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Nyheder2022maj17

A new law unchains fusion energy
Physicists at EPFL, within a large European collaboration, have revised one of the fundamental laws that has been foundational to plasma and fusion research for over three decades, even governing the design of megaprojects like ITER. The update shows that we can actually safely use more hydrogen fuel in fusion reactors, and therefore obtain more energy than previously thought.
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Protein linked to intellectual disability has complex role
Researchers have identified a previously unknown function for the fragile X protein, the loss of which is the leading inherited cause of intellectual disability. The researchers showed that the protein modulates how neurons in the brain's memory center process information, a central part of learning and memory.
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LATEST

Experts Say That Elon Musk Has No Idea How Math Works
Elon Musk, the CEO of Tesla and SpaceX, and possibly the future owner of Twitter , has a plan to figure out just how many fake accounts there actually are on the social media platform: by asking users to literally count them individually, a plan that experts say is a fool's errand, CNBC reports . In fact, his plan sounded so unbelievable on the face of it that said experts are now convinced Musk
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Elon Musk Has a Ridiculous Excuse for Why He Suddenly Doesn't Want to Buy Twitter
Tesla CEO Elon Musk is doubling down on his demands that Twitter "show proof" that less than five percent of users on the platform are bots. Otherwise, he said of his thunderous attempts to buy the social media platform , "this deal cannot move forward." Let's be honest, though. It doesn't take much reading between the lines to interpret this as Musk looking for a way out of spending $44 billion
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Retired General Accidentally Tweets Video Game Footage Thinking It's Real
Four Star Gullible Retired US four star general Barry McCaffrey, who also served as the Director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy under the Bill Clinton administration and makes regular TV appearances as an expert on military affairs, shared a video yesterday of what he said was a "Russian aircraft getting nailed by [Ukraine] missile defense" on Twitter — only to realize minutes late
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Why the Internet Hates Amber Heard
A shadow box above Rebecca's dining-room table, hanging there since 2006 , displays an autographed copy of the Pirates of the Caribbean script—signed by Keira Knightley, Orlando Bloom, and Johnny Depp. Though Rebecca, at age 36, is emphatically no longer a Depp fan, she says she keeps the script on her wall as a conversation starter. If someone asks about it, maybe she'll go into the full story,
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A creator-led internet, built on blockchain | Adam Mosseri
As digital assets like cryptocurrency and NFTs become more mainstream, design thinker and head of Instagram Adam Mosseri believes that creators are uniquely positioned to benefit. These blockchain-enabled technologies could remove the need for a "middleman" in the form of large social media platforms, allowing creators to more freely distribute their work and connect with their audiences. He expla
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Quantum magnets in motion
The behavior of microscopic quantum magnets has long been a subject taught in lectures in theoretical physics. However, investigating the dynamics of systems that are far out of equilibrium and watching them "live" has been difficult so far. Now, researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics in Garching have accomplished precisely this, using a quantum gas microscope. With this tool, q
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Komodo National Park is home to some of the world's largest manta ray aggregations, study shows
Through a collaborative effort including the public, scientists from the Marine Megafauna Foundation and Murdoch University are reporting a large number of manta rays in the waters of Komodo National Park, an Indonesian UNESCO World Heritage Site, suggesting the area may hold the key to regional recovery of the threatened species.
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FDA announces plans to ease the shortage of baby formula
Abbott, one of the largest formula-makers in the U.S., has reached an agreement with the government to bring a closed factory back on line. And the FDA is easing some restrictions on imported formula. (Image credit: Scott Olson/Getty Images)
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We need a definitive exit from our Covid-19 pandemic. Here's the roadmap | Eric Topol
Nasal or oral coronavirus vaccines, more and better drugs, and a variant-proof vaccine could catalyze a clear way out As the virus accelerates its evolution, the humans capitulate. For two and a half years, Covid-19 has been outrunning our response, getting more and more transmissible, reaching a level of infectiousness that few pathogens have ever attained. Instead of taking a stance of getting
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Scientists Say Organisms Trapped in This Ancient Rock May Still Be Alive
Prehistory We don't wanna freak you out, but West Virginian scientists may have found a life form more than 800 million years old. In a new paper published in the journal Geology , West Virginia University geologists say that some of the microorganisms found inside the Browne Formation, an 830 million-year-old rock found in the Australian desert, may still be alive — and if they are, it could hel
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Miami Backed a City Crypto, Which Then Imploded and Lost 95% of Its Value
Mayors of several major US cities are noticeably quiet about city-based cryptocurrencies they once promoted as a solution to many of their municipalities' problems. CityCoins, a Delaware-based startup, has convinced the mayors of cities including New York City and Miami to institute city-branded blockchain projects. But Miami's crypto, dubbed MiamiCoin, has hit of a snag: its value has plummeted
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Sad Delivery Robot Gets Lost In The Woods
Into the Woods If a delivery robot gets lost in the woods and nobody's there to find it, does it, uh, okay, we kinda lost the metaphor on that one. Regardless, the internet was delighted over the weekend when British history professor Matthew McCormack made a hilarious discovery during his morning bike ride: a six-wheeled delivery robot, driving by its lonesome self along a forested path, in a ra
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Puzzling Quantum Scenario Appears Not to Conserve Energy
The quantum physicists Sandu Popescu, Yakir Aharonov and Daniel Rohrlich have been troubled by the same scenario for three decades. It started when they wrote about a surprising wave phenomenon called superoscillation in 1990. "We were never able to really tell what exactly was bothering us," said Popescu, a professor at the University of Bristol. "Since then, every year we come back and we see i
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Dogecoin Creator Says That 70 Percent of Crypto Investors Are Complete Morons
Big Woof Dogecoin cocreator Billy Markus apparently doesn't think very highly of the people who invest in cryptocurrencies like, well, his. In a tweet appearing to respond to the precipitous crash of the Terra stablecoin last week, in which the coin meant to be tied to the worth of the US Dollar lost a whopping 97 percent of its worth , Markus said it appears that large swaths of crypto investors
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How to Write Software With Mathematical Perfection
Leslie Lamport may not be a household name, but he's behind a few of them for computer scientists: the typesetting program LaTeX and the work that made cloud infrastructure at Google and Amazon possible. He's also brought more attention to a handful of problems, giving them distinctive names like the bakery algorithm and the Byzantine Generals Problem. This is no accident. The 81-year-old compute
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Don't Make Your Own Formula
By the time they are six months old, 75 percent of babies in the U.S. use formula. And for many babies under 1, formula is the primary or exclusive source of nutrition—which is why the baby-formula shortage is so frightening to many parents. The reasons for the shortage include the general supply-chain issues plaguing many sectors of the economy and the shutdown of a major formula plant earlier t
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Osteoporosis patients should not be afraid to exercise regularly, say experts
UK's first exercise guidance on bone disease affecting 3m in Britain encourages people to move more Millions of people with osteoporosis should not be afraid to exercise regularly, experts have said in guidance aimed at boosting bone health, cutting the risk of falls and improving posture. The condition, which weakens bones and makes them more likely to break, affects more than 3 million people i
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Bad News! That "Door" on Mars Doesn't Look Like Much When Zoomed Out
Door Open Apparently that photo of a "door" on the surface of Mars was cropped just so to make it seem like something much cooler than it really is. Over the weekend, a photo from NASA's Curiosity Mars rover went viral because it depicted what appeared to be a rectangular doorway cut into the Red Planet's Mount Sharp . Though Mars Science Laboratory project scientist Ashwin Vasavada assured Gizmo
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Why Tucker Carlson Should Want the Buffalo Manifesto Made Public
The alleged teenage mass shooter in Buffalo, New York, wrote and posted a 180-page manifesto. I read the whole thing, and the only part that surprised me was the banality of his stated intention to eat "corn beef hash" for breakfast, followed by lunch at McDonald's, before killing as many Black people as possible. He expects to go to prison and either die there or someday be freed as a hero, afte
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Cold, Ashamed, Relieved: On Leaving Russia
Editor's note: This article has been translated from the original Russian by Boris Dralyuk. It was written by Maxim Osipov as he made his journey into exile from his town of Tarusa to Yerevan, the capital of Armenia, where Russians are allowed to enter without visas, and finally to Berlin. Cold , ashamed , relieved . These three words close Defying Hitler , Sebastian Haffner's memoir about the ri
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The America That Killed George Floyd
I n the late '90s, not long after I left Cameroon to attend college in the United States, I learned of a word used in certain African-immigrant communities to refer to African Americans: Akata . It was not uttered with affection; far from it— Akata means "wild animal," and thus has much in common with the N-word. In my early days here, it wasn't unusual for me to see a fellow African look at an A
