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Nyheder2022maj13

I Invented Gilead. The Supreme Court Is Making It Real.
In the early years of the 1980s, I was fooling around with a novel that explored a future in which the United States had become disunited. Part of it had turned into a theocratic dictatorship based on 17th-century New England Puritan religious tenets and jurisprudence. I set this novel in and around Harvard University—an institution that in the 1980s was renowned for its liberalism, but that had
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What are viruses?
Viruses are microscopic parasites that lack the capacity to thrive and reproduce outside of a host body.
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LATEST

TikTok's New, Terrible Trend
Johnny Depp is suing Amber Heard for defamation. As the trial wears on, mocking her testimony has become the latest disturbing thing to go viral on social media.
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Astronomers spot quadruple stars that may spark supernova explosions
A quadruple star system discovered in 2017 and recently observed at the University of Canterbury Mt. John Observatory could represent a new channel by which thermonuclear supernova explosions can occur in the universe, according to results published in Nature Astronomy today (13 May) by an international team of astronomers.
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Expert Says Crypto Crash is Just Like 2008 Financial Crisis
Crash & Burn If the great crypto crash of 2022 is giving you deja vu, you're not alone. In a controversial Foreign Policy editorial , blockchain expert and author David Gerard argued that this week's incredible cryptocurrency crash greatly resembles the 2008 financial crisis — which ironically predicated the rise of crypto to begin with. Prior to the 2008 financial crisis, "the economy was runnin
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Lawyers File on Behalf of Elephant to Make Her a Legal Person
Elephant Case A New York elephant named Happy is getting her day in court, after activists filed to establish her as a legal person in the eyes of the law. As the Wall Street Journal reports , lawyers from the Nonhuman Rights Project have filed a writ of habeas corpus on behalf of Happy to establish her legal personhood — and thusly free her from captivity at the Bronx Zoo, where she's lived and
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Elon Musk Wants to Meet His Chinese Doppelgänger
Double Take SpaceX and Tesla CEO Elon Musk is itching to meet his Chinese doppelgänger — that is, if the man actually resembles the billionaire in real life. But first, some background for those unfamiliar with the self-described "Elong Musk." In recent months, a video of Ma Yilong , a Chinese man who seemingly bears a striking resemblance to Musk, went viral not only due to his uncanny resemblan
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Guy Turns Tesla Model 3 Into Giant "Mad Max"-Esque Tank
Frankentank A group of German engineers converted a Tesla Model 3 into a hulking beast to take it off-roading. As seen in an eight minute YouTube video , the gearheads spent four weeks adding giant chain tracks to the car, turning an otherwise pedestrian sedan into a six-ton, fully electric off-roading rampager. As Elektrek points out , Teslas are popular conversions for off-road enthusiasts beca
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Madonna Releases Extremely Explicit NFT Collection
Let's cut to the chase: On a scale of 1 to Ozzy Osbourne , Madonna "Madonna" Ciconne's NFT scheme is maybe the least bad celebrity entrant into the space we've seen so far. The Material Girl herself released a collection of three porny video NFTs that'll be auctioned off for charity. Proceeds from the collection, titled "Mother of Creation," will go to the charities Voices of Children, City of Jo
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The Clearest Account Yet of How Trump's Team Botched the Pandemic
The U.S. response to the pandemic has already spawned a range of speedily published books. A few notable examples have come from masters of journalistic narrative, including Michael Lewis and Lawrence Wright ; former officials, such as Scott Gottlieb and Andy Slavitt ; and newspaper reporters, especially Yasmeen Abutaleb and Damian Paletta . But the most significant entry so far, the book that sh
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Housing costs skyrocket as SpaceX expands in Texas city
SpaceX plans to launch rockets near Brownsville, Texas, and send the first person to Mars from there. Seven years after breaking ground, residents say the only thing skyrocketing is housing prices. (Image credit: Gaige Davila/ Texas Public Radio )
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'Holy cow': scientists successfully grow plants in moon soil for the first time
Researchers at the University of Florida planted thale cress in harsh lunar dirt returned by Apollo 11 astronauts For the first time, scientists have grown plants in soil from the moon collected by Nasa 's Apollo astronauts. Researchers had no idea if anything would sprout in the harsh moon dirt and wanted to see if it could be used to grow food by a new generation of lunar explorers. The results
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Gang Violence Surging as Crypto Crashes in Bitcoin Country
Southbound While the value of Bitcoin continues its precipitous fall , El Salvador, the country that adopted Bitcoin as legal tender under its blockchain-loving president last year, is experiencing a surge in gang violence, Politico reports . Salvadorian President Nayib Bukele was unable to attend a big crypto conference in Miami last month because of gang violence that led to the largest single-
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Scientists Claim to Bring Dead Human Eye Cells Back to Life
Death is defined as the irreversible cessation of circulatory, respiratory or brain activity. At least, that's the definition scientists give in the first line of a new study in which they say they "woke up" light-sensing cells from human organ donors five hours after death, a breakthrough that could potentially allow scientists to extend the shelf life of donor organs and lead to new ways to tre
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The Crypto Crash Is Just the Start
Sign up for Derek's newsletter here . The American economy isn't looking great right now. U.S. GDP shrank last quarter, despite a hearty showing from American consumers. Inflation is high; markets are down; both wages and personal-savings rates show some troubling statistical signals. Is the U.S. destined to have a recession in 2022? I don't know for sure. But here are nine signs that worry me. 1
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Mark Zuckerberg Shows Off New AR Headset But Blurs It Out for Some Bizarre Reason
NSFW Headset Facebook emperor Mark Zuckerberg has teased the existence of his company Meta's latest mixed reality headset, dubbed Project Cambria. But for some reason, the device's physical design is still under wraps — as evidenced by the fact that the company chose to completely pixelate out the device in a short demo video shared by Zuckerberg yesterday. Which has us wondering: what is Meta hi
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Button pushers: the artists making music from mushrooms
Musicians and scientists armed with synths and electrodes are plugging in to mushrooms and cacti to encourage humans to reconnect with the Earth To musician Tarun Nayar, mushrooms sound squiggly and wonky. Nayar's "organismic music" project Modern Biology has only been active since last summer but, with his videos of mushrooms making calming ambient soundscapes, he's already racked up more than h
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The Abortion Policy Most Americans Want
The relationship between public opinion and the codification of rights is not linear. Public opinion lagged decades behind the courts on the question of interracial marriage, but led the way on same-sex marriage. In theory, rights supersede public opinion—you should have the right to free speech even if what you're saying is very unpopular. In practice, rights are safer when they are popular. Now
