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Nyheder2022maj18

Rare stone circle found at prehistoric ritual site in Cornwall
Archaeologists find pits lying in crooked horseshoe formation at Castilly Henge near Bodmin A rare stone circle has been found at a prehistoric ritual site in Cornwall, with seven regularly spaced pits mapped by a team of archaeologists. Bracken and scrub were cleared over the winter at Castilly Henge near Bodmin to allow archaeologists to survey the site. They found the pits lying in a crooked h
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What Parents Did Before Baby Formula
The baby was just two weeks old, and hungry. Elizabeth Hanson tried to breastfeed, but didn't have enough milk. With terror, she watched as her daughter lost weight, tiny bones protruding from her skin. In America, in modern times, most parents can count on multiple safe, healthy options for feeding an infant: breast milk or formula. That is, unless they are experiencing the impacts of the curren
12h
Marvel Signs Deal to Insert CGI Stan Lee Cameos Into Future Films
Never Say Die Comic books legend Stan Lee died years ago, but now it looks like he could live on — because Marvel is maneuvering to allow his likeness to be used in films, theme parks and more. The Holly wood Reporter revealed today that a 20-year deal between Marvel, Genius Brands International and POW! Entertainment — the intellectual property company Lee started in 2001 — will allow Marvel to
3h
NASA Reveals Early Plans to Send Two Astronauts to Surface of Mars
During a high-level talk on NASA's objectives for human space exploration, we got an early glimpse of what a 30 day crewed mission to the surface of Mars could eventually look like. It's an exciting prospect that, while many years if not decades away, shows the agency's commitment to fulfilling humanity's dreams of setting foot on the Red Planet for the first time in history. NASA director of spa
6h
Pharma Bro Martin Shkreli Released From Prison, Seen Eating at Cracker Barrel
Looks like "pharma bro" Martin Shkreli — best known for raising the price of a life-saving drug from $13.50 to $750 per pill — is out of the clink and living it up at Cracker Barrel. That horrifying Mad Lib is brought to you by one of Shkreli's buddies, who posted on Twitter that he'd picked the former pharma exec up from prison, following up with a photo of the pair dining at the chain eatery. "
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Spectacular ceiling frescoes discovered in the Temple of Khnum at Esna
In the Temple of Khnum at Esna, Upper Egypt, German and Egyptian researchers have uncovered a series of vibrantly-colored ceiling frescoes. The relief images in the central section of the ceiling, Professor Christian Leitz from the University of Tübingen reports, make up a total of 46 depictions of the Upper-Egyptian vulture goddess Nekhbet and the Lower-Egyptian serpent goddess Wadjet. Both are d
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Enzyme breaks down PET plastic in record time
Plastic bottles, punnets, wrap—lightweight packaging made of PET plastic becomes a problem if it is not recycled. Scientists at Leipzig University have now discovered a highly efficient enzyme that degrades PET in record time. The enzyme PHL7, which the researchers found in a compost heap in Leipzig, could make biological PET recycling possible much faster than previously thought. The findings hav
10h
Research team develops wood-based foam to keep buildings cooler
Summertime is almost here, a time when many people try to beat the heat. But running air conditioners constantly can be expensive and wasteful. Now, researchers reporting in the ACS journal Nano Letters have designed a lightweight foam made from wood-based cellulose nanocrystals that reflects sunlight, emits absorbed heat and is thermally insulating. They suggest that the material could reduce bui
4h
Seafloor animal cued to settle, transformed by a bacterial compound
Most bottom-dwelling marine invertebrate animals, such as sponges, corals, worms and oysters, produce tiny larvae that swim in the ocean prior to attaching to the seafloor and transforming into juveniles. A new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) and led by University of Hawai'i (UH) at Mānoa researchers revealed that a large, complex molecule, called lipo
15h
First direct observation of the dead-cone effect in particle physics
The ALICE collaboration at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has made the first direct observation of the dead-cone effect—a fundamental feature of the theory of the strong force that binds quarks and gluons together into protons, neutrons and, ultimately, all atomic nuclei. In addition to confirming this effect, the observation, reported in a paper published today in Nature, provides direct experim
3h
Child's 130,000-year-old tooth could offer clues to extinct human relative
Researchers believe the discovery in a Laos cave proves that Denisovans lived in the warm tropics of southeast Asia A child's tooth at least 130,000 years old found in a Laos cave could help scientists uncover more information about an early human cousin, according to a new study. Researchers believe the discovery proves that Denisovans – a now-extinct branch of humanity – lived in the warm tropi
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Crypto-Shilling Celebs Suddenly Very Quiet Now That It's Crashing
Busted Remember all those celebrities who took money from crypto companies to do ads encouraging low-information dupes into investing? They're still rich, but they've been awfully quiet since the industry they shilled has tanked in value . As The New York Times notes , not a single one of the celebrities who did cryptocurrency ads earlier this year has said anything since its cumulative valuation
7h
The Supreme Court Needs an Ethics Code
The extraordinary leak of a draft Supreme Court opinion overruling Roe v. Wade has reignited a discussion about ethical responsibility in public life. The core concern of ethics is that, in deciding what to say and how to act, those with public roles must look to the public's interests, not their own or those of a narrow class of allies. In a period of acute concern about the erosion of instituti
13h
Scientists Gene Hack Hamsters Into Hyper-Aggressive Monsters
Hamster Brawl Scientists say that a little gene hacking turned adorable hamsters into vicious monstrosities. Researchers at Georgia State University may have published the scientific understatement of the year when saying that their CRISPR experiment with hamsters "found that the biology behind social behavior may be more complex than previously thought." Using the revolutionary gene editing tech
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How Complex Is a Knot? New Proof Reveals Ranking System That Works
Back in 1981, Cameron Gordon introduced a new way to relate two knots — mathematical constructs modeled after the knots that appear in a single thread or string. In his paper, he conjectured that this new relationship could be used to arrange groups of knots according to how complicated they are. This winter, Ian Agol, a mathematician at the University of California, Berkeley, posted a six-page..
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What COVID Hospitalization Numbers Are Missing
For weeks now , as COVID-19 cases have ticked upward in the Northeast and mid-Atlantic, pundits and political leaders have offered a supposedly reassuring refrain: Cases might be climbing, but hospitalizations aren't yet following suit. In some places, that has been true. Several health-care workers around the country told me they're seeing the lowest caseloads since last summer. A few aren't hav
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John Fetterman Wins on Vibes
Even if you don't know a single policy he supports, chances are good that you know what John Fetterman looks like. Pennsylvania's lieutenant governor is larger than life at 6 foot 8, distinctively bald with a salt-and-pepper goatee, and draped in a baggy shirt or hoodie. Oh, and he's a shorts guy too. Fetterman easily won today's Democratic primary for U.S. Senate, and will run in November in a r
19h
Goodnight Sweet Prince: NASA is Officially Killing Its Mars Lander
The end of NASA's InSight Mars lander is, well, in sight. The spacecraft has long been battling with Martian dust obstructing its umbrella-shaped solar panels, making it increasingly difficult to charge its batteries. Now, in a Tuesday update , NASA revealed that Insight's science operations are coming to a close later this summer. By December, they say, the lander will have "become inoperative."
