviate pain. Normal recovery from a painful injury involves inflammation and blocking that inflammation with drugs could lead to harder-to-treat pain.
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Mind the gap: Space inside eggs steers first few steps of life
Imagine sitting at a meeting where the shape of the table and your place at it might impact how you get along with the other members. Cells also communicate with their nearest neighbors, and in embryos, nothing is left to chance in the 'seating plan' for the first few cells. However, questions remain about the how this process is controlled and how it can influence the overall growth of an organis
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Family size may influence cognitive functioning in later life
A new study found that having three or more versus two children has a negative effect on late-life cognition. The results further indicated that this effect was strongest in Northern Europe, where higher fertility decreases financial resources but does not improve social resources in this region.
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The deadly impact of urban streets that look like highways
Serious auto crashes in urban areas are more likely on city streets that look to drivers like highways, new research suggests. The study used a novel approach: researchers applied machine learning techniques to analyze more than 240,000 images of road segments in Columbus, Ohio.
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Neurophilosophy
# – or the #brain's lack of discipline ##1. Discipline: What is #Neurophilosophy? The subtitle of this essay "the lack of discipline of the brain" refers to a book by the medical doctor and philosopher Georg Northoff: "The brain without discipline. What now, Mr. Kant? On the trail of consciousness with neurophilosophy. (2012)", which deals with the question of how the spirit gets into the bottle
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Best 6.5-Inch Speakers for 2022
If you spend lots of time in your car, a good set of speakers is a worthwhile investment. A great-sounding car stereo system makes a long commute, or a drive across the country, a more enjoyable experience. The best place to start is by replacing your stock speakers. Most standard car speakers are about 6.5 inches in diameter, so finding a good set of speakers in that size range means you can ins
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Using shark teeth to decipher evolutionary processes
From embryo to turtle cracker: Palaeobiologists studied the multiple changes in tooth shape in the tiger shark. The study is also central in drawing conclusions about extinct species from the myriad of preserved shark teeth in the field of palaeontology.
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Excessive sports training may have negative effects on mood
New research on road cyclists sheds light on the importance of monitoring a training session load with the use of heart rate variability measuring tools, to favor assimilation and prevent injuries, and to compare training intensity with mood states the following morning.
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Water makes tree branches droop at night
Terrestrial laser scanning data show that trees move their branches in a diurnal pattern, settling down for the night — as if falling asleep. Changes in the water status of leaves and branches causes branches to move downward at night, up to 20 cm depending on the tree species.
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Small microring array enables large complex-valued matrix multiplication
Optical computing uses photons instead of electrons to perform computations, which can significantly increase the speed and energy efficiency of computations by overcoming the inherent limitations of electrons. The basic principle of optical computing is the light-matter interaction. Matrix computing has become one of the most widely used and indispensable information processing tools in science a
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Study sheds light on what influences water supplied by snowmelt
Water often falls from the sky and is stored in mountains across the U.S. as snow before it melts and flows down to urban and rural communities. Knowing what factors influence when and how much of that snowmelt ultimately makes it to streams, rivers and reservoirs is crucial for water managers trying to make the most of limited water resources. A new study led by researchers at University of Nevad
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Jellyfish's stinging cells hold clues to biodiversity
The cnidocytes — or stinging cells — that are characteristic of sea anemones, hydrae, corals and jellyfish, and make us careful of our feet while wading in the ocean, are also an excellent model for understanding the emergence of new cell types, according to new research.
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What we're still learning about how trees grow
A new study finds that tree growth does not seem to be generally limited by photosynthesis but rather by cell growth. This suggests that we need to rethink the way we forecast forest growth in a changing climate, and that forests in the future may not be able to absorb as much carbon from the atmosphere as we thought.
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Climate change increases risks of tree death
All of that carbon in trees and forests worldwide could be thrown back into the atmosphere if the trees burn up in a forest fire. Trees also stop scrubbing carbon dioxide from the air if they die due to drought or insect damage. The likelihood of those threats impacting forests is increasing nationwide, making relying on forests to soak up carbon emissions a much riskier prospect.