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The American Variant of Democracy Is Contaminating My Home
In late 2021, as Australian cities were seeing anti-lockdown and anti-vaxxer protests against the country's long-running pandemic restrictions and newly implemented vaccine mandates, Donald Trump Jr. tweeted "Don't Australia my America." As someone who has recently moved back to Sydney after covering the Trump presidency for the BBC, I have instead found myself thinking the opposite: Don't Americ
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Joan Didion's Magic Trick
This article was featured in One Story to Read Today, a newsletter in which our editors recommend a single must-read from The Atlantic , Monday through Friday. Sign up for it here. "T hink of this as a travel piece," she might have written. "Imagine it in Sunset magazine: 'Five Great California Stops Along the Joan Didion Trail.' " Or think of this as what it really is: a road trip of magical thi
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There's a Better Way to Debate Abortion
If Justice Samuel Alito's draft majority opinion in Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization becomes law, we will enter a post– Roe v. Wade world in which the laws governing abortion will be legislatively decided in 50 states. In the short term, at least, the abortion debate will become even more inflamed than it has been. Overturning Roe , after all, would be a profound change not just in th
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The Biggest Threat to Putin's Control of Crimea
I n May 2020 , the Ukrainian writer Serhiy Zhadan stood before a crowd of battle-hardened Ukrainian marines at a base in Mariupol, roughly 40 miles from the Russian border. The soldiers had been holding the line for six years against Russian proxies in the Donbas, and Zhadan had come to boost morale with some poetry. Glancing down at a tablet in his right hand, he recited a selection of his Ukrai
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"Coronaphobia": How antivaxxers and pandemic minimizers pathologize fear of disease
Over the weekend, Dr. Lucy McBride, a concierge medicine doctor who has become famous as a pandemic minimizer and one of the drivers of "Urgency of Normal", Tweeted an article that she had written over a year ago about "coronaphobia". Whether she understands it or not, this is a very old antivax trope: To pathologize fear of infectious disease as mental illness. The post first appeared on Scienc
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The Problem With Wills
The chances are reasonable that you'll die before making a will. According to most studies, fewer than half of American adults report having a last will and testament that lays out how they want their property divided up, among other final wishes. Though some portion of that group opts for alternative types of estate planning, while others might draft a will late in life, many just never get arou
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What It Would Take to See the World Completely Differently
W hen the marine biologist Rachel Carson was a young girl, she discovered a fossilized shell while hiking around her family's hillside property in Springdale, Pennsylvania. Those who knew her then would later contend that this relic sparked such intense reverie in her that she instantly felt a tug toward the sea. What was this ancient creature, and what was the world it had known? Though Carson h
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The Defiant Strangeness of Werner Herzog
T wenty-five years ago , while in Tokyo directing an opera, the German filmmaker Werner Herzog turned down the offer of a private audience with the emperor of Japan. "It was a faux pas, so awful, so catastrophic that I wish to this day that the earth had swallowed me up," Herzog writes in the preface to his first novel, The Twilight World . Nonetheless, his hosts wondered whether he might like to
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There's a "Secret Society" in the Pentagon Hiding UFO Secrets, Officials Say
There's reportedly a minor civil war brewing amongst government officials over just how much of their UFO intelligence they should turn over to Congress and the public — and at the heart of it, an alleged cabal of powerful secret-keepers. In interviews with Politico , government officials — who, unsurprisingly, spoke on condition of anonymity — said that there are those within the Pentagon who ar
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E-cigarettes 'as safe as nicotine patches' for pregnant smokers trying to quit
Pregnant smokers were more likely to quit when using e-cigarettes than patches after four weeks, study shows E-cigarettes are as safe to use as nicotine patches for pregnant smokers trying to quit, and may be a more effective tool, researchers have revealed. Smoking in pregnancy can increase the risk of outcomes including premature birth, miscarriage and the baby having a low birth weight. But st
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New US lab to create versions of atoms never recorded on Earth
By studying isotopes scientists hope to gain insight into how elements within exploding stars came to be From carbon to uranium, oxygen to iron, chemical elements are the building blocks of the world around us and the wider universe. Now, physicists are hoping to gain an unprecedented glimpse into their origins, with the opening of a new facility that will create thousands of peculiar and unstabl
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Biggest Gold Weighs From Season 12 | Gold Rush
Stream Gold Rush on discovery+: https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/gold-rush #GoldRush #ParkerSchnabel #Discovery Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery From: Discove
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Axman's Fast Car Forces a Photo Finish | Street Outlaws: America's List
Stream Street Outlaws: America's List on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/street-outlaws-americas-list #StreetOutlaws #StreetRacing #Discovery Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter:
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Women almost twice as likely to be trapped in crashed vehicle, study finds
Exclusive: Calls to improve car design and safety as females also found to have different injury patterns to men Women are almost twice as likely as men to become trapped in a motor vehicle after a crash and they also sustain different patterns of injury, data suggests. The research – the first large UK study to compare sex differences in injury patterns and the likelihood of becoming trapped aft
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Who owns Einstein? The battle for the world's most famous face
Thanks to a savvy California lawyer, Albert Einstein has earned far more posthumously than he ever did in his lifetime. But is that what the great scientist would have wanted? In July 2003, the physicist and Pulitzer-prize-nominated author Dr Tony Rothman received an email from his editor bearing unwelcome news. Rothman's new book was weeks from publication. An affable debunking of widely misunde
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Seeing through the fog: Pinpointing young stars and their protoplanetary disks
Imagine walking through a dense, hazy fog in the middle of the night, seeing patches of light from cars and towns shimmering in the distance. It's nearly impossible to tell if the lights are deep in the fog or beyond it. Astronomers trying to find young stars face a similar problem: the light from stars they're hunting is shimmering through great big regions of hazy gas and dust in space, called m
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Wealthy Horrified That Drought Could Affect Their Luxurious Pools and Koi Ponds
Water Cutback Following a climate change-fueled drought, California's water levels are at a historic low point, with the government placing unprecedented restrictions on water usage. Governor Gavin Newsom is pleading Californians to cut back significantly, spending $100 million on ad campaigns to encourage water conservation. But all that talk is not sitting well with the ultra wealthy — many of
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'Homo sapiens is too arrogant: Call us Homo faber, the toolmaker'
We need to dispel the arrogant and misguided idea that modern humans are superior to earlier human species. It is thanks in part to all our predecessors such as Neanderthals that we are who we are today. This is according to Marie Soressi, Professor of Hominin Diversity Archaeology.
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Why Africa needs community-led conservation | Resson Kantai Duff
Conservation efforts in Africa have typically been led by "parachute conservationists" — outsiders who drop in thinking they have all the answers, hire locals to implement them and then disappear. But conservationist Resson Kantai Duff has a better way to save wildlife in Africa: let locals lead these efforts themselves. She calls for a major shift in how conservation in Africa works, showing why
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Quasi-periodic oscillation detected in blazar PKS 0405-385
By analyzing the historical light curve of blazar PKS 0405-385 from NASA's Fermi spacecraft, Chinese astronomers have detected quasi-periodic oscillation from this source. The discovery, presented in a paper published May 5 on arXiv.org, could shed more light on the nature and behavior of this blazar.
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Summer Reading Guide
Updated: 2020-11-09 00:00:00 For the summer, The Atlantic 's writers and editors have picked sets of books to match your mood. Do you want to be transported to another place , or are you looking to feel a sense of wonder about the universe ? Perhaps you're just seeking a comforting new spin on a familiar story . We're also here with suggestions for taking a deep dive into a single subject , or fo
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Anti-aging drugs are being tested as a way to treat covid
Covid-19 is far more likely to kill you if you're old. One reason is that aged immune systems struggle to cope with infections and recover from them. So why not try drugs that make bodies young again? That's the bold idea now being explored in clinical trials around the world, which are testing drugs that reverse the impacts of age on the body, rejuvenate the immune system and clear out aged, wor
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Mysterious nuclear transient AT2019pev inspected in X-rays
Astronomers from the Ohio State University (OSU) and elsewhere have performed a detailed X-ray observational campaign of a mysterious nuclear transient event known as AT2019pev. Results of the study, published May 10 on the arXiv pre-print server, offer more clues into the nature of this peculiar object.