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Elon Musk Spotted Seemingly Using Starship Heat Shield as Snack Tray
Tasty Morsels Twitter users spotted an interesting piece of serving ware in a photo of SpaceX CEO Elon Musk with Indonesian president Joko Widodo having a chat — a Starship ceramic heat shield tile being used to hold snacks. The two sat down to discuss everything from electric vehicles to interplanetary space travel. Indonesia happens to be the world's biggest producer of nickel, a crucial ingred
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NASA Alarmed That Astronauts' Spacesuits Keep Filling Up With Water
Watery Grave The spacesuits that allow astronauts to venture outside of the International Space Station have been declared "no-go" for upcoming spacewalks. That's because the suits' helmets keep filling with excess water, a potentially life threatening scenario astronauts have been battling with on multiple occasions, CBS reports . The massive and unwieldy suits, referred to as "extra-vehicular m
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The Pope Says His Preferred Medication for Injury Is Tequila
Hey barkeep, hurry up, would ya? In a viral video the Associated Press covered yesterday , Pope Francis stopped to speak with onlookers as he passed through St. Peter's Square in Vatican City. He sat inside the bulletproof popemobile and chatted with Mexican seminary students from the Legion of Christ who asked the Argentinian leader in his native Spanish how his knee was doing, according to the
2h
Ukraine's Way Out
The war in Ukraine is entering a more dangerous phase. Even though Russia appears to have downsized its goals after Kyiv blunted Moscow's initial invasion, the Kremlin is now determined to enlarge the chunk of eastern and southern Ukraine that it grabbed in 2014. Meanwhile, NATO allies are pouring in arms, providing intelligence, and savoring the prospect of a "victory" that entails expelling Rus
15h
Elon Musk Warns That Humankind Will "End Up in Adult Diapers"
Tesla CEO Elon Musk has rehashed one of his favorite talking points yet again , warning of the dangers of having fewer children, something that he says could lead to the collapse of human civilization . "At least maintain our numbers," he said during a conference in Miami earlier this week, as quoted by Insider . "We don't necessarily need to grow dramatically, but least let's not gradually dwind
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People With Schizophrenia Are Skipping Meds and Making Peace With the Voices
Turns out not making people feel inferior because their brains work differently could be better than forcing them to conform — you know, like a lot of societal expectations . A New York Times report published yesterday followed a female patient who experiences auditory hallucinations and described the voices she often hears. As a child, doctors prescribed her multiple medications: antipsychotics
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The Impossible Ambition of Kendrick Lamar's New Album
"Sorry I didn't save the world," Kendrick Lamar says in the final moments of Mr. Morale & The Big Steppers , his new double album. The apology is not sarcastic. Lamar really has spent nearly two decades of rapping trying to open minds, save souls, and bring peace … and yet, still, all of this ( gestures wildly ) is going on. Lamar sings his album-closing track, "Mirror," in a lighthearted voice a
8h
The Rotten Core of Our Political System
A lexander Burns and Jonathan Martin are star political reporters for The New York Times , and their scoops in This Will Not Pass: Trump, Biden, and the Battle for America's Future have already made headlines . But the book is more interesting than just for perishable news that will attract ogling Washington insiders. It's a document of decline and fall—a chronicle that should cause future reader
12h
The Myth That Roe Broke America
The idea that American politics became bitter and divisive because of Roe v. Wade , the 1973 Supreme Court decision legalizing abortion, is a cherished bit of right-wing folk history, akin to the idea that Robert E. Lee opposed slavery or that the purpose of the Electoral College was to protect small states from the tyranny of big states . Like any political use of history, its purpose is to just
12h
The Crypto Crash Feels Amazing
Updated at 6:10 p.m. ET on May 18, 2022 "What do you think of this company Netscape ?" my parents asked. It was 1995, and they had called me on the landline, which back then just meant the telephone. Netscape was a company that made a graphical web browser— the web browser, really—but gave it away for free. Its income statement showed only modest revenue (and substantial losses). The web was new
2h
Conservatives Are Defending a Sanitized Version of 'The Great Replacement'
Three years ago, when a white-supremacist fanatic killed dozens of people in El Paso, Texas, the reaction from the right was unreserved condemnation . When another white-supremacist fanatic killed 10 people at a supermarket in a Black neighborhood in Buffalo, New York, last week, the reaction from some figures on the right was to acknowledge that the guy had a point about this whole "replacement"
4h
Japan Approves Play to Dump Radioactive Water Into Ocean
Flood Gates Japanese regulators just gave the Fukushima nuclear plant the green light to release around 1.4 million liters of treated radioactive wastewater into the Pacific ocean starting next year, the Associated Press reports . While the environmental risks are minimal according to the regulator, there's still plenty of tritium, a potentially carcinogenic byproduct, in the water that could thr
7h
The Good That Ted Cruz's Win Can Do
To hold his Senate seat against his challenger, Beto O'Rourke, in 2018, Ted Cruz spent nearly $40 million. O'Rourke's campaign spent double that amount. The day before the vote in Texas, Cruz lent his campaign $260,000. This was a curious—and seemingly unnecessary—gesture: The campaign's final report showed it ended with $263,000 cash in hand. Yet Cruz was not acting irrationally. He was preparin
10h
The Intersectionality of Hate
"The idea is if we don't look out the white race will be—will be utterly submerged. It's all scientific stuff; it's been proved." These are not the words of the teenager who walked into a supermarket in Buffalo, New York, on Saturday to hunt down Black Americans, although they might as well be. These are the words of Tom Buchanan, a rich, repugnant character in the 1925 novel The Great Gatsby. ​​
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Much Like Hipsters, Scallops Can Be Lured to Their Death by Disco Lights
Clam-iroquai Just like your average EDM fan, scallops can, as it turns out, be captured more easily when you turn on the pretty lights for them. As The Guardian reports , a group of fishing consultants (yes, that's a thing) have devised a devious plot to lure unsuspecting scallops — by flashing "disco" lights inside trap baskets, which apparently attracts them. This technique was actually created
4h
Tucker Carlson Deserves Blame—But Not for Buffalo
This is an edition of Up for Debate, a newsletter by Conor Friedersdorf. On Wednesdays, he rounds up timely conversations and solicits reader responses to one thought-provoking question. Every Monday, he publishes some thoughtful replies. Sign up for the newsletter here. Question of the Week Caitlin Flanagan's masterful " Chasing Joan Didion " has me thinking about travel. What have you learned w
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What the Primaries Reveal About the Future of Trumpism
F or all the talk about how Donald Trump's endorsed candidates would fare in the Republican primaries this year, the results in this week's races made clear: Whatever happens to Trump's personal influence, Trumpism is consolidating its dominance of the GOP. The former president's scorecard on Tuesday was mixed. Candidates he endorsed won the GOP nominations for governor in Pennsylvania and Senate
6h
Study shows how diet has transformed the ancient dog into a family pet
The shape of the mandible (the lower jaw) is influenced by the mechanical action of the jaw muscles that connect it to the skull, and mandible shape therefore reflects the diet of the animal. The lower jaw is also sufficiently robust to survive burial and fossilization, providing a valuable insight into the diets of animals that are long dead.