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Scientists Grow Living Plants in Moon Soil Captured by Astronauts
A new skill may soon be in high demand among potential astronauts: gardening. Three scientists from the University of Florida say they've successfully grown plants in samples of lunar soil collected during three different Apollo missions. The research, published in the journal Nature today , showed off the tiny but miraculous green Arabidopsis thaliana , or thale cress, seedlings. The team used s
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Massive single-cell atlas across human tissues highlights cell types where disease genes are active
Genetic studies have revealed many genes linked to both common and rare disease, but to understand how those genes bring about disease and use those insights to help develop therapies, scientists need to know where they are active in the body. Research on single cells can help achieve this goal, by surveying gene activity in specific cell types. Scientists need to profile all cell types and compar
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Video games can help boost children's intelligence
Scientists have studied how the screen habits of US children correlates with how their cognitive abilities develop over time. They found that the children who spent an above-average time playing video games increased their intelligence more than the average, while TV watching or social media had neither a positive nor a negative effect.
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The Higgs boson and the rise of the standard model of particle physics in the 1970s
At the dawn of the 1970s, the idea of a massive scalar boson as the keystone of a unified theoretical model of the weak and electromagnetic interactions had yet to become anchored in a field that was still learning to live with what we now know as the standard model of particle physics. As the various breakthroughs of the decade gradually consolidated this theoretical framework, the Brout–Englert–
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From cavefish to humans: Evolution of metabolism in cavefish may provide insight into treatments for a host of diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, and stroke
New research examines how cavefish, surface-dwelling river fish that flooded into underground cave systems over 100,000 years ago, developed unique metabolic adaptations to survive in nutrient-scarce environments. The study created a genome-wide map of liver tissue for two independent colonies of cavefish along with river fish to understand how cavefish metabolism evolved and how this may be appli
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'Tabula sapiens' multi-organ cell atlas already yielding surprises for biologists
With rare exceptions, each of the trillions of cells in our bodies carries an exact duplicate of the human genome, which contains between 20,000 and 25,000 protein-coding genes. But to carry out the specialized functions that make life possible, organs like the kidney, lung, heart, and brain rely on tissues built from distinctive cell types, which come about when individual cells develop to expres
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Quantum systems and the flight of the bee
At first glance, a system consisting of 51 ions may appear easily manageable. But even if these charged atoms are only changed back and forth between two states, the result is more than two quadrillion (1015) different orderings that the system can take on.
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Ancient DNA maps 'dawn of farming'
Nature, Published online: 12 May 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01322-w Huge collection of genomes charts how hunter-gatherers turned into some of the world's first farmers in Turkey.
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Effectively removing emerging contaminants in wastewater treatment plants
Currently, treatment systems let, on average, half of the emerging contaminants found in wastewater go through. However, scientists are developing new technologies to make infrastructure more efficient and remove the remaining contaminants that would otherwise be discharged into waterways. Jean-François Blais, water treatment and environmental decontamination expert at the Institut national de la
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The genetic origins of the world's first farmers clarified
The genetic origins of the first agriculturalists in the Neolithic period long seemed to lie in the Near East. A new study shows that the first farmers actually represented a mixture of Ice Age hunter-gatherer groups, spread from the Near East all the way to south-eastern Europe.
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Megalodon mystery: What caused a painful toothache?
