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Nyheder2022september03

The Speech No President Should Have to Give

This is an edition of The Atlantic Daily, a newsletter that guides you through the biggest stories of the day, helps you discover new ideas, and recommends the best in culture. Sign up for it here . We're all parsing The Speech, Joe Biden's "Soul of the Nation" address about the growing anti-constitutionalism of Republican extremism. But we should first consider how hard it is to evaluate a speec

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Did New Zealand Not Let Enough People Die of COVID?

In a previous article, titled, Lockdowns "Postponed the Inevitable". Is That a Bad Thing?, I noted that South Korea and New Zealand couldn't keep the virus away forever, but they suffered many fewer deaths per capita than the US and nearly every other country in the world. Over 800,000 Americans would be alive today if the US had their death rate. I […] The post first appeared on Science-Based M

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Nasa to crash $330m spacecraft into asteroid to see if impact can alter course

Space agency to cause collision with Dimorphos to test if it can avert sci-fi fears of catastrophic impact with Earth In a few weeks, Nasa controllers will deliberately crash their $330m Dart robot spacecraft into an asteroid. The half-tonne probe will be travelling at more than four miles a second when it strikes its target, Dimorphos, and will be destroyed. The aim of this kamikaze science miss

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Infektionssjukdomar ökar på svenska sjukhus

Antalet personer som vårdas på sjukhus till följd av en infektion har ökat. Dessa patienter ligger också inne längre än andra patienter. Ökningen har skett i alla åldersgrupper, men är störst hos personer över 80 år. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .

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Weekend reads: A tale of deception; hydroxychloroquine in Australia; AI and ML to fix your papers — or write them

Would you consider a donation to support Weekend Reads, and our daily work? Thanks in advance. The week at Retraction Watch featured: An editor on why he ignores anonymous whistleblowers – and why authors are free to publish 'bullshit and fiction' In four years, a psychosocial counselor co-authored seven papers on disparate medical topics. How? When an … Continue reading

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The Economist Who Knows the Miracle Is Over

Brad DeLong felt confident that the story started in 1870. The polymath economist was writing a book on economic modernity—about how humans transitioned from eking out an existence on our small planet to building a kind of utopia on it—and he saw an inflection point centuries after the emergence of capitalism and decades after the advent of manufacturing at scale. "The Industrial Revolution is go

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Californians asked to conserve power amid brutal heat wave

Californians sweltering in the West's lengthening heat wave were asked to reduce air conditioning and cut other electricity use again during critical hours Friday and again Saturday to prevent stress on the state's electrical grid that could lead to rolling blackouts.

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Artificial intelligence can be used to better monitor Maine's forests, study finds

Monitoring and measuring forest ecosystems is a complex challenge because of an existing combination of softwares, collection systems and computing environments that require increasing amounts of energy to power. The University of Maine's Wireless Sensor Networks (WiSe-Net) laboratory has developed a novel method of using artificial intelligence and machine learning to make monitoring soil moistur

2h

Artificial intelligence can be used to better monitor Maine's forests, study finds

Monitoring and measuring forest ecosystems is a complex challenge because of an existing combination of softwares, collection systems and computing environments that require increasing amounts of energy to power. The University of Maine's Wireless Sensor Networks (WiSe-Net) laboratory has developed a novel method of using artificial intelligence and machine learning to make monitoring soil moistur

2h

Artemis 1: Nasa's moon rocket springs hazardous leak ahead of launch

Artemis 1 poised to make a second attempt to fly after Nasa declared it fixed an engine issue Nasa's pioneering moon rocket sprang another hazardous leak Saturday, as the launch team began fueling it for liftoff on a test flight that must go well before astronauts climb aboard. The Artemis 1 was poised to make a second attempt to fly on Saturday afternoon after the US space agency declared it had

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California Legislature Passes Law That Would Force Tesla to Change Name of Full Self-Driving

Legal Troubles In July, the California DMV filed a complaint that EV manufacturer Tesla had put out "untrue or misleading" advertisements on its website in relation to its Full Self-Driving (FSD) and Autopilot technology. The DMV's gripe, essentially, is that the tech is impressive — but because it still needs constant supervision, it's neither fully self-driving nor anything approaching a true a

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Here's What the Former Head of NASA Has to Say About the Moon Mission Delay

This week, space enthusiasts and a slew of celebrity guests gathered to watch the historic launch of NASA's Space Launch System (SLS), the staggeringly expensive rocket intended to launch American astronauts toward the Moon in just a few short years. The only problem? The launch didn't happen. To get a sense of perspective, we called up Sean O'Keefe, who served as administrator of NASA from 2001

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Amazon Bungles Release of Most Expensive TV Show in History

Wizard Beats Amazon's big budget, highly anticipated prequel "The Lord of the Rings: The Rings of Power" is finally here — and as the most expensive TV show ever made, the company has a lot riding on its success. The plan was to premier the first two episodes in a simultaneous release on its Prime Video streaming platform, a fairly common practice. But the streamer's execution was a little unorth

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Russia Says the International Space Station Is a Dangerous, Decrepit Mess

This Old House The newly appointed head of Roscosmos, Russia's space agency, says the International Space Station is turning into a hunk of junk. "Technically, the ISS has exceeded all its warranty periods. This is dangerous," Yuri Borisov told Reuters . "An avalanche-like process of equipment failure is beginning, cracks are appearing." In July, Russia announced more details about its plans to b

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Making nanodiamonds out of bottle plastic

What goes on inside planets like Neptune and Uranus? To find out, an international team conducted a novel experiment. They fired a laser at a thin film of simple PET plastic and investigated what happened using intensive laser flashes. One result was that the researchers were able to confirm their earlier thesis that it really does rain diamonds inside the ice giants at the periphery of our solar

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Best XLR Microphones of 2022

When people talk about XLR microphones, they're referring to the type of connection a microphone has to your audio interface, mixer, or amplifier in order to transmit a signal. Most professional microphones have an XLR output, though USB microphones have also become quite popular with podcasters, streamers, and gamers. While USB microphones are "plug and play," they come with limitations. In this

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Pot Smokers Not More Likely to Be Apathetic or Lazy, Scientists Find

A new study has found that, counter to popular belief, smoking weed doesn't appear to actually make people lazy and apathetic after all. Published in the International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology , this Cambridge University and King's College London study cites "stoner" characters like "The Dude" from "The Big Lebowski," Jesse Pinkman from "Breaking Bad," and even Argyle from the latest se

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Artificial intelligence can be used to better monitor Maine's forests

Researchers have developed a novel method of using artificial intelligence and machine learning to make monitoring soil moisture more energy and cost efficient. The software learns over time how to make the best use of available network resources, which helps produce power efficient systems at a lower cost for large scale monitoring compared to the existing industry standards.

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Study raises red flags about corporatization of health care, researcher says

New research reveals private equity firms that acquire physician-owned medical practices appear to be imposing measures to squeeze out more profits. It's not clear whether these practices hurt clinical outcomes for patients. However, the findings raise concerning parallels with the rapid growth of private equity acquisition of nursing homes and hospital systems.

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Metformin prevents age-associated ovarian fibrosis by modulating the immune landscape in female mice | Science Advances

Abstract Ovarian fibrosis is a pathological condition associated with aging and is responsible for a variety of ovarian dysfunctions. Given the known contributions of tissue fibrosis to tumorigenesis