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Nyheder2022maj28

Weather's unwanted guest: Nasty La Nina keeps popping up
Something weird is up with La Nina, the natural but potent weather event linked to more drought and wildfires in the western United States and more Atlantic hurricanes. It's becoming the nation's unwanted weather guest and meteorologists said the West's megadrought won't go away until La Nina does.
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Seeing how odor is processed in the brain
A specially created odor delivery device, along with machine learning-based analysis of scalp-recorded electroencephalogram, has enabled researchers to see when and where odors are processed in the brain. The study found that odor information in the brain is unrelated to perception during the early stages of being processed, but when perception later occurred, unpleasant odors were processed more
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Huge Facility to Produce 15,000 Tons of Lab Grown Meat Per Year in the US
Big Meat Energy The biggest bioreactor lab designed for cultivating "no kill" meat has announced plans to open up shop in the US and produce a cluck-ton of beef. Good Meat, the lab grown meat division of Eat Just, Inc., announced via press release earlier today that it's building ten 250,000-liter bioreactors that it claims could make as much as 15,000 tons of meat per year without killing a sing
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Monkeypox outbreak could be just 'the peak of the iceberg', WHO warns
Pandemic preparedness chief Sylvie Briand says 'unusual' spread of virus can be easily contained with the right measures The World Health Organization has warned that 200 monkeypox cases found in recent weeks outside countries where the virus usually circulates could be just the beginning. "We don't know if we are just seeing the peak of the iceberg [or] if there are many more cases that are unde
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First Pompeiian human genome sequenced
The first successfully sequenced human genome from an individual who died in Pompeii, Italy, after the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 CE is presented this week in a study published in Scientific Reports. Prior to this, only short stretches of mitochondrial DNA from Pompeiian human and animal remains had been sequenced.
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New ultra-faint dwarf galaxy discovered
Astronomers from the University of Arizona (UA) and elsewhere report the discovery of a new ultra-faint dwarf galaxy. The newfound galaxy, designated Tucana B, is the first quenched and isolated object of this type identified in the extreme outskirts of the Local Group. The finding is reported in a paper published May 18 on the arXiv pre-print server.
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Most Dinosaurs Were Warm-Blooded After All
Endothermy was widespread among both avian and non-avian dinosaurs, a study suggests, so the metabolic strategy is unlikely to account for birds' survival through the mass extinction event that wiped out their dinosaur cousins.
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New type of extremely reactive substance discovered in the atmosphere
For the first time, an entirely new class of super-reactive chemical compounds has been discovered under atmospheric conditions. Researchers from the University of Copenhagen, in close collaboration with international colleagues, have documented the formation of so-called trioxides—an extremely oxidizing chemical compound that likely affects both human health and our global climate.
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The 'fuel of evolution' is more abundant than previously thought in wild animals
Darwinian evolution is the process by which natural selection promotes genetic changes in traits that favor survival and reproduction of individuals. How fast evolution happens depends crucially on the abundance of its "fuel": how much genetic difference there is in the ability to survive and reproduce. New research by an international research team with participation of the Leibniz Institute for
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Study of North Pacific 'garbage patch' shows abundance of neuston organisms
A team of researchers from the U.K. and the U.S. has found that in addition to human garbage, the North Pacific "garbage patch" also has an abundance of neuston organisms. In their paper posted on the bioRxiv site, the group describes their study of material in the patch of sea and what sorts of creatures they found living in it.
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New data reveals climate change might be more rapid than predicted
About 30 massive, intricate computer networks serve the scientists who stand at the forefront of climate change research. Each network runs a software program comprised of millions of lines of code. These programs are computational models that combine the myriads of physical, chemical and biological phenomena that together form the climate of our planet. The models calculate the state of Earth's a
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Tunable quantum traps for excitons
Researchers at ETH Zurich have succeeded for the first time in trapping excitons—quasiparticles consisting of negatively charged electrons and positively charged holes—in a semiconductor material using controllable electric fields. The new technique is important for creating single photon sources as well as for basic research.
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Supermassive black holes inside dying galaxies detected in early universe
An international team of astronomers used a database combining observations from the best telescopes in the world, including the Subaru Telescope, to detect the signal from the active supermassive black holes of dying galaxies in the early universe. The appearance of these active supermassive black holes correlates with changes in the host galaxy, suggesting that a black hole could have far-reachi
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Like it or not, we're prone to adopt popular beliefs, even fake ones
As social creatures, we humans care what others think and are influenced by the number of likes, hearts and retweets on social media posts. The downside? An attraction to popular beliefs—whether they're true or false—can speed up the spread of conspiracy theories, suggests new UC Berkeley research.
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First Human Genome Sequenced from Ancient Pompeii
The genome is from a male who was likely in his late thirties when the historic Mount Vesuvius eruption occurred. The analyses suggest he is related to the diverse Imperial Roman population of the time, and that he may have suffered from spinal tuberculosis.
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Protein supplement helps control Type 2 diabetes
A study which holds potential for dietary management of the condition, has shown that drinking a small amount of why protein before meals helps people with type 2 diabetes control their blood sugar. The work shows for the first time this works in people as they went about normal everyday life.
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A Culture That Kills Its Children Has No Future
The grieving people of Uvalde, Texas, a town in the Hill Country about 80 miles west of San Antonio, now confront the irreplaceability of life in one of its most ghastly and unnatural incarnations: the murder of at least 19 children and two adults , with several more injured. In their mourning they will join dozens of other communities scattered throughout the country where school shootings this
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Elon Musk Speculates About Storing All Human DNA in Database
In the early 2000s, scientists from the Human Genome Project announced a breakthrough: they had sequenced the complete human reference genome , including all three billion DNA letter, a scientific undertaking likened at the time to landing astronauts on the Moon. While the reference genome has come under question as of late, with scientists adding more than two million additional variants , it st
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78 Minutes
We were told today, in the latest version of events offered by authorities in Texas, that police left children locked in a classroom with a gunman for 78 minutes as they repeatedly called 911 begging for help, not knowing that their would-be rescuers were standing idly by. If there is a more poignant and more savage allegory for a country with a clear and urgent reason to solve an obvious policy
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Pentagon: Stop Asking Questions About Our "Killer Robots," Which Don't Exist by the Way
Killing Commentary The Pentagon is selling a t-shirt that says not to worry about their "killer robots" — which raises a lot of questions arguably answered by their t-shirt, it seems. During a recent event organized by the Atlantic Council, an international relations think tank in Washington, DC, Marine lieutenant general and artificial intelligence head honcho Michael Groen said that although th
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The Ludicrous Beauty of Top Gun: Maverick
In the original Top Gun , the enemy is intentionally obscure: anonymous pilots flying MiGs from a hostile but unnamed country who have to be chased away and shot down by the heroic Maverick (played by Tom Cruise) and his fellow graduates of the Top Gun naval flight school. Who exactly the enemy is does not matter. What matters is that the hero is America. Tony Scott's film was a highly successful
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You Are Going to Get COVID Again … And Again … And Again
Two and a half years and billions of estimated infections into this pandemic, SARS-CoV-2's visit has clearly turned into a permanent stay. Experts knew from early on that, for almost everyone, infection with this coronavirus would be inevitable. As James Hamblin memorably put it back in February 2020, " You're Likely to Get the Coronavirus ." By this point, in fact, most Americans have. But now,
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Elon Says a Recession Would Be a "Good Thing"
Good Riddance Fresh off his recent Twitter-buying fiasco, Elon Musk is now claiming that it would be good, actually, if the world went into a recession. The SpaceX and Tesla CEO revealed that he believes the world is approaching a recession — which "is actually a good thing," he says. "It has been raining money on fools for too long," the world's richest man remarked. "Some bankruptcies need to h
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Where Were the Police?