Researchers examined a deformed tooth from an Otodus megalodon , the world's largest prehistoric shark, to find out what caused it: was it developmental or related to feeding? The work could give paleontologists more insight into the developmental processes associated with tooth injury in ancient sharks , as well as feeding behavior. "We tend to reserve our sympathy for the prey, but the life of
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Study finds increased risk of dementia after hospitalization for major TBI
People who have been hospitalized for a major traumatic brain injury (TBI) may have a higher risk of developing dementia when compared to people who do not have a TBI, according to a new study. Major TBI was defined as having bleeding in the brain and a hospital stay of three or more days. Researchers did not find an increased risk for people who had minor TBI, which was defined as a concussion wi
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Cerebros en el Espacio Sideral
por JC Gorman Los cerebros han evolucionado durante 500 millones de años para existir en un planeta con gravedad. Sin embargo, cuando los astronautas ingresan al espacio exterior, sus cerebros tienen que superar algunos desafíos serios contrarios a la forma en que fueron diseñados. Los astronautas reportan todo tipo de efectos secundarios, tanto durante su […]
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US forests provide 83 million people with half their water
Forested lands across the U.S. provide 83 million people with at least half of their water, according to a broad new study of surface water sources for more than 5,000 public water systems. 125 million people, or about 38% of the country's population, receive at least 10% of their water from forests. In the arid western U.S., 39.5 million people get more than half of their surface drinking water f
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A first: Scientists grow plants in soil from the Moon
Scientists have, for the first time, grown plants in soil from the Moon. They used soil collected during the Apollo 11, 12 and 17 missions. In their experiment, the researchers wanted to know if plants would grow in lunar soil and, if so, how the plants would respond to the unfamiliar environment, even down to the level of gene expression.
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Acoustic black holes as noise traps in wooden structures
Research is currently being completed at Empa on a world-first in the sound insulation of wooden buildings. Using a physical theory from the 1990s and the tools of digitization, a research team has developed new floor elements made of solid wood panels that have so-called acoustic black holes. The idea came from Stefan Schoenwald, head of Empa's Building Acoustics laboratory in Dübendorf. He has e
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Quantum one-way street in topological insulator nanowires
Very thin wires made of a topological insulator could enable highly stable qubits, the building blocks of future quantum computers. Scientists see a new result in topological insulator devices as an important step towards realizing the technology's potential.
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How cells correct errors under time pressure
How does a cell balance risk and speed when dividing? EPFL scientists have developed and experimentally tested the first mathematical theory that describes the cell's best strategy for dividing safely and efficiently.
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Best Wireless Earbuds Under $100
If you look around, it seems like wireless earbuds are everywhere. You see them on public transportation, the street, or cafes. What was once a niche product has become thoroughly mainstream in a way that few could have expected in such a short period of time. Two big technical developments made wireless possible: The gradual removal of the headphone jack from smartphones (thanks Apple!), and imp
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Recreational runners prefer to run at an energy-saving pace
When recreational runners are left to their own devices, they prefer to run at the same calorie-saving pace, regardless of the distance, according to a new study. Previously, scientists theorized that runners burn the same amount of calories for a given distance no matter how fast they run because the energetic cost depends mostly on the weight of the runner and time run. The new study in Current
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[Social anxiety] So that me … Any help ? (4 years of rmedication)
After being gratuated of highs-school diploma i mooved to another city for university, as it was too much stress for me i've severly abuse of alcool (drinking before any class in the morning and afternoon) during a whole semeste, so i just can't still follow this path even more as a student so i've return home. I started seing an addictologist that prescribed me several different medication SRNS
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Talking about white privilege online can backfire
If there's an online discussion about race, using the term "white privilege" can create a polarized situation, researchers report. The mention of white privilege can create internet discussions that are less constructive, more polarized, and less supportive of racially progressive policies, says Christopher Quarles, a doctoral student at the School of Information at the University of Michigan and
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Google Introduces Monk Skin Tone Scale to Improve AI Color Equity
When it comes to trailblazers in the field of color equity, Google doesn't grace the top of many lists. But there's a contingent within the company trying to change that. At its I/O 2022 conference, Google introduced a tool it intends to use to improve color equity through representation. It's a set of ten color swatches that correspond to human skin tones, running the whole gamut from very light
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Scientists enhance X-ray data analysis with artificial intelligence
Artificial intelligence (AI) is transforming every scientific field, from biology to materials science. When it comes to some types of X-ray experiments, new AI approaches have enabled researchers to obtain a more accurate analysis of their samples and to do so in a much shorter amount of time.