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It's Surprisingly Likely That You Have a Nasty Parasite in Your Eyeball
They say the eyes are the windows to the soul. And now, scientists say, it turns out they might also be windows to one of the world's preeminent parasites. In an essay for The Conversation , researchers described how they were able to detect infection from the Toxoplasma gondii parasite by studying thousands of retinal photographs, searching for signs of the sometimes eye-attacking disease. Toxop
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Boeing's Attempt to Compete With SpaceX Is Even More Cursed Than We Thought
Curses Boeing's Starliner , its crew capsule that rivals SpaceX's Crew Dragon spacecraft, has clearly been cursed from the start — and its most recent problems run far deeper than initial reports suggested. The good news is that there's still a chance Starliner is going to make its May 19 International Space Station launch date after ample turmoil, CNBC reports . The bad news is that the underlyi
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Enzyme in babies' blood linked to risk of sudden infant death syndrome
Scientists find babies who died from Sids had lower levels of BChE on average, but say link 'needs more investigation' Scientists may have come a step closer to uncovering the causes for sudden infant death syndrome in a study that has been hailed as a significant advance by the British scientist whose work underpinned the Back to Sleep campaign of the 1990s. The study is the first to identify a
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The U.S. Is About to Make a Big Gamble on Our Next COVID Winter
Up here in the Northern Hemisphere, the spring weather's just barely warming, but regulators in the United States are already wringing their hands over a tricksy fall brew: the contents of the COVID shot that vaccine makers are prepping for autumn, when all eligible Americans may be asked to dose up yet again (if, that is, Congress coughs up the money to actually buy the vaccines). In a recent ad
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HRT products could be sent to UK from mainland Europe next week
Regulator expected to consent to import of hormone replacement pills and patches from France Extra supplies of hormone replacement therapy products could be shipped to the UK from France and Poland as soon as next week, a major manufacturer has said after crisis meetings were held to address the nationwide shortage . Tina Backhouse, the general UK manager at Theramex, which makes about a dozen HR
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Actor Ezra Miller Claims They Filmed Alleged Assault to Turn It Into NFTs
Gone in a Flash Actor Ezra Miller, famed for their role in "The Flash," was apparently having a very normal one during their recent arrest in Hawaii, when they claimed they filmed an altercation to turn it into NFTs. As TMZ reports , Miller — with whom, in full disclosure, this reporter smoked weed at a house party in 2013, during which they seemed pretty chill — claimed during their March 29 arr
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A Mathematical Formula for the Right Time to Show Up at a Party
My role at parties is, unfortunately, to be the one who shows up way before everyone else. Even when I actively try to show up later, to seem more like a normal human, I still somehow end up among the first to walk in the door. I was generally spared this fate earlier in the pandemic, when many parties became dangerous and I had far fewer to attend. Now that parties are back for many people, so i
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The Devaluation of Care Work Is by Design
About a year into the pandemic, at an emotional low, I entered the hours I spent caring for my family and our home into the online Invisible Labor Calculator to see how much my work might be worth. It was created by the journalist Amy Westervelt, who used Bureau of Labor Statistics data to assign an hourly wage to different tasks—cleaning, considering the emotional needs of family members, doing
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A quick guide to the most important AI law you've never heard of
It's a Wild West out there for artificial intelligence. AI applications are increasingly used to make important decisions about humans' lives with little to no oversight or accountability. This can have devastating consequences: wrongful arrests , incorrect grades for students, and even financial ruin . Women, marginalized groups, and people of color often bear the brunt of AI's propensity for er
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Why the Right Went Quiet on Ukrainian Refugees
L ast summer, anti-immigration advocates mobilized in opposition to the resettlement of tens of thousands of Afghan refugees in the United States. "It threatens the national security of the United States," wrote Stephen Miller, the former top Donald Trump adviser. Miller charged in another tweet that President Joe Biden had "cruelly betrayed his oath of office" by expediting the entry of Afghans
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Is a Common Virus Suddenly Causing Liver Failure in Kids?
Last October, a young girl with severe and unusual liver failure was admitted to a hospital in Birmingham, Alabama. Her symptoms were typical: skin and eyes yellow with jaundice, markers of liver damage off the charts. But she tested negative for all the usual suspects behind liver disease . Her only positive test was, surprisingly, for adenovirus—a common virus best known for causing mild colds,
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The Swing Voters in the Culture War
Last month, Michigan state Senator Mallory McMorrow became an overnight sensation in progressive circles. After a colleague accused her of trying to "groom and sexualize kindergartners," McMorrow delivered a raw and emotional speech that neither shied away from progressive social stances nor consented to fighting the battle on that territory. "People who are different are not the reason that our
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Black hole winds are no longer as they used to be
During the first billion years of the universe, winds blown by supermassive black holes at the centers of galaxies were much more frequent and more powerful than those observed in today's galaxies, some 13 billion years later. Such winds were so mighty that they slowed down the growth of the supermassive black holes from which they originate. These are the results of a study led by three researche
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How dragonflies right themselves when dropped upside down
A trio of researchers, two with Cornell University, the other with Howard Hughes Medical Institute, has discovered the means by which dragonflies are able to right themselves so quickly from an upside-down orientation. In their paper published in the journal Science, Z. Jane Wang, James Melfi and Anthony Leonardo describe experiments they conducted with flying dragonflies and what they learned abo
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More efficient optical quantum gates
Future quantum computers are expected not only to solve particularly tricky computing tasks, but also to be connected to a network for the secure exchange of data. In principle, quantum gates could be used for these purposes. But until now, it has not been possible to realize them with sufficient efficiency. By a sophisticated combination of several techniques, researchers at the Max Planck Instit
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Mercury removal made easy in toxic environments
Mercury pollution is a global problem in water, air and soil near goldmines, cement and some metal production, and other heavy industries burning fossil fuels—with removal too expensive or difficult in some of the poorest countries in the world.