9h
The baby formula shortage has birthed a shady online marketplace
After Ashley Diaz had her baby in early April, she faced a setback. She wasn't producing enough breast milk. Her newborn son needed formula to supplement his nutrition. So she sent her mother to Target to stock up. She came back with only two boxes—the maximum allowed. Now, many of those store shelves are empty, not only in Los Angeles, where Diaz lives, but across the United States. Parents are
14h
New algorithm approach paves the way for larger, more complex metalenses
Compact and lightweight metasurfaces—which use specifically designed and patterned nanostructures on a flat surface to focus, shape and control light—are a promising technology for wearable applications, especially virtual and augmented reality systems. Today, research teams painstakingly design the specific pattern of nanostructures on the surface to achieve the desired function of the lens, whet
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Outbursts of magnetar SGR J1935+2154 investigated in detail
European astronomers have conducted a detailed, long-term X-ray monitoring campaign of a magnetar known as SGR J1935+2154, since it entered its active phase, experiencing numerous X-ray outbursts. Results of the study, published May 10 on arXiv.org, could help us better understand the nature of this magnetar.
9h
These materials were meant to revolutionize the solar industry. Why hasn't it happened?
Solar panels are basically synonymous with silicon. The material is used in about 95% of the panels in today's market. But silicon solar cells are limited in how much energy they can harness from the sun, and they are still relatively expensive to make. For many, compounds called perovskites have long held promise as potentially cheaper, lighter, more efficient solar materials. But despite the ex
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The Miraculous Comeback of the Field Trip
Photographs by Cassidy Araiza You could hear them getting antsy through the bus windows. "I want to see a meerkat!" "Finally, I get to feel my feet!" And a deeper voice, just as emphatic: "SIT! DOWN!" It was a little after 10 a.m. on May 6 when three busloads of third graders poured out into the heat of a dusty parking lot at Out of Africa, a wildlife park about 90 miles north of Phoenix, Arizona
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Burst Pipe AND Power Failure on the Saga! | Deadliest Catch
Stream Deadliest Catch on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/deadliest-catch #DeadliestCatch #Discovery #DiscoveryPlus Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Disco
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Quantum key distribution network accurately measures ground vibration
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in China has found that quantum key distribution (QKD) networks can be used to accurately measure ground vibration. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group describes their implementation of a twin-field, fiber-based QKD network over a distance of 658 km. They also determined that the network could be used
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Water Levels in Lake Mead Reach Record Lows
Lake Mead, North America's largest artificial reservoir, formed on the Colorado River between Nevada and Arizona, has shrunk to historic lows—dropping to about 30 percent of its capacity. The reservoir is a major source of water for Arizona, Nevada, and California, as well as part of Mexico, serving nearly 25 million people and huge agricultural areas. A combination of drought, climate change, an
4h
Kale 'miracle food' paper retracted for being 'word salad'
Kale may be a superfood, but for one paper on the vegetable, Twitter proved to be its Kryptonite. We'll explain. Last November, Food Science & Nutrition published an article titled "Kale (Brassica oleracea var. sabellica) as miracle food with special reference to therapeutic and nutraceuticals perspective." How miraculous? As the authors, from Government College University … Continue reading
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Image: Hubble reveals a river of star formation
This newly revised NASA Hubble Space Telescope image of the Hickson Compact Group 31 (HCG 31) of galaxies highlights streams of star-formation as four dwarf galaxies interact. The bright, distorted clump of young blue-white stars (top-right of center) is NGC 1741. Although it appears to be a single galaxy, NGC 1741 is actually a pair of colliding dwarf galaxies. Another dwarf, cigar-shaped galaxy
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Ultrahigh piezoelectric performance demonstrated in ceramic materials
The ability of piezoelectric materials to convert mechanical energy into electrical energy and vice versa makes them useful for various applications from robotics to communication to sensors. A new design strategy for creating ultrahigh-performing piezoelectric ceramics opens the door to even more beneficial uses for these materials, according to a team of researchers from Penn State and Michigan
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Plantwatch: the plants that kill their insect pollinators
Jack-in-the-pulpit plants lure in gnats, cover them in pollen and trap them. As they struggle to escape they pollenate female flowers There are two plant species with the most brutal flowers in the world, which deliberately kill their insect pollinators. The flowers of jack-in the pulpit, Arisaema angustatum, and its close relative Arisaema peninsulae are hidden inside a bowl-shaped wrapper with
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NSW announces new inquiry into Kathleen Folbigg's conviction over her children's deaths
Scientists had called for Folbigg's release after it was discovered two daughters had a genetic variant that can cause sudden death Follow our Australia news live blog for the latest updates Get our free news app ; get our morning email briefing The New South Wales attorney general has ordered a second public inquiry into the conviction of the woman dubbed "Australia's worst female serial killer"
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Physicists shine new light on an old quantum optics problem about collective behavior
When atoms interact with each other, they behave as a whole rather than individual entities. That can give rise to synchronized responses to inputs, a phenomenon that, if properly understood and controlled, may prove useful for developing light sources, building sensors that can take ultraprecise measurements, and understanding dissipation in quantum computers.
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The workplace, redefined by women of color | Deepa Purushothaman
Corporate inclusion visionary Deepa Purushothaman shares how women of color can advocate for themselves in workplace settings where they are undervalued, discriminated against and overlooked — and how companies can foster working cultures that empower everyone to achieve success. (This conversation, hosted by TED current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rodgers, was part of an exclusive TED Mem
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Marine ecologists warn of coral extinction by the end of the century
Vibrant coral reefs teeming with marine life are diminishing throughout the Caribbean as global temperatures rise. Coral reefs are habitats that support the seafood industry, are barriers for coastal communities from storms, flooding and sea level rise, and are attractions for tourism. Their net economic value worldwide is estimated to be tens of billions of dollars. However, if atmospheric and oc
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The Download: A baby formula crisis, and the hunt to improve solar panels
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. The baby formula shortage has birthed a shady online marketplace Across the United States, parents are scrambling to find baby formula amid a nationwide shortage. To non-parents, the shortage may seem sudden, but it's been quietly snowballing into a crisis for
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I tried to buy an Olive Garden NFT. All I got was heartburn.