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Smaller female North Atlantic right whales have fewer calves
The declining body size of North Atlantic right whales may have critical consequences for the future of the species. New research, co-authored by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution's senior scientist Michael Moore, shows that smaller females produce fewer calves.
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Changes in cholesterol production lead to tragic octopus death spiral
For all their uncanny intelligence and seemingly supernatural abilities to change color and regenerate limbs, octopuses often suffer a tragic death. After a mother octopus lays a clutch of eggs, she quits eating and wastes away; by the time the eggs hatch, she is dead. Some females in captivity even seem to speed up this process intentionally, mutilating themselves and twisting their arms into a t
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High-resolution genomes reveal nuanced origins of the first farmers
Farming has been thought to originate from a single population in Southwest Asia, which covers parts of the modern-day Middle East, and made its way to areas in Turkey, Greece, and eventually across Western Europe. Scientists have long debated how these populations have emerged and flowed throughout these regions, but now an international team of researchers have excavated a trove of new genetic i
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For some people, religious leaders might be most effective at communicating the importance of COVID-19 vaccination
Vaccinating a substantial portion of society has been found to be the best way to bring the COVID-19 pandemic under control, but the pace of vaccination has slowed down since the vaccines were first made available to the public in December 2020. As of May 2022, only 66% of the eligible population in the United States was fully vaccinated, even as vaccines were going unused around the country.
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Superhard material synthesis made cheaper
Skoltech researchers and their colleagues from Tomsk Polytechnic University have proposed an efficient and inexpensive way to synthesize superhard tungsten boride, used in drilling and other industrial technologies. The research describing the new technique was published in the journal Inorganic Chemistry and was featured on the cover of the May issue.
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How to stop banks from investing in dirty energy | Lucie Pinson
Money is pollution's biggest driving force — particularly, the cash invested in dirty energy projects, says financial responsibility campaigner Lucie Pinson. She shares a three-pronged approach to stop banks from funding fossil fuel companies, including what she calls "collaborative blackmailing" (it's more ethical than it sounds). By demanding more accountability from polluting companies and enc
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Tackling workplace bullying
Workplace bullying has always been a problem but recognition of this problem and how we must stand up to it and try to eradicate it from the workplace culture has only come to the fore in recent years. A conceptual review in the International Journal of Management Practice looks at the issues, the terminology, and the definitions with the aim of helping researchers fill the many gaps in the litera
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Google Shows Off AR Glasses Capable of Language Translation
At this week's Google I/O conference the company teased a bevy of future products that are currently in development. In addition to the upcoming Pixel Watch, Pixel tablet, and new Pixel phones, it also teased a new set of Augmented Reality (AR) glasses. Google has mostly been left out of the wearable/metaverse conversation up until now, but the company is throwing its hat in the ring with a truly
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Explosion on a white dwarf observed
When stars like our Sun use up all their fuel, they shrink to form white dwarfs. Sometimes such dead stars flare back to life in a super hot explosion and produce a fireball of X-ray radiation. A research team has now been able to observe such an explosion of X-ray light for the very first time.
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When unconscious, the brain is anything but 'silent'
The cerebral cortex is thought to be the seat of conscious processing in the brain. Rather than being inactivated, specific cells in the cortex show higher spontaneous activity during general anesthesia than when awake, and this activity is synchronized across those cortical cells. Improving our understanding of the neuronal mechanisms of general anesthesia could lead to better anesthetic drugs an
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Life after death for the human eye: Vision scientists revive light-sensing cells in organ donor eyes
Scientists have revived light-sensing neuron cells in organ donor eyes and restored communication between them as part of a series of discoveries that stand to transform brain and vision research. Billions of neurons in the central nervous system transmit sensory information as electrical signals; in the eye, specialized neurons known as photoreceptors sense light.