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New nanomechanical oscillators with record-low loss
The vibrational modes of nanomechanical resonators are analogous to different notes of a guitar string and have similar properties such as frequency (pitch) and lifetime. The lifetime is characterized by the quality factor, which is the number of times that the resonator oscillates until its energy is reduced by 70%. The quality factor is crucial for the modern applications of mechanical resonator
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'Underneath, Everything Has Changed'
T o avoid drawing unwanted attention , Tommy and the four others dressed as if they were heading out for a leisurely day. It was July 2020, and the weather was perfect for some time on the water. The young men acted as though they knew one another well, and were excited to reconnect. But inside, Tommy felt panicked and desperate. He was about to attempt an escape from Hong Kong, where he faced a
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'Phage therapy' successes boost fight against drug-resistant infections
Two US patients recover from intractable infections, giving hope for treatments beyond antibiotics Two US patients have recovered from intractable infections after being treated with a pioneering therapy involving genetically engineered bacteria-killing viruses. The cases raise hopes that so-called phage therapy could be used more widely to combat the global crisis of drug-resistant infections. O
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South Africa's April floods made twice as likely by climate crisis, scientists say
Brutal heatwave in India and Pakistan also certain to have been exacerbated by global heating, scientists say The massive and deadly floods that struck South Africa in April were made twice as likely and more intense by global heating, scientists have calculated. The research demonstrates that the climate emergency is resulting in devastation. Catastrophic floods and landslides hit the South Afri
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NASA Astronauts Say There Was a Bright Side to Almost Getting Blown Up
Hardly Phased Did you really think something as inconsequential as the threat of being destroyed by Russian space junk would phase NASA astronauts during their stay on board the International Space Station? Well, you'd only be sort of wrong. It's not that the crew of astronauts, who traveled to the station on SpaceX's Crew-3 mission, weren't worried about low-orbit debris created by Russia's anti
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'Groundbreaking': NHS advised to offer women tablet for fibroids
Nice recommends alternative to injections or surgery for treating non-cancerous growths in womb Thousands of women in England and Wales with fibroids are to be offered a new tablet to ease their symptoms as an alternative to injections or surgery. Fibroids are non-cancerous growths that develop in or around the womb. About one in three women develop them at some point in their life. They most oft
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Study shows that when a tissue curves, the volume of the cells that compose it increases
How do our cells organize themselves to give their final shape to our organs? The answer lies in morphogenesis, the set of mechanisms that regulate their distribution in space during embryonic development. A team from the University of Geneva (UNIGE) has just made a surprising discovery in this field: when a tissue curves, the volume of the cells that compose it increases instead of decreasing. Th
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A World Without iPods
Plus: An interview with Steve Jobs, keeping up with early MIT hackers, and a relatable collapse.
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Study finds disparities in natural gas leak prevalence in US urban areas
A Colorado State University-led study published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology reveals that in U.S. cities over a several-year period, natural gas pipeline leaks were more prevalent in neighborhoods with low-income or majority non-white populations than those with high income or predominately white populations.
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Book Review: The Toxic Legacy of DDT
In "How to Sell a Poison," medical historian Elena Conis chronicles the history of the infamous pesticide and its lasting impact on public health and the environmental movement, showing how concerns were raised long before Rachel Carson's "Silent Spring" became a catalyst for activists in the 1960s.
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A gene in tuberculosis bacteria is found essential for siderophore secretion and virulence
Lei Zhang, Ph.D., and Michael Niederweis, Ph.D., of the University of Alabama at Birmingham have made what they call "a major step" in understanding how Mycobacterium tuberculosis acquires iron from its human host—a process essential for the pathogenesis of this bacterium. Tuberculosis kills more than 1 million people each year, but without iron, M. tuberculosis cannot grow.
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Researchers develop 3D-printed shape memory alloy with superior superelasticity
Laser powder bed fusion, a 3D-printing technique, offers potential in the manufacturing industry, particularly when fabricating nickel-titanium shape memory alloys with complex geometries. Although this manufacturing technique is attractive for applications in the biomedical and aerospace fields, it has rarely showcased the superelasticity required for specific applications using nickel-titanium s
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Any research that uses theoretical statistics or computational learning theory to model learning?
Let me elaborate. I am interested in research that uses concepts from theoretical statistics (such as sufficiency, Fisher information, bounds of estimation) or concepts from computational learning theory (such as PAC) to model learning in humans. A quick google search did not bring me any closer to such studies. It would be preferable if the studies are theoretical in nature, where a model is pro
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Best Car Speakers of 2022
A good set of speakers for your car is one of the best upgrades you can make if you spend lots of time driving. Concert-quality sound will shorten your commute or make stop-and-go traffic tolerable. On a road trip, your favorite music becomes a soundtrack for your adventure. Even running around town becomes more enjoyable when your speakers deliver clear sound, letting you sing along. Car speaker
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More states want power to approve wetlands development
In 2020, Florida became just the third state—and the first in decades—to take over management of a key federal Clean Water Act program. Now, state rather than federal officials decide whether companies can dredge and fill wetlands and waterways for projects ranging from mining to housing developments to roads and bridges.