Money is weird now. When we were settling in on the theme for our May/June issue , I decided to buy an NFT of an Olive Garden for my friend Katie, who really loves Olive Garden. It was also an attempt to try to better understand NFTs. Each of the " Non-Fungible Olive Gardens ," really just a photo of a restaurant, was minted for $19.99 and listed on the NFT trading platform OpenSea—the amount tet
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A 590-Foot-Tall Dam in China Will Be Built Entirely by Robots
As the world rushes to stop burning fossil fuels and implement more renewable sources of power, there's a lot of hype around solar and wind . While they're comparatively easier to get up and running, these energy sources don't have nearly the same output capacity—or consistency—as hydropower. China is investing big in all of the above, most recently announcing construction of a massive dam on the
9h
Going Nowhere Fast
A pair of exercise bicycles are resting 12,500 feet beneath the surface of the North Atlantic Ocean, about 370 miles south-southeast of Newfoundland. In 1912, these same bikes sat alongside rowing machines, an "electric camel," and other pieces of state-of-the-art equipment in the gymnasium of the RMS Titanic. The bicycles had a single flywheel and were mounted in front of a large dial whose red
12h
A hybrid open-top light-sheet microscope for versatile multi-scale imaging
During image analysis, researchers use light sheet microscopy of cleared tissue as a preferred method for high throughput volumetric imaging. A flexible system can provide a range of sizes, resolution and tissue-clearing protocols. In a new report now published in Nature Methods, Adam K. Glaser and a team of interdisciplinary scientists in mechanical engineering, bioengineering, and synthetic biol
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Team develops automated platform for plasmid production
Plasmids have extensive use in basic and applied biology. These small, circular DNA molecules are used by scientists to introduce new genes into a target organism. Well known for their applications in the production of therapeutic proteins like insulin, plasmids are broadly used in the large-scale production of many bioproducts.
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Injured women face discrimination over life-saving drugs, say researchers
Female patients in England and Wales half as likely to receive TXA, which cuts risk of bleeding to death by 30%, as injured men Injured women are experiencing sex discrimination in the administration of a life-saving drug that cuts the risk of bleeding to death by 30%, researchers have warned. They found that female trauma victims were half as likely to receive tranexamic acid (TXA) as injured me
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Industry lobbying on WHO overshadowing public health policy, researchers suggest
Has the World Health Organization become collateral damage in the wars over global commerce? Producers of such products as commercial milk formulas, processed foods, alcoholic beverages, pharmaceuticals and electronic gaming software have been ramping up efforts to influence United States policy toward the WHO. This, University of California, Davis researchers suggest in a new paper, compromises a
2h
Surveillance pathway tells cells when they run low on lipids
Researchers have discovered a molecular pathway that allows cells to sense when their lipid supplies become depleted, prompting a flurry of activity that prevents starvation. The findings might someday lead to new ways to combat metabolic disorders and a variety of other health conditions.
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High rates of landscape degradation not product of landscape fires
Once humans discovered how to tame fire, they began using it for heat, cooking, to scare away animals and to alter their environs, especially burning areas to plant and to restore grazing land. In Madagascar, scientists and conservationists have long believed that fire is a leading cause of high landscape degradation, but an international team of researchers have found that medium to large fires o
3h
Molecular surveillance pathway tells cells when they run low on lipids
UT Southwestern researchers have discovered a molecular pathway that allows cells to sense when their lipid supplies become depleted, prompting a flurry of activity that prevents starvation. The findings, reported in Nature, might someday lead to new ways to combat metabolic disorders and a variety of other health conditions.
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Best Samsung Watches of 2022
The best Samsung watches offer some of the clearest innovation in smartwatch design. Your Galaxy watch can be many things: an intimate mobile health tracker that lives on your wrist, a music player with gigabytes of storage, a window into Google Maps that helps you navigate the world, and even a replacement for your smartphone that allows you to take important calls and texts when you're out on a
3h
NBA sees rise in acts of symbolic violence, decline in acts of physical violence
A new analysis of NBA basketball broadcasts from 1998 to 2018 reveals a decline in acts of physical violence, such as pushing and elbowing, and a rise in acts of symbolic violence, such as shouting, trash talking, and menacing displays. Assaf Lev from the Department of Sports Therapy at Ono Academic College in Kiryat Ono, Israel, and colleagues present these findings in the open-access journal PLO
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Will the James Webb Space Telescope Reveal Another Earth?
With the December 2021 launch of the James Webb Space Telescope, one of the most expensive and ambitious scientific initiatives ever attempted commenced operations. Now that the telescope has been successfully deployed in its unique position in space, its advanced instruments will be able to gather data on questions that scientists once could only dream of answering. Is there life on other planet
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What should parents know about hepatitis in kids?
If you're a parent who is worried about the sudden—and unusually high—number of acute hepatitis cases in children, you're not alone. But medical experts say there is no need for panic. Instead, they recommend that physicians and parents educate themselves on what to watch out for. Hepatitis, or inflammation of the liver, is extremely rare in children. Yet more than 100 cases of severe hepatitis—i
4h
French towns sweat in record May heat
Several southern French towns sizzled in record high temperatures for May on Wednesday, while the month as whole is on track to be the hottest since records began, the national weather service said.
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Keeping buildings cooler with a wood-based foam
Summertime is almost here, a time when many people try to beat the heat. But running air conditioners constantly can be expensive and wasteful. Now, researchers have designed a lightweight foam made from wood-based cellulose nanocrystals that reflects sunlight, emits absorbed heat and is thermally insulating. They suggest that the material could reduce buildings' cooling energy needs by more than
4h
For wetland plants, sea-level rise stamps out benefits of higher CO2
Wetlands across the globe are in danger of drowning from rising seas. But for decades, scientists held out hope that another aspect of climate change — rising carbon dioxide (CO2) — could trigger extra plant growth, enabling coastal wetlands to grow fast enough to outpace sea-level rise. That helpful side effect is disappearing, scientists have discovered.