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North Korea on brink of Covid-19 catastrophe, say experts
Number fallen ill reportedly rose to almost 1.5 million as country thought to be without vaccine grapples with what it calls 'fever' North Korea stands on the brink of a Covid-19 catastrophe unless swift action is taken to provide vaccines and drug treatments, experts have warned, as the number of people reported to have fallen ill rose to almost 1.5 million. The isolated country reported another
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How to trick your brain into better eating habits
Ditching the cutlery, scoffing a big first bite and discussing the carrots can help rewire our brains and make us more mindful of our meals Before diving in at a dinner party, my friend Lizzie always makes a point of asking the host to describe each dish they've made. It's a way of acknowledging their efforts – but, according to food psychology, she could also be helping herself and her fellow di
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Identification of kick velocity large enough for individual gravitational wave event following binary black hole merger
A team of researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics in Germany and multiple institutions in the U.S. has identified a kick velocity large enough for an individual gravitational wave event after observing a binary black hole merger—a first. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group describes their study of the binary black hole merger GW200
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How a SIDS Study Became a Media Train Wreck
Sudden infant death syndrome, or SIDS, " will be a thing of the past ," according to Carmel Harrington, a sleep researcher at the Children's Hospital at Westmead, in Australia. A press release describes her new study, out this month, as a "game-changing" effort and a "world-first breakthrough" that could prevent future deaths from the tragic illness. Celebrations quickly spread on social media: "
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Contact lens that can release drug could be used to treat glaucoma
Invention can deliver medication after detecting pressure in the eye from fluid buildup, scientists say A contact lens that can release a drug if it detects high pressure within the eye has been created by scientists who say it could help treat glaucoma. Glaucoma is an eye disease that involves damage to the optic nerve, and can lead to blindness if not treated. Continue reading…
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Shaping the future of light through reconfigurable metasurfaces
The technological advancement of optical lenses has long been a significant marker of human scientific achievement. Eyeglasses, telescopes, cameras, and microscopes have all literally and figuratively allowed us to see the world in a new light. Lenses are also a fundamental component of manufacturing nanoelectronics by the semiconductor industry.
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Introducing an Expanded Books Section
When Emily Dickinson encountered her first real book as a child, she experienced a moment of pure, joyful recognition. "This, then, is a book!" she exclaimed . "And there are more of them!" The Atlantic would go on to publish Dickinson's poems; perhaps more important, it introduced her to a lifelong mentor, Thomas Wentworth Higginson. After Dickinson read his article "Letter to a Young Contributo
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Hacker Shows Off Cool Trick for Stealing Teslas
Beep-Beep A security researcher has demonstrated how easy it is to trick a Tesla into letting a thief hack their way inside and even start the car, Bloomberg reports . Sultan Qasim Khan, a security consultant at security firm NCC Group, demonstrated the technique, which involves redirecting communications between a Tesla owner's smartphone or key fob and the car itself, to journalists at Bloomber
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Infertile men may be twice as likely to develop breast cancer, study suggests
Researchers find link between fertility issues and cancer risk, but say biological reason unclear Infertile men may be twice as likely to develop breast cancer than those without fertility issues, according to one of the largest ever studies of the disease. Breast cancer in males is less common than in females and its relation to infertility had previously been investigated only in small studies.
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Scenes From Svalbard
The Svalbard archipelago is a Norwegian group of islands located in the Arctic Ocean, about 650 miles (1,050 kilometers) from the North Pole. It is home to the northernmost year-round settlements on Earth, with an overall population of about 2,900. In recent years, Svalbard has been moving its economy more toward tourism and scientific research and away from coal mining, which supported much of t
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How to avoid eating the world: From degrowth to a sustainable food system transformation
Proponents of degrowth have long argued that economic growth is detrimental to the environment. Now, scientists show that curbing growth alone would not make the food system sustainable—but changing what we eat and putting a price on carbon would. In a first, a group led by the Potsdam Institute used a quantitative food and land system model to gauge the effects of degrowth and efficiency proposal
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Office Hours
H ow she used to smoke in his office, back when the University allowed that in campus buildings. He didn't smoke, but allowed her to as she sat on the sofa across from his desk. Or rather, he didn't object, and even set out a little dessert plate as an ashtray. Maybe because it gave them both a pretense for talking longer, for the extra duration of a cigarette, then two, then three. So that by th
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Analysis of ancient incense found at Famen Royal Temple reflects importance of incense trade along the Silk Road
A team of researchers affiliated with the Palace Museum, the Famen Temple Museum and the University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, all in China, has conducted an analysis of ancient incense found at the Famen Royal Temple. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes what they found through their analysis and why they believe their findings refl
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Did you solve it? The funniest jokes in maths
The answers to today's rib-tickling riddles Earlier today I set you the puzzles below, chosen by Irish mathematician Des MacHale, a prolific writer of joke and puzzle books. You can read some of his jokes here . The puzzles were a mixture of word, number and lateral thinking puzzles. They all give some 'haha' with the 'aha!'. Continue reading…
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Method to cultivate microbial communities in a permanently stable manner
The capabilities of complex microbial communities are used for numerous biotechnological processes. This requires special compositions of the microbial communities. However, these are often unstable and susceptible to disruption. UFZ researchers have now developed a "mass transfer method with a loop" that can stabilize microbial communities in the long term.
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A One-and-Done CRISPR Gene Therapy Will Aim to Prevent Heart Attacks
In a few months, a daring clinical trial may fundamentally lower heart attack risk in the most vulnerable people. If all goes well, it will just take one shot. It's no ordinary shot. The trial, led by Verve Therapeutics , a biotechnology company based in Massachusetts, will be one of the first to test genetic base editors directly inside the human body. A variant of the gene editing tool CRISPR-C
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Achoo! The hay fever season lasts longer than ever. Here's what we can do about it | Kate Ravilious
The climate crisis is giving trees a bigger window to spread their pollen, but cleaner air and better early warning forecasts can help protect us If you have sneezed your way through the last few days, you are not alone. About a quarter of the UK population are thought to suffer from hay fever, with numbers continuing to grow. And the latest research suggests that the climate crisis is going to m
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Study sheds new light on the mechanism of individual cell memory, using yeast as a model
Whi3 is a mnemon (Whi3mnem), or in other words, a protein that stores information in individual cells by forming stable super-assemblies. This memory state is then inherited by only one individual daughter cell at mitosis (individual memory). For example, when facing an uncommitted mating partner, budding yeast cells coalesce the G1/S inhibitor Whi3 into a dominant mnemon super-assembly that drive
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The aurora borealis can be heard even when it can't be seen
Professor Emeritus Unto K. Laine of Aalto University has made recordings of auroral sounds, showing that the phenomenon is much more common than previously believed and occurs even in the absence of visible northern lights. "This cancels the argument that auroral sounds are extremely rare and that the aurora borealis should be exceptionally bright and lively," Laine says.
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Bless This Startup That's Turning Horrible CO2 Emissions Into Delicious Vodka
Virtuous Vodka A startup with the elemental name of Air Company is producing vodka made with carbon dioxide emissions, CNBC reports , a futuristic new beverage that can both get you drunk and allow you to feel just a tiny bit better about the environment. The company makes use of CO2 emissions from carbon-producing industries, which it turns into various alcohols, including vodka, perfume, and ha
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Image: Giant elliptical galaxy UGC 10143
This new NASA Hubble Space Telescope image spotlights the giant elliptical galaxy, UGC 10143, at the heart of galaxy cluster Abell 2147, about 486 million light-years away in the head of the constellation Serpens. UGC 10143 is the biggest and brightest member of Abell 2147, which itself may be part of the much larger Hercules Supercluster of galaxies. UGC 10143's bright center, dim extended halo,
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Converting CO2 to formic acid using an alumina-supported, iron-based compound
Photoreduction of CO2 into transportable fuel like formic acid (HCOOH) is a great way of dealing with CO2's rising levels in the atmosphere. To aid in this mission, a research team from Tokyo Tech chose an easily available iron-based mineral and loaded it onto an alumina support to develop a catalyst that can efficiently convert CO2 into HCOOH with ~90% selectivity.
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Improving ion transmission efficiency of mass spectrometers
A recent study by researchers from the Hefei Institutes of Physical Science and published in Analytical Chemistry presents a novel electrostatic field ion funnel focusing technology called direct current (DC)-ion funnel. It realizes ion focusing with only a DC electric field, thus improving the sensitivity of mass spectrometers.
