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Nyheder2022maj19

Watch dolphins line up to self-medicate skin ailments at coral 'clinics'
If a human comes down with a rash, they might go to the doctor and come away with some ointment to put on it. Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins get skin conditions, too, but they come about their medication by queuing up nose-to-tail to rub themselves against corals. In the journal iScience on May 19, researchers show that these corals have medicinal properties, suggesting that the dolphins are usi
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Discovery of high-speed moving plasma turbulence that outpaces the movement of heat
In order to achieve a fusion power plant, it is necessary to stably confine a plasma of more than 100 million degrees Celsius in a magnetic field and maintain it for a long time. A research group led by Assistant Professor Naoki Kenmochi, Professor Katsumi Ida, and Associate Professor Tokihiko Tokuzawa of the National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), National Institutes of Natural Sciences (NI
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How cranberries could improve memory and ward off dementia
Researchers have found that eating cranberries could improve memory, ward off dementia, and reduce 'bad' cholesterol. The research team studied the benefits of consuming the equivalent of a cup of cranberries a day among 50 to 80-year-olds. They hope that their findings could have implications for the prevention of neurodegenerative diseases such as dementia.
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LATEST

Scientists Warn of International Monkeypox Outbreaks
Public health officials across the world have voiced concern over outbreaks of monkeypox, a rare disease that's related to other viruses such as smallpox. The cases — one was identified in the US at the time of writing, 13 suspected but not yet confirmed in Canada, five confirmed in Portugal, nine confirmed in the UK, and seven suspected in Spain, according to the BBC — are now being investigated
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Pugs Are So Grotesque They Can Barely Be Considered Dogs, Experts Say
Royally Messed Up It's hard to overstate just how messed up pugs are. Case in point, researchers from the UK's Royal Veterinary College published findings on pug health yesterday in the journal Canine Medicine and Genetics finding that the unfortunate critters' squished brains that are too big for their skulls, their spines are messed up, they can barely breathe, and are predisposed toward almost
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How Complex Is a Knot? New Proof Reveals Ranking System That Works.
Back in 1981, Cameron Gordon introduced a new way to relate two knots — mathematical constructs modeled after the knots that appear in a single thread or string. In his paper, he conjectured that this new relationship could be used to arrange groups of knots according to how complicated they are. This winter, Ian Agol, a mathematician at the University of California, Berkeley, posted a six-page..
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Previously unknown crocodile species lived in Asia 39 million years ago
Researchers from the Senckenberg Center for Human Evolution and Paleoenvironment at the University of Tübingen have identified fossils of a previously unknown crocodile species in Vietnam. The nearly four-meter-long, almost completely preserved skeleton from the Na Duong site is part of the group of long-snouted crocodiles from the gharial family. The fossil, which is between 35 and 39 million yea
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The Supreme Court's Next Targets
Following the Supreme Court's leak of a draft decision overturning Roe v. Wade , many Court-watchers and pundits have pointed to same-sex marriage and access to contraceptives as rights now potentially at risk . And while in the long run the logic set forth in Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization could undermine those precedents, the Court may eviscerate other major areas of law far soone
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'Some things can't be repaired': how do you recover when a friend betrays you?