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How does forest restoration affect water cycles?
How would afforestation and restoration of large areas worldwide affect water-fluxes world wide? A new study has interesting answers. Impacts on precipitation reach far beyond country or even continent level: tree restoration in the Amazon can, for example, affect rainfall in Europe and Eastern Asia. The study has calculated the global impact of large-scale tree restoration on water fluxes and wat
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Migrating Turtles Aren't As Good At Navigation As We Thought
The hawksbill sea turtle. (Photo: Kris-Mikael Krister/Unsplash) Every year colonies of sea turtles migrate to warmer regions, often traveling for hundreds or thousands of miles to reach tropical safety. Tourists and scientists alike have previously thought these creatures possessed highly precise means of navigation to help them reach their destinations. But this isn't the case. New research show
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Overleveren brugte sit sidste liv
Den nu forhenværende koncerndirektør i Region Midtjylland Ole Thomsen har redet mange storme af gennem næsten 12 år som koncerndirektør. Amputationsskandalen blev én gang for meget for politikerne i regionsrådets forretningsudvalg, som i dag fyrede Ole Thomsen.
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Effect of climate change on kidney beans, bean sprouts and green beans
A team of researchers from the Universitat Politècnica de València (UPV), belonging to the Instituto Universitario de Conservación y Mejora de la Agrodiversidad Valenciana (COMAV), and the Universidad Técnica Particular de Loja (Ecuador) has evaluated the effects of climatic conditions on local and commercial varieties of beans (Phaseolus vulgaris), garrofón (P. lunatus) and green beans (Vigna ung
6h
Why the world has a lot to learn about conservation, and trust, from Indigenous societies
Twenty-five years ago, when I was a young anthropologist working in northern Siberia, the Indigenous hunters, fishers and trappers I lived with would often stop and solemnly offer something to the tundra. It was usually small, such as coins, buttons or unlit matches. But it was considered essential. Before departing on a hunting or fishing trip, I'd be asked if I had some change in my outer coat.
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New imaging method makes tiny robots visible in the body
Microrobots have the potential to revolutionize medicine. Researchers at the Max Planck ETH Centre for Learning Systems have now developed an imaging technique that for the first time recognizes cell-sized microrobots individually and at high resolution in a living organism.
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Slow walking may be to blame for perceived congestion in pedestrian areas
When designing public spaces or other places where foot traffic is considered, planners and architects need to know how people perceive the spaces in question. It is commonly believed that a space will feel more congested if the crowd density is higher. However, new research suggests that walking speed of individuals actually plays a greater role than crowd density in how someone feels about a bus
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Helping social innovators scale up in size and impact
Even with brilliant, original ideas, social innovators are often limited by funding and skills shortages when it comes to scaling up. A new Horizon Europe call is opening on May 12, 2022, to set up a European Social Innovation Catalyst Fund that will help social innovators grow their ideas.
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Cells hold the secrets of aging
Most of us think about getting older from time to time, noticing how the years slip by and counting the gray hairs. Some of us even try and fight back, rubbing anti-aging creams into our cheeks and turning to ideas like fasting.
6h
Hvad blev der af Peter?
Et af de meget store dyr på den internationale, sundhedsvidenskabelige savanne, dr.med. Peter Christian Gøtzsche, mistede for lidt over tre år siden alle officielle poster og job og blev katapulteret ind i en post-karriere tilværelse, som han hverken havde planlagt eller lyst til. Men noget otium er der ikke tale om.