My advice, if you are in an active-shooter situation, is the same no matter your age. Listen for the source of the shooting. Give yourself at most two seconds for this task. Those are not firecrackers. Then run as fast as you can in the other direction, and do not stop running until the only thing you hear is the sound of birds chirping, wind in the trees or grass, and the beating of your own hea
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Creator of "Stablecoin" That Crashed to Zero Says It's Creating a New One
Terra Squirma The dust hasn't even settled from the Terra stablecoin's meteoric crash, but the people behind it are already trying to make a new currency. Well, sort of. Yesterday, the official Terra account tweeted that "Terra 2.0 is coming" after a majority of investors voted to create a new blockchain that, confusingly, will use the exact same name. News of this new blockchain comes just over
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Man Who Got Blown Away While Holding Huge Umbrella Announces Plan to Become Astronaut
Umbrella Academy The hunt has begun for the world's first Turkish astronaut — and one of the country's most oddball minor celebrities has thrown his hat into the ring. As the Middle East Monitor reports , Sadik Kocadalli was jokingly referred to as "Turkey's first astronaut" in 2019 when video went viral of him flying through the air during a huge storm , while holding onto a large patio umbrella
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The Amber Heard–Johnny Depp Trial Is Not a Joke
The first time it happened, she said, she thought it was a joke. On the stand in her defamation trial a few weeks ago, the actor Amber Heard shared her account of the first time her now-ex-husband, Johnny Depp, allegedly hit her. She'd asked him about one of his tattoos: the one on his bicep (the one he'd famously had edited ) that to her looked like a muddle of black ink. The tattoo spelled out
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Check Out This Moon-Shaped Ice Crystal on the Space Station's Window
A Russian cosmonaut has shared an absolutely gorgeous photo of a Moon-shaped ice formation on the window of the International Space Station — and although we have questions, we sure do love to see it. On Twitter and Telegram, Cosmonaut Sergei Korsakov posted photos of a circular frost pattern on the interior of a window aboard the ISS, replete with our Pale Blue Dot down below. Space frostwork on
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Chinese Scientists Reportedly Plotting How to Destroy SpaceX Satellites
Hard Kill Chinese researchers, including several associated with the country's defense industry, are investigating ways to disable or even destroy SpaceX's Starlink satellites if they ever prove to be a threat to national security, the South China Morning Post reports , in a sign that the Chinese military community increasingly sees SpaceX's orbital infrastructure as a potential adversary. A new
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A flavorful field guide to foraging | Alexis Nikole Nelson
Whether it's dandelions blooming in your backyard or purslane sprouting from the sidewalk, vegan forager Alexis Nikole Nelson is on a mission to show how freely growing flora could make its way to your plate. With contagious enthusiasm and a live cooking demo, she explains the benefits of expanding your palate to include "wild" foods that are delicious, nutritious and planet-friendly — and gives
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Physicists Rewrite the Fundamental Law That Leads to Disorder
In all of physical law, there's arguably no principle more sacrosanct than the second law of thermodynamics — the notion that entropy, a measure of disorder, will always stay the same or increase. "If someone points out to you that your pet theory of the universe is in disagreement with Maxwell's equations — then so much the worse for Maxwell's equations… Source
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An ER Doctor's 'Third Way' Approach to the Gun Crisis
Nearly 15 years ago, a young man who had shot himself in the head with his father's gun was wheeled into the emergency room where Megan Ranney worked. Despite her team's best efforts, the patient died. "It was the first firearm suicide I'd ever taken care of," Ranney, an emergency physician and public-health expert in Rhode Island, told me. In the days after, Ranney found herself wondering about
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Humans Approaching Intelligence Level Required for Interplanetary Life, Scientists Say
Are We There Yet? Humans might be smart enough to accomplish interplanetary life within the next 200 years, scientists said this week. A team of eight researchers published a new study in the preprint journal Arxiv and said humanity could become a Kardashev Type I Civilization by the year 2371. The Kardashev model was made in 1964, according to the study, to assess how close a civilization is to
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MIT Says We Could Build a House With Lab-Grown Wood
Lab-Grown Lumber Deforestation is a bigger problem than ever, with humans razing ten million hectares of forest each year, according to the UN Food and Agriculture Organization. To tackle the problem head-on, researchers at MIT have come up with a new way to grow "wood-like plant material" in a lab, according to a statement , potentially paving the way for an environmentally friendly new source f
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Scientists Intrigued by Strange Lights in Old Space Photos
Light Action Researchers are puzzled by unexplained lights that show up in photographic plates of the night sky that date back over 70 years, as spotted by Salon . Images taken by the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey in California on April 12, 1950, show nine mysterious dots of light in a row seemingly popping in and out of view. It's an intriguing new piece of the sprawling puzzle about unexplaine
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Monkeypox patients advised to avoid contact with pets for three weeks
UK experts urge confirmed cases to avoid handling household pets as precautionary measure People with monkeypox have been told to avoid contact with their pets for three weeks amid concerns the animals could become infected and pass the virus on to other people. Monkeypox is caused by a viral infection and can be found in animals including rodents and monkeys, as well as in humans. It is typicall
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His Clients Were Acquitted of Murder. Why Did They Get Life Sentences?
PART I: The Writ I n the end, Jarrett and Joi Adams decide to confront the attorney general in person. They buy tickets to his fundraiser—they figure it's their best chance to speak with the man. The car they've requested pulls up to the Airbnb they're renting this week in August in Richmond, Virginia, and the driver sets the address on his phone for McLean, some two hours away. Jarrett and Joi s
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Decolonize Russia
The former national security adviser Zbigniew Brzezinski once said that without Ukraine, Russia would cease to be an empire. It's a pithy statement, but it's not true. Even if Vladimir Putin fails to wrest back Ukraine, his country will remain a haphazard amalgamation of regions and nations with hugely varied histories, cultures, and languages. The Kremlin will continue ruling over colonial holdi
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Deliveries of All-Electric Ford F-150 Lightning Officially Begin
Truck Off People who love big trucks and the environment — rejoice! The first electric Ford F-150 Lightning was delivered to a retail customer today in the automaker's home state of Michigan. Netizen @oneguynick posted a photo with his new truck on Twitter today, and you have to admit the hulking silver four-door beast looks anything but electric as the happy couple stand outside the dealership i
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Man Shot to Death by Police and Guard Near Space Force Station
Space Force Authorities have released very few details about a man shot and killed near the New Boston Space Force Station in New Hampshire, but a press release the state attorney general's office published yesterday includes the name of the two men who shot him. Yesterday's presser says New Boston police officer Shane Morton and security guard Peter White were involved in the shooting, though it
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Video Shows Elon Musk Climbing Mechazilla Tower
Ride to the Top In a new video by YouTuber Tim "Everyday Astronaut" Dodd, SpaceX CEO Elon Musk can be seen ascending to the top of the space company's " Mechazilla " tower, a massive metal construction designed to aid during both launch and landing of the company's behemoth Starship spacecraft. The company has yet to launch its Starship into orbit , but it has made strides in building the hardwar
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Pompeii victim's genome successfully sequenced for first time
Scientists say man shares similarities with modern Italians and others who lived in region during Roman empire The genome of a victim of the catastrophic eruption of Mount Vesuvius over the ancient city of Pompeii has been sequenced for the first time, scientists have revealed, shedding new light on the health and diversity of those who lived in the Roman empire at the time of the disaster. In a
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Rebound COVID Is Just the Start of Paxlovid's Mysteries
The first data on Paxlovid, out last November, hinted that the COVID antiviral would cut the risk of hospitalization and death by 89 percent . Pundits called the drug " a monster breakthrough ," " miraculous ," and " the biggest advance in the pandemic since the vaccines ." " Today's news is a real game-changer ," said Albert Bourla, the CEO of Pfizer, which makes the drug. The pills are " a game
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America Needs Anti-Racialism
President Joe Biden has declared war on white supremacy. Shortly after the hideous racist massacre in Buffalo, New York, he urged his fellow citizens to banish this hateful ideology from our public life: "We need to say, as clearly and forcefully as we can, that the ideology of white supremacy has no place in America." But what exactly do we mean by white supremacy , and what would it mean to bri
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War Will Never Be This Bulky Again
Nearly 80 years on from the end of World War II, it is striking how much of that conflict remains with us. This is of course true in terms of historic legacy—politicians who compare themselves to Churchill, for example, or fears of German power within Europe. But Russia's invasion of Ukraine makes clear that we still live in World War II's shadow in other ways too. The Russian military, for examp
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The Time Bandit Gets Lucky in a Huge Storm | Deadliest Catch
Stream Deadliest Catch on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/deadliest-catch #DeadliestCatch #Discovery #DiscoveryPlus Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Disco
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What It Feels Like to Lose Your Child in a Mass Shooting
Nicole Hockley has done all of this before. The bewildering phone call in the middle of the day. The anxious drive, followed by the waiting, the endless waiting, alongside other frantic or frozen parents. Then, at last, learning the impossible, mind-numbing news: Your child is dead. The tiny person you made with your own body, whom you fed, dressed, and taught to say thank you , was shot to death
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Photos of the Week: Firefighting Goats, Lake Chair, Saint Javelin
A fancy-dress evening in Versailles, a destroyed industrial area in Ukraine, a mass wedding on the Uyuni Salt Flat, mourning families in Texas, migrants rescued in the Mediterranean Sea, the Cannes Film Festival in France, a whale rescue near Mallorca, Fleet Week in New York City, and much more
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Elon Musk Alarmed by Deepfake of Him Endorsing Crypto Scam
Uncanny Valley A deepfaked video crypto scammers are using to convince their marks that SpaceX and Tesla CEO Elon Musk has started a new investment platform is just realistic enough to look super creepy — and it's even swindled a handful of people already. A netizen posted the short clip online yesterday and tagged Musk, warning that the scam had gone viral already. The video is edited footage of
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What does a black hole sound like? NASA has an answer
NASA began "sonifying" its famous photos of outer space to help people who are visually impaired enjoy the images. Recently, it recreated the sound of a black hole 240 million light-years away. (Image credit: NASA/CXC/Columbia Univ./C. Hailey et al.)