4h
Hidden lake may reveal what Antarctica was like before it froze
An investigation of the underside of the world's largest ice sheet in East Antarctica has revealed a city-size lake whose sediments might contain a history of the ice sheet since its earliest beginnings. That would answer questions about what Antarctica was like before it froze, how climate change has affected it over its history, and how the ice sheet might behave as the world warms. Two miles o
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Discovery uncovers need for ammonia emission regulations
A discovery by former Carnegie Mellon Ph.D. student, Mingyi Wang, leading a large collaborative team, sheds light on one way new particles are forming in the upper troposphere. The study, published in Nature, reveals an unexpected volatile reaction between nitric acid, sulfuric acid, and ammonia, synergistically creating new particles at a rapid rate. The findings suggest that in addition to carbo
4h
How antisemitism spreads online and what you can do
A new book digs into how Twitter, Facebook, TikTok, and other platforms may be fueling the rise of antisemitism in the United States and globally. According to the Anti-Defamation League, 2021 was a low point in the history of American antisemitism. The organization tallied 2,717 antisemitic incidents for that year, the most since it began collecting data in 1979. Co-edited by Sabine von Mering ,
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Graphene-wrapped zeolite membranes for fast hydrogen separation
The effects of global warming are becoming more serious, and there is a strong demand for technological advances to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. Hydrogen is an ideal clean energy which produces water when burned. To promote the use of hydrogen energy, it is essential to develop safe, energy-saving technologies for hydrogen production and storage. Currently, hydrogen is made from natural gas, s
5h
For wetland plants, sea-level rise stamps out benefits of higher carbon dioxide
Wetlands across the globe are in danger of drowning from rising seas. But for decades, scientists held out hope that another aspect of climate change—rising carbon dioxide (CO2)—could trigger extra plant growth, enabling coastal wetlands to grow fast enough to outpace sea-level rise. That helpful side effect is disappearing, they discovered in a new study published May 18.
5h
Developing a better diagnostic nano-probe
Biomarkers are components that may be present in biological samples and are related to specific diseases. Therefore, doctors can analyze biological samples from a patient to check their health condition or to monitor the progress of a specific therapy. Typically, these samples need to be purified and diluted before the analysis, and current medical diagnostic techniques rely on health care facilit
5h
New advances for reducing defects in multimaterials using directed energy deposition
Materials used in the fields of aerospace, automobiles, medical equipment and defense need to withstand extremely harsh environments. Small flaws in the materials, i.e. cracks, can lead to catastrophic consequences and massive economic loss. However, most materials cannot handle such high temperatures and pressures. Multimaterials, like functionally graded materials (FGMs), which combine different
5h
Study shows a '15-minute city' within reach for Vancouver
According to a new study published by Simon Fraser University researchers, 79 percent of residents in the City of Vancouver have access to a grocery store within a 15-minute walk and 99 percent had at least on grocery store within a 15-minute cycle.
5h
Component for brain-inspired computing
Researchers have developed a new material for an electronic component that can be used in a wider range of applications than its predecessors. Such components will help create electronic circuits that emulate the human brain and that are more efficient at performing machine-learning tasks.
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Technique protects privacy when making online recommendations
Researchers have developed a novel privacy-preserving protocol that could enable an algorithm that provides recommendations to guarantee a user's personal information remains secure while ensuring recommendation results are accurate. Their technique is so efficient it can run on a smartphone over a very slow network.
5h
Bringing order to the chaos of sea level projections
In their effort to provide decisionmakers with insight into the consequences of climate change, climate researchers at NIOZ, Deltares and UU are bringing order to the large number of sea level projections, translating climate models to expected sea level rise. Their new overview study was published in the journal Earth's Future. These results offer tools for decision making on the shorter and long
5h
New study sheds light on the phenomenon of female Jewish slavery and uncovers gang rape in Livorno's slave prison
Historian Prof. Tamar Herzig, Vice Dean for Research at Entin Faculty of Humanities, exposed previously unknown evidence of an organized gang rape of a group of enslaved Jewish girls and women from North Africa in the Italian city of Livorno at the beginning of the 17th century. The rape was organized by Dr. Bernardetto Buonromei, a high-ranking state official at Livorno's slave prison, who was al
5h
'Polluted' babies, millions dead: Scientists sound alarm on global pollution
By many measures, modern science has greatly improved the American way of life. Advances in chemistry and other technologies over the past century have made food more affordable and transportation more convenient and paved the way for a plethora of consumer goods. About 4 in 5 U.S. households own a computer and smartphone.
5h
Scientists reveal different water isotope concentrations in precipitation observations across Brazil's diverse climate
An isotope of a chemical element contains the same number of protons in the center of its atom, but when compared to another atom, the number of neutrons is different. Regarding water, some hydrogen and oxygen atoms within water molecules contain different number of neutrons, resulting in water isotopes. Because of the wide range of interactions that water molecules within precipitation can have w
5h
Tree loss on Madagascar not caused by small-scale fires used for land clearing
Once humans discovered how to tame fire, they began using it for heat and cooking as well as to scare away animals and to alter their environs, especially burning areas to plant and to restore grazing land. In Madagascar, scientists and conservationists have long believed that fire is a leading cause of high landscape degradation, but an international team of researchers have found that medium to
5h
Native plant gardening for species conservation
Declining native species could be planted in urban green spaces. Researchers from the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv), the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU), Leipzig University and other institutions describe how to use this great potential for species protection. In their most recent study, published in the journal Nature Sustainability, they recommend pra
6h
New study highlights major step forward in monitoring ocean health
In a major step forward for monitoring the biodiversity of marine systems, a new study published today in Environmental DNA details how MBARI researchers are using autonomous underwater robots to sample environmental DNA (eDNA). eDNA allows scientists to detect the presence of aquatic species from the tiny bits of genetic material they leave behind. This DNA soup offers clues about biodiversity ch
6h
Discovering a new way by which aerosols rapidly form and grow at high altitude
Aerosol particles can form and grow in Earth's upper troposphere in an unexpected way, reports the CLOUD collaboration in a paper published today in Nature. The new mechanism may represent a major source of cloud and ice seed particles in areas of the upper troposphere where ammonia is efficiently transported vertically, such as over the Asian monsoon regions.
6h
Proposed nitrogen fertilizer policies could protect farmer profits, environment
Nitrogen fertilizer has major implications for crop yields and environmental health, specifically water quality in the Gulf of Mexico. Federal and state governments have shied away from regulating nitrogen fertilizer use, but voluntary and incentives-based programs have not been particularly successful; the oxygen-starved "dead zone" in the Gulf remains much larger than goals set by the federal-st
6h
On the road to cleaner, greener, and faster driving
Researchers have developed a technique to control a fleet of autonomous vehicles as they approach and pass through a signalized intersection in a way that reduces fuel consumption and greenhouse emissions from idling and stop-and-go traffic, while improving travel speeds.
6h
Health screening, genetic tests might identify people at risk of premature heart disease
Health screening and genetic tests might identify more than 1 million U.S. adults who have familial hypercholesterolemia, a common genetic disorder that causes elevated bad cholesterol levels, which may lead to premature cardiovascular disease. Identifying familial hypercholesterolemia early in adulthood creates an opportunity for early treatment aimed at preventing heart attack and death, accordi
6h
Review: The Litter-Robot 4 Is The Rolls-Royce of Cat Litter Boxes
The unwashed, clumped masses have what they're waiting for. Litter-Robot 4 — the latest in a popular line of self-cleaning litter boxes by Whisker — has arrived. The self-cleaning litter box, while an incredible idea attempted by many, has rarely achieved a level of excellence by their respective makers. The idea? Cats go in, do their smelly business, jump out, and after a moment or two, the devi
6h
Oat reference genome: Insights into a uniquely healthy cereal crop
Cultivated oat (Avena sativa L.) is an old crop thought to have been domesticated over 3,000 years ago, while growing as a weed in wheat and barley fields. Oat has a low carbon footprint, substantial health benefits and the potential to replace animal-based food products. However, lack of genome resources has prevented the application modern methods of plant breeding. An international research tea
6h
New model could improve matches between students and schools
For the majority of students in the U.S., residential addresses determine which public elementary, middle, or high school they attend. But with an influx of charter schools and state-funded voucher programs for private schools, as well as a growing number of cities that let students apply to public schools across the district (regardless of zip code), the admissions process can turn into a messy g
6h
How galaxies could exist without dark matter
Nature, Published online: 18 May 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01403-w How dark-matter-free galaxies may have formed, the scientists surviving the war in Ukraine, and imaging the black hole Sagittarius A*.