With the 'Wagatha Christie' trial poring over the destruction of a celebrity friendship, four people share their experiences of treachery and trauma As the libel suit between Rebekah Vardy and Coleen Rooney rumbles on in the high court, the public has heard weeks of claims and counterclaims about Instagram stings, paparazzi ambushes and phones lost in the sea . But one thing has been clear from t
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Doctors Impressed by Drugs That Rejuvenate Immune System
Immunity-boosting drugs may have huge implications in the pharmaceutical fight against COVID-19. As MIT Technology Review reports , a number of immunity-boosting drugs are currently being studied to see whether they can help course-correct damage the coronavirus does to the immune system. One of the most promising avenues of research comes from a class of pharmaceuticals known as statins, which a
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America Isn't Ready to Truly Understand the Buffalo Shooting
O ne evening about seven years ago in St. Andrews, Scotland, I was walking home from a long day of doctoral research. Most people out that night were not concluding studies. A scattered few exited the ancient city's meager collection of pubs and restaurants. That ordinary night shifted when a drunken man stumbled out of one of those bars and spotted my Black body. He presented no manifesto. I hav
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The U.S. Housing Market Has Peaked
Sign up for Derek's newsletter here . If you've tried to buy a home in the past two years, you have my most profound sympathies. Your experience has probably gone something like this: You found your dream home online; sent photos around to your family; visited the premises (or decided to buy, sight unseen); got your financial statements in order; smartly offered 10 percent over asking; and learne
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Tesla Autopilot May Have Been Involved in Fatal Crash That Killed Three
Fatal Collision Earlier this month, a 2022 Tesla Model S rammed a curb and plowed into construction equipment , killing its three occupants. Now, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has revealed that it's investigating the fatal crash, suggesting the vehicle may have had semiautonomous driving features turned on, The Wall Street Journal reports , in yet another grisly and h
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Simple Gene Circuits Hint at How Stem Cells Find New Identities
The human body contains more than 200 types of cells by most estimates, all descended from a single fertilized egg. The spindly cells of the skin, the gangly branching neurons, the plump fat cells, the exquisitely sensitive rods and cones of the eye — all of these are products of a long process of development, during which their physical forms altered beyond recognition. With few exceptions… So
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Is He Mansplaining? Survivalists Argue in the Jungle | Naked and Afraid
Stream Naked and Afraid on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/naked-and-afraid #NakedAndAfraid #Discovery #Survival Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discover
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Pharmacy in the sea: Dolphins 'use coral as medicine for skin ailments'
New research suggests the cetaceans may be self-medicating for their skin ailments, adding to evidence of the medicinal properties of some corals and sponges Who doesn't like a bath scrub? Dolphins definitely do: they are known for being clever, playful, tactile animals, and they like to rub against rough surfaces, nap in coral beds and soak on sponges like guests at an underwater spa. However, d
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Mindfulness Hurts. That's Why It Works.
" How to Build a Life " is a weekly column by Arthur Brooks, tackling questions of meaning and happiness. Click here to listen to his podcast series on all things happiness, How to Build a Happy Life . S ome years ago, a friend told me that his marriage was suffering because he was on the road so much for work. I started counseling him on how to fix things—to move more meetings online, to make do
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The Fight to Decouple Sex From Marriage
This article was featured in One Story to Read Today, a newsletter in which our editors recommend a single must-read from The Atlantic , Monday through Friday. Sign up for it here. I n 1991, as the Supreme Court hearings of Clarence Thomas were turning sexual-harassment allegations into television, Helen Gurley Brown, the editor and muse of Cosmopolitan magazine, was asked whether any of her staf
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Europe's Ireland Problem Is Here to Stay
I n the run-up to the 2003 invasion of Iraq, Secretary of State Colin Powell introduced President George W. Bush to the " Pottery Barn rule ": "You break it, you own it." Powell's point was that military victory over Saddam Hussein would not be the end of America's involvement, but the beginning. Something similar is true for Northern Ireland today, where the fragile peace settlement that has jus
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Why China is still obsessed with disinfecting everything
In a one-minute video that went viral in China in early May, three government workers in hazmat suits spray disinfectant all over someone's home: inside the fridge, under the television, over the couch. On social media, Chinese people worried about whether their home would experience the same treatment if they were unlucky enough to catch the virus. Outside China, people have mostly moved on from
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How fast-growing algae could enhance growth of food crops
A new study provides a framework to boost crop growth by incorporating a strategy adopted from a fast-growing species of green algae. The algae, known as Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, contain an organelle called the pyrenoid that speeds up the conversion of carbon, which the algae absorb from the air, into a form that the organisms can use for growth. In a study published May 19, 2022 in the journal
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How to Get Started Biking
This week, we cover the basics of cycling for fun and transportation, including selecting, maintaining, and accessorizing your two-wheeler.
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Climate change reveals unique artifacts in melting ice patches
One day more than 3,000 years ago, someone lost a shoe at the place we today call Langfonne in the Jotunheimen mountains. The shoe is 28 cm long, which roughly corresponds to a modern size 36 or 37. The owner probably considered the shoe to be lost for good, but on 17 September 2007 it was found again—virtually intact.
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The destruction of Gran Chaco, forgotten sister of the Amazon rainforest – podcast
From deep inside Gran Chaco, a dry tropical forest in Argentina one and a half times the size of California, comes a wake-up call for the world's forests. We've lost more than a fifth of this incredibly biodiverse region since 1985. And it's just one of many precious carbon-trapping ecosystems being lost to unrelenting deforestation. Six months ago in Glasgow, world leaders at Cop26 pledged to en
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Yes. I Remember it Well. A COVID 45 Retrospective
With faltering memory, questionable opinions, and sketchy references, an infectious disease revenant reflects on the last 2.5 years of COVID 45. Grizzly bear assault free. As in no assault, not the price of a Grizzly bear assault. The post Yes. I Remember it Well. A COVID 45 Retrospective first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .