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Eat plants, try pilates and stay positive: how to keep your body younger than your years
Do blueberries make you live longer? Is pilates proper exercise? How do you avoid loneliness? Botox, yes or no? Here's how to age better Who doesn't want a long and healthy life? Ageing may be non negotiable but how you do it affords some wiggle room. There is, however, no time to lose. Ideally you'd have been getting your health in order before middle age. But it's never too late to start. Each
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Someone's Selling NASA Moon Dust That Got Eaten By Cockroaches
Tummy Yummy This just might be the most expensive meal in history. Too bad humans didn't get to eat it! We're talking about Moon dust retrieved from the guts of bugs that scientists fed lunar soil collected by the Apollo 11 astronauts brought back in 1969. Among other critters, cockroaches ate and digested small amounts of the soil so scientists could study its effects — and the remains of the in
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The Hinduization of India Is Nearly Complete
W hen the British withdrew from the Indian subcontinent in 1947, paving the way for the independence of the newly partitioned nations of India and Pakistan, the Muslims of the region had a choice. They could resettle in Pakistan, where they would be among a Muslim majority, or remain in India, where they would live as a minority in a majority-Hindu but constitutionally secular state. For Shah Ala
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Mass Shootings, Young Men, and What Can Be Done
This is an edition of Up for Debate, a newsletter by Conor Friedersdorf. On Wednesdays, he rounds up timely conversations and solicits reader responses to one thought-provoking question. Every Monday, he publishes some thoughtful replies. Sign up for the newsletter here. Question of the Week What do you think about guns, the right to bear arms, gun deaths, and gun policy? Conversations of Note Ye
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Patriotic Songs for a Cruel Country
The nation has selected a new musical champion, and he sings with a twang. This week, American Idol crowned Noah Thompson, a scruffy-goateed 20-year-old construction worker from Kentucky, as its 20th season's winner. On his debut single, "One Day Tonight," Thompson imagines giving a girlfriend all that she pines for: a diamond ring, a fixer-upper in Denver, a honeymoon in Vegas. He's singing abou
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The Sit-Up Is Over
When I think of a sit-up, my mind flashes immediately to the (carpeted, for some reason) floor of my elementary-school gym. Twice a week, our teachers marched us there for ritual humiliation and light calisthenics, and under the watchful gaze of a former football coach with a whistle perpetually dangling from his lips, we'd warm up with the moves we'd been told were the building blocks of physica
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SpaceX Replacing Defective Heat Shield Before Next Astronaut Launch
Scorched SpaceX has run into trouble making its astronaut-ferrying spacecraft fully reusable, something the company's billionaire CEO Elon Musk has previously described as the "holy grail." According to a NASA statement, the heat shield attached to the Crew Dragon spacecraft meant to take the next crew of astronauts to the International Space Station in September as part of the Crew-5 mission, ha
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Walmart Announces Drone Deliveries to 4 Million Households
Special Delivery It looks like Walmart may be able to do what Amazon can't — get its drone delivery program off the ground. According to a recent press release , Walmart announced an expansion to its DroneUp program, which it claims will provide the potential to reach four million US households in six states – Arizona, Arkansas, Florida, Texas, Utah and Virginia — as well as the ability to delive
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The First Electric F-150 Buyer Tried to Get a Cybertruck Instead
Chosen One Long ago, the ancient electric vehicle oracles prophesied that one Michigan resident would be the first to receive an electric truck delivery — but didn't clarify which auto maker would be The Chosen One. As luck would have it, Nicholas Schmidt made history yesterday when he became the first official owner of a brand new electric Ford F-150 Lightning. The electrified version of Ford's
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UAE Official Says Murder Should Be Illegal in the Metaverse
During a speech at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, the United Arab Emirates' minister of state for artificial intelligence Omar Sultan Al Olama warned that committing serious crimes including "murder" should be made illegal in the metaverse. "If I send you a text on WhatsApp, it's text right?" Al Olama said, as quoted by CNBC . "It might terrorize you but to a certain degree it wi
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Microsoft Exec Accused of Watching VR Porn in Front of Employees
Not Cool Microsoft's team meetings sound like a nightmare. In a new Insider investigation , dozens of employees claim misconduct is rampant at the software giant, and often excused for the "golden boys" who make the company the most money. The report alleges that an executive named Alex Kipman, who leads a team that CEO Satya Nadella is particularly reliant on, has inappropriately touched women a
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Survivalist Legend Teaches the New Guy How to Survive | Naked and Afraid
Stream Naked and Afraid on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/naked-and-afraid #NakedAndAfraid #Discovery #Survival Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discover
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Children Deserve the Honest Truth About Mass Shootings
America is in mourning. The country is processing the deaths of 19 children and two teachers, murdered on Tuesday in their elementary-school classroom by an 18-year-old gunman. The massacre marks the second-deadliest school shooting on record in the United States, and the grief that has followed can feel overwhelming even to adults who have grown used to America's regular, brutal gun violence. Fo
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The Two Choices That Keep a Midlife Crisis at Bay
" How to Build a Life " is a weekly column by Arthur Brooks, tackling questions of meaning and happiness. Click here to listen to his podcast series on all things happiness, How to Build a Happy Life . The dirty secret of social scientists is that a lot of research is actually "me-search." Many of us tend to study aspects of life that affect us personally, looking for solutions to our own issues.
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Ground Test Finds Zero Gold! | Gold Rush: Dave Turin's Lost Mine
Stream Gold Rush: Dave Turin's Lost Mine on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/gold-rush-dave-turins-lost-mine #GoldRush #DaveTurin #DaveTurinsLostMine Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on T
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Gay Men Need a Specific Warning About Monkeypox
A disproportionate number of cases in the recent monkeypox outbreak have shown up among gay and bisexual men. And as public-health authorities investigate possible links to sexual or other close physical contact at a Pride event in the Canary Islands, a sauna in Madrid, and other gay venues in Europe, government officials are trying hard not to single out a group that endured terrible stigma at t
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Maths doesn't need a rebrand. We should celebrate its diversity and complexity | Letter
Prof Ulrike Tillmann on Andy Haldane's suggestion that maths could be rebranded as numeracy to make it more approachable I read with interest your article in response to Andy Haldane's comments suggesting maths could be rebranded as numeracy ( Pass notes, 18 May ). I welcome Mr Haldane's support for the mathematical sciences and appreciate his intent to make the subject approachable to all. Never
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Observation of fractional exclusion statistics in quantum critical matter
A quantum system consisting of a large number of microscopic particles obeys statistical laws at the macroscopic level. In nature, there are two kinds of microscopic quantum particles. One is the boson satisfying the Bose-Einstein statistics, and the other is the fermion satisfying the Fermi-Dirac statistics.
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Solar wind a major driver of atmospheric sodium at Mercury
No object in the solar system experiences the sun's solar wind more powerfully than Mercury. The planet's magnetic field deflects the sun's stream of electrically charged particles at a distance of only 1,000 kilometers from Mercury's surface, a point called the magnetopause.
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The future of US reproductive rights after Roe v. Wade | Mary Ziegler, Loretta J. Ross, Erika Bachiochi, Joshua Prager
The recent leak of the US Supreme Court's draft opinion overturning Roe v. Wade — the nearly 50-year-old ruling to legalize abortion nationwide — has left many wondering what happens next for reproductive rights in the country. In a thoughtful, at times contentious conversation between legal historian Mary Ziegler, activist Loretta J. Ross, legal scholar Erika Bachiochi and journalist Joshua Pra
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Why bittersweet emotions underscore life's beauty | Susan Cain
Life is a constant state of both joy and sorrow, dark and light, bitter and sweet. In a meditative conversation, author Susan Cain explores how being attuned to the bittersweetness of life — and being fully present for both the happy times and the sad times — helps us navigate love and loss and connect to the "insane beauty" of the world. (This conversation, hosted by TED current affairs curator
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The big new idea for making self-driving cars that can go anywhere
Four years ago, Alex Kendall sat in a car on a small road in the British countryside and took his hands off the wheel. The car, equipped with a few cheap cameras and a massive neural network, veered to the side. When it did, Kendall grabbed the wheel for a few seconds to correct it. The car veered again; Kendall corrected it. It took less than 20 minutes for the car to learn to stay on the road b
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Bionic reading: could an ADHD-friendly hack turn me into a speed-reader? | Daniel Lavelle
This typographical trick certainly helps me focus. But maybe having a wandering mind isn't such a bad thing With ADHD, thoughts and impulses intrude on my focus like burglars trying to break into a house. Sometimes these crooks carefully pick the backdoor lock before they silently enter and pilfer all the silverware. At other times, stealth goes out of the window; they're kicking through the fron
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The Review: Top Gun
Top Gun: Maverick is out soon! But can any movie with fast planes, Tom Cruise, and beach volleyball truly compare to the classic fighter-pilot movie about, as writer Shirley Li puts it, "cute boys calling each other cute names"? And do audiences have an appetite anymore for what Megan Garber called an "infomercial for America" ? Find out with Shirley, Megan, and David Sims, and explore the moral
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Finding coherence in quantum chaos
A theoretical breakthrough in understanding quantum chaos could open new paths into researching quantum information and quantum computing, many-body physics, black holes, and the still-elusive quantum to classical transition.
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Who Owns 4chan?
While the infamous imageboard's ties to mass shootings have long been clear, its relationship with a Japanese toymaker has remained remarkably murky.
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Watch a robotic shoulder practice twisting and stretching human cells
A robotic shoulder that stretches, presses, and twists lab-grown human tendon tissue could pave the way for more successful tissue grafts. Though the field of tissue engineering is still mostly experimental, skin cells, cartilage, and even a windpipe grown from samples of human cells have been implanted in patients so far. But growing usable human tendon cells—which need to stretch and twist—has
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What the Voyager Space Probes Can Teach Us About Immortality as They Sail Through Space for Eons
Voyager 1 is the farthest human-made object from Earth. After sweeping by Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, it is now almost 15 billion miles (24 billion kilometers) from Earth in interstellar space. Both Voyager 1 and its twin, Voyager 2, carry little pieces of humanity in the form of their Golden Records . These messages in a bottle include spoken greetings in 55 languages, sounds and image
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Dust devils and daytime upslope winds explain Mars's constant haze
A large team of researchers affiliated with multiple institutions in the U.S., Spain, France and Finland has found that frequent dust devils and daytime upslope winds are the reason for Mars's constant atmospheric haze. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their study of data from the first 216 sols of Perseverance rover's trek across the surface of parts o
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Rats Learned to Hide and Seek. Scientists Learned Way More.