7h
Microcomb-driven silicon photonic systems
Nature, Published online: 18 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04579-3 A simple and power-efficient microcomb source is used to drive complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor silicon photonic engines, a step towards the next generation of fully integrated photonic systems.
7h
Gibbin mesodermal regulation patterns epithelial development
Nature, Published online: 18 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04727-9 Characterization of Gibbin, encoded by AHDC1, offers insights into the epidermal and mesodermal patterning phenotypes seen in Xia–Gibbs and related syndromes in humans, which derive from abnormal mesoderm maturation as a result of gene-specific DNA methylation decisions.
7h
Observation of ultracold atomic bubbles in orbital microgravity
Nature, Published online: 18 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04639-8 Bubbles of ultracold atoms have been created, observed and characterized at the NASA Cold Atom Lab onboard the International Space Station, made possible by the microgravity environment of the laboratory.
7h
Resolving the H i in damped Lyman α systems that power star formation
Nature, Published online: 18 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04616-1 Spectroscopy of a gravitationally lensed galaxy at a redshift of 2.7 with spatially resolved maps of two foreground damped Lyman α systems indicates a vast mass of neutral hydrogen gas, consistent with a star-forming region.
7h
Metabolic diversity drives cancer cell invasion
Nature, Published online: 18 May 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01301-1 The migration and growth of cancer cells at sites far from the initial tumour is usually fatal. Metabolic heterogeneity — variable expression of an enzyme in the initial tumour — is identified as an early step in this deadly process.
7h
A lab-on-a-chip that takes the chip out of the lab
Nature, Published online: 18 May 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01299-6 A microfluidic system achieves miniaturization without the need for extra equipment, bringing chip-based devices closer to mainstream commercial reality, with a framework that could be widely applied to diagnostics.
7h
Giant collision created galaxies devoid of dark matter
Nature, Published online: 18 May 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01298-7 Two galaxies that are curiously lacking in dark matter — the most abundant matter in the Universe — might have formed when a collision between dwarf galaxies separated ordinary matter from its dark counterpart.
7h
Maternal enzyme reprograms paternal DNA for healthy offspring
Nature, Published online: 18 May 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01237-6 It emerges that high blood sugar deregulates the enzyme TET3 in the eggs of female mice, preventing it from properly modifying sperm-derived DNA when eggs are fertilized. This leads to metabolic defects in adult progeny.
7h
Scallops swim into illuminated fishing pots
Scallops are drawn to illuminated fishing pots like moths to a flame. The study examined the effect of LED lights on crab and lobster pots used by fishing boats off the coast of Cornwall, UK, and the research team was stunned by the results. More than 500 scallops were caught — 99.6% of them in pots with lights.
7h
Kids 5-11 Approved For COVID-19 Boosters
(Photo: Jesse Paul/Unsplash) The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has officially put its stamp of approval on COVID-19 vaccination booster doses for children ages 5 through 11. In a release published Tuesday, the organization authorized booster shots of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine for children who received their second dose of the primary vaccine at least five months prior. Parents have been ab
7h
Best Smart Garage Door Openers in 2022
The best smart garage door openers are an often overlooked part of the smart home makeover. Lighting, televisions, refrigerators, and even thermostats come with "smart" capabilities to control and optimize them fully directly from a phone, tablet, or PC. Now, even the "ol' clicker" is available in smart offerings, with features you didn't even know you wanted. Ever left the house and wondered if
7h
Rainforest trees may have been dying faster since the 1980s, study finds
Tropical trees in Australia's rainforests have been dying at double the previous rate since the 1980s, seemingly because of climate impacts, according to the findings of a long-term international study published in Nature today. This research has found the death rates of tropical trees have doubled in the last 35 years, as global warming increases the drying power of the atmosphere.
7h
Important genetic origin of our senses identified
Having a head is quite an advantage. Although this may sound banal, it had to be tested in a long evolutionary process: As animal life developed, invertebrates initially dominated the oceans. These had already developed head structures, but the development of a novel, improved head led to the success of vertebrates. This "new head" allowed a wide spatial distribution and multiplication of sensory
7h
Synthesis of two-dimensional holey graphyne
Diamond and graphite are two naturally occurring carbon allotropes that we have known about for thousands of years. They are elemental carbons that are arranged in a manner so that they consist of sp3 and sp2 hybridized carbon atoms, respectively. More recently, the discovery of various other carbon allotrope materials, such as graphene, fullerene, carbon nanotube, graphyne, and graphdiyne, has be
7h
Key to reducing defects in multimaterials
Functionally graded materials (FGMs) are high-performance materials with expected applications in aerospace, automobiles, defense, and medicine. These materials are usually employed in conditions of extreme temperature and pressure, therefore making it important for them to be as defect-free as possible. Now, researchers have found a way to minimize defects in FGMs by manipulating the gradient of
7h
Raising the bar on sex and gender reporting in research
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30398-1 For nearly a decade, Nature Portfolio journals have asked for information about sex and gender in research studies, and more recently, we have also encouraged authors to use the Sex and Gender Equity in Research (SAGER) guidelines in their work. We are now updating our guidance and practice so that authors are mo
7h
Gun ownership and homicide in the US: A stronger correlation
In 2017, there were nearly 40,000 gun-related deaths in the United States, including homicides and suicides. To delve into this alarming statistic, U.S.-trained Université de Montréal economist Karim Chalak and his coauthors did an econometric study of the rate of U.S. gun ownership and the associated risk of death, and found it to be much higher than previously thought.
8h
Dutch veterans feel misunderstood
Veterans experience social stereotyping and disinterest, concludes anthropologist Yvon de Reuver, who will receive a Ph.D. for her research from Radboud University on 23 May. Veterans are known to suffer from psychological problems they developed during their military service. But how do the veterans experience this themselves? De Reuver examined what it means to them, being a veteran.
8h
Why people trust or distrust experts when it comes to critical issues
These days, it doesn't take much to set off a heated online debate. Anyone can publicly share their opinion, but not everyone is concerned with accuracy or acting in good faith. And when it comes to critical issues such as the pandemic and climate change, trusting the wrong people can have serious consequences.