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Quasi-symmetry in CoSi reveals new type of topological material
Ever since the discovery of the quantum Hall effect (Nobel Prize 1985), symmetry has been the guiding principle in the search for topological materials. Now an international team of researchers from Germany, Switzerland, and the U.S. has introduced an alternative guiding principle, "quasi-symmetry," which leads to the discovery of a new type of topological material with great potential for applica
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What the UFO Discussion Really Needs
This week, a House of Representatives subcommittee on intelligence and counterterrorism gathered to discuss unidentified aerial phenomena. This was, on one level, a very unusual event—the rare congressional hearing about UFOs, the first in more than 50 years. And yet it proceeded as many others do on Capitol Hill: dryly, politely, and uneventfully. Which seemed odd. Shouldn't there have been a li
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The Download: China's disinfection obsession, and US anti-disinformation board woes
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. Why China is still obsessed with disinfecting everything In a one-minute video that went viral in China in early May, three government workers in hazmat suits spray disinfectant all over someone's home: inside the fridge, under the television, over the couch.
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Recycling more precious metals from nuclear and electronic waste using the Picasso pigment, Prussian blue
A big problem with the disposal of nuclear and electronic wastes is that the process wastes precious metals such as gold and platinum-group metals, which are key metals in computer chips. Researchers form Nagoya University in collaboration with those from the Tokyo Institute of Technology have discovered that a solution to this pressing environmental and technological problem may lie in a pigment
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5G private networks enable business everywhere
The world is rapidly moving from human-directed manufacturing using computerized assembly lines to largely automated smart factories that manufacture more efficiently using real-time data. Considered by many to be the fourth industrial revolution, or "Industry 4.0," this transformation requires a bevy of technologies to deliver on its promise of ultra-reliable low-latency communications (URLLC).
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Microplastics threaten typical remote cryospheric regions
Microplastics usually refer to plastic fibers, films, fragments, and microbes with size less than five millimeters. They are widely distributed in water, soil, sediment, the atmosphere, and even snow and ice, which impacts Earth's climate and environment.
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What drives young people to commit hate crimes
It happened again over the weekend: another mass shooting and alleged hate crime, this time in Buffalo, New York, that left 10 dead and three injured. Most of the victims were Black. The 18-year-old accused shooter said he picked up his beliefs from internet forums and cited the "great replacement"—the theory that Jews and elites are intentionally replacing white people with people of color and im
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Executive narcissism inhibits inter-unit knowledge transfer
Narcissistic executives cause the units or subsidiaries they manage to be less receptive to knowledge coming from other units. The new research, published in the Strategic Management Journal, explores the relationship between executive narcissism and inter-unit knowledge transfer. The authors find that the effects of narcissism are reduced when there's a high environmental complexity or dynamism a
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'Polypharmacy' puts older cancer patients at risk
"Polypharmacy," the concurrent use of multiple medications, can lead to harmful drug interactions, which is especially dangerous for cancer patients about to undergo therapy, a new study shows. Even for individuals who don't have cancer, multiple medication use is fraught with risks and tricky to navigate because of the emotions involved, says Erika Ramsdale, an oncologist at the Wilmot Cancer In
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Hulu's Conversations With Friends Needed More Bite
Early in Sally Rooney's debut novel, Conversations With Friends , the heroine has a nightmare. Frances, a college student, dreams that a tooth has come loose in her mouth, leaving a hole that pumps out so much blood, she can't speak. "The blood tasted thick, clotted and salty," she recounts. "I could feel it, vividly, running back down my throat." The dream provides a dramatic metaphor for how th
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Researchers develop new measurement method in molecular electronics
In molecular electronics, single molecules are stretched between two electrodes to form an electrically conducting element in which molecular conductivity is then measured. Although the underlying method for this phenomenon, scanning tunneling microscopy, was awarded the Nobel Prize more than thirty years ago, a major limitation remains: To access molecular conductivity, the molecules to be measur
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Cooperation rewards water utilities
Inter-utility water agreements can help mitigate risks, in research that used supercomputer simulations of water supply in the North Carolina Research Triangle. Findings are generalizable to any place where water providers face financial and supply challenges in allocating regional water.