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Readers Offer Their Moral Dilemmas
This is an edition of Up for Debate, a newsletter by Conor Friedersdorf. On Wednesdays, he rounds up timely conversations and solicits reader responses to one thought-provoking question. Every Monday, he publishes some thoughtful replies. Sign up for the newsletter here. Last week, I asked readers to describe a moral dilemma. Susanna situates us in the medical profession: Imagine you are a doctor
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A new mathematical model of cellular movement
A mathematical model that describes how cells change their shape during movement suggests that the movement is mainly driven by the contraction of the skeletal proteins, called "myosin." The new model developed at Penn State can help researchers to better understand the various biological processes where cellular movement plays a key role and also could inform the development of artificial systems
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Democracy Is Ailing—Not Because We Broke It, but Because What We're Trying to Build Is Unprecedented
Masks. Vaccines. Immigration. Abortion. Gun control. Taxes. The list of divisive issues in American politics goes on, with liberals and conservatives seeming more polarized and less able to agree than ever before. Indeed, democracy is in a fragile state, not only in the US but around the world. What's gone wrong to get us into this sorry situation? In an enlightening discussion last week at the C
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Modeling suggests loss of biocrusts by 2070 could result in increase of 15% more dust emissions
An international team of researchers has found via global modeling that loss of biocrusts due to global warming could result in an additional 15% more dust emitted into the atmosphere by 2070. In their paper published in the journal Nature Geoscience, the group describes their analysis of currently available data regarding the impact of biocrust on global cycling and what impact losses of biocrust
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New drought benchmark reached in Europe between 2018 and 2020
These were days, months and years that many will come to remember: the drought from 2018 to 2020. An international team of researchers led by scientists from the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) has succeeded in categorizing the historical dimensions of this event. Based on their findings, no drought covering such a large area for an extended period and coinciding with warmer temp
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Frogs Keep Mating With the Wrong Things
Two years ago, Juan Díaz Ricaurte was hiking through the mountains of Brazil when a male yellow cururu toad affixed itself to his boot. Díaz Ricaurte gently detached the frog and set it back on the ground, several feet away; undeterred, it bounded back over and wrapped its arms around the shoe again. "It was super focused on grabbing Juan's boot," says Filipe Serrano, Díaz Ricaurte's fellow biolo
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New trait-based approach to global change ecology moves from description to prediction
It's not enough to understand what the effects of climate change are. Society needs ways to get ahead of these changes, to predict them before they actually happen. And when it comes to conservation, the approach scientists use to study species in the wild could be critical to these predictions, according to a recent research review led by biologist Stephanie Green and published in Proceedings of
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Watch the Milky Way Instantly Pop Into View During Lunar Eclipse
Milking It For a brief and shining moment, this week's lunar eclipse allowed a stunning view of our lovely home, the Milky Way galaxy. Video of the spectacular event was captured by the Gemini Observatory's All-Sky camera at its facilities on Hilo, Hawaii. In the three seconds at approximately 5:30 PM local time that the Sun, Earth, and Moon aligned and thus placed the Moon in our planet's shadow
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Best Walkie Talkies in 2022
The best walkie talkies keep you connected to the rest of your party, whether traversing the backwoods, skiing down a slope, or playing in the neighborhood. These handheld devices are ruggedly built to endure harsh weather and rough treatment. Many models go beyond simply allowing people to communicate verbally. Some can connect to your smartphone to create a mini texting network or geolocate oth
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New Video Offers a Better View of Rocket Lab's Helicopter-Catching Rocket
The days of one-and-done rockets may be coming to an end… unless you're NASA . After SpaceX seemingly perfected propulsive landings for the Falcon 9, Rocket Lab is developing another means of reusing rocket boosters. Earlier this month , the company succeeded in catching a parachuting rocket with a helicopter, and now it's released a much better video showing how it went down. On May 2nd, Rocket
29min
Seeking Last-Minute Summer Opportunities or Suggestions
Hi, I am planning to begin an applied math Ph.D. at a top 5 program in the US in the Fall. I majored in math and computer science in college. I have recently been reading about reinforcement learning and probabilistic programming, and I am hoping to find a paid or volunteer project (e.g. research or programming) this summer related to RL, computational cognitive science, or computational neurosci
38min
Organic polymeric scintillators excite the X-ray community
X-ray detection is of great importance in diverse applications, such as radiation detection, medical diagnosis, and security inspection. A popular way to achieve X-ray detection is to integrate a photodetector with a luminescent material called a scintillator, which emits energy in the form of light. Scintillators can convert high-energy X-ray photons to low-energy visible luminescence.
45min
New metasurface-based device creates different images depending on light and environmental conditions
Researchers have developed a new metasurface-based device that can produce multiple distinct holographic images depending on the surrounding medium and the wavelength of light used. The ability to store information that is only retrievable with the right set of keys—such as a certain light wavelength combined with wet conditions—could be further developed to design simple yet effective encryption
52min
Scientists nail down 'destination' for protein that delivers zinc
New research describes a 'chaperone' protein that delivers zinc, a trace element essential for survival in all living things, to where it's needed. The chaperone could be especially important when access to zinc is limited — for example in nutrient deficient diets and for growing crops on depleted soils.
1h
Narcissism affects whether people follow COVID mitigation efforts
New research indicates a person's individual level of narcissism affects whether they are more, or less, willing to participate in COVID-19 mitigation strategies like masking and vaccination. The researchers—including Peter Hatemi, professor of political science at Penn State—looked at the effects of both " grandiose " and "vulnerable" narcissism on whether people were more or less likely to wear
1h
Rocket engine exhaust pollution extends high into Earth's atmosphere
Researchers assessed the potential impact of a rocket launch on atmospheric pollution by investigating the heat and mass transfer and rapid mixing of the combustion byproducts. The team modeled the exhaust gases and developing plume at several altitudes along a typical trajectory of a standard present-day rocket. They did this as a prototypical example of a two-stage rocket to transport people and
1h
Improved wind forecasts save consumers millions in energy costs
Scientists determined that by increasing the accuracy of weather forecasts over the last decade, consumers netted at least $384 million in energy savings. The researchers based their predictions on NOAA's High Resolution Rapid Refresh model, which provides daily weather forecasts for every part of the U.S. These include wind speed and direction data, which utilities can use to gauge how much energ
1h
Phage therapy: A model to predict its efficacy against pathogenic bacteria
Antibiotic resistance represents a major public health challenge, associated with a high mortality rate. While bacteriophages — viruses that kill bacteria — could be a solution for fighting antibiotic-resistant pathogens, various obstacles stand in the way of their clinical development. To overcome them, researchers have developed a model to better predict the efficacy of phage therapy and possi
1h
First animals developed complex ecosystems before the Cambrian explosion
Early animals formed complex ecological communities more than 550 million years ago, setting the evolutionary stage for the Cambrian explosion, according to a study by Rebecca Eden, Emily Mitchell, and colleagues at the University of Cambridge, UK, publishing May 17th in the open-access journal PLOS Biology.
1h
Study gives animal testing alternatives a confidence boost
As part of a government effort to reduce animal testing, researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have worked with the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) and Inotiv Inc. to produce a new protocol for screening skin allergens. The method is potentially cheaper and faster than animal testing, while maintaining a similar performance.
1h
Friendly fungi announce themselves to their hosts
For many years after discovering a diverse population of sometimes dangerous microbes constantly living in our intestines, scientists described the situation as a form of living with the enemy. But when it comes to commensal populations of the fungus Candida albicans, the dreaded invader may be better seen as a helpful friend arriving with gifts.
1h
Aerodynamics of perching birds could inform aircraft design
If you have ever watched a bird land on a tree branch, you may have noticed that it rapidly pitches its wings upward at a high angle to execute a smooth landing. However, for some birds, they land by folding their wings as they perch instead, creating a sweeping motion as they decelerate.
1h
U.S. study analyzing tooth survival after root canal in general population
Oral health is a public health issue that significantly affects people's overall health. A ground-breaking study of root canal longevity using electronic dental record data from 46,000 root canal patients treated in community dental practices found geographic and procedure disparities, providing real-world insight that can be used to inform dental practice.
2h
Different subtypes defined in small cell lung cancer
Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a malignant disease associated with a particularly high mortality rate. According to a new multicenter study, SCLC can be divided into several subgroups in terms of clinical behavior. These subtypes respond differently to chemotherapeutics and targeted drugs. This opens up possibilities for personalized treatment for this type of cancer as well.
2h
Change of temperature causes whole body reprogramming
Human beings, like most organisms, are constantly exposed to alternating colder or warmer temperatures. These environmental variations cause striking metabolic effects and require constant adaptations. While some of these adaptations confer certain beneficial effects on health, the impact of cold and warmth on the various organs in a whole-body context was not known.
2h
Loops for micro-organisms
The capabilities of complex microbial communities are used for numerous biotechnological processes. This requires special compositions of the microbial communities. However, these are often unstable and susceptible to disruption. Researchers have now developed a 'mass transfer method with a loop' that can stabilize microbial communities in the long term.
2h
Chimpanzees combine calls to form numerous vocal sequences
Compared to the complex use of human language, the way animals communicate with each other appears quite simple. How our language evolved from such a simple system, remains unclear. A group of researchers has now recorded thousands of vocalizations from wild chimpanzees in Taï, Ivory Coast. They found that the animals produced hundreds of different vocal sequences containing up to ten different ca
2h
Head of NASA Accuses China of Being "Good at Stealing"
Grade NAS-A Beef In a candid moment during an otherwise dull Congressional budget hearing, the administrator of NASA said very plainly how he feels about the way China "steals" spacecraft designs from the American public and private sectors. During the House Appropriations Committee hearing , Alabama representative Robert Aderholt asked NASA boss Bill Nelson what the agency is "doing to secure Am
2h
Llama 'nanobodies' could target irregular heart rhythms
Researchers have designed tiny proteins, called nanobodies, derived from llama antibodies that could potentially deliver targeted medicines to human muscle cells. The researchers say the ability to more precisely target such tissues could advance the search for safer, more efficient ways to alleviate pain during surgery, treat irregular heart rhythms , and control seizures. The results of the new
2h
New technology dramatically increases the recovery rate of precious metals from waste
In South Korea, which relies on imports for 99.3% of its metal resources, the per capita consumption of those metal resources is the highest in the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, and consumption of precious metals in industries such as renewable energy, healthcare and semiconductors is increasing. Gold is in demand for applications such as batteries, electric vehicles and
2h
Previously unknown dolphin species were present in ancient Swiss ocean
Twenty million years ago, the Swiss Plateau region, or Mittelland, was an ocean in which dolphins swam. Researchers at the University of Zurich's Paleontological Institute have now discovered two previously unknown species related to modern sperm whales and oceanic dolphins, which they identified based on ear bones.