Before they could do anything else, the neuroscientists had to teach the rats how to play hide-and-seek. Michael Brecht at the Humboldt University of Berlin concocted the idea. His student Annika Reinhold trained six of their lab rodents to scurry around a room filled with obstacles and cardboard boxes, and either locate the hidden human or find a hiding spot themselves. As I reported in 2019 , t
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Save your breath: traditional Kyrgyz dance helps ease chronic lung disease
Exercise to help COPD hospital patients is being rolled out across Kyrgyzstan and to neighbouring countries Photographs by Danil Usmanov Every day on the respiratory ward at one of Kyrgyzstan's biggest hospitals, Aidai Temiraly Kyzy, a 24-year-old nurse, puts on the music and leads her patients in the Kara Jorgo , the national dance of the central Asian country. This involves a range of body move
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All-optical computation of a group of transformations using a polarization-encoded diffractive network
Implementing large-scale linear transformations or matrix computations plays a pivotal role in modern information processing systems. Digital computer systems need to complete up to billions of matrix operations per second to perform complex computational tasks, such as training and inference for deep neural networks. As a result, the throughput of linear transform computations can directly influe
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Toward customizable timber, grown in a lab
Each year, the world loses about 10 million hectares of forest—an area about the size of Iceland—because of deforestation. At that rate, some scientists predict the world's forests could disappear in 100 to 200 years.
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Zoo Saving DNA From Rare Animals In Case They Go Extinct
Still Around Animal researchers in the UK are teaming up in an attempt to save endangered species from permanent extinction. England's Chester Zoo announced a partnership earlier this week with a tissue bank called Nature's SAFE to cryogenically freeze genetic material from animals that pass away at the zoo. Their cells could be used to save species from extinction in the future, according to a p
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The Secret Math Behind Mind-Reading Magic Tricks
In our most recent Insights puzzle, I challenged readers to figure out how certain magic tricks work. The tricks in question were of the sort where the magician somehow divines the identity of your hidden numbers or playing cards. But how does the magician correctly deduce what's in your mind based on seemingly no information? As we'll see below, the secret is to extract just enough information t
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Tracking chirality in real time
Chiral molecules exist in two forms, called enantiomers, which are mirror images of each other and non-superimposable—much like a pair of hands. While they share most chemical and physical properties, enantiomers can have adverse effects in (bio)chemical phenomena. For example, a protein or enzyme may only bind one enantiomeric form of a target molecule. Consequently, identification and control of
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Made to measure: why we can't stop quantifying our lives
From ancient Egyptian cubits to fitness tracker apps, humankind has long been seeking ever more ways to measure the world – and ourselves. But what is this doing to us? If anything exemplifies the power of measurement in contemporary life, it is Standard Reference Peanut Butter. It's the creation of the US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and sold to industry at a price of $1
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Hummingbirds may struggle to go any further uphill
Any animal ascending a mountain experiences a double whammy of impediments: The air gets thinner as it also becomes colder, which is particularly problematic for creatures struggling to keep warm when less oxygen is available. For tiny animals with the highest-octane lifestyles, such as hovering hummingbirds, the challenges of relocating to higher levels to evade climate change may be too much, bu
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When Stranger Things Finally Gave Its Villain a Voice
This article contains spoilers for the first seven episodes of Stranger Things Season 4. Only on Netflix's sci-fi horror drama Stranger Things have teenagers gotten used to fighting interdimensional demons. Early in Season 4, Robin (played by Maya Hawke) offers an explanation for her and her friends' nonchalance in dealing with threats from the Upside Down, the desolate alternate realm that regul
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Britain is paving the way for gene-edited food – will the public stomach it?
Twenty years ago, the anti-GM movement had wide backing. Experts say the current mood on gene editing is softer At the height of the anti-GM movement, in 1999, the then head of Greenpeace UK, Peter Melchett, was charged with theft and criminal damage after scything down a field of genetically modified maize. In a decisive victory for the anti-GM movement, Lord Melchett and 27 fellow activists wer
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What Really Happens When Mercury Is in Retrograde
You've probably heard some version of the line, usually delivered with a sigh. Someone is having a crappy day. Or they're in a weird mood. Or nothing seems to be going right, despite their best efforts. And they've laid the blame on Mercury, the smallest planet in our solar system, nearest to the sun. Everything is Mercury's fault. The darn thing is in retrograde. And in fact, it's happening righ
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Inside Charm Industrial's big bet on corn stalks for carbon removal
In recent weeks, a crew of staffers from a company called Charm Industrial have been working on the edge of Kansas corn fields, moving rolled bales of stalks, leaves, husks, and tassels up to a white semi-trailer. Inside, a contraption called a pyrolyzer uses high temperatures in the absence of oxygen to break down the plant material into a mix of biochar and bio-oil. The former will eventually g
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We Tell Ourselves Stories About Money to Live
Stories about American capitalism tend to have a recognizable villain: the robber baron, the business tycoon, the financial investor, your boss. But, as Karl Marx once put it, the evil capitalist "is only capital personified." Far more chilling, he wrote, are the workings of capital itself, which, "vampire-like, only lives by sucking living labour, and lives the more, the more labour it sucks." W
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Cyberpunk Overload! It's the Summer of the Robot Vending Machine
Robotic Vending Machine The days of having to walk over to a vending machine to pick up a snack may be numbered. Now they're going to start coming to you. Robotic vending machines are making their way to malls, airports, and even grocery stores across the US, Axios reports . Take Tortoise, for instance, a startup that claims to have created the first remote-controlled store on wheels , The compan
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Researcher describes how extraterrestrial civilizations could colonize the galaxy even if they don't have starships
Astronomers have searched for extraterrestrial civilizations in planetary systems for sixty years, to no avail. In the paper published by International Journal of Astrobiology, Cambridge University Press, and titled "Migrating extraterrestrial civilizations and interstellar colonization: Implications for SETI and SETA," Irina K. Romanovskaya proposes that the search for extraterrestrial intelligen
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Art Plundered From Africa Stolen Back, Sold as NFTs
NFT Robin Hood Stealing from the rich to give to the poor is arguably pretty awesome — but stealing from colonial museums to put money back in the pockets of African artists is, somehow, even cooler. Billing itself as "the world's first digital repatriation of stolen art to the Metaverse," the Looty non-fungible token (NFT) project aims to digitally "steal" ancient African art back from instituti
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Diatoms are under threat of decline due to ocean acidification, study shows
While calcifying organisms like oysters and corals have difficulty forming their shells and skeletons in more acidic seawater, diatoms have been considered less susceptible to the effects of ocean acidification—a chemical change triggered by the uptake of carbon dioxide (CO2). The globally widespread tiny diatoms use silica, a compound of silicon, oxygen and hydrogen, as a building material for th
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What a Book Can Do for a Girl
Less than halfway through Hayao Miyazaki's animated feature Spirited Away , a 10-year-old girl gets her name back. She's lost too many things since stumbling into a supernatural world—her parents, even briefly her physical body. The retrieval of her name, followed by a friend's kind gift of a fresh meal, loosens up all her stored grief. Chihiro cries freely for what's been taken between bites of
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How Charm Industrial hopes to use crops to cut steel emissions
Charm Industrial has gained attention for its unusual approach to storing away carbon dioxide: converting plant matter into bio-oil that it then pumps into deep wells and salt caverns. (See related story .) But the San Francisco startup is now exploring whether that oil could be used to cut emissions from iron and steelmaking as well, pursuing a new technical path for cleaning up the dirtiest ind
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Is Online Presence a Turnoff?
T he narrator of Patricia Lockwood's 2021 novel, No One Is Talking About This , is a caricature of an "extremely online" person. She's constantly on her phone, inhaling an enormous amount of content each day: bizarre makeup hacks, dog videos, pictures of breakfast food and people's bruises. Her speech is peppered with the slang and nihilistic humor of her feed. While her younger sister is focused
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Chemists use light energy to produce small molecular rings
In the search for new active agents in medicine, molecules whose atoms are linked in rings are becoming increasingly important. Such ring systems have particularly suitable properties for producing such active agents and they are driving the development of innovative treatments for malignant tumours, as well as for neurodegenerative and infectious diseases. A team of chemists headed by Prof. Frank
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How Criminal-Justice Reform Fell Apart
A typical way to think about history is as a series of turning points. Sometimes it's just as useful to think about the moments that looked like turning points and then turned out not to be. For a brief period, culminating two summers ago, the United States seemed to be on the verge of a serious rethinking of its approach to criminal justice. Years of falling crime had made citizens open to new p
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The Atlantic Daily: The Only Sure Outcome of Depp v. Heard
Tomorrow, Johnny Depp and Amber Heard's six-week defamation trial comes to a close. Depp is suing Heard, his ex-wife, for $50 million, accusing her of defaming him in a 2018 Washington Post op-ed in which she refers to herself—without naming him—as "a public figure representing domestic abuse." Heard, in turn, filed a $100 million defamation counterclaim against Depp. The jury will likely issue a
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Siberian tundra could virtually disappear by mid-millennium
Due to global warming, temperatures in the Arctic are climbing rapidly. As a result, the treeline for Siberian larch forests is steadily advancing to the north, gradually supplanting the broad expanses of tundra which are home to a unique mix of flora and fauna. Experts from the Alfred Wegener Institute have now prepared a computer simulation of how these woods could spread in the future, at the t
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Cops Are Now Deepfaking Murder Victims To Catch Their Killers
Cold Case Detectives are trying something that appears to never have been done before: deepfaking a murder victim in a last-ditch attempt to bring his killer to justice. As Euronews reports , Dutch police are describing their use of "deepfake" technology in the cold case of Sedar Soares' 2003 murder a "world first." The 13-year-old Soares was shot dead in a parking garage in Rotterdam nearly twen
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Tsunami threats are greatly underestimated in current models, new research shows
The 2004 Sumatra earthquake generated one of the most destructive tsunamis ever recorded, with 100-foot waves that killed nearly 230,000 and resulted in an estimated $10 billion in damage. It also ushered in a new understanding that potent tsunamis are triggered by shallow earthquake ruptures of underwater fault lines. Future tsunamis are likely to be just as severe, if not worse, potentially kill
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The Atlantic Daily: When You Get COVID Again and Again
The coronavirus is nothing if not scrappy. In the two and a half years since the microbe hurtled into our midst, it has infected most Americans —probably most of the world's population—and researchers have cooked up several lifesaving vaccines. And yet, the virus keeps finding new ways to spread quickly among us, sometimes infiltrating the same hosts again and again and again. Scientists think SA
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How to Switch to Google Fi
Here's everything you need to know about switching from Verizon, T-Mobile, or AT&T to the search giant's cell phone service.