8h
Reliable diagnostics at the tip of your finger
Biomarkers are components that may be present in biological samples and are related to specific diseases. Therefore, doctors can analyze biological samples from a patient to check their health condition or to monitor the progress of a specific therapy. Typically, these samples need to be purified and diluted before the analysis, and current medical diagnostic techniques rely on healthcare faciliti
8h
How the brain changes during depression treatment
Researchers have shown what happens to the brain when a person receives a depression treatment known as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). rTMS is a depression treatment typically used when other approaches — such as medications — haven't been effective for a patient. By stimulating the dorsolateral pre-frontal cortex, rTMS activates several other regions of the brain involved
8h
Energy-efficient AI hardware technology via a brain-inspired stashing system?
Researchers have proposed a novel system inspired by the neuromodulation of the brain, referred to as a 'stashing system,' that requires less energy consumption. Computer scientists have now developed a technology that can efficiently handle mathematical operations for artificial intelligence by imitating the continuous changes in the topology of the neural network according to the situation.
8h
Statins may provide protection against depression
Statins have been hailed as a wonder drug; the cholesterol-lowering drugs have been prescribed to tens of millions of people since their approval in the late 1980s to prevent heart attack and stroke. But the drugs may yet have additional benefits, some research has hinted, including on mental health. Now, a new study examines the influence of statins on emotional bias, a marker for risk of depress
9h
Scientists see signs of traumatic brain injury in headbutting muskox
Scientists saw for the first time hallmarks of concussions and other head trauma in the brains of deceased headbutting animals — muskoxen and bighorn sheep. The results may contradict the commonly-held belief that ramming animals do not suffer brain injuries and support the notion that studies on animals with brains evolutionarily similar to those of humans may help researchers understand and red
9h
Study identifies cellular 'chaperone' for zinc
A team has described and characterized the first zinc metallochaperone: a protein that puts zinc into other 'client' proteins. The findings shed light on the public health issue of zinc deficiency and open an entirely new area of biology for exploration.
9h
DNA offers link to ancient Indigenous people of Uruguay
The first whole genome sequences of the ancient people of Uruguay provide a genetic snapshot of Indigenous populations of the region before European military campaigns decimated them. "Our work shows that the Indigenous people of ancient Uruguay exhibit an ancestry that has not been previously detected in South America," says John Lindo, co-corresponding author of a paper on the findings and an a
9h
Discrimination Is Breaking People's Hearts
Nature, Published online: 18 May 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01346-2 Heart attacks, strokes and other consequences of cardiovascular disease are particularly dangerous for people who face inequity.
9h
Racism is different from colorism
Ronald Hall is a professor in the School of Social Work at Michigan State University. He has written over 200 books/articles/monographs, etc., on colorism—discrimination on the basis of skin tone, often among the same ethnic or racial group. Below are highlights from an interview with The Conversation. Answers have been edited for brevity and clarity.
9h
For plant-based proteins, soy is a smart choice
Soy—the versatile protein source that comes from the species of legumes known as soybeans—is becoming a popular alternative to meat and dairy products, and for good reason. Whether you are trying to eat healthier, eat more sustainably, or both, College of Agriculture, Health and Natural Resources Department of Nutritional Sciences researcher Yangchao Luo and his research group recently published a
9h
Celebrated Mexican archaeologist wins major Spanish award
Eduardo Matos Moctezuma, a celebrated Mexican archaeologist who led the excavation of the Great Aztec Temple in Mexico City, won this year's Princess of Asturias award in the social sciences category, the Spanish foundation behind the prizes announced Wednesday.
10h
Protein's role in fragile X is more complex than thought
Researchers have identified a previously unknown function for the fragile X protein, the loss of which is the leading inherited cause of intellectual disability. The researchers showed that the protein modulates how neurons in the brain's memory center process information, a central part of learning and memory. Fragile X syndrome is due to a genetic mutation that largely eliminates the fragile X
10h
How orangutan mothers communicate with their offspring
Together with a Swiss-German team, behavioral scientist Dr. Marlen Fröhlich from the Senckenberg Center for Human Evolution and Paleoenvironment at the University of Tübingen has studied mother-offspring interactions in orangutans. The team paid particular attention to individual differences and flexibility in the communication strategies of orangutan mothers, which they studied both in the wild a
10h
Sibling interactions impact child well-being in Latinx children
Most children in the U.S. grow up with siblings, yet the role of sibling relations in child development and well-being is relatively understudied, especially among families of color. Researchers at Penn State, Arizona State University, and Harvard are working together to study these dynamics in Latinx children to better understand the role of siblings' warmth and negativity in children's everyday
10h
Bra arbetsmiljö får lärare att stanna kvar i yrket
Många lärare väljer att byta bana och det spär på lärarbristen i Sverige. En studie har nu tittat på vad som får lärare att vilja fortsätta i yrket. Resultatet visar att upplevd hälsa och en bra arbetssituation har stor betydelse. – Detta visar hur viktigt det är att skolledningarna tar arbetsmiljöarbetet på allvar, säger forskaren Gunnar Bergström vid Högskolan i Gävle. Inlägget dök först upp p
10h
Jordbrukets massiva maskiner äventyrar livsmedelsförsörjningen
Jordbrukets maskiner är nu lika tunga som bastanta dinosaurier och djupare jordlager skadas av framfarten på åkrarna. På global nivå uppskattas omkring en femtedel av den odlingsbara marken nu vara i riskzonen – med stora konsekvenser för livsmedelsförsörjningen på sikt. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
10h
Bästa sätten att minska biltrafiken i städer
Vilka åtgärder för att minska biltrafiken i städerna fungerar bäst? Forskare vid Lunds universitet har gått igenom nästan 800 vetenskapliga studier för att ta reda på svaret. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
10h
Vad har betydelse för en lyckad integration i skolan?
Vad är viktigt när nyanlända elever ska integreras i det svenska utbildningssystemet och vad innebär egentligen en lyckad integration? Ali Osman, docent i pedagogik, förklarar vad som både kan hjälpa och försvåra integration. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
10h
This crafty tool can eavesdrop on 6G wireless signals
Hackers could make a tool to eavesdrop on some 6G wireless signals with just office paper, an inkjet printer, a metallic foil transfer, and a laminator. The researchers who discovered the wireless security hack will present their findings and demonstrate the attack this week in San Antonio at ACM WiSec 2022 , the Association for Computing Machinery's annual conference on security and privacy in w
11h
Science in Africa: lessons from the COVID-19 pandemic
Nature, Published online: 18 May 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01150-y The continent followed Western nations too closely in its early response to the coronavirus emergency, says Nigerian virologist Oyewale Tomori.