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Spin keeps electrons in line in iron-based superconductor
Researchers from PSI's Spectroscopy of Quantum Materials group together with scientists from Beijing Normal University have solved a puzzle at the forefront of research into iron-based superconductors: the origin of FeSe's electronic nematicity. Using Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) at the Swiss Light Source (SLS), they discovered that, surprisingly, this electronic phenomenon is primar
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A Möbius strip constructed solely of carbon atoms
Obtaining structurally uniform nanocarbons in order to properly relate structure and function, ideally as single molecules, is a great challenge in the field of nanocarbon science. Thus, the construction of structurally uniform nanocarbons is crucial for the development of functional materials in nanotechnology, electronics, optics, and biomedical applications. An important tool for achieving this
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Best Mouse Pads of 2022
When planning your perfect desk setup, you need to think about what mouse to buy, what keyboard will be best, and what chair will be the most comfortable. However, you might overlook a simple but game-changing item: a mouse pad. Mouse pads can protect your desk from scratch marks and help make your gaming experience more immersive by giving a smoother surface to glide over. Even if you're not a h
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How Cat Litter Could Fight Climate Change
(Photo: Litter Robot/Unsplash) Fellow cat lovers, rejoice: those dusty granules of clay we've learned to live with may have a use beyond our pets' bathroom habits. Researchers at MIT have found that a common ingredient in cat litter can remove methane from the atmosphere and help fight climate change. The revelation occurred when associate professor Desiree Plata and three engineering doctoral st
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How to explain localized gap modes in Bose-Einstein condensates
Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs), created in ultracold bosonic atoms and degenerate quantum gases, are a macroscopic quantum phenomenon and are considered as a single particle in mean-filed theory. By preparing the BECs or ultracold atomic gases onto optical lattices, the existence of nonlinear matter-wave solitons and their dynamics and simulation in condensed-matter physics can be investigated.
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Generating ultra-violet lasers with near-infrared light through 'domino upconversion' of nanoparticles
Strong and coherent ultraviolet light emission devices have enormous medical and industrial application potential, but generating ultraviolet light emission in an effective way has been challenging. Recently, a collaborative research team co-led by researchers from City University of Hong Kong (CityU) developed a new approach to generate deep-ultraviolet lasing through a "domino upconversion" proc
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China Eastern MU5735 Crash May Have Been Intentional, Preliminary Assessment Shows
(Photo: André Gustavo Stumpf/Wikimedia Commons) Just a couple months ago, China Eastern Airlines flight MU5735 took a horrifying turn when it crashed into a mountain, killing all 132 people on board. Eerie security camera footage showed the plane taking a sudden nosedive mid-flight, sparking questions about whether the crash could have been intentional. Now data from the plane's recovered black b
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Pleasure Is a Deeply Unerotic Portrait of the Porn Industry
The protagonist of Pleasure is a plucky young performer who has moved to Los Angeles with a dream of superstardom. Bella Cherry (played by Sofia Kappel) has a Hollywood story that gets told off- and on-screen all the time: An ambitious starlet does anything she can to break into movies, grasps at celebrity while encountering corruption, and tries to maintain her integrity in a craven business. Bu
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Emergent reliability in sensory cortical coding and inter-area communication
Nature, Published online: 19 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04724-y The mouse neocortex supports sensory performance through transient increases in sensory coding redundancy, neural codes that are robust to cellular variability, and inter-area fluctuation modes that transmit sensory data and task responses in non-interfering channels.
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Volatile neurons unite to stabilize visual experience
Nature, Published online: 19 May 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01212-1 It has been unclear how the brain creates stable visual experiences from the highly variable activity of individual neurons. Imaging from thousands of neurons across the entire mouse visual cortex provides an explanation.