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The Download: Locking up carbon with corn, and the path to greener steel
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. Inside Charm Industrial's big bet on corn stalks for carbon removal In recent weeks, a crew of staffers from a company called Charm Industrial have been working on the edge of Kansas corn fields, moving rolled bales of stalks, leaves, husks, and tassels up to
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How to Fix Twitter—And All of Social Media
Those debating the future of Twitter and other social-media platforms have largely fallen into two opposing camps. One supports individuals' absolute freedom of speech; the other holds that speech must be modulated through content moderation , and by tweaking the ways in which information spreads. It sounds like an old-fashioned confrontation between the idealists and the realists, but in this ca
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Scientists identify how the brain links memories
Our brains lose the ability to link related memories as we age. Scientists genetically restored this brain function in middle-aged mice and identified an FDA-approved drug that achieves the same thing. The study suggests a new approach for combating middle-aged memory loss and a possible early intervention for dementia.
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The Ugly Truth About the Beautiful Game
The philosopher Roger Scruton once wrote that people become conservative as they experience loss; the sense of passing, of dying and death. Loss gives them a love of things as they are, a desire to hold, to protect, to conserve — even if all attempts to do so come too late. I thought of this recently when I found myself in the absurd situation of feeling sad that a multimillionaire French soccer
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The Download: Driverless cars' AI plan, and stretching cells with a robotic shoulder
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. The big new idea for making self-driving cars that can go anywhere Four years ago, Alex Kendall sat in a car on a small road in the British countryside and took his hands off the wheel. The car, equipped with a few cheap cameras and a massive neural network, v
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New non-radioactive, neutral reagent reveals viruses in clear detail
Seeing is believing—or, for scientists, the beginning of understanding. Researchers can visualize atomically small details with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) by beaming electrons through the sample and capturing their interactions to form an image. But such tiny specimens can evade the electrons, so they need to be specially treated with heavy metals to ensure interactions. To see viruses
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How mice choose the best escape route
Escaping imminent danger is essential for survival. Animals must learn a new environment fast enough for them to be able to choose the shortest route to safety. But how do they do this without ever having experienced threat in the new environment?
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Chemists reveal how tau proteins form tangles
One of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease is the presence of neurofibrillary tangles in the brain. These tangles, made of tau proteins, impair neurons' ability to function normally and can cause the cells to die.
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The Most Ill-Advised Libel Trial Since Oscar Wilde's
This article was featured in One Story to Read Today, a newsletter in which our editors recommend a single must-read from The Atlantic , Monday through Friday. Sign up for it here. At its core , the "Wagatha Christie" trial awaiting judgment in London is a clash between different ideas of celebrity. The combatants are two prominent "WAGs"—the wives and girlfriends of English footballers. Coleen R
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What the Voyager space probes can teach humanity about immortality and legacy
Voyager 1 is the farthest human-made object from Earth. After sweeping by Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune, it is now almost 15 billion miles (24 billion kilometers) from Earth in interstellar space. Both Voyager 1 and its twin, Voyager 2, carry little pieces of humanity in the form of their Golden Records. These messages in a bottle include spoken greetings in 55 languages, sounds and images f
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Naked Emperors and Laptop Class Doctors
The authors of this statement are anti-vaccine: "The idea that everyone must be vaccinated against COVID-19 is as misguided as the anti-vax idea that no one should. The former is more dangerous for public health." The post first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .
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Vanuatu declares climate emergency
Vanuatu's parliament has declared a climate emergency, with the low-lying island nation's prime minister flagging a US$1.2 billion cost to cushion climate change's impacts on his country.
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Decline of diatoms due to ocean acidification
Diatoms are the most important producers of plant biomass in the ocean and help to transport carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere into the deep ocean and thus regulate our climate. Because diatoms rely on silica rather than calcium carbonate to build their shells, they were previously thought to benefit from ocean acidification — a chemical change in seawater triggered by the increasing uptak
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Hubble views an interacting spiral
This image, taken by the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 on NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, features the spiral galaxy NGC 3509. Located some 350 million light-years away, NGC 3509 is an interesting galaxy whose sweeping tidal tail (not visible in this image) offers hints of its evolution.
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Estimating impact and defining a future-ready cybersecurity strategy with brand risk calculator
Thank you for joining us on "The cloud hub: From cloud chaos to clarity." Watch Bill Mew, digital ethics campaigner and CEO of CrisisTeam.co.uk talk to Vishal Salvi, SVP & CISO at Infosys, and Ameya Kapnadak, chief growth officer and head of consulting at Interbrand India, about why brands need to implement a well-defined, evolving cybersecurity strategy to ensure continued brand trust—and how th
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Best Cordless Phones of 2022
Cordless phones aren't an outdated technology just yet, especially when you take a look at the best cordless phones on the market. Today's cordless phones aren't the clunky, battery-zapping models of the past. They're sleek, with high-end devices that improve clarity and range. There are many reasons to keep a landline, from running a home business to poor cell coverage in your area. Cordless pho
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This Week's Awesome Tech Stories From Around the Web (Through May 28)
ROBOTICS Dyson Reveals Its Big Bet…Robots Jasper Jolly | The Guardian "Dyson has signaled it is placing a 'big bet' on producing robots capable of household chores by 2030, as it looks to move beyond the vacuum cleaners, fans and dryers that made its founder one of the wealthiest British businessmen. The company, founded by billionaire Sir James Dyson, on Wednesday published photographs of robot
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Weekend reads: Female driver stereotypes; 'stealth research'; AI comes to fake scientific images
Would you consider a donation to support Weekend Reads, and our daily work? Thanks in advance. The week at Retraction Watch featured: Journal about 'ambient intelligence' retracts more than 50 papers at once The "internet may be a challenging venue": Biomedical engineering group up to four retractions Drug researchers in Russia have four papers subjected to expressions … Continue reading
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No Hard/Easy Consciousness without Multisensory Integration
Mammalian consciousness is predicated on multisensory integration. There is no way to understand what it is to be, without sensory input and there is no way to know, without sensory integration and relay, to the memory. Integration occurs at relay centers — transforming senses before heading out. Olfactory bulb for smell, thalamus for others. Integration is convergence into uniformity. The unifor
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EGU2022 – A personal diary from a science enthusiast perspective
After two years of Corona-induced online meetings in 2020 and 2021 , this year's General Assembly of the European Geosciences Union (EGU) started on Monday May 23 both on premise in Vienna and online as a hybrid conference. I spent the whole week in Vienna, picking and chosing sessions I was interested in. This blog post will be a compilation – a kind of diary – of the happenings from my perspect
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Filosofiprofessorn om skolan: "Systemet har svikit barnen"
En förklaring bakom den allt mer pressade situationen för svenska elever med höga stressnivåer är styrsystemet "new public management" inom offentlig sektor, menar Jonna Bornemark, filosofiprofessor som nu reagerar på Vetenskapens världs Det svenska skolexperimentet. Hon pekar på att det mänskliga försvinner i dagens skola.
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Best Waterproof Phone Cases of 2022
Waterproof phone cases prepare your phone for adventure with powerful splash protection and will keep your phone dry, even when it's submerged for long periods of time. These waterproof phone cases often include some of the features of traditional phone cases, such as drop protection, while others work like miniaturized dry bags and often hook onto your neck or arm using a lanyard or cord. The fo
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New light-powered catalysts could aid in manufacturing
Chemists designed a new photoredox catalyst that could make it easier to incorporate light-driven reactions into continuous flow manufacturing processes. The polymer catalysts could be used to coat tubing and perform chemical transformations on reactants as they flow through the tube.
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New route to build materials out of tiny particles
Researchers have found a new way to build synthetic materials out of tiny glass particles — so-called colloids. They showed that they can simply use the shape of these colloids to make interesting building blocks for new materials, regardless of other properties of the colloidal particles.
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Novel sensors enable precise measurement of dopamine
Dopamine is an important signalling molecule for nerve cells. Its concentration could not be precisely determined with both high spatial or temporal resolution until now. A new method has now made this possible: A research team used modified carbon nanotubes that glow brighter in the presence of the messenger substance dopamine. These sensors visualize the release of dopamine from nerve cells with
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Why gun control laws don't pass Congress, despite majority public support and repeated outrage over mass shootings
With the carnage in Uvalde, Texas, and Buffalo, New York in May 2022, calls have begun again for Congress to enact gun control. Since the 2012 massacre of 20 children and four staff members at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, legislation introduced in response to mass killings has consistently failed to pass the Senate. We asked political scientists Monika McDermott and David
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Learning from nature: Biosynthesis of cyanobacterin opens up new class of natural compounds for applications in medicine and agriculture
Researchers have succeeded in understanding the biosynthetic mechanisms for the production of the natural product cyanobacterin, which is produced in small quantities by the cyanobacteria Scytonema hofmanni. In the process, they also discovered a new class of enzymes for building carbon-carbon bonds. The (bio)chemists are thus significantly expanding the biocatalytic repertoire currently known fro
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New cancer subtype may illuminate treatment strategy
Researchers have identified a previously unrecognized form of hormone therapy-resistant prostate cancer, as well as a set of molecules that drive its growth. This discovery opens the door to the development of therapies that treat this specific disease.