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This is the first image of the black hole at our galaxy's center
Astronomers have unveiled the first image of the supermassive black hole at the center of our own Milky Way galaxy. This result provides overwhelming evidence that the object is indeed a black hole and yields valuable clues about the workings of such giants, which are thought to reside at the center of most galaxies. A global research team called the Event Horizon Telescope Collaboration produced
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Open Now: A Forest for the Trees
A forest grows in downtown Los Angeles. Opening today with a limited run through summer 2022, A Forest for the Trees is an immersive art show created and directed by visionary artist Glenn Kaino , together with The Atlantic and Superblue, that is designed to inspire audiences to reimagine their relationship with the natural world. A Forest for the Trees is open to all ages, and tickets are on sal
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A single hormone directs body's responses to low-protein diet
A single hormone appears to coordinate the lifespan extension produced by a low-protein diet. Low-protein diets produce beneficial metabolic effects in aged mice, improving metabolic health, reducing frailty, and extending lifespan. These beneficial effects were also apparent when protein intake was reduced in middle-aged mice, even protecting against the detriments of obesity. Importantly, these
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Malaria parasites form vortices
Researchers managed to set larger groups of malaria parasites into motion and to analyze the acquired image data. The collectively moving pathogens form vortex systems that are largely determined by physical principles. Computer simulations helped identify the mechanisms underlying these rotating movements.
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Bear Grylls Looks for Bird Eggs in 110 Degree Heat | Man vs Wild
Stream Man vs. Wild on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/man-vs-wild #ManVsWild #BearGrylls #Survival Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery From: Disco
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Development of a novel large-scale manufacturing technology for sulfide solid electrolytes
A research group in the doctoral program of Toyohashi University of Technology's Department of Electrical and Electronic Information Engineering that includes a doctoral student Hirotada Gamo and specially appointed assistant professor Jin Nishida, specially appointed associate professor Atsushi Nagai, assistant professor Kazuhiro Hikima, professor Atsunori Matsuda and others, developed a large-sc
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The pandemic-accelerated digitization of the automotive supply chain
Thank you for joining us on "The cloud hub: From cloud chaos to clarity." Read this conversation with Matthias Haberstroh, director of supply chain management at ZF Group, where he discusses the pandemic's impact on the digitalization of the automotive supply chain and how it will define the future of the industry. Click here to continue.
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Going gentle on mechanical quantum systems
Systems in which mechanical motion is controlled at the level of individual quanta are emerging as a promising quantum-?technology platform. New experimental work now establishes how quantum properties of such systems can be measured without destroying the quantum state — a key ingredient for tapping the full potential of mechanical quantum systems.
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New aircraft structures production technology has increased their strength
Scientists from NUST MISIS have developed a method of producing composite parts for the aerospace industry, which has increased the strength of finished products by 15% due to a combination of laser technologies and isostatic pressing. The results of the study have been published in The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology.
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Seasonal variations of methane consuming and methane producing microbial communities contribute to emissions
Wetland ecosystems are the most important and prolific natural methane (CH4) sources. CH4 is constantly flowing in and out of these regions (flux), and that flow periodically fluctuates. Methanogens (methane producers) and methanotrophs (methane consumers) are microorganisms that influence CH4 fluxes in wetlands. However, the mutual, or symbiotic relationship between methanogens and methanotrophs
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Enhancing agent experience with AI contact centers
Thank you for joining us on "The cloud hub: From cloud chaos to clarity." Contact centers hold significant value for businesses, but they often have to deal with a disengaged workforce and unsatisfied customers. New AI systems can help contact centers become future-ready with a smarter workforce, happier customers, and stronger finances. Click here to continue.
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Terahertz near-field microscopy based on an air-plasma dynamic aperture
As a novel far-infrared inspection method, the development of terahertz (THz) imaging technology has attracted considerable attention in recent years. With the unique properties of THz radiation, such as non-ionizing photon energies and broad spectral information, this imaging technique has shown powerful application potential in many fundamental research and industrial fields. However, the resolu
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Study finds soil composition isn't key to southeast Raleigh flooding
Some types of soil act more like concrete than a sponge, allowing water to flow off to flood streams, creeks and rivers. However, a recent study by North Carolina State University researchers suggests recurrent problematic flooding in part of Raleigh is more likely due to the amount and location of paved surface in the area, rather than to the composition of soil.
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Exploring chemical logic systems that can respond to environmental conditions
The ability to process information obtained from their immediate environment helps organisms perform difficult tasks. Even the simplest form of life (a single cell), can sense various chemical and physical stimuli and process this information through their intrinsic complex intracellular logic to perform complicated cellular functions such as cell division, cell motility, and cargo transport.
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Development of high-durability single-atomic catalyst using industrial humidifier
Fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) are an eco-friendly means of transportation that will replace internal combustion locomotives. FCEVs offer several advantages such as short charging time and long mileage. However, the excessive cost of platinum used as a fuel cell catalyst leads to limited supply of FCEVs. There has been extensive research on non-precious metal catalysts such as iron and cobalt
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An optoelectronic thermometer based on microscale infrared-to-visible conversion devices
High-accuracy spatially and temporally resolved temperature sensing is critical and has broad applications in diverse fields, such as industrial manufacturing, environmental protection, and healthcare monitoring. Optical-based sensors offer attractive solutions for temperature monitoring in biomedical diagnostics, owing to their advantages of remote detection, minimal intrusion, immunity to electr
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A vertical matrix X-ray detector for multi-energy discrimination
There are three types of cone cells in the retina that are called L-cones (sensitive to red light), M-cones (sensitive to green light), and S-cones (sensitive to blue light). The coordinated response of cone cells to visible light in the wavelength range of 400-780 nm lets us see the colorful world. In the wavelength range of invisible X-ray (1 pm—10 nm), X-ray detectors perform the same function
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Physics and applications of Raman distributed optical fiber sensing
Raman distributed optical fiber sensing has been demonstrated to be a mature and versatile scheme that presents great flexibility and effectivity for the distributed temperature measurement of a wide range of engineering applications. The past decades have witnessed its rapid development and extensive applicability ranging from scientific research to industrial manufacturing.
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How variability shapes learning and generalization
Variability is crucially important for learning new skills. Consider learning how to serve in tennis. Should you always practice serving from the exact same location on the court, aiming at exactly the same spot? Although practicing in more variable conditions will be slower at first, it will likely make you a better tennis player in the end. This is because variability leads to better generalizat
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Video: Gaia, the billion star surveyor
ESA's Gaia space telescope revolutionizes our understanding of the Milky Way. It scans the sky to measure the position, movement, distance, and characteristics of billions of stars.