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America Did Too Good a Job at Saving Canada Geese
Throughout the town of Rochester, Minnesota, where I grew up, 18 themed goose statues (each an imposing 5 feet tall and 525 pounds heavy) stand sentinel. Airport Goose wears aviator goggles. A press pass hangs around Newspaper Goose's neck. Library Goose cosplays as William Shakespeare. At amateur baseball games, Rochesterites cheer for the Honkers. In our local newspaper, the movie reviews once
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Blurring the boundary between Floquet matter and metamaterials
Metamaterials—artificial media with tailored subwavelength structures—have now encompassed a broad range of novel properties that are unavailable in nature. This field of research has stretched across different wave platforms, leading to the discovery and demonstration of a wealth of exotic wave phenomena. Most recently, metamaterial concepts have been extended to the temporal domain, paving the w
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How Stockholm applied greening concepts and what we can learn from it
Based on an evaluation of over 500 academic articles, an international research team has traced the application of greening concepts in the context of Swedish planning and particularly in the Stockholm metropolitan region. The researchers, who include Professor Christian Albert's research lab Planning Metropolitan Landscapes at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB), have drawn up recommendations for urban
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Why baby leatherback marine turtles can't 'see the sea'
For most sea turtles, the journey to find the ocean from their nests is pretty straightforward. However, leatherback hatchlings more often crawl around in circles trying to find the ocean. Circling delays their entry into the ocean, wastes energy, and places them at greater danger from natural predators. Under different moon phases: bright light during full moon and only starlight under new moon,
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Using light and sound to reveal rapid brain activity in unprecedented detail
Biomedical engineers at Duke University have developed a method to scan and image the blood flow and oxygen levels inside a mouse brain in real-time with enough resolution to view the activity of both individual vessels and the entire brain at once. This new imaging approach breaks long-standing speed and resolution barriers in brain imaging technologies and could uncover new insights into neurova
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How great leaders innovate — responsibly | Ken Chenault
In times of uncertainty, leaders have a responsibility to inspire hope. Sharing hard-won wisdom, business leader Ken Chenault talks about what it takes to enact positive, enduring change — and why it's more important than ever to invest in responsible innovation that uplifts people and centers equality and fairness. (This conversation was hosted by TED current affairs curator Whitney Pennington R
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Unexpected differences between males and females in fossil mouse deer
Mouse deer are among the smallest ruminants in the world. Today, they live in the tropics of Africa and Asia and are barely larger than hares. Males and females differ little in appearance. But that was not the case about eleven million years ago. Josephina Hartung and Professor Madelaine Böhme from the Senckenberg Center for Human Evolution and Paleoenvironment at the University of Tübingen came
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Restoring the Great Lakes: After 50 years of US-Canada joint efforts, some success and lots of unfinished business
The Great Lakes cover nearly 95,000 square miles (250,000 square kilometers) and hold over 20% of Earth's surface fresh water. More than 30 million people in the U.S. and Canada rely on them for drinking water. The lakes support a multibillion-dollar maritime economy, and the lands around them provided many of the raw materials—timber, coal, iron—that fueled the Midwest's emergence as an industria
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Aquatic fungi: Forgotten conservation targets
They are always there, dwelling in the water, where they play a key role in food webs, in cycling of nutrients, matter and energy, and water purification. However, as happens with organisms that tend to be inconspicuous and often invisible to the naked eye, society mostly neglects them, and forgets their huge importance in providing support and stability of aquatic ecosystems. What is even more pr
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Buffalo shooting adds to rise of hate crimes in the US
The recent mass shooting in Buffalo, New York on May 14 is set apart from the many mass shootings that happen yearly in the US by white nationalism. Rather than indiscriminately shooting, the 18-year-old suspect targeted a supermarket in a predominantly Black neighborhood. He allegedly wrote a white supremacist manifesto online, traveled about 200 miles to the store, and livestreamed the attack,
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Satellite monitoring of biodiversity moves within reach
Global biodiversity assessments require the collection of data on changes in plant biodiversity on an ongoing basis. Researchers have now shown that plant communities can be reliably monitored using imaging spectroscopy, which in the future will be possible via satellite. This paves the way for near real-time global biodiversity monitoring.
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How a Volcanic Bombardment in Ancient Australia Led to the World's Greatest Climate Catastrophe
Some 252 million years ago, the world was going through a tumultuous period of rapid global warming. To understand what caused it, scientists have looked to one particular event in which a volcanic eruption in what is now Siberia spewed huge volumes of greenhouse gas into the atmosphere. However, there is evidence the climate was already changing before this. Sea surface temperatures had increase
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New theory suggests collision of dwarf galaxies could explain dark matter–free galaxies
A team of astrophysicists affiliated with multiple institutions in the U.S., one in Germany and one in Canada, has developed a new theory to explain the existence of odd, dark matter–free dwarf galaxies. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the researchers propose that a collision between two dwarf galaxies could explain the dark matter–free dwarf galaxies that have been discovered over
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Laser annealing transmon qubits for high-performance superconducting quantum processors
Quantum physicists aim to scale the number of qubits during quantum computing, while maintaining high-fidelity quantum gates; this is a challenging task due to the precise frequency requirements that accompany the process. Superconducting quantum processors with more than 50 qubits are currently actively available and these fixed frequency transmons are attractive due to their long coherence and n
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New strategies to save rice, the world's most indispensable grain
Plants — they're just like us, with unique techniques for handling stress. To save one of the most important crops on Earth from extreme climate swings, scientists are mapping out plants' own stress-busting strategies. Biologists have learned what happens to the roots of rice plants when they're confronted with two types of stressful scenarios: too much water, or too little. These observations for
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Hunga volcano generated incredible atmospheric waves
Researchers report the first comprehensive account of the Hunga volcano eruption's atmospheric waves. The Hunga volcano ushered in 2022 with a bang, devastating the island nation of Tonga and sending aid agencies, and Earth scientists, into a flurry of activity. It had been nearly 140 years since an eruption of this scale shook the Earth. Robin Matoza of the University of California, Santa Barbar
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Research finds most effective influencer marketing tactics
A YouTube personality takes a break from chatting about video games to talk about a web hosting service. An Instagram account devoted to beauty spotlights a new haircare product. A TikToker shouts out a fast-food sandwich to her fans. Anyone who uses social media has almost certainly seen influential figures—commonly referred to as influencers—and the brands that sponsor their posts.