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Ancient viral elements embedded in human genome are not from fossil retrovirus
Using a next generation sequencing analysis to examine human endogenous retrovirus (HERV) integration sites, researchers from Kumamoto University, the National Institute of Genetics (Japan), and the University of Michigan (U.S.) have discovered that these ancient retroviruses can undergo retrotransposition (DNA sequence insertion with RNA mediation) into iPS cells. The team believes that their dis
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No photosynthetic improvement in ictB transformants in field-grown model crop
It is projected that by the year 2050, the global food supply will need to increase by 50-80% to keep up with the growing population. Researchers all over the world have been working to find ways to sustainably grow food crops to meet this need, and improving photosynthesis in plants holds great possibilities to solving these issues.
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Researchers unravel role of cohesins in embryonic stem cell division
Chromosomes undergo precise structural changes at a molecular level during the different phases of cell division. These changes occur at a high level of accuracy to prevent genome instability. Genome instability resulting from broken, missing, or rearranged chromosomes has been found to be the root cause of cell death, carcinogenesis, and congenital disorders. Studying genomic instability helps re
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Scientists identify beetle that triggers production of red propolis in Brazil
Jairo Kenupp Bastos first heard about the insect while visiting Canavieiras on the south coast of Bahia, a state in the Northeast of Brazil. "Local beekeepers told me about a tiny beetle that made holes in a plant called Dalbergia ecastaphyllum [Coinvine], a member of the pea family, and that the holes leaked a resin used by bees to make red propolis," said Bastos, a professor of pharmacognosy (th
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Linker histone's surprising partnership with single-stranded DNA
To keep order in the tight quarters of the cell nucleus, our DNA is neatly clamped in place around a central disk by H1 linker histone, which helps shepherd DNA into the tidy chromatin fibers that comprise chromosomes. Linker histone, however, is far more than a mere protein clip. Without sufficient H1, the process of gene transcription falters and the intricate dance of DNA repair screeches to a
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Women resent compliments about communality at work
Women feel more frustrated than men by the gendered expectations placed on them at work, even when those expectations appear to signal women's virtues and are seen as important for workplace advancement, according to new Cornell research.
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Choking local funding prevents terrorism
Terrorist attacks are highly responsive to local funding availability, and financial counter-terrorism can, thus, be effective in reducing terrorism casualties, according to new research by Nicola Limodio (Department of Finance, Bocconi University) forthcoming in Econometrica.
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T cell warriors need their R & R
T cells, biology textbooks teach us, are the soldiers of the immune system, constantly on the ready to respond to a variety of threats, from viruses to tumors. However, without rest and maintenance T cells can die and leave their hosts more susceptible to pathogens, scientists report.
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An arms race that plays out in a single genome
We often think of biological arms races occurring between the immune system and pathogens, or predator and prey, but biologists have now discovered an example that plays out within a single genome. Their work in fruit flies may have implications for key biological processes in humans, including fertility and even cancer.
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Intensive whaling did not rob the fin whale of its genomic diversity
Fin whales are the second largest creatures on our planet, surpassed only by blue whales. They can reach a length of around 20 meters—and require up to two metric tons of food per day. Accordingly, they release enormous amounts of nutrients—with significant effects on the ecosystems of the oceans. However, industrial whaling has significantly reduced their numbers. It was geared towards the oil of
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Biosynthesis of cyanobacterin opens up new class of natural compounds for applications in medicine and agriculture
The fact that nature is an excellent chemist is demonstrated by the abundance of molecules, so-called natural products, which it produces biosynthetically. These natural products are also of central importance to us humans. They are used in many ways in our everyday lives, especially as active agents in medicine and agriculture. Prominent examples are antibiotics such as penicilins isolated from m
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Experience influences the visual processing of stone tools
Scientists at the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH) have assessed whether knowledge and experience affect the distribution of the attention during the visual exploration of stone tools, in a study published in the journal Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences. The results suggest that prior experience does indeed influence how the tool is processed visually.
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Best Projectors Under $500 in 2022
Tapping into movie magic has never been easier or more affordable with the best projectors under $500. Experiencing a projector first-hand, up close, truly has to be seen to be believed. And even inexpensive projectors provide quite a bit of movie night fun, with big, bright screens that smack of your local theater. Unlike your local theater, you won't have to shell out $10 bucks for popcorn. Her
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Ancient viral elements embedded in human genome not from fossil retrovirus
Many types of animals, including humans, successfully coexist with retroviruses, and we know that ancient retrovirus viral elements can even be found within our genome. We also know that these endogenous retroviruses can be utilized for development and evolution. However, uncontrolled endogenous retroviruses may be a cause of disease in the human body. Now, researchers have discovered that endogen
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Quantum Internet Is a Step Closer After Quantum Teleportation Breakthrough
Quantum communication technology could one day enable an ultra-secure quantum internet, but so far creating the linkages in such a large network has proven challenging. A breakthrough in the ability to teleport quantum information could be a promising way forward. The reason many are excited about future quantum communication networks is the fact that it's essentially impossible to eavesdrop on m
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Oil and gas brine 'no better' at controlling dust than rainwater, researchers find
Spreading wastewater, or brine, from conventional oil and gas wells on unpaved roads is a longstanding practice for suppressing dust, which can become a breathing and visibility hazard during warmer months. Common in several other states, the practice was halted in Pennsylvania in 2018 and is under evaluation by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (DEP). The DEP commissioned a
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Researchers study adolescents' life aspirations in Cambodia
Adolescents are tasked with navigating competing priorities, including whether to marry, have children, pursue a job/career, go to college, and contribute to society. A paper recently published in Developmental Psychology describes one of the first studies to examine how adolescents in a developing country such as Cambodia negotiate substantially greater access to educational and professional oppo
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Supermassive black holes inside of dying galaxies detected in early universe
An international team of astronomers used a database combining observations from the best telescopes in the world, including the Subaru Telescope, to detect the signal from the active supermassive black holes of dying galaxies in the early Universe. The appearance of these active supermassive black holes correlates with changes in the host galaxy, suggesting that a black hole could have far reachi
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Smart, dissolving pacemaker communicates with body-area sensor and control network
Engineers have taken their transient pacemaker and integrated it into a coordinated network of four soft, flexible, wireless wearable sensors and control units placed on different anatomically relevant locations on the body. The sensors communicate with each other to continuously monitor the body's various physiological functions, including body temperature, oxygen levels, respiration, muscle tone
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Benchmarking transcriptomics integration methods for transcript distribution prediction and cell type deconvolution
In a study published in Nature Methods, a research team led by Prof. Qu Kun from the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences has benchmarked 16 spatial and single-cell transcriptomics integration methods for transcript distribution prediction and cell type deconvolution.
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New type of extremely reactive substance in the atmosphere
An entirely new class of super-reactive chemical compounds has been discovered under atmospheric conditions. Researchers have documented the formation of so-called trioxides — an extremely oxidizing chemical compound that likely affects both human health and our global climate.
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Vision changes in space
Understanding the effects of microgravity on the human body is essential in enabling astronauts to travel through the harsh environment of space for months, or even years. Significant changes to the body's skeletal and muscle systems have been studied for decades, and strategies to maintain physical fitness are being applied through various countermeasures, including vigorous exercise, aboard the
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'Demon ducks of doom' laid huge prehistoric eggs
A unique duck-like line of megafauna known as the "demon ducks of doom" were the rightful mothers of giant prehistoric eggs in Australia, according to a new study that resolves a decades-old debate. Imagine sharing your neighborhood with a 2-meter tall, 200 kg bird (6.5 feet, 400 pounds) with a massive beak. This was the case for Australia's first human inhabitants some 65,000 years ago. There, o
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Roadside objects can trick driverless cars
An ordinary object on the side of the road can trick driverless cars into stopping abruptly or another undesired driving behavior, report researchers. "A box, bicycle, or traffic cone may be all that is necessary to scare a driverless vehicle into coming to a dangerous stop in the middle of the street or on a freeway off-ramp, creating a hazard for other motorists and pedestrians," says Qi Alfred
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Toward error-free quantum computing
For quantum computers to be useful in practice, errors must be detected and corrected. A team of experimental physicists has now implemented a universal set of computational operations on fault-tolerant quantum bits for the first time, demonstrating how an algorithm can be programmed on a quantum computer so that errors do not spoil the result.
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How to talk to kids about the Texas school shooting
In the wake of the mass shooting at an elementary school in Texas, teachers and parents are once again wondering how to talk about the horrific events to their children without stoking fear. Nearly 300,000 students in the United States have been on a school campus during a shooting since 1999. In the past decade, there have been almost 1,000 school shootings in America, according to Sandy Hook Pr
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Scientists make toxic gas sensing nine times more effective
A Russian-Belorussian research team has developed a new tungsten oxide–based gas sensing material that shows high sensitivity to carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide and acetone. The new material's gas sensing response was nine times higher than that of the existing sensors. The study was published in Nano-Structures & Nano-Objects.
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Hubble looks at a face-on grand spiral
This image from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope features the Grand Design Spiral, NGC 3631, located some 53 million light-years away in the direction of the constellation Ursa Major. The "arms" of grand design spirals appear to wind around and into the galaxy's nucleus.