2h
Evidence of slash-and-burn cultivation during the Mesolithic
As early as 9,500 years ago, people in Europe used slash-and-burn methods to make land usable for agriculture. This is shown by environmental data generated by scientists from the Senckenberg Center for Human Evolution and Paleoenvironment (S-HEP) at the University of Tübingen on the basis of two drill cores from the Ammer Valley. The data were then correlated with results from the Mesolithic scat
2h
China's terrestrial carbon sequestration in 2060 could offset 13% to 18% of energy-related peak carbon dioxide emissions
President Xi of China announced in September 2020 that China will "aim to have CO2 emissions peak before 2030 and achieve carbon neutrality before 2060." Although it is essential to reduce CO2 emissions from energy consumption, which accounts for more than 85% of the total annual CO2 emission in China, the role of terrestrial carbon sequestration cannot be underestimated in carbon neutrality.
2h
How three mutations work together to spur new SARS-CoV-2 variants
Like storm waves battering a ship, new versions of the SARS-CoV-2 virus have buffeted the world one after another. Recently, scientists keeping tabs on these variants noticed a trend: Many carry the same set of three mutations. In a new study in ACS' Biochemistry, researchers examined how these mutations change the way a key piece of the virus functions. Their experiments show how this triad alter
2h
Ecological functions of streams and rivers severely affected globally
Agriculture, loss of habitat or wastewater effluents — human stressors negatively impact biodiversity in streams and rivers. Very little is known yet about the extent to which their capacity for self-purification and other essential ecosystem services are also impacted. An international research team has synthesized the globally available research on this topic in a meta-analysis. This study prov
2h
New light on organic solar cells
Efficient and environmentally friendly solar cells are required for a transition to a fossil-free energy supply. Researchers at have now mapped how energy flows in organic solar cells, something that previously had been unknown.
2h
New guideline refines care for brain bleeds: Compression socks, some meds not effective, study suggests
Several in-hospital treatments and post-discharge therapies for people who have had an intracerebral hemorrhage, or a bleeding stroke, are not as effective as health care professionals once thought. Compression socks or stockings, anti-seizure medicines and steroid treatment are among treatments with uncertain effectiveness. Studies show that minimally invasive surgical procedures may be a useful
2h
For large bone injuries, it's Sonic hedgehog to the rescue
A new study presents intriguing evidence that large bone injuries might trigger a repair strategy in adults that recapitulates elements of skeletal formation in utero. Key to this repair strategy is a gene called Sonic hedgehog. In this study, researchers took a close look at how mice are able to regrow large sections of missing rib — an ability they share with humans, and one of the most impress
2h
Validation brings new predictive capability to global megafire smoke impacts
New research modeling smoke from two recent megafires sets the stage for better forecasting of how emissions from these global-scale events will behave and impact temperatures. As huge wildfires become more common under climate change, increased attention has focused on the intensity and duration of their emissions, which rival those of some volcano eruptions.
2h
Mars' emitted energy and seasonal energy imbalance
Seasonal imbalance between the solar energy absorbed and released by the planet Mars could be a cause of the Red Planet's dust storms, according to new research. Understanding how the system works on Mars could help scientists predict how climate change could affect Earth.
2h
Desktop air curtain system prevents spread of COVID-19 in hospital settings
Researchers have developed a desktop air curtain system that blocks all incoming aerosol particles. An air curtain, or air door, is a fan-powered ventilation system that creates an air seal over an entryway, but one challenge in developing smaller air curtains is fully blocking emitted aerosol particles over time because it is difficult to maintain the air wall over a long distance.
3h
Vaccinia virus pulls together a makeshift tool to repair its DNA, exposing a vulnerability that could be targeted
The vaccinia virus uses its own machinery and not that of the cell it infects to repair ultraviolet radiation-caused damage to its DNA, according to new research. The virus repurposes an enzyme it uses for copying its DNA to repair the damage. Blocking that enzyme disrupts both the copying and repairing of viral DNA, resulting in a dramatic reduction in new virions.
3h
Boost in nerve-growth protein helps explain why running supports brain health
Exercise increases levels of a chemical involved in brain cell growth, which bolsters the release of the 'feel good' hormone dopamine, a new study shows. Dopamine is known to play a key role in movement, motivation, and learning. Experts have long understood that regular running raises dopamine activity in the brain and may protect nerve cells from damage. In addition, past research has tied exerc
3h
Seeing molecules inside a nanometer-sized 'sardine can'
Researchers have successfully developed a new technique allowing them to observe gas molecules packing into metal-organic frameworks (MOF) using infrared spectroscopy. Their innovation was to measure polarized light absorption of guest molecules in a MOF film to deduce molecule alignment using this common piece of lab equipment. This method is the first to show guest alignment and does so in real-
3h
Highway links benefit businesses, unless they are based outside cities
There is a Chinese proverb: "If you want to be rich, build roads first; if roads are open, all businesses will flourish." Many studies have shown that the construction of transportation infrastructure has played an important role in China's social and economic development. However, few studies have focused on how construction impacts enterprise efficiency and macroeconomic growth on a regional bas
3h
Prioritizing environmental justice while capturing carbon from the air
Reaching carbon emission goals requires efforts on all fronts of carbon management: decreasing carbon emissions, capturing carbon, and storing carbon. Traditionally, cost and resource availability are leading factors that determine how and where these efforts are made, leaving environmental and societal impacts as afterthoughts.
4h
Best ASUS Routers of 2022
Your router is the gateway to faster internet speeds, and the best ASUS routers can do that while providing excellent security, strong parental controls, and advanced customization features. However, ASUS is also well-known for their gaming routers. These models are packed with features that prioritize game data and connect to servers that enhance performance. Many factors influence which router
4h
One-year results of treat-and-extend regimen with intravitreal brolucizumab for treatment-naïve neovascular age-related macular degeneration with type 1 macular neovascularization
Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41598-022-10578-1 One-year results of treat-and-extend regimen with intravitreal brolucizumab for treatment-naïve neovascular age-related macular degeneration with type 1 macular neovascularization
4h
Spore in The Core: 830-Million-Year-Old Microbes Trapped in Halite Might Be Alive
Hans-Joachim Engelhardt, CC BY-SA 4.0. Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halite#/media/File:HALIT_X_NaCl_Natriumchlorid_W%C3%9CRFEL_KUBUS_50P.jpg You've heard of Elf on the Shelf — now get ready for the spore in the core. Or maybe the coccus in the rock-us. Researchers looking at ancient Australian halite cores have reported 830-million-year-old microbes inside the rock salt crystals — and th
4h
Arabidopsis thaliana shoots regenerate better in balmy conditions
Warm temperatures strongly enhance the regeneration of thale cress shoots, plant scientists at RIKEN have found. They have also uncovered the molecular mechanism behind this effect, which will help optimize the regeneration of plant cuttings for both plant-science research and horticulture.
4h
'Village doctors' can improve blood pressure for rural patients
Training community health workers on how to prescribe and adjust anti-hypertension medications and how to coach people to better manage their blood pressure could significantly benefit patients with high blood pressure in rural areas, researchers report. High blood pressure is a leading cause of heart disease and early death, but many across the globe live in areas with limited access to high-qua
4h
A probabilistic model for classifying temporary rivers
Temporary rivers are streams that can dry up during portions of the year. Although they are common in many environments and have important effects on the local ecosystem, compared to streams that consistently flow, temporary rivers have been relatively understudied.
4h
Effects of litter quality, fauna and environments on litter decomposition in forest ecosystems
Litter decomposition is a key process that controls carbon and nutrient cycles in forest ecosystems. In litter decomposition at local or broad special scales, the three factors including litter quality, fauna, and environments (decomposition site) that influence litter decomposition. However, most existing studies have focused on the independent effects of these factors on litter decomposition.
4h
Where were Herod the Great's royal alabaster bathtubs quarried?