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Political scientist examines a quarter-century of post-Apartheid government
Back in April 1994, the world watched a remarkable event: South Africa's first democratic election with universal suffrage. The country whose Apartheid system had legalized racial segregation since the late 1940s went to the polls and elected a new national assembly. In turn, that assembly picked a Black president: Nelson Mandela, who, after decades in prison, became the South Africa's new leader.
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Light-controlled reactions at the nanoscale
Controlling strong electromagnetic fields on nanoparticles is the key to triggering targeted molecular reactions on their surfaces. Such control over strong fields is achieved via laser light. Although laser-induced formation and breaking of molecular bonds on nanoparticle surfaces have been observed in the past, nanoscopic optical control of surface reactions has not yet been achieved. An interna
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When the equinox gene appears, repair transitions into regrowth
When animals experience a large injury, such as the loss of a limb, the body immediately begins a wound healing response that includes sealing the wound site and repairing local damage. In many animals, including humans, when the local wound site is taken care of, this response ends. However, in some animals, the initial wound response soon transitions into another stage of healing: regeneration,
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Overgrazing disrupts entire ecosystem
The Tibetan highlands have a special significance both as a grazing ecosystem and global carbon store. Furthermore, it plays a key role in the formation of the monsoon and supplying of potable water for a fifth of the earth's population. An international research team from Kiel University (CAU), together with the universities of Göttingen and Hanover and the Chinese Academy of Sciences has for the
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Early-stage detection of microbial contamination in cell therapy products
Researchers from Critical Analytics for Manufacturing Personalized-Medicine (CAMP), an Interdisciplinary Research Group (IRG) at the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART), MIT's research enterprise in Singapore, have identified a critical quality attribute (CQA) for the possible development of a rapid and sensitive process analytical technology (PAT) for sterility. Specificall
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The sun as you've never seen it before
Powerful flares, breathtaking views across the solar poles, and a curious solar "hedgehog" are among the haul of spectacular images, movies and data returned by Solar Orbiter from its first close approach to the sun. Although the analysis of the new dataset has only just started, it is already clear that the ESA-led mission is providing the most extraordinary insights into the sun's magnetic behav
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Terapi anpassad till autism minskade stress i skolan
En anpassad variant av terapiformen ACT kan hjälpa personer med autismspektrumtillstånd, visar forskning vid Karolinska institutet. Behandling anpassad till autism är ovanlig, men den nya terapiformen har visat sig fungera både i skola och psykiatrisk öppenvård. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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Föräldraskap i högre ålder kopplas till ökade risker
Kvinnor som är äldre, ensamstående eller som får barn efter IVF-behandling har större risk att få en komplicerad graviditet och sämre hälsa. En studie visar även att risken för diagnoser kan öka hos barnen. Men det finns också fördelar med att bli mamma efter 40. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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Smarta prylar ökar risken för cyberattacker
Den digitala miljö som omger oss idag gör vår vardag smidigare. Men, när vi kopplar upp oss mot nätet för att uppdatera våra smarta prylar blir vi sårbara för hackerattacker. Ju fler olika prylar som måste uppdateras desto sårbarare blir vi. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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Så kan man räkna gäddorna i sjön
Det går att uppskatta hur mycket fisk det finns under ytan genom ett vattenprov. Det visar en studie där forskare från SLU sett ett tydligt samband mellan koncentrationen gädd-DNA i vattnet och mängden gädda. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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When smokers switch to e-cigs, other healthier choices may follow
Adult smokers who shift to using to e-cigarettes may have more chances to improve health and well-being, according to a new study. Researchers monitored changes in health and social functioning among smokers at two stages in adulthood, age 30 and again at 39. Approximately one-third of smokers shifted to vaping some or all the time by age 39. This group reported better physical health, exercised
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20 millioner kroner til forskning i HIV-kur
Thomas A. Rasmussen, der er 1. reservelæge ved institut for infektionssygdomme og lektor ved institut for Klinisk Medicin på AUH og AU, vil finde en kur mod HIV-virus. Til det projekt har han netop modtaget stor bevilling på 20 millioner kroner.