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UK Seeks to Allow Gene-Edited Plants
I guess some good came out of Brexit. The EU essentially has banned GMO (genetically modified organisms) products, which I believe is unscientific and overly restrictive . Anti-GMO attitudes are demonstrably correlated with poor knowledge about agriculture and genetics. That's because anti-GMO attitudes were largely created by a propaganda campaign based on lies and disinformation. For example, m
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'Inadvertently published' paper by pharma employee retracted almost a year later
A Takeda employee has lost a 2021 paper that the journal says it "inadvertently published." The article, "Seasonal and Secular Periodicities Identified in the Dynamics of US FDA Medical Devices (1976–2020): Portends Intrinsic Industrial Transformation and Independence of Certain Crises," appeared in Therapeutic Innovation & Regulatory Science. It has yet to be cited, according to … Continue readin
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Book Review: A Timely History of Nuclear Catastrophes
In "Atoms and Ashes," Harvard professor Serhii Plokhy provides a harrowing account of the world's six past nuclear catastrophes, from the 1954 Castle-Bravo test in the Marshall Islands to the 2011 Fukushima disaster, and how their aftershocks still haunt the idea of nuclear power in the climate change era.
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Solution-processable microporous polymer platform for heterogenization of diverse photoredox catalysts
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-29811-6 Heterogeneous photocatalysts are easily separable and recyclable, but homogeneous ones are precisely tunable. Here, the authors merge the benefits of these two catalyst types by incorporating diverse dyes into solution-processable, porous polymers.
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Ag9GaSe6: high-pressure-induced Ag migration causes thermoelectric performance irreproducibility and elimination of such instability
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30716-7 The Ag9GaSe6 is a high-efficient thermoelectric material yet suffers instability. Here, the authors demonstrate the instability is caused by the pressure-induced liquid-like Ag migration, which can be eliminated by a simple annealing treatment.
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ZrTe2/CrTe2: an epitaxial van der Waals platform for spintronics
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30738-1 Van der Waals heterostructures offer the potential of integrating multiple material layers into a single device to achieve new functionalities. Here, Ou et al combine ZrTe2, a topological semimetal, with CrTe2, a 2D ferromagnet, in a single heterostructure and demonstrate spin-orbit torque switching of the 2D fer
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Transmission of SARS-CoV-2 from humans to animals and potential host adaptation
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30698-6 Here, Tan et al. find that the rapid spread of SARS-CoV-2 in mink and deer required minimal adaptation, has only caused moderate changes to the evolutionary trajectory of the virus, and has not led to viral mutations that greatly improve human transmission thus far.
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Cross-reactive immunity against the SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variant is low in pediatric patients with prior COVID-19 or MIS-C
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30649-1 The antibody response to the SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variant is not well studied in children. Here, the authors provide an age-stratified analysis of SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing capacity of sera from children with acute or convalescent COVID-19 as well as children with multisystem inflammatory syndrome.
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Deathloop: Putting AMD's FidelityFX Super Resolution 2.0 to The Test Against Nvidia's DLSS
Earlier this month, AMD offered us the chance to preview FidelityFX Super Resolution (FSR) 2.0, courtesy of the game Deathloop. Deathloop is currently the only title to support both versions of FSR as well as Nvidia's Deep Learning Super Sampling (DLSS), making this an excellent opportunity to take them both out for a collective spin. Despite the name, FSR 2.0 is not an update to FSR 1.0. It's an
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The Experiment: How to Start Over With Olga Khazan
In The Atlantic 's new series How to Start Over , Olga Khazan takes listeners on a journey of reinvention. How to Start Over is your guide to navigating life's gray areas, whether knowing it's time to make a career switch, repairing strained family ties, or forging new connections in a post-pandemic world. Be part of The Experiment . Use the hashtag #TheExperimentPodcast, or write to us at theexp
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Epigenetiska markörer förutspår risk för komplikationer vid typ 2-diabetes
En ny studie av forskare vid Lunds universitet ger ytterligare stöd för att typ 2-diabetes bör delas in i undergrupper och behandlas på olika sätt. Studien visar att det finns tydliga epigenetiska skillnader mellan olika grupper av diabetespatienter. Epigenetiska markörer kan kopplas till risken de olika undergrupperna har att utveckla vanliga komplikationer vid diabetes, som stroke, hjärtinfarkt
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Schneider Shorts 27.05.2022 – #MeTooSTEM Whistleblower to Jail
Schneider Shorts 27.05.2022 – how Peruvian sexual harasser played his political networks to sentence a whistleblower to jail term, why English upper class is intellectually superior, journals cracking and breaking under papermills, polite people in russian academy of science, and a russophobic conspiracy theory on monkeypox.
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En succes er født
ANMELDELSE TV2's nye dramaserie 'Dag & nat' giver et troværdigt og realistisk indblik i døgnrytmen på en travl fødegang, skriver Morten Hedegaard, tidl. klinikchef på Rigshospitalets fødeafdeling.
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»Jeg var lige der, hvor jeg skulle være«
Voldsomme, uplanlagte og uønskede karriereskift behøver ikke skyldes dramatiske stridigheder, dårlig trivsel eller direkte fyringer. De kan forårsages af noget så basalt som ens helbred, som det skete for Anne Møller Nielsen, der måte opgive en særdeles lovende karriere som anæstesiolog.
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Ombryd supersygehusene
STIKPILLEN: Problemet er, at de unge læger, sygeplejersker, jordemødre og andre personalegrupper samstemmende og i stor udstrækning taler om stress, angst for arbejdet og dårligt arbejdsmiljø, skriver Torben Mogensen, tidl. vicedirektør, Hvidovre Hospital.
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En seriemisbrugers bekendelser
KULTURKANYLEN Birgitte Hysse Forchhammer er direktør i Hjernesagen og misbruger af tv-serier. Hun foretrækker serier, som giver indsigt i forskellige samfund og kulturer. Overordnet set har hun dog en bred smag og bruger kultur til at få nye ideer og se andre perspektiver end dem, der falder lige for.
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Diabetes drug boosts fertility of obese mice
Research indicates that a type 2 diabetes medication, dapagliflozin, alters reproductive hormones in obese mice. The results are promising, as human and mouse reproductive cycles are similar, says Chen Chen, a professor in the School of Biomedical Sciences at the University of Queensland. "After eight weeks of treatment, blood glucose levels in the mice normalized, body weight reduced, reproducti
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Egyptian fruit bat brains suit tongue echolocation
The brains of Egyptian fruit bats are highly specialized for echolocation and flight, with motor areas of the cerebral cortex that are dedicated to sonar production and wing control, new research shows. Leah Krubitzer, a professor in the Center for Neuroscience at the University of California, Davis, studies how evolution produces variation in brain organization across a wide variety of mammals,
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TCL Has No Idea When the PS5 Pro, Xbox Series Next Will Arrive
A slide TV manufacturer TCL presented during one of its briefings today has caused no small amount of ruckus online, given that it appears to point towards a next-gen console refresh cycle kicking off next year. There is no evidence that this is actually happening and a great many reasons to think it isn't. The only companies that know what Sony and Microsoft's long-term upgrade plans are for the
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Best 8-Inch Subwoofers for 2022
When it comes to sound, 8-inch subwoofers require a tradeoff. In exchange for their smaller size, you have to choose between great-sounding bass, or that powerful rumble that rattles bricks — you can't have both. For smaller cars and smaller spaces, an 8-inch sub may be the difference between low, resonant bass or none at all. That smaller size means that a subwoofer will fit under or behind a se
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Gun violence: Experts discuss causes, trends, solutions
The recent string of mass shootings has once again captured the attention of the American public. The tragic shootings in an elementary school in Texas, a grocery store in New York, a church in California and locally in the streets of downtown Sacramento have many people wondering what can be done to prevent such tragedies.
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How to tie-dye cotton with acorns and rust
Tie-dyeing is a fun activity that can spice up clothes with colorful patterns. Although kits are available in stores, nature provides dyes that can be extracted from items found in one's yard—for example, acorns and rust. In ACS's Journal of Chemical Education, researchers present a "green" process for tie-dyeing cotton with renewable resources and wastes that undergraduate students can easily do
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Autonomous underwater imaging: Faster and more accurate
Recently conducted tests used new algorithms to outperform state-of-the-art programming for autonomous underwater sonar imaging, significantly improving the speed and accuracy for identifying objects such as explosive mines, sunken ships, airplane black boxes, pipelines and corrosion on ship hulls.
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Best Apple Watch Cases of 2022
While an Apple Watch can withstand a great deal of impact, some Apple Watch owners would tell you there are exceptions. Apple doesn't sell standalone cases for its signature smartwatch — the latest of which is the Series 7 — but there are plenty available from third-party sellers, including leading names in protective gear such as Caseology and Urban Armor . No case for any product can guarantee
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Why haven't we discovered co-orbital exoplanets? Tides may offer a possible answer
In our solar system, there are several thousand examples of co-orbital objects: bodies that share the same orbit around the sun or a planet. The Trojan asteroids are such an example. We have not yet observed any similar co-orbitals in extrasolar systems, despite discovering more than 5,000 exoplanets. In a new study published in Icarus by Anthony Dobrovolskis, SETI Institute, and Jack Lissauer, NA
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A unique catalyst paves the way for plastic upcycling
A recently developed catalyst for breaking down plastics continues to advance plastic upcycling processes. In 2020, scientists developed the first processive inorganic catalyst to deconstruct polyolefin plastics into molecules that can be used to create more valuable products. Now, the team has developed and validated a strategy to speed up the transformation without sacrificing desirable products
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More reptile species may be at risk of extinction than previously thought
The iconic Red List of Threatened Species, published by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), identifies species at risk of extinction. A study in PLOS Biology publishing May 26 by Gabriel Henrique de Oliveira Caetano at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel, and colleagues presents a novel machine learning tool for assessing extinction risk, and then uses this tool to sh
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People must be 'heart' of climate action, researchers say
Tackling the climate crisis can only be achieved by "placing people at the heart of climate action," researchers say. The research team, led by the University of Exeter, warn against relying solely on breakthroughs in climate science and technology. Instead, they say social science can help engage people and societies, and ensure a green transition that is both effective and promotes other goals s
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Fishing for a new source of proteoglycans, an important health food ingredient
Aggrecan, a major component of proteoglycan (PG) having chondroitin sulfate (CS) in cartilaginous tissues, has become increasingly popular as an ingredient in health food. In fact, proteoglycans from salmon nasal cartilage demonstrate biological properties such as antiaging, inhibition of angiogenesis, and attenuation of inflammatory responses. Commercially available chondroitin sulfate proteoglyc
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Shedding light on spermatogenesis failure caused by testicular warming
Testicles of most mammals are cooled in the scrota, and elevated testicular temperatures lead to spermatogenesis failure and male infertility. A research team led by Shosei Yoshida at the National Institute for Basic Biology in Japan detailed this process using organ culture and revealed that spermatogenesis is impaired at multiple steps in a delicate temperature-dependent fashion.