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Deindustrialization as fact and fiction
The declining importance of manufacturing in rich societies is associated with deep concerns, but also with the hope of opening up new opportunities for economic development. As a result, predictions of a structural change from an industrial to a service society have repeatedly been the subject of political conflicts. To understand how social power structures and conflicts influence such future sc
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Four shades of deglobalization
In very recent times, an earthquake in Japan, a blackout in Texas, the grounding of a container ship in the Suez Canal, the pandemic, and the war in Ukraine have disrupted important supply chains, restricting the flow of essential goods such as microchips, gas, and food, and thus calling into question globalization as we have known it for the past 40 years—starting, that is, with the reforms of Ro
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Sweet lime oils defeat pests
Citrus peel and pulp is a growing waste problem in the food industry and in the home. However, there is potential to extract something useful from it. Work in the International Journal of Environment and Waste Management describes a simple steam distillation method that uses a domestic pressure cooker to extract useful essential oils from the peel of sweet lime (mosambi, Citrus limetta).
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Responsible adoption of AI in a cloud environment
Thank you for joining us on "The cloud hub: From cloud chaos to clarity." The transformative potential of algorithmic systems, the reach of their effects, combined with the paucity of supervision, can bring certain reputational, financial, and ethical risks. Responsible AI is required to provide assurance to users and build continuous trust in AI-based systems. Click here to continue.
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Microbes help orchestrate how the gut uses its genes
The microbes that help break down food actually tell the gut how to do its job better, according to a new study in mice. The researchers said it appears that the microbes are able to influence which of the gut's genes are being called into action, and in turn, that interaction might lead to a remodeling of the epithelial cells lining the gut so that they match the diet.
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Our cells take their ease in the curves
How do our cells organize themselves to give their final shape to our organs? The answer lies in morphogenesis, the set of mechanisms that regulate their distribution in space during embryonic development. A team has just made a surprising discovery in this field: when a tissue curves, the volume of the cells that compose it increases instead of decreasing. This discovery opens new avenues for in
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When quan­tum par­ti­cles fly like bees
A quantum system with only 51 charged atoms can take on more than two quadrillion different states. Calculating the system's behavior is child's play for a quantum simulator. But verifying the result is almost impossible, even with today's supercomputers. A research team has now shown how these systems can be verified using equations formulated in the 18th century.
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Decoding the leaf: Scientists search for features to ID modern, fossil leaves
Machine learning programs that can classify leaves and place them in biological families may unlock new clues about the evolution of plant life, but only if scientists understand what the computers are seeing. A team led by Penn State scientists combined a machine learning approach and traditional botanical language to find and describe new features for fossil identification.
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How sleep helps to process emotions
Researchers have identified how the brain triages emotions during dream sleep to consolidate the storage of positive emotions while dampening the consolidation of negative ones. The work expands the importance of sleep in mental health and opens new ways of therapeutic strategies.
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Rigid waterproof coating for paper aims to reduce our dependence on plastic
For our sake and the environment, there is a considerable amount of research into the reduction of plastic for many and various applications. Researchers have now found a way to imbue relatively sustainable paper materials with some of the useful properties of plastic. This can be done easily, cost effectively, and efficiently. A coating called Choetsu not only waterproofs paper, but also maintain
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Towards more efficient, non-toxic, and flexible thin-film solar cells
While solar cells are a great alternative to fossil fuels, the environmental impact of the processes involved in manufacturing solar cells has been a concern. Solar panel fabrication often involves toxic materials such as cadmium and industrial waste. In a new study, researchers have now developed an eco-friendly method that eliminates the use of toxic cadmium in the production process to produce
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Custom program increases healthy eating for families with Mexican roots
New research shows that kids with Mexican roots consumed fewer sugary beverages, French fries, and fast food and ate more vegetables after participating in Abriendo Caminos, a culturally-tailored education program with their families. Abriendo Caminos (Opening Roads), aims to help Hispanic families lead healthier lives by weaving traditions and personal values into lessons on nutrition, physical
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Research warns to beware of your alliance partners' acquisitions
Alliances and acquisitions are often considered separately and managed by different units, but Dovev Lavie (Bocconi University, Milan) warns that "alliance managers should monitor their partners' acquisitions and study their acquisition targets in order to identify competitive threats and opportunities for synergies. Similarly, managers in the acquiring organization should assess the implications
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Enabling new possibilities for manufacturers by unlocking the value of data from cloud
Thank you for joining us on "The cloud hub: From cloud chaos to clarity." Watch this panel discussion to hear experts explain how global manufacturers can harness the power of data and analytics on top of cloud. Panel experts include: Scott Anderson, director of IT, enterprise architecture, and BI/data analytics apps, and automation CoE at John Deere; Baledev Marepally, IT leader of analytics and
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The Loch Ness monster: A modern history
Reports of Loch Ness monster sightings keep coming. The latest report, accompanied by a video, is of a 20–30ft long creature occasionally breaking the water's surface. Although the video clearly shows a moving v-shaped wake it does not reveal the underlying source. The witnesses certainly saw something, but what?
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Paper or plastic? Rigid waterproof coating for paper aims to reduce our dependence on plastic
There is a considerable amount of research into the reduction of plastic for many and various applications. For the first time, researchers have found a way to imbue relatively sustainable paper materials with some of the useful properties of plastic. This can be done easily, cost effectively, and efficiently. A coating called Choetsu not only waterproofs paper, but also maintains its flexibility
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Not all is rosy for the pink pigeon
The authors of a major study on the once critically endangered pink pigeon say boosting the species' numbers is not enough to save it from extinction in the future. Despite the population increase, the team's analysis shows the pink pigeon has a high genetic load of bad mutations, which puts it at considerable risk of extinction in the wild within 100 years without continued conservation actions.
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How to pick a great scientific collaborator
Nature, Published online: 13 May 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01323-9 A simple framework can help you to identify 'likeable freeloaders' and 'misaligned partners' — and to self-assess.
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Could we learn to love slugs and snails in our gardens?