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The Linear Bias
Having a working understanding of the biases and heuristics that our brains use to make sense of the world is critical to neuropsychological humility and metacognition. They also help use make better sense of the world, and therefore make better decisions. Here's a fun example. Let's say you increase your driving speed from 40 mph to 60 mph over a 100 mile journey. How much would you need to incr
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The People vs. Chesa Boudin
I n December, Richie Greenberg stepped out the front door of his home in a residential, park-filled neighborhood of San Francisco to find a woman he did not recognize on his steps. She yelled at him and tried to block him from going back into his own house, pulling out a small knife and stabbing the air with it. "Walk down the steps!" he shouted at her as he called 911. "Get off of my fucking ste
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3D reconstruction reveals star formation activities of two dust clouds
Using tens of thousands of stars observed by the Gaia space probe, astronomers from MPIA and Chalmers have revealed the 3D shapes of two large star-forming molecular clouds, the California Cloud and the Orion A Cloud. In conventional 2D images, they appear similarly structured, containing filaments of dust and gas with seemingly comparable densities. In 3D, however, they look quite distinct. In fa
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After we tried to correct claims about 'deadly' water filters in Flint, we were accused of scientific misconduct—and that was just the beginning
The Sept. 10, 2019 PBS article accompanying the FRONTLINE documentary "Deadly Water" was topped by a provocative headline: "The EPA Says Flint's Water is Safe — Scientists Aren't So Sure." The PBS story relied on a study of adverse health outcomes for people given point-of-use (POU) water filters during the Flint Federal Emergency. We were … Continue reading
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Daily briefing: Flu vaccine might also prevent COVID-19
Nature, Published online: 17 May 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01406-7 Health-care workers that got a flu shot were nearly 90% less likely to develop severe COVID-19 over the next few months. Plus, how to disinfect rooms with light and the first plants have been grown in Moon dust.
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Scalable super hygroscopic polymer films for sustainable moisture harvesting in arid environments
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30505-2 Extracting atmospheric water is a sustainable strategy to enable decentralized access to safely managed water but remains impractical due to its limited daily water output at low relative humidity. Here, the authors demonstrate a hygroscopic polymer composed of renewable biomass which allows high water uptake at
7h
Plant beta-diversity across biomes captured by imaging spectroscopy
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30369-6 Spaceborne spectroscopy is a promising tool to monitor vegetation globally. Here, the authors combine airborne spectroscopy and field-based vegetation data to demonstrate that spectral imagery from upcoming satellite missions can be used to capture changes in plant species composition across biomes.
7h
Intermolecular 2+2 imine-olefin photocycloadditions enabled by Cu(I)-alkene MLCT
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30393-6 An ideal method to construct azetidines would be through a [2 + 2] photocycloaddition that joins an olefin and an imine, shown only rarely in the literature, partially due to competitive photochemical processes of the imine. Here, the authors report copper-catalyzed photocycloadditions of imines and alkenes to pr
7h
High-performance photocatalytic nonoxidative conversion of methane to ethane and hydrogen by heteroatoms-engineered TiO2
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30532-z Photocatalytic nonoxidative coupling of methane (NOCM) emerges as an appealing approach for the production of value-added C2 + hydrocarbons and hydrogen. Here the authors propose a heteroatom engineering strategy to prepare Pd single atoms loaded TiO2 for active and selective photocatalytic NOCM.
7h
Reversing insufficient photothermal therapy-induced tumor relapse and metastasis by regulating cancer-associated fibroblasts
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30306-7 Photothermal therapy (PTT) has emerged as a promising approach for cancer treatment. Here, in preclinical cancer models, the authors show that PTT efficacy could be improved using tumor cell-derived microparticles that co-deliver the photosensitizer indocyanine green and a vitamin-D receptor ligand, calcipotriol,
7h
Addressing the quantitative conversion bottleneck in single-atom catalysis
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30551-w The practical application of single atom catalyst (SAC) in liquid-phase heterogeneous catalysis is hampered by the productivity bottleneck as well as catalyst leaching. Here, a bench-top, fast-flow reactor integrated with Pt1-MoS2 SAC was fabricated for continuous production of multifunctional anilines (28 exampl
7h
A sea change in craft brewing
Nature, Published online: 19 May 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01376-w Petar Puškarić made a beer from marine yeasts during his master's degree in ecology.