From the Middle Bronze Age, Egypt played a crucial role in the appearance of calcite-alabaster artifacts in Israel, and the development of the local gypsum-alabaster industry. The absence of ancient calcite-alabaster quarries in the Southern Levant (modern day Israel and Palestine) led to the assumption that all calcite-alabaster vessels found in the Levant originated from Egypt, while poorer qual
4h
Complete chloroplast genome of Coleanthus subtilis, a protected rare species
Coleanthus subtilis (Tratt.) Seidel (Poaceae) is a rare grass in the monotypic genus Coleanthus Seidl. It has been protected in many countries, such as the Czech Republic, North America and China, because of the extremely short life cycle, strict habitat and breeding conditions, and habitat destruction. In addition, C. subtilis has a remarkable ability to reappear in its previous habitats after lo
4h
Tungsten isotopes in seawater provide insights into the co-evolution of Earth's mantle and continents
In a study published in the journal Nature Communications, Andrea Mundl-Petermeier and Sebastian Viehmann of the Department of Lithospheric Research at the University of Vienna have demonstrated that a new geochemical archive—182Tungsten in banded iron formations—can be used to simultaneously trace the evolution of both the Earth's mantle and continents throughout Earth's history. This offers new
4h
Magnetic nanoparticles in biological vehicles individually characterized for the first time
Imagine a tiny vehicle with a nanomagnetic structure, which can be steered through the human body via external magnetic fields. Arriving at its destination, the vehicle may release a drug, or heat up cancer cells without affecting healthy tissue. Scientists of different disciplines are working on this vision. A multidisciplinary research group at Universidad del País Vasco, Leioa, Spain, explores
4h
Chimpanzees found to combine calls to form numerous vocal sequences
Humans are the only species on earth known to use language. We do this by combining sounds to form words and words to form hierarchically-structured sentences. The question of where this extraordinary capacity originates from remains to be answered. In order to retrace the evolutionary origins of human language, researchers often use a comparative approach—they compare the vocal production of othe
4h
Scientists identify characteristics to better define long COVID
Researchers have identified characteristics of people with long COVID and those likely to have it. Scientists used machine learning techniques to analyze an unprecedented collection of electronic health records (EHRs) available for COVID-19 research to better identify who has long COVID.
4h
Using bacteria to accelerate CO2 capture in oceans
You may be familiar with direct air capture, or DAC, in which carbon dioxide is removed from the atmosphere in an effort to slow the effects of climate change. Now a scientist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has proposed a scheme for direct ocean capture. Removing CO2 from the oceans will enable them to continue to do their job of absorbing excess CO2 from the atmosphere.
5h
2-drug combo reduces risk of an asthma attack
A combination of two drugs dramatically reduces the chances of having an asthma attack, according to a new global study. The findings show that a combination of albuterol, which provides relief from an asthma attack by relaxing the smooth muscles and is used for immediate asthma relief, and the corticosteroid budesonide, taken via an inhaler, lowers the number of sudden episodes of shortness of b
5h
Why octopus mothers self destruct
New research helps explain why some female octopuses die after laying their eggs. The findings point to the optic gland and cholesterol. For all their uncanny intelligence and seemingly supernatural abilities to change color and regenerate limbs, octopuses often suffer a tragic death. After a mother octopus lays a clutch of eggs, she quits eating and wastes away; by the time the eggs hatch, she i
6h
Band crossover and magnetic phase diagram of superconducting Ba2CuO4-δ
Researchers led by Prof. Zou Liangjian from the Hefei Institutes of Physical Science (HFIPS) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) have recently investigated the magnetic phase diagram of the high-Tc (critical temperature) superconducting compound Ba2CuO4-δ and its superconducting pairing symmetry based on the spin-fluctuation mechanism. Results were published in Physical Review B.
6h
Trygghet och ro när svårt sjuka barn vårdas hemma
I Skåne har svårt sjuka barn rätt att vårdas hemma istället för på sjukhus, något som ökar livskvaliteten för hela familjen i en ofta tung tid. Men fortfarande erbjuds alltför få barn vård i hemmet. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
6h
Populära storstäder vill dämpa partysugna turister
Invånarna i populära städer som Barcelona och Amsterdam fick under pandemin en välbehövlig paus från tillfälliga besökare. Nu planeras lokala åtgärder för att stävja problem och konflikter när partyturisterna väntas återkomma. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
6h
Nytt ljus över organiska solceller
För att utnyttja potentialen i solenergin krävs solceller som är billiga och miljövänliga. Forskare har kartlagt hur energin flödar i organiska solceller, något som kan bidra till att göra dem mer effektiva. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
6h
The Download: Potential new covid treatments, and the crypto crash
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. Anti-aging drugs are being tested as a way to treat covid Covid-19 is far more likely to kill you if you're old. One reason is that aged immune systems struggle to cope with infections and recover from them. So why not try drugs that make bodies young again? I
7h
Health Benefits of Clean Energy
What if there were a change we could make in our society that would save, in the US alone, more than 50,000 lives per year and avoid more than $600 billion every year in health care costs and lost productivity? How much should we invest each year to make the necessary changes? Even if we invested $3 trillion over the next 10 years, that would only be half as much as we would save over the same le
7h
Sugar trouble kills the mood for mating cockroaches
New research clarifies what happens when a sugary cockroach mating ritual takes a bitter turn, resulting in rejected males. Male German cockroaches ( Blattella germanica ) offer females a pre-mating "gift" of body secretions that combines sugars and fats—think of the roach version of chocolate —in order to attract and hold female attention long enough to start copulation. "This is common mating b
7h
Daily briefing: How to find a great scientific collaborator
Nature, Published online: 16 May 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01370-2 How to spot collaborators that are fun to work with, make a fair contribution and share your ambitions. Plus, Australian researchers lament the state of science ahead of the election and four ways to stop future pandemics at the source.
7h
Olympus OM-D E-M1X review
Looking for ultra lightweight kit that packs a heavyweight punch? The Olympus OM-D E-M1X provides a compact system that's ideal for wildlife and safari shooting.
8h
Canon EOS R5 review
The Canon EOS R5 is so good at photographing wildlife, it's effectively a cheat code for capturing images of animals – not to mention humans or any other subject.
8h
Why Interview an Autocrat?
Absolute Power Mohammed bin Salman is modernizing a stubbornly premodern kingdom, Graeme Wood wrote in April. He has also eliminated rivals and critics, creating a climate of fear without precedent in Saudi Arabia's history. Graeme Wood's article is the best argument I've read in some time for why the West needs to wean itself off oil. Mohammed bin Salman is very scary, and holds great power only
9h
How citation cartels give 'strategic scholars' an advantage: A simple model
Sincere scholars work to expand society's knowledge and understanding. They cite all the relevant research, even that produced by those they disagree with or personally dislike. They encourage debate. For the sincere scholar, a citation is a responsibility, and proper and thorough citations demonstrate research quality. For the strategic scholar, a citation is an asset … Continue reading
9h
Theory-guided design of hydrogen-bonded cobaltoporphyrin frameworks for highly selective electrochemical H2O2 production in acid
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30523-0 Guided by high-throughput computational screening, we report the preparation of hydrogen-bonded cobaltoporphyrin frameworks and demonstrate the achievement of high activity and selectivity for electrochemical H2O2 production in acid.
10h
Dynamically actuated soft heliconical architecture via frequency of electric fields
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30486-2 Frequency responsiveness within a broad dynamic range in adaptive systems while also reducing high-frequency induced heating remains a challenge for advanced photonics. Here, authors report a frequency-actuated heliconical soft architecture with reversible modulation of the photonic bandgap in a wide spectral ran
10h
Cortical Cyclin A controls spindle orientation during asymmetric cell divisions in Drosophila
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30182-1 The Frizzled/Dishevelled planar cell polarity pathway is involved in mitotic spindle orientation, but how this is coordinated with the cell cycle is unclear. Here, the authors show with Drosophila sensory organ precursor cells that Cyclin A is recruited in prophase by Frizzled/Dishevelled, regulating division ori
10h
Mutational landscape of normal epithelial cells in Lynch Syndrome patients
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-29920-2 It is unclear whether somatic mutation rates are elevated in Lynch Syndrome (LS), which is the most common cause of hereditary colorectal cancer. Here, the authors use whole-genome sequencing and organoid cultures to show that normal tissues in LS patients are genomically stable, while ancestor cells of neoplasti
10h
Targeted detection of cancer at the cellular level during biopsy by near-infrared confocal laser endomicroscopy
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30265-z Radiography identifies suspicious lung nodules that are not always easy to diagnose via biopsy. Here, the authors utilize a fluorescent dye that targets the folate receptor and show using needle based endomicroscopy that it can be used to identify cancer cells during biopsy procedures
10h
Online Data Could Pose Risks in a Post-Roe v. Wade World
If the Supreme Court overturns the landmark decision, women in states where abortion becomes illegal could find themselves subject to increased digital surveillance. For someone suspected of seeking an abortion, social media posts, location data, and online searches could be gathered as evidence.
10h
Ellis Island, lighthouses among historic NJ sites flooding as seas rise
By Ayurella Horn-Muller (Climate Central ) and Andrew S. Lewis and Michael Sol Warren (NJ Spotlight News), with television segment by Brenda Flanagan (NJ Spotlight News) Read the Climate Central report, Future Flood Risk: Historic Sites in NJ . The Garden State's history is starting to wash away. New Jersey as it exists today was built up over hundreds of years from the arrival of Europeans, and
13h
Is the world keeping Cop26's climate promises?