Before you squash or poison the next slug or snail you see in your garden, consider this: The British Royal Horticultural Society no longer classifies these gastropods as pests. Why on earth would a leading gardening organization do that, you might wonder. After all, slugs and snails are usually seen as a problem, given their eagerness to devour the plants you've lovingly nurtured.
6h
Trees aren't a climate change cure-all: Two new studies on the life and death of trees in a warming world show why
When people talk about ways to slow climate change, they often mention trees, and for good reason. Forests take up a large amount of the planet-warming carbon dioxide that people put into the atmosphere when they burn fossil fuels. But will trees keep up that pace as global temperatures rise? With companies increasingly investing in forests as offsets, saying it cancels out their continuing greenh
6h
Best 85-Inch TVs in 2022
The best 85-inch TVs are strictly for anyone looking to make their entertainment center dazzle friends and amaze enemies. Televisions in the 80-inch range are about as big as screens get for civilians. It's not just screen size getting an upgrade, these televisions are packed with power that makes even 60-inch screens feel primitive. Yes, they're extremely pricey, but newer models are made to be
6h
How to grow plants on the moon
What do you need to make your garden grow? As well as plenty of sunshine alternating with gentle showers of rain—and busy bees and butterflies to pollinate the plants—you need good, rich soil to provide essential minerals. But imagine you had no rich soil, or showers of rain, or bees and butterflies. And the sunshine was either too harsh and direct or absent—causing freezing temperatures.
6h
A metasurface-based light-to-microwave transmitter for hybrid wireless communications
Today, wireless communications play an increasingly important role in our daily lives. For future "freewheeling" sixth generation (6G) wireless communications, the hybrid communication systems that can exploit advantages of both optical and microwave wireless technologies are critical. However, the traditional hybrid communication systems typically require a complicated relay to perform multiple o
6h
On-chip photodetection: Two-dimensional material heterojunctions
Photonic integrated circuits (PICs) use photons as information carriers and are expected to solve the bottleneck problems of microelectronic chips in terms of speed, power consumption and integration density with their advantages of ultra-high transmission speed, low delay, and anti-electromagnetic crosstalk. They are of key significance to promoting breakthroughs in microelectronics technology, q
6h
Novel zeolites-silver catalyst boosts formaldehyde oxidation at low temperatures
A research group led by Prof. Xiao Jianping and Assoc. Prof. Jiao Feng from the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), in collaboration with Prof. Qu Zhenping from Dalian University of Technology, designed a tandem bifunctional zeolites-silver (Ag) catalyst that could boost formaldehyde oxidation at low temperatures.
6h
Mapping heat flow beneath Greenland highlights geothermal 'freak zone'
In our understanding of global geothermal heat flow, Greenland and the surrounding ocean floor has effectively been a blind spot. Now, scientist have dug up all available and somewhat unavailable heat flow data, creating common ground for working with Greenland geothermal heat as an alternative energy source, a factor in melting of the ice cap and much more.
6h
Pink pigeons in Mauritius made a remarkable comeback from near-extinction, but are still losing genetic diversity
In the 1980s there were just ten or so pink pigeons left in the wild. Known to scientists as Nesoenas mayeri, the species is found only on Mauritius, the Indian Ocean island that was once home to the dodo. Like the dodo, the pink pigeon made an easy target for cats, rats and other predators introduced by humans, who also chopped down almost all of their native forest. Unlike the dodo, however, the
6h
Structure of key protein for cell division puzzles researchers
Human cell division involves hundreds of proteins at its core. Knowing the 3D structure of these proteins is pivotal to understand how our genetic material is duplicated and passed through generations. The groups of Andrea Musacchio and Stefan Raunser at the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology in Dortmund are now able to reveal the first detailed structure of a key protein complex for hum
6h
Algae reveal clues about climate changes over millions of years
Organisms adjust their cell walls according to environmental conditions such as temperature. Some adaptations involve changes in lipids, which may still be preserved long after the rest of the organisms has been degraded. Researchers at the University of Göttingen studied a specific group of lipids called long chain diols, which are found in sea sediments all over the world, and which can be prese
6h
Cardiac progenitor cells generate healthy tissue after a heart attack
Following a heart attack, the human body is incapable of repairing lost tissue due to the heart's inability to generate new muscle. However, treatment with heart progenitor cells could result in the formation of functional heart cells at injured sites. This new therapeutic approach may be tested in clinical studies within the next two years.
6h
A New Space Academy in Colorado Will Train Private-Industry Astronauts
There are still plenty of technical hurdles to cross to achieve a vibrant space economy, but one less-discussed barrier to progress could be space-ready manpower. That's why a group of astronauts, engineers, and entrepreneurs have teamed up to create the world's first private space academy. Last year saw some major milestones for the private space industry as multiple companies conducted their fi
6h
US fish stocks continue era of rebuilding and recovery
Today, NOAA released the 2021 Status of Stocks report, highlighting the efforts to rebuild and recover U.S. fisheries by providing a snapshot of the more than 460 stocks managed by NOAA Fisheries. In addition, NOAA issued an update to the Fisheries of the United States report, which provides details about the economic impacts of fisheries, and tracks annual seafood consumption and the productivity
6h
The crime-fighting power of cross-border investigative journalism | Bektour Iskender
Organized crime operates across national borders — to keep up, investigative journalists need to do the same. TED Fellow Bektour Iskender gives the inside scoop on his efforts to unveil secret, insidious operations in his home country of Kyrgyzstan, and how he worked with a team of journalists to uncover corruption and spark a national movement. He shares three key insights on how global networks
6h
How non-deadly parasites create greener ecosystems
Non-deadly parasites cause deer, caribou, bison, and other similar animals to eat less, research finds. In an interesting twist, this means that a world with more sublethal parasitic infections is a greener world. "Parasites are well known for their negative impacts on the physiology and behavior of individual hosts and host populations, but these effects are rarely considered within the context
6h
Tadpoles for dinner? Indigenous community in Mexico reveals a favorite recipe for a particular frog
Stone soup (caldo de piedra) is a traditional meal from the Indigenous Chinantla region in the state of Oaxaca, Mexico. Prepared by men, it is made by placing tomato, cilantro, chili peppers, onion, raw fish, salt, and water in a jicara (a bowl made from the fruit of the calabash tree) in a hole dug near a river. Then, the ingredients are cooked by adding red hot rocks to the "pot."