7h
In Myanmar, Lessons for Life After Roe v. Wade
In Myanmar, where abortion is illegal unless the mother's life is at risk, some grassroots networks have made it their mission to provide access to reproductive care. In a post-Roe v. Wade world, such networks are poised to become more popular in the U.S., whether government officials like them or not.
7h
The Experiment Podcast: Fighting to Remember Mississippi Burning
Listen and subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Podcasts In June 1964, at the height of the civil-rights movement, the Ku Klux Klan burned a Black Methodist church to the ground in the town of Philadelphia, Mississippi, and murdered three civil-rights workers in cold blood. This crime became one of the most notorious of its era, shocking the nation on the eve of the passage of
9h
Psykolog: Selvskade blandt unge kan nedbringes med nysgerrighed
I dag afholdes den første nationale konference om selvskade blandt unge. Her vil et af budskaberne være, at sundhedspersonale og andre voksne kan være med til at stoppe selvskadende unge ved at turde spørge ind til mistrivsel og selvskade. Det siger Lotte Rubæk, der er psykolog og leder af Team for selvskade i Region Hovedstaden.
9h
Skeptical Science New Research for Week #20 2022
Drought: the past is no longer prologue Drought management in the United States (and elsewhere) is highly informed by events of the past, employing records extending 60 years or longer in order to plan for and cope with newly emerging meterorological water deficits. Water resource managers and agricultural concerns use recorded droughts as models for negotiating periods of low precipitation in th
10h
The destruction of Gran Chaco, forgotten sister of the Amazon rainforest
From deep inside Gran Chaco, a dry tropical forest in Argentina one and a half times the size of California, comes a wake-up call for the world's forests. We've lost more than a fifth of this incredibly biodiverse region since 1985. And it's just one of many precious carbon-trapping ecosystems being lost to unrelenting deforestation. Six months ago in Glasgow, world leaders at Cop26 pledged to end
13h
Book on What Information Wants
Hey! Thought this group would be interested in a book series we're running. 😊📚 We're writing a book on What Information Wants —how information flows and how it's changing on the internet. We're writing it in public and share new drafts on the 3rd Thursday of every month. This Thursday, May 19 from 5-7pm PDT, we're hosting the second chapter on "How DNA Formed The Tree Of Life." If you're intere
15h
Participation in the project study
Hello r/cogsci members, I am conducting a study for my Master's thesis in cognitive science. It would be really nice of you to participate in the short study if you can spare 10mins. Please click here, Experiment 1a Thank you in advance. #cogSci_research #thesis #masters submitted by /u/kvscogsci20 [link] [comments]
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Scientist uncovers clues to aging in mitochondria
Many age-related diseases share a common feature: the mitochondria of cells begin to malfunction. While the cause is not known, scientists have discovered a new mechanism of how mitochondria start to go wrong, which opens new doors for researchers to explore how to begin to fix the problem.
17h
Brain capital: A new investment approach for late-life well-being
Within many societies and cultures around the world, older adults are too often undervalued and underappreciated, according to a new article. This exacerbates many key challenges that older adults may face. It also undermines the many positive aspects of late life that are of value at both an individual and societal level. In the article, 'Investing in Late-Life Brain Capital,' a global team of ex
17h
Accelerating the pace of machine learning
Machine learning happens a lot like erosion. Data is hurled at a mathematical model like grains of sand skittering across a rocky landscape. Some of those grains simply sail along with little or no impact. But some of them make their mark: testing, hardening, and ultimately reshaping the landscape according to inherent patterns and fluctuations that emerge over time. Effective? Yes. Efficient? Not
17h
EGU22 – Cranky Uncle is going to Vienna!
After two years of Corona-induced online meetings in 2020 and 2021 , this year's General Assembly of the European Geosciences Union (EGU) will take place as a hybrid conference in both Vienna and online from May 23 to 27. To take hybrid and necessary hygiene restrictions into account, there (unfortunately) will be no poster or PICO sessions at this year's conference. Instead, all 1.5-hour session
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