11h
Lægepraksis på hospitalsmatrikel giver styrket samarbejde
Lægehuset Amager er placeret på Amager Hospital til stor glæde for personalet og patienterne. »Jo mere vi kender til hinanden, desto bedre kan vi samarbejde – også når det bliver vanskeligt,« siger Anna S. Mogensen, praktiserende læge og kompagnon, om samarbejdet med hospitalslægerne.
13h
Has the BLM Movement Influenced Police Use of Lethal Force?
For decades, researchers have studied the influence of social movements on broader society. Yet nearly nine years after the start of Black Lives Matter, few studies have sought to quantify the movement's impact on police use of lethal force. Researchers point to a central challenge: incomplete data.
13h
The use of single-cell multi-omics in immuno-oncology
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30549-4 Single-cell multi-omics (scMulti-omics) has brought transformative insights into immuno-oncology, demonstrating success in describing novel immune subsets and defining important regulators of antitumor immunity. Here, we give examples of how scMulti-omics has been used in specific tumor studies and discuss how th
13h
Steering the reaction pathway of syngas-to-light olefins with coordination unsaturated sites of ZnGaOx spinel
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30344-1 Great progress has been made in the development of bifunctional oxide-zeolite catalysts to tackle the selectivity challenge in syngas chemistry. Here the authors show syngas conversion can be steered along a highly active and selective pathway towards light olefins via ketene acetate (acetyl) intermediates.
13h
Singlet and triplet to doublet energy transfer: improving organic light-emitting diodes with radicals
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-29759-7 Organic light-emitting diodes must be engineered to circumvent efficiency limits imposed by the ratio of triplet to singlet exciton formation, following electron-hole capture. Here, authors unlock energy transfer channels between singlet, triplet and doublet excitons using thermally activated delayed fluorescence
13h
Origins of glycan selectivity in streptococcal Siglec-like adhesins suggest mechanisms of receptor adaptation
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30509-y Streptococcal siglec-like binding regions (SLBRs) selectively bind cell surface glycans, but the basis for this selectivity is not understood. Here, the authors identify selectivity-modulating SLBR regions and study how changes in SLBR glycan selectivity affect interactions with human glycoprotein receptors.
13h
Mechanistic insights into photochemical nickel-catalyzed cross-couplings enabled by energy transfer
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30278-8 Although the combination of photo- and nickel catalysis has garnered intense interest in the preceding years, the mechanisms by which these transformations occur are to some degree unresolved. Here the authors provide computational and spectroscopic support for a Dexter energy-transfer mechanism in the context of
13h
The planarian wound epidermis gene equinox is required for blastema formation in regeneration
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30412-6 Many regenerative animals form an outgrowth at wound sites called a blastema. Here the authors identify equinox, which is expressed in the planarian wound epidermis and essential to initiate positional information regeneration and blastema formation.
13h
Feasibility of whole genome and transcriptome profiling in pediatric and young adult cancers
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30233-7 Cancer whole-genome and transcriptome sequencing (cWGTS) has been challenging to implement in clinical settings. Here, the authors develop a workflow to deliver robust cWGTS analyses and reports within clinically-relevant timeframes for paediatric, adolescent and young adult solid tumour patients.
13h
UN floats plan to boost renewables as climate worries mount
The United Nations chief on Wednesday launched a five-point plan to jump-start broader use of renewable energies, hoping to revive world attention on climate change as the U.N.'s weather agency reported that greenhouse gas concentrations, ocean heat, sea-level rise, and ocean acidification hit new records last year.
15h
Can introducing a central bank digital currency improve social welfare?
While cash is issued in the form of physical paper and coins, central bank digital currency (CBDC) involves recording transaction information in a digital ledger kept by the central bank. A study published in Economic Inquiry examines how introducing CBDC affects welfare in an economy in which tax evasion occurs in cash transactions.
15h
Are microplastics pervasive in Nigerian drinking water?
In Nigeria, about 90% of water available for drinking is sourced from boreholes, or deep, narrow wells that tap into naturally occurring underground water. A recent study in Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry found that microplastics (MPs) are abundant in the drinking water of these boreholes.
15h
The kids are not OK
Julia Steinberger is an ecological economist at the University of Lausanne in Switzerland. She first posted this piece at Medium.com , and it was reposted on Yale Climate Connections with her permission. Today I went to give a climate talk at my old high school in Geneva – and was given a masterclass in our failings. This is the story of a day that shook me up. I have given climate talks at high
18h
Timing of heart surgery crucial, research shows
The timing of valve replacement heart surgery is crucial, and should be performed earlier than previously thought for people with aortic stenosis, a new study shows. The condition is one of the most common and serious valve disease problems, caused by a narrowing of the aortic valve opening.
21h
Will the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and is the United Nations report on climate change be ignored or we adapt and change with the future?
https://youtu.be/N0DxuK_OW14 We don't have a real awareness of the implications of climate change. How these elements could really play together. We need to move together and we need to move fast as the effects of climate change are already being felt. Major changes taking place in the global environment are at the centre of a growing research interest today. They are increasingly attracting atte
21h
mRNA vaccines like Pfizer and Moderna fare better against COVID-19 variants of concern
A comparison of four COVID-19 vaccinations shows that messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccines — Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna — perform better against the World Health Organization's variants of concern (VOCs) than viral vector vaccines — AstraZeneca and J&J/Janssen. Although they all effectively prevent severe disease by VOCs, the research suggests that people receiving a viral vector vaccine are more vul
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Automated platform for plasmid production
Researchers have developed PlasmidMaker, a versatile automated platform for plasmid design & construction. These circular DNA molecules are used by scientists to introduce new genes into a target organism, and have extensive use in basic and applied biology. In particular, they have applications in the large-scale production of bioproducts.
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Chemists skew the odds to prevent cancer
A theoretical framework shows how to increase the odds of identifying cancer-causing mutations before tumors take hold. Researchers demonstrate that only a few energetically favorable pathways are likely to lead to cancer.
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Algorithms empower metalens design
Researchers have developed a new method for designing large-scale metasurfaces that uses techniques of machine intelligence to generate designs automatically. The method will enable new metasurface designs that can make an impact on virtual or augmented reality, self-driving cars, and machine vision for embarked systems and satellites.
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Seeing molecules inside a nanometer-sized 'sardine can'
Researchers have successfully developed a new technique allowing them to observe gas molecules packing into metal-organic frameworks (MOF) using infrared spectroscopy. Their innovation was to measure polarized light absorption of guest molecules in a MOF film to deduce molecule alignment using this common piece of lab equipment. This method is the first to show guest alignment and does so in real-
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Robotic swimmer shows how microorganisms get around
A robotic swimmer could help researchers better understand the movements of bacteria and other microorganisms. Just by moving around, microorganisms like bacteria and sperm are performing a remarkable feat. The effects of viscosity are amplified at small scales, which means a microorganism swimming in water is a bit like a person trying to do the backstroke in a tar pit. Scientists still don't ha
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