Last November in Glasgow, countries agreed to limit the global temperature rise to 1.5C above pre-industrial averages. Six months on, the world has changed, with the war in Ukraine, high energy prices and the cost of living crisis threatening to derail us from achieving our climate goals. Ian Sample speaks to the Guardian's environment correspondent, Fiona Harvey, about what promises are still on
15h
Fra tanker på Twitter til toprådgiver
Nok så virksomme vacciner og behandlinger nytter ikke, hvis ingen vil tage imod dem. Derfor handler pandemibekæmpelse også om psykologi, viden om adfærd og kunnen inden for den vanskelige disciplin kommunikation, lyder det fra lederen af HOPE, Michael Bang Petersen.
15h
Alvorligt psykisk syge udvikler oftere diabetes-komplikationer
Ny dansk registerforskning viser, at hvis man både har type 2-diabetes og alvorlig psykisk sygdom, har man 15 til 40 pct. højere risiko for at udvikle komplikationer til type 2-diabetes. Personer med alvorlig psykisk sygdom udvikler også komplikationerne tidligere end personer uden psykisk sygdom.
15h
New theory promises to reshape how we think about polymer superstructures
Polymer scientists recently announced that they have solved a longstanding mystery surrounding a nanoscale structure, formed by collections of molecules, called a double-gyroid. This shape is one of the most desirable for materials scientists, and has a wide range of applications; but, until now, a predictable understanding of how these shapes form has eluded researchers.
22h
Best TVs Under $500
When you need a good and reliable screen in a clutch, one of the best TVs under $500 should do the trick. Sure, you may have to compromise when it comes to screen size, resolution, and glitzy features, but sometimes simply good is good enough. Plus, with televisions this cheap, you'll be able to put one in every room of the house, including some rooms that will inspire equal parts envy and revuls
1d
'Gold standard' star holds a record number of elements
In our sun's neighborhood of the Milky Way galaxy is a relatively bright star, and in it, astronomers have been able to identify the widest range of elements in a star beyond our solar system. The study has identified 65 elements in the star, HD 222925. Forty-two of the elements identified are heavy elements that are listed along the bottom of the periodic table. "To the best of my knowledge, tha
1d
Antidepressants during pregnancy are unlikely to cause seizures in kids later
Taking antidepressants during pregnancy is unlikely to cause seizures in newborn babies and epilepsy in children, according to a new study. Researchers examined whether taking selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors in the first trimester of pregnancy was associated with an increased risk of seizures in babies younger than one month or of epilepsy l
1d
Policymakers underestimate methane's climate and air quality impacts, says a new study
Methane emissions have been increasing rapidly in recent years, contributing significantly to global warming. Despite this, methane is not adequately treated within existing national and international governance frameworks. Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS) researchers highlight the urgent need for action in a new study published in Environmental Science & Policy.
1d
Event Horizon: A Q&A With the EHT Scientists Who Captured Images of Sagittarius A*
This is the first image of Sgr A*, the supermassive black hole at the centre of our galaxy, with an added black background to fit wider screens. It's the first direct visual evidence of the presence of this black hole. It was captured by the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT), an array which linked together eight existing radio observatories across the planet to form a single "Earth-sized" virtual tel
1d
Official numbers may miss 20% of COVID deaths
The current stats on COVID deaths might be a big undercount of the true death toll. The finding comes just as the United States has marked 1 million deaths due to COVID-19. New research finds that official COVID-19 death trackers may have missed more than 170,000 deaths. The current COVID-19 death total may even be above 1.2 million. The study examined excess deaths —a metric that captures the nu
1d
Departmental policies key to police officers' decisions to activate body-worn cameras
Body-worn cameras (BWCs) have become increasingly common in U.S. police departments, but we know little about their use in the field, including the factors related to whether and why police activate them. A new study examined the prevalence and correlates of BWC activation in Phoenix, Arizona. The study found that departmental policy may be the most important factor in determining BWC activation,
1d
The European drought event from 2018 to 2020 was the most intense in over 250 years
These were days, months and years that many will come to remember: the drought from 2018 to 2020. An international team of researchers has succeeded in categorizing the historical dimensions of this event. Based on their findings, no drought covering such a large area for an extended period and coinciding with warmer temperature has occurred in Europe since the middle of the 18th century. The year
1d
Perception-based nanosensor platform could advance detection of ovarian cancer
Ovarian cancer kills 14,000 women in the United States every year. It's the fifth leading cause of cancer death among women, and it's so deadly, in part, because the disease is hard to catch in its early stages. Patients often don't experience symptoms until the cancer has begun to spread, and there aren't any reliable screening tests for early detection.
1d
Amazon deforestation threatens newly discovered fish species in Brazil
Researchers have discovered and described two new species of Amazonian fish — one with striking red-orange fins and the other so small it is technically considered a miniature fish species. Both species inhabit waters located at the bleeding edge of human encroachment into the Amazon rainforest roughly 25 miles north of the Brazilian city of Apuí. The study's authors said that ongoing deforestati
1d
CRISPR now possible in cockroaches
Researchers have developed a CRISPR-Cas9 approach to enable gene editing in cockroaches, according to a new study. The simple and efficient technique, named 'direct parental' CRISPR (DIPA-CRISPR), involves the injection of materials into female adults where eggs are developing rather than into the embryos themselves.
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From degrowth to a sustainable food system transformation
Proponents of degrowth have long argued that economic growth is detrimental to the environment. Now, scientists show that concerning the food sector, curbing growth alone would not make our food system sustainable — but changing what we eat and putting a price on carbon would.
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Precursor of spine and brain forms passively
Researchers have conducted a detailed study of neurulation — how the neural tube forms during embryonic development. They conclude that this happens less actively than previously thought. This also has implications for understanding defects such as spina bifida.
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Chinese penduline tit buries eggs to prevent them from blowin' in the wind
Many animal species bury their eggs, for a number of different reasons. While it is firmly established that Eurasian penduline tits bury them because of sexual conflict, their Chinese counterparts seem to have an entirely different reason. Experimental manipulations show that for these birds burial prevents the eggs from falling out of the nest in strong winds.
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Flu vaccine could cut COVID risk
Nature, Published online: 16 May 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01315-9 Health-care workers who got the influenza vaccine were also protected from COVID-19 — but the effect might not last long.
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A CubeSat is flying to the moon to make sure Lunar Gateway's orbit is stable
Before this decade is over, NASA will send astronauts to the moon for the first time since the Apollo Era. As part of the Artemis Program, NASA also plans to establish the infrastructure that will allow for a "sustained program of lunar exploration." A key part of this is the Lunar Gateway, an orbiting space station that will facilitate regular trips to and from the lunar surface. In addition to b
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Bacteria that 'record' data can check gut health
Researchers have equipped gut bacteria with data logger functionality as a way of monitoring which genes are active in the bacteria. These microorganisms could one day offer a noninvasive means of diagnosing disease or assessing the effect of a diet on health. The researchers have now tested their modified bacteria in mice. It's an important step towards using sensor bacteria in medicine in the f
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First plants grow in soil from the moon
For the first time in history, scientists have grown plants in soil from the moon. The new study also investigates how plants respond biologically to the moon's soil, also known as lunar regolith, which is radically different from soil found on Earth. The work is a first step toward one day growing plants for food and oxygen on the moon or during space missions. More immediately, this research co
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Best AV Receivers in 2022
Three components are required to create a home theater system: a TV (or projector), speakers, and an AV (audio / video) receiver. An AV receiver is the piece that connects the source of your audio — a record player, for instance — to your speakers. This piece of equipment can also carry a video signal from a game console, Blu-ray player, or PC to your television. What makes AV receivers special i
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Unanticipated high mortality rate of participants in multidecade juvenile justice study
Gun-related deaths are at a record high, according to a recent report by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), rising 35 percent during the first year of the pandemic. Northwestern researcher Linda Teplin, who has been studying the juvenile justice population for more than 25 years, understands youth from low-income neighborhoods are especially vulnerable.
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New theoretical model reveals multiple component processes in perceptual learning
How repeated training or practice leads to long-term performance improvements is one of the fundamental questions in skill acquisition. Although long-term benefits of perceptual learning have been observed in a wide range of perceptual tasks, studies also documented some very interesting short-term phenomena during the learning process. However, most existing studies have focused on the average pe
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Lower prices can make more people eat vegetarian
More meat eaters would choose a vegetarian burger if it was cheaper than a meat burger. But it takes a large price difference—even if the price was reduced by 30%, only a third of those who normally choose meat burgers would choose vegetarian. These are the results in an economics study from the University of Gothenburg, examining the driving forces and obstacles to replacing meat with green alter
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Artery stiffness may predict Type 2 diabetes risk better than BP and standard risk factors
Analysis of more than 11,000 people investigated whether high blood pressure or arterial stiffness may be a better predictor of future Type 2 diabetes risk. Results found that adults with increased arterial stiffness had a higher risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, regardless of their hypertension status when added to standard risk factors. More research is needed to determine the association amon
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Smart pacifier developed to monitor infant health in the hospital
A wireless, bioelectronic pacifier could eliminate the need for invasive, twice-daily blood draws to monitor babies' electrolytes in Newborn Intensive Care Units or NICUs. This smart pacifier can also provide more continuous monitoring of sodium and potassium ion levels. These electrolytes help alert caregivers if babies are dehydrated, a danger for infants, especially those born prematurely or wi
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Researchers identify the cuticle as the first protective barrier of plants against UV radiation
The cuticle, the outermost part of a plant, which acts as the interphase between the plant and the environment, is becoming increasingly important in agriculture. It has already been shown that the cuticle has hydrologic properties to prevent water loss, as well as mechanical properties that guard against fruit cracking, and that it plays a role in the defense against pathogens.