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Suicide risk rises after vulnerable teens have miscarriages
Vulnerable teens who have a miscarriage are at increased risk for suicide, new shows. The study looks at mental health in adolescent girls who have been involved with both the juvenile justice system and the foster care system. Researchers drew on a long-term dataset collected between 1997 and 2006, which tracked teens' outcomes after entering those systems. In that population, pregnancy was link
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The Standard Model of Particle Physics May Be Broken
As a physicist working at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at Cern, one of the most frequent questions I am asked is "When are you going to find something?". Resisting the temptation to sarcastically reply "Aside from the Higgs boson, which won the Nobel Prize, and a whole slew of new composite particles?", I realize that the reason the question is posed so often is down to how we have portrayed p
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Showdown in the Cochrane Corral
Spændingerne om retning og strategi i det prestigefyldte internationale forskernetværk Cochrane var så stærke, at bestyrelsen splintredes på generalforsamlingen i 2018. Den danske medgrundlægger af netværket, Peter Gøtzsche, var omdrejningspunktet og endte med at blive ekskluderet.
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A college that doesn't exist. An email address that goes dark. Who wrote this paper?
Alexander Templeton works at the math library of Glen Liberty Community College in Scottsbluff, Nebraska. At least that's what a paper, "A bibliometric analysis of Atangana-Baleanu operators in fractional calculus," Templeton appears to have published in the Alexandria Engineering Journal claims. But no Glen Liberty Community College appears to exist in Scottsbluff – or anywhere … Continue reading
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That feeling you get when listening to sad music? It's humanity
Susan Cain prefers to poke around the less-examined corners of can-do America. In 2012 she published "Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking," which became a phenomenon and made the congenitally less chatty among us fashionable and even cool. The 1993 Harvard Law School graduate's new book, "Bittersweet: How Sorrow and Longing Can Make Us Whole," has become a New York Ti
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All N. American bison have a bit of cattle DNA
A new study reveals the strongest evidence to date that all bison in North America carry multiple small, but clearly identifiable, regions of DNA that originated from domestic cattle. Researchers compared genome sequences among the major historical lineages of bison to 1,842 domestic cattle , establishing that all analyzed bison genomes contained evidence of cattle introgression. "This comparativ
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Detecting viruses in a pinprick
Scientists at Swansea University, Biovici Ltd and the National Physical Laboratory have developed a method to detect viruses in very small volumes.
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Study shows two career assessment screenings effective for veterans, civilians
When veterans leave the military, they not only have the possibility of significant challenges like lasting physical injuries, post-traumatic stress disorder or mental health concerns, they also face the reality of transitioning to a new life, often in higher education or a new career field. While many services are in place to help address the physical and mental obstacles, little research has bee
7h
Disabled lovers need more support
The intimate romantic and sexual lives of people with complex communication needs (CCN) are often compromised by social and technological barriers that need to be explored to improve opportunities for personal relationships.
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Conflict-related sexual violence needs urgent action
Russia's war in Ukraine has displaced millions of people, most of them women and children. This mounting crisis suggests that conflict-related sexual violence, which has been reported in Ukraine, requires urgent action, say Washington University in St. Louis experts on refugees and displaced populations.
7h
Så kan robotar vinna människors tillit
Vi litar på en robot när vi spelar spel, men känner oss inte lika trygga om den ska hjälpa oss med medicinering. Förtroende, förutsägbarhet och känsla av kontroll är några faktorer som avgör om samspelet mellan människa och robot blir lyckat. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
8h
Meteorit från Mars visar spår av vatten – men inget liv
Undersökning av en meteorit med ursprung från Mars, visade att den utsatts för mycket begränsad påverkan av vatten. Forskare har studerat meteoriten med hjälp av neutron- och röntgentomografi. Tekniken kommer förmodligen att användas när Nasa runt 2030 hämtar hem prover från vår röda grannplanet. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
8h
Vem älskar en gruva?