7h
ICE Found Effectively Operating as Domestic Spy Agency
(Photo: Tobias Tullius/Unsplash) If Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) didn't have a bad enough rap sheet already, it's now worse: a law school out of Washington, DC has revealed the agency has been operating as a "domestic surveillance agency" for years. Georgetown Law's Center on Privacy and Technology has been spending the last two years examining ICE's behavior through internal agency
7h
Go Off-Grid With Jackery's New High-Capacity Generator and Solar Panels
Jackery announced the Solo Generator 2000 Pro and SolarSaga 200W portable solar panel at an event held in New York City on May 10. Both gadgets are are bundled together in a $6,199 package that can help ease your reliance on the electrical grid, or provide power in situations where you won't be near an electrical line, like camping. The Solo Generator 2000 Pro is an ultra high-capacity battery eq
7h
Tiling mechanisms of the Drosophila compound eye through geometrical tessellation
Tile patterns in which the same shape is laid out without gaps can be seen on castle walls and chess boards in artificial objects, and in insect compound eyes and beehives in biology. Square tiles are common in artificial objects, while hexagonal tiles occur in living things. It was thought that this was due to the physical characteristics of the hexagon being structurally robust, the circumferenc
7h
Milky Way's black hole was 'birth cry' of radio astronomy
The first image of the supermassive black hole at the center of our Milky Way galaxy brings radio astronomy back to its celestial birthplace. The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT), a worldwide collection of millimeter-wave radio telescopes, made the new, landmark image of the same region from which came the first cosmic radio waves ever detected. That detection, by Bell Telephone Laboratories engineer
7h
The Allure of the Campus Novel
Why are so many writers drawn to campus novels? In a 2006 article, Megan Marshall writes that the genre is "escape reading." Citing older works such as The Harrad Experiment and 3 in the Attic , Marshall sees many college novels as "fumbling and sophomoric confessionals." That's certainly changed. Campus novels today have expanded beyond the confines of the Ivy League and deal with some of our so
7h
This Week In Space: We Can Still Have Nice Things
This image shows the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) looking up at the Milky Way as well as the location of Sagittarius A*, the supermassive black hole at our galactic centre. Highlighted in the box is the image of Sagittarius A* taken by the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) Collaboration. Located in the Atacama Desert in Chile, ALMA is the most sensitive of all the observatories
7h
Study of zebrafish ovaries reveals new structure vital for normal egg development
It is humbling to realize that we humans share about 70% of our genes with zebrafish. There are also a whole host of other similarities that make these small transparent fish an ideal animal model for the study of many human diseases and biological processes. In the lab of Dr. Yaniv Elkouby at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU)'s Faculty of Medicine, the focus is on the development of the imm
7h
Study reveals evolution of crab group Thoracotremata
Thoracotremata (Brachyura, Decapoda) is the most derived crab group, encompassing 1,248 extant species. It currently comprises four superfamilies: Grapsoidea MacLeay, Ocypodoidea Rafinesque, Cryptochiroidea Paulson and Pinnotheroidea De Haan.
7h
Cilia on coral reef polyps found to generate horizontal currents
A large international team of researchers has found that cilia on coral reef polyps generate horizontal currents that are used to carry mucus across the surface of a reef. In their paper published in the journal Current Biology, the group describes how they discovered the currents generated by the cilia and experiments they conducted to learn more about their purpose.
8h
A shrinking fraction of the world's major crops goes to feed the hungry, with more used for nonfood purposes
Rising competition for many of the world's important crops is sending increasing amounts toward uses other than directly feeding people. These competing uses include making biofuels; converting crops into processing ingredients, such as livestock meal, hydrogenated oils and starches; and selling them on global markets to countries that can afford to pay for them.
8h
Some jumping spiders spot blood-red mosquito bellies
A species of jumping spider in Kenya appears to use the blood-red abdomen of mosquitoes to target them as prey. "They're such tiny animals, with an even tinier brain, and a sensory system that we don't quite understand," says Lisa Taylor, an entomologist at the University of Florida. Taylor and collaborators examined the dietary preferences of an East African jumping spider, Evarcha culicivora .
8h
Spindlar i norr har undkommit insektsdöden
Antalet insekter i Europa har minskat dramatiskt under de senaste decennierna. Men inte i fjällbjörkskogen i västerbottniska Ammarnäs. Här finns lika många spindlar och insekter som på 60-talet, visar en långtidsstudie. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
9h
The Download: Europe's ambitious AI Act, and picturing our galaxy's black hole
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. A quick guide to the most important AI law you've never heard of It's a Wild West out there for artificial intelligence. AI applications are increasingly used to make important decisions about humans' lives with little to no oversight or accountability. The Eu
9h
Scientists Grow Plants in Lunar Soil
After years of requesting tiny samples of lunar soil, plant scientists at the University of Florida were finally granted 12 grams to work with (out of the 382 kg brought back during the Apollo missions). They had proposed a simple experiment – could seeds germinate and plants grow in lunar soil? It turns out the answer is yes, sort of. The researchers used Arabidopsis, or rockcress, which is a ge
9h
'Diversity in brain research: Does it matter?' – Meet DIRPA Winner Sanne Peters
Join us on 18 May for the 'Diversity in brain research: Does it matter?' webinar! Register here: https://www.humanbrainproject.eu/en/follow-hbp/news/2022/05/09/webinar-18-may-2022-diversity-brain-research-does-it-matter/ In this webinar, the Human Brain Project encourages scientists to consider sex, gender and additional diversity factors in neuroscience and related fields: because biology, socia
10h
An Ode to Chewing Gum
E ver broken a piece of gum? Broken its spirit, I mean. Chewed it for so long, and with such absentminded, mechanical fury, that its molecular structure finally collapses and it dissolves into a kind of traumatized putty in your mouth. I've done this only once in my life, after a night of what we used to call "raving" (dance floors, chemicals) in London, but it impressed me greatly. First I was i
10h
Chemists synthesize psychotropic compound from rainforest tree
The bark of the Galbulimima belgraveana tree, found only in remote rainforests of Papua New Guinea and northern Australia, has long been used by indigenous people for both healing and ceremony. A tea brewed from the bark not only induces a dreamlike state but is said to ease pain and fever. To probe these effects, researchers have isolated more than 40 unique chemicals from the tree bark but have
10h
Plants Can Grow in Lunar Soil, But They Suck at It
The hawksbill sea turtle. (Photo: Francesco Gallarotti/Unsplash) It's human nature to attempt to grow plants outside of their native habitats. (The tropical monstera in my living room can attest to that.) So it's no surprise that scientists have attempted to grow plants in soil from the Moon. Of course, they didn't do it just to see if they could. The researchers—two horticulturists and a geologi
11h
Tackling malaria transmission at a single cell level in an endemic setting in sub-Saharan Africa
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30268-w Studying malaria transmission biology using scRNA-sequencing provides information on within-host strain diversity and transcriptional states. Here, we comment on our collaborative efforts at establishing single-cell capacities in sub-Saharan Africa and the challenges encountered in Mali's endemic setting.