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Gender bias found in names given to new species
A trio of researchers at the University of Otago in New Zealand, has found that when it comes time to name a newly found species after someone, female honorees tend to be underrepresented. In their paper published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, Robert Poulin, Cameron McDougall and Bronwen Presswell describe their analysis of thousands of newly named species
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Daily briefing: Retinas revived after donor's death
Nature, Published online: 13 May 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01361-3 New method keeps retinas from degrading rapidly after death. Plus, ancient DNA maps the 'dawn of farming' and why so many missions are going to the Moon.
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If you stand like Superman or Wonder Woman, would you feel stronger?
Dominant or upright postures can help people feel—and maybe even behave—more confidently. A new analysis by the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU), the University of Bamberg and The Ohio State University has confirmed what small studies already suggested. The team evaluated data from around 130 experiments with a total of 10,000 participants. The results also disprove the controversia
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Improved method to make branched polymers
Branched polymers, polymers that look like tiny tree branches, have significant potential for water filtration, the biomedical field, nanoelectronics, and other applications. Researchers have now come up with a better way for efficiently creating these unique structures.
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The Atlantic Expands Books Coverage and Announces an Imprint With Independent Publisher Zando
The Atlantic , a literary destination since its founding 165 years ago as a magazine of "Literature, Art, and Politics," is today unveiling a dramatically expanded Books section devoted to essays, criticism, reporting, original fiction, poetry, and book recommendations, and announcing a first-of-its-kind book imprint called Atlantic Editions in partnership with the independent publisher Zando. At
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Stimulus cash does the most when it goes to people who spend it
Stimulus directed to households is most effective when it's targeted to people who need it most, researchers report. In response to the shock of the COVID-19 pandemic, the US Congress pumped trillions of dollars into the economy in the form of stimulus checks, expanded unemployment benefits, and targeted spending to bolster specific industries such as airlines. The massive package apparently stav
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Can this soil microbe boost artificial photosynthesis?
A spot of molecular glue and a timely twist help a bacterial enzyme convert carbon dioxide into carbon compounds 20 times faster than plant enzymes do during photosynthesis, research finds. The results stand to accelerate progress toward converting carbon dioxide into a variety of products. Plants rely on a process called carbon fixation—turning carbon dioxide from the air into carbon-rich biomol
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Bridge collapse in Pakistan due to glacier lake outburst flood
Extraordinary record-high temperatures in Pakistan triggered the collapse of the Hassanabad Bridge along the Karakoram Highway in the Hunza Valley. The ongoing unprecedented heat wave melted ice on Shisper Glacier, creating a lake which flooded, wiping out the bridge and damaging nearby homes, buildings, and two power plants.
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Guest alignment and defect formation during pore filling in metal-organic framework films
Most people don't think about how molecules fit in the ultra-small spaces between other molecules, but that is what Professor Masahide Takahashi's research team think about every day at Osaka Metropolitan University. They study metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), composed of modularly arranged metal ions and molecules (organic linkers), forming a scaffold. Metal ions act as corners connected by longe
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Resurrecting restaurants after the pandemic
The COVID-19 pandemic has had a devastating effect on millions of people as well as the businesses on which many of us depend. A new study in the International Journal of Services, Economics and Management, looks at the impact lockdowns and other measures have had on the food and drinks industry, showing how many businesses in this sector have summarily failed because of the emergence of this leth
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The Atlantic's June Cover Story: "Chasing Joan Didion"
Last fall, having heard that Joan Didion's health was in decline, The Atlantic 's staff writer Caitlin Flanagan got in her car and started driving across California. "I wanted to feel close to the girl who came from Nowhere, California (have you ever been to Sacramento?), and blasted herself into the center of everything. I wanted to feel close to the young woman who'd gone to Berkeley, and studi
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Hormonal changes during menopause are directly related to decline in cardiovascular health
Levels of bad cholesterol rise during menopause, and 10% of this increase is likely due to shifts in sex hormones. Women usually undergo menopause at the age of 48 to 52 years, leading to a decline in estrogen and increase in follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). Menopause is thought to predispose women to heart disease since it typically develops 10 years later than in men, and risk rises after men
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Idrottsliv utomhus under pandemin utmanade föreningar
Under pandemin flyttade idrotten ofta utomhus. Det blev ett sätt att kunna fortsätta med träning och idrottsverksamhet. Företag inom träningssektorn var bättre på att hitta kreativa lösningar under omställningen än föreningsidrotten, visar ny forskning. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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Actually, Summer Is Not Tomorrow
Sign up for Kaitlyn and Lizzie's newsletter here. Lizzie: As inspiration for this newsletter, which is about a birthday party, I started researching well-known birthday moments in movies, to see how the birthday celebrations that I experience in my life stack up to those in the cinematic universe. I found IMDb's " 25 Most Memorable Birthday Scene in Movies ," which offers helpful descriptions of
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The Download: The grim spread of the Buffalo shooting video, and crypto's tough test
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. Social media platforms are still struggling to stop the spread of the Buffalo shooting video Social media platforms are still struggling to stop the spread of the video of the racist mass shooting in Buffalo, New York, on Saturday that left 10 people dead, mos
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Latest sandstorm brings Iraq to standstill
Another sandstorm that descended Monday on Iraq sent at least 2,000 people to hospital with breathing problems and led to the closure of airports, schools and public offices across the country.
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The Arrested Development of Geoff Dyer
Most writers of books have only one story to tell; it is the one wrapped around a piece of emotional wisdom the author has made his or her own. If the writers are any good at what they do, the story deepens with each book that is written. If they are less than good, the story will simply repeat itself at the same level at which it originally took shape. In time, the work of the better writer will
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Så väger forskare samman resultat från många studier
Det publiceras miljoner vetenskapliga artiklar varje år, och under pandemin kom det många tusentals som handlade om covid-19. Systematiska översikter är då ett sätt att väga samman alla studier som genomförts inom ett specifikt område och ger en överblick över resultaten från dessa studier. Nu är en sådan översikt klar och publicerad – och resultatet överraskade forskarna.
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Computer modeling reveals modalities to actuate mutable, active matter
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30445-x Catalytic reactions on flexible sheets generate fluid flows that transform the shape of the sheet, which in turn modifies the flow. These complex interactions make computer models vital for designing and harnessing these feedback loops to create soft active matter that autonomously performs self-sustained mechani
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Structural anatomy of Protein Kinase C C1 domain interactions with diacylglycerol and other agonists
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30389-2 Protein kinase Cs (PKCs) define a central DAG-sensing node in intracellular phosphoinositide signaling pathways that regulate cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis, and motility. The structures of PKC C1 domain complexes with DAG and 4 agonists reveal the molecular basis of ligand recognition and capture.
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Multifunctional metal-organic framework-based nanoreactor for starvation/oxidation improved indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-blockade tumor immunotherapy
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30436-y Inhibited immune response and low levels of delivery inhibit starvation cancer therapies. Here, the authors report on the co-delivery of glucose oxidase and IDO inhibitor 1-methyltryptophan using metal organic frameworks and show amplified release in response to starvation therapy along with immune modulatory eff
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A nucleotide-sensing oligomerization mechanism that controls NrdR-dependent transcription of ribonucleotide reductases
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30328-1 Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) is an essential enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of DNA building blocks. Here, the authors present the cryo-EM structure and mechanism of action of NrdR, the RNR-specific repressor, that controls transcription of RNR genes in bacteria.
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Mitochondria preserve an autarkic one-carbon cycle to confer growth-independent cancer cell migration and metastasis
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30363-y Chemotherapeutic antifolates, such as methotrexate (MTX), impair cancer cell proliferation by inhibiting nucleotide synthesis. Here, the authors show that MTX sustains an autarkic mitochondrial one-carbon metabolism leading to serine synthesis to promote cancer cell migration and metastasis.
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Suppressing high-dimensional crystallographic defects for ultra-scaled DNA arrays
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30441-1 DNA nanofabrication techniques have huge potential for the patterning of electronic materials and devices but suffer from defects which become more significant at lower scales. Here, the authors report on a study into the causes of line defects and develop criteria for reducing defects demonstrating this techniqu
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