Klimatomställning kräver elektrifiering. Och elektrifiering mängder av metall – till batterier, solceller och vindkraftverk. Många av dem finns att bryta i svensk berggrund. Frågan är om vi vill? Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
8h
Nytt rymdinstrument ska utforska Jupiters månar
Nästa år flyger en rymdfarkost till Jupiter för att utforska förutsättningar för liv på planetens omgivande månar. Ombord finns ett partikelinstrument som ska mäta joner och elektroner i Jupitersystemet. Utvecklingen av instrumentet presenteras nu i en avhandling. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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Ny chans att spana efter tång – i år under månens sken
Vid fullmåne blir det fart på blåstångens kärleksliv. Forskare uppmanar nu allmänheten att ge sig ut på en nattlig strandpromenad i sommar och inspektera tångens tillstånd – och därmed bidra till ökad kunskap om vad som händer under Östersjöns yta. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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The Download: Google's stalkerware ban failure, and a bet for climate catastrophe
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. Google is failing to enforce its own ban on ads for stalkerware Google Search displays advertisements for stalkerware services that boast real-time monitoring of romantic partners and spouses, despite the company's self-imposed ban on such ads. According to re
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Stem Cells for Parkinson's Disease
The healing potential of stem cells came to the public consciousness in 2001, when president George Bush banned federal funding for any research involving new embryonic stem cell lines. This sparked a public and professional debate, with proponents touting the amazing potential of stem cells to cure serious diseases, with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's frequently mentioned as examples. Critics were
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Want to prevent pandemics? Stop spillovers
Nature, Published online: 12 May 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01312-y Decision-makers discussing landmark agreements on health and biodiversity must include four actions to reduce the risk of animals and people exchanging viruses.
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Runx1 and Runx2 inhibit fibrotic conversion of cellular niches for hematopoietic stem cells
Nature Communications, Published online: 12 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30266-y The transcription factors, Runx1 and Runx2 are critical embryonically for generation of HSCs and osteoblasts, respectively. Here the authors show that adult mice lacking Runx1 and Runx2 in HSC-supporting CAR cells displayed an increase in fibrosis with reduced HSCs in bone marrow.
10h
Leder: Amputeret ledelse
Det klinger hult, når koncerndirektøren vedkender sig, at ansvaret for amputationsskandalen 'principielt er mit', men i samme åndedrag siger, at han 'ikke ved, hvordan jeg kunne have båret det ansvar bedre'.
11h
Space Is an Ecosystem Like Any Other. And It's in Peril.
The band of orbital space just above our atmosphere can be thought of as a critical part of our natural environment, a resource vital to creatures both above and below the skies. In recent years, artificial satellites have emerged as an invasive species that threatens to tip the system out of balance.
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AUH-karkirurger dumpede ledelsen i trivselsundersøgelse
Region Midtjylland undersøgte i 2019 de ansattes trivsel og syn på ledelsen i en såkaldt TULE-rapport. Svarene fra AUH's karkirurger viste ikke bare ekstremt lav tillid til ledelsen, men også overraskende stor utilfredshed med egen faglighed. Det er meget opsigtsvækkende, mener to arbejdsmiljøforskere.
11h
Fra to til seks asylcentre på få uger
Tilstrømning af ukrainske flygtninge har skabt en speciel sundhedsfaglig opgave i store dele af Danmark, eksempelvis i Nord-, Midt- og Vestjylland, hvor man på få uger skalerer antallet af asylcentre fra to til seks. De almene lægefalige kompetencer deles mellem centrene, der primært bemandes af sygeplejersker.
12h
Technology
Now a Days is advanced you can turn lights on or off with the blink of your eye submitted by /u/williamblake112 [link] [comments]
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Skeptical Science New Research for Week #19 2022
In case of emergency break glass— but glass can cut Fire extinguishers, safety belts, first aid kits, insurance policies, geoengineering: we never enjoy using them. But given our demonstrated, deep empirical record of proclivity for creating hazards and risk we'd obviously be foolish not to include emergency responses in our inventory. Of late geoengineering has become more acutely and urgently c
13h
Psykiatriambulansen ger bättre akutvård
Många samtal till SOS-alarm handlar om psykisk ohälsa. Men ambulanssjuksköterskor är i första hand utbildade i att ta hand om akut fysiskt sjuka eller skadade personer. Därför infördes en psykiatriambulans på prov i Region Skåne. Ambulansen, som är bemannad med både en ambulans- och en psykiatrisjuksköterska, finns nu permanent i Malmöregionen.