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Fishing for new source of proteoglycans, an important health food ingredient
Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs), commonly obtained from salmon nasal cartilage, are a key ingredient of various health foods. As the popularity of health foods increases, scientists are searching for alternative sources of CSPGs. Now, researchers have analyzed the PGs and their CS structures in the head cartilage of 10 edible bony fishes, including sturgeons. Their findings point to seve
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Breathing to win: Scientists show importance of screening breathing patterns in athletic populations
Dysfunctional breathing patterns are associated with a high risk of musculoskeletal conditions, resulting in poor physical performance. Now, a study has found that among athletes across age groups, there is a high prevalence of dysfunctional breathing patterns. Effective intervention strategies are required to restore normal breathing patterns and prevent injuries among athletes to ensure their su
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US Census Bureau: Big city losses early in COVID pandemic
Ko Im always thought she would live in New York forever. She knew every corner of Manhattan and had worked hard to build a community of friends. Living in a small apartment, she found her attitude shifting early in the coronavirus pandemic. After her brother accepted a job in Seattle in the summer of 2020, she decided to move there too.
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Get Great Deals on Tech, Mattresses, and Home Goods During Amazon's Memorial Day Sale
Amazon has kicked off its Memorial Day Weekend sale early, with thousands of items discounted to their lowest prices of the season. Nobody wants to spend their precious time off combing through every possible deal, which is why we've done the work for you. Below are the best items from Amazon's Memorial Day Weekend sale broken down by category. We'll continue to update this post as new deals beco
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Harnessing the immune system to treat traumatic brain injury in mice
Researchers have designed a targeted therapeutic treatment that restricts brain inflammation. The effectiveness of this approach in improving outcomes was demonstrated following brain injury, stroke or multiple sclerosis in mice. The system increases the number of regulatory T cells, mediators of the immune system's anti-inflammatory response, in the brain. By boosting the number of T regulatory c
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Gut bacteria can make blood pressure medication less effective
Hypertension, or high blood pressure, is a major risk factor for heart disease and stroke, two of the leading causes of death in America. It's also one of the most common chronic conditions in the United States, with nearly half of U.S. adults considered hypertensive under current guidelines. Among those with high blood pressure, an estimated 20% have what's known as resistant hypertension, meanin
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Tsunami threats underestimated in current models
USC researchers have found a correlation between tsunami severity and the width of the outer wedge — the area between the continental shelf and deep trenches where large tsunamis emerge — that helps explain how underwater seismic events generate large tsunamis.
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The 6G frequency switch that spares scientific services
Nature, Published online: 26 May 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01306-w Next-generation wireless services will demand massive increases in data traffic, requiring access to signals at higher frequencies than are presently used. This would disrupt scientific research, but a savvy sharing protocol offers a fix.
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Agriculture tech use opens possibility of digital havoc
Wide-ranging use of smart technologies is raising global agricultural production but international researchers warn this digital-age phenomenon could reap a crop of another kind — cybersecurity attacks. Complex IT and math modelling has highlighted the risks.
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How plate tectonics, mountains and deep-sea sediments have maintained Earth's 'Goldilocks' climate
For hundreds of millions of years, Earth's climate has warmed and cooled with natural fluctuations in the level of carbon dioxide (CO₂) in the atmosphere. Over the past century, humans have pushed CO₂ levels to their highest in 2 million years—overtaking natural emissions—mostly by burning fossil fuels, causing ongoing global warming that may make parts of the globe uninhabitable.
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How preserving a country's languages can lead to decolonization
As a child in the Philippines during the 1970s, Joi Barrios-Leblanc remembers singing songs that glorified the country's president Ferdinand Marcos, and his U.S-backed regime of martial law that turned the government into a one-man dictatorship that killed, tortured and incarcerated thousands of its citizens.
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Size effect of AlGaInP red micro-LEDs on silicon substrate
Micro-LEDs have been used in many fields due to their superior performance, such as micro-displays, visible light communication, optical biochips, wearable devices, and biosensors. Obtaining high resolution and high pixel density is one of the key technical challenges of working with micro-LED array displays, as it requires smaller and smaller chip sizes and pixel pitches.
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Historic Greenland ice sheet rainfall unraveled
For the first time ever recorded, in the late summer of 2021, rain fell on the high central region of the Greenland ice sheet. This extraordinary event was followed by the surface snow and ice melting rapidly. Researchers now understand exactly what went on in those fateful summer days and what we can learn from it.
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To track sea turtles, get DNA from the sand
The DNA "fingerprints" that sea turtles leave behind offer scientists a way to track the health and whereabouts of the endangered animals, say researchers. The study is the first to sequence sea turtles' environmental DNA , or eDNA—genetic material shed as they travel over beaches and in water. The research project is also the first to successfully collect animal eDNA from beach sand. Scientists
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Teaching robots to touch
Nature, Published online: 26 May 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01401-y Robots have become increasingly adept at interacting with the world around them. But to fulfil their potential, they also need a sense of touch.
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Studying primates to learn about the evolution of speech
Speech and language skills are unique to modern humans. While this ability evolved over millions of years, it is not possible to trace language in the fossil record because it leaves no direct imprint. Instead, re-examining the ways our nearest living relatives communicate is helping to unravel this mysterious capability.
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Even vaccinated people can get long COVID
Even vaccinated people with mild breakthrough COVID-19 infections can experience long COVID with debilitating, lingering symptoms that affect the heart, brain, lungs, and other parts of the body, new research shows. The study of more than 13 million veterans also found that vaccination against the virus that causes COVID-19 reduces the risk of death by 34% and the risk of getting long COVID by 15
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How digital technology can help keep cities green and pleasant
Parks, small woodlands and even simple patches of grass not only keep a city attractive, but also help people find a sense of bliss in an otherwise bustling urban environment. With new technologies, we can plan and monitor these urban "green spaces" better than ever before.
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Tracking the demise of a giant Antarctic iceberg
As soon as an iceberg is born it starts to die. Waves chip away at its edges, air thaws it from above, and water melts it from below. Scientists recently chronicled such death throes for one of the world's largest-known icebergs and published their research in Remote Sensing of Environment.
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Hubble captures gravitationally bound galaxies NGC 3227 and NGC 3226
This NASA Hubble Space Telescope image finds the large spiral galaxy, NGC 3227, wrapped in a turbulent gravitational dance with its companion, the elliptical galaxy NGC 3226. The twosome—collectively known as Arp 94—is relatively nearby, between 50 and 60 million light-years away toward the constellation Leo, the Lion. A close look at the area between the two galaxies reveals faint tidal streams o
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Two years after George Floyd's murder, what's changed?
It's been two years since Derek Chauvin murdered George Floyd during a police stop by keeping his knee on Floyd's neck. What has changed since? Chauvin's actions, that continued despite protests from a growing crowd of onlookers, sparked nation-wide protests and pressure for police reform. Since then, Chauvin and three other police officers involved in the stop have been convicted of multiple cha
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Spears and other tactics curb lionfish invasion
A new study from the team outlines the do's and don'ts of responding to a lionfish invasion. Invasive lionfish have spread through the western Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea, and the Gulf of Mexico over the last few decades. More recently, lionfish have also invaded the Mediterranean Sea via the Suez Canal, leading to concerns about their possible impact on ecosystems. A team of scientists hopes t
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How Memories Are Linked
Memory research, both at the psychological and neurological level, is fascinating, partly because memories are so essential to who we are. We often don't perceive the underlying mechanisms by which memories are formed, stored, and recalled, but they dramatically affect our mental life. Further, being aware of how our memories work is a critical part of neuropsychological humility – human memory i
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Scientists Accidentally Turn Gene-Edited Hamsters Into Aggressive Bullies
(Photo: Andy Holmes/Unsplash) Sometimes experiments don't go as planned. Case in point: when some scientists set out on making hamsters more "peaceful" via gene editing, they accidentally made the fuzzy little rodents more aggressive instead. Neuroscientists at Georgia State University (GSU) wanted to see how vasopressin, a mammalian hormone, influenced social behavior. They used a relatively nov
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NASA Moves Forward With Next-Gen Solar Sail Project
Getting from point A to point B in the solar system is no simple feat, and inefficient, heavy rockets aren't always the best way. Therefore, NASA has announced it is moving ahead with a new solar sail concept that could make future spacecraft more efficient and maneuverable. The Diffractive Solar Sailing project is now entering phase III development under the NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NI
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Cross-neutralization of Omicron BA.1 against BA.2 and BA.3 SARS-CoV-2
Nature Communications, Published online: 26 May 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30580-5 It is important to understand the cross-neutralization among distinct SARS-CoV-2 Omicron sublineages. Zou et al. show that sera from Omicron BA.1-infected people are significantly weaker in neutralizing Omicron BA.2, BA.3, and USA-WA1/2020 than neutralizing BA.1.
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