12h
A broader perspective on the economics of malaria prevention and the potential impact of SARS-CoV-2
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30273-z Economic evaluations of public health interventions to prevent malaria should consider the adoption of wider perspectives and the inclusion of non-health impacts, particularly economic development outcomes, such as education. This is especially relevant in malaria elimination settings and in the context of the cu
12h
Malaria in 2022: Increasing challenges, cautious optimism
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30133-w Malaria cases and deaths remain unacceptably high and are resurgent in several settings, though recent developments inspire optimism. This includes the approval of the world's first malaria vaccine and results from novel vaccine candidates and trials testing innovative combinatorial interventions.
12h
Mechanical instability generated by Myosin 19 contributes to mitochondria cristae architecture and OXPHOS
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30431-3 The structure of the mitochondrial inner membrane, or cristae, is important for functional oxidative phosphorylation and energy production. Here, the authors show that loss of myosin 19 impairs cristae structure as well as energy production, connecting motor activity to membrane potential.
12h
Gravitational Waves Might Allow Us to Detect Earthquakes at the Speed of Light
Fukushima Daiichi punched a hole in Toshiba's nuclear ambitions. Earthquakes are, by their very nature, impossible to predict. The best we can hope for is an early warning system that gives people a chance to take cover, but that chance is usually measured in seconds or minutes. Cosmology research might provide a better way. A team from Côte d'Azur University developed a machine learning algorith
12h
Storm chasers face host of dangers beyond severe weather
The deaths of four storm chasers in car crashes over the last two weeks have underscored the dangers of pursuing severe weather events as more people clog back roads and highways searching for a glimpse of a lightning bolt or tornado, meteorologists and chasers say.
13h
Forskare jagar svaret på ökningen av akut svår hepatit hos barn
I slutet av mars rapporterades de första fallen av akut svår hepatit av okänd orsak hos barn i Storbritannien. Sedan dess, och till dags dato, har antalen ökat till fler än 450 i ett tjugoåtta länder och även i Sverige rapporteras nu om 9 misstänkta fall. Den akuta leverinflammationen drabbar framför allt barn under 16 år som i övrigt är helt friska, vilket förbryllar forskarna som nu söker svar p
13h
Schneider Shorts 13.05.2022 – Insatiable Quacks
Schneider Shorts 13.05.2022 – three long shorts about various biomedical professors with very little ethics but with a lot of love for money, one long short about russia's "bioweapon" Big Lie now including antivaxxery and antisemitism, and finally, some music!
16h
Online Brain and Music Symposium with Cody Fry
Hello! We are the UBC Brain and Music Student Group. On May 14 at 0900 PST, we're assembling a symposium, "In Tune with Your Brain". We aim to explore the dynamic between neuroscience, arts, medicine, and the communal nature of music across all disciplines. Headlined by keynote speaker and Grammy-nominated Cody Fry, it will be virtually broadcasted at no cost. The event is geared towards students
19h
Event Horizon Telescope Releases Jaw-dropping First Images of Sagittarius A*
This is the first image of Sgr A*, the supermassive black hole at the centre of our galaxy, with an added black background to fit wider screens. It's the first direct visual evidence of the presence of this black hole. It was captured by the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT), an array which linked together eight existing radio observatories across the planet to form a single "Earth-sized" virtual tel
23h
Fish and humans: A new approach to Bloom syndrome research
Researchers at Eötvös Loránd University (ELTE) have created a new disease model that has contributed to a better understanding of Bloom syndrome and the sex determination processes of zebrafish. The study, linking two seemingly unrelated topics, was carried out by the research teams of Mihály Kovács (Department of Biochemistry) and Máté Varga (Department of Genetics) and published in the scientifi
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NASA's ECOSTRESS detects 'heat islands' in extreme Indian heat wave
A relentless heat wave has blanketed India and Pakistan since mid-March, causing dozens of deaths, fires, increased air pollution, and reduced crop yields. Weather forecasts show no prospect of relief any time soon. NASA's Ecosystem Spaceborne Thermal Radiometer Experiment on Space Station instrument (ECOSTRESS) has been measuring these temperatures from space, at the highest spatial resolution of
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Image: A small sombrero for Hubble
NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has allowed astronomers to view galaxies of all shapes and sizes from nearly every angle. When a galaxy is seen edge-on, the mesmerizing perspective reveals a dazzling slice of the universe. The "Little Sombrero," also known as NGC 7814 or Caldwell 43, is one such galaxy.
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Hunga volcano eruption provides an explosion of data
The massive Jan. 15, 2022, eruption of the Hunga submarine volcano in the South Pacific Ocean created a variety of atmospheric wave types, including booms heard 6,200 miles away in Alaska. It also created an atmospheric pulse that caused an unusual tsunami-like disturbance that arrived at Pacific shores sooner than the actual tsunami.
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