13h
Reportage: Asylcenterlæge i krigstid
Patienterne er bl.a. ukrainske og syriske flygtninge, men det lægelige arbejde på Asylcenter Vesthimmerland minder på mange måder om arbejdet i almen praksis. De sproglige og kulturelle barrierer kalder dog på ekstra tålmodighed og – nogle gange – en bestemt tone.
15h
Forelsket i et anderledes arbejdsliv
Lena Westh Mathiesen har sat den normale karrierevej på pause og arbejder for et vikarbureau. Derigennem er hun blevet fast læge på flere asylcentre og passer desuden lægevagtstelefon, og hverdagen minder derfor på mange måder om den hverdag, man møder i almen praksis.
15h
Why a tool for reversing Trump era rules is seldom used
This is a re-post from Yale Climate Connections by Lexi Smith and Bud Ward "CRA" It's one of those acronyms even many-a-veteran environmental policy geek may not recognize. Amidst the scores and scores of acronyms in the field – CERCLA, IPCC, SARA, LUST, NPDES, NDCs, FIFRA, NEPA and scores more – CRA remains, contentedly or otherwise, under the radar screen. Maybe because it's an acronym with a s
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India and Pakistan's brutal heat wave poised to resurge
This is a re-post from Yale Climate Connections by Jeff Masters A brutal, record-intensity heat wave that has engulfed much of India and Pakistan since March eased somewhat this week, but is poised to roar back in the coming week with inferno-like temperatures of up to 50 degrees Celsius (122°F). The heat, when combined with high levels of humidity – especially near the coast and along the Indus
15h
Why aren't women getting diagnosed with ADHD?
It's estimated that a million women in the UK could have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder – but according to the ADHD Foundation, 50–75% of them do not know they have it. Going without a diagnosis can impact someone's education, employment and physical and mental health. So why are women being left behind? Madeleine Finlay speaks to Jasmine Andersson about her experience of getting a late
16h
More gender segregation in jobs means more harassment, lower pay
A new paper in The Quarterly Journal of Economics, published by Oxford University Press, indicates that people who are the gender minority in their workplace are more likely to experience sexual harassment. This harassment discourages people from taking jobs in workplaces where they would be a gender minority. It also leads current minorities to leave their jobs for new ones with lower pay.
16h
Brains ~in Space~
[En Español] Brains have been evolving for 500 million years to exist on a planet with gravity. However, when astronauts enter outer space, their brains have to overcome some serious challenges contrary to the way they were designed. Astronauts report all types of side effects, both during their time in Space and upon their return […]
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Clues about concussions from the gut
Scientists suggest telltale signs of concussions might be found in the gut. By taking blood, stool and saliva samples from 33 football players, the researchers were able to examine the diagnostic potential of the gut's microbiome. They say their findings demonstrate that a simple, objective diagnostic test could be developed to track the impact of concussions and signal when it's safe to return to
19h
Exposing liars by distraction
It is well documented that lying during interviews takes up more cognitive energy than telling the truth. A new study found that investigators who used this finding to their advantage by asking a suspect to carry out an additional, secondary, task while being questioned were more likely to expose lie tellers. The extra brain power needed to concentrate on a secondary task (other than lying) was pa
19h
Smart Lenses Images
I have always wanted smart lenses that allowed you to put continually moving images as part of the iris and pupil like a black hole accretion disk, basically a much better version of crazy lenses. When will this be possible? submitted by /u/marcustrelle [link] [comments]
20h
Can general working memory be improved by training on Dual n-Back?
I'm not interested in whether it increases fluid intelligence , I'm just interested in if it can improve your working memory in ways not trained on. As someone with ADHD who has problems with working memory, doing dual n-back daily could be worth it for me if it actually results in being able to be more focused and attentive or have more "mental workspace," as I've seen WM described. In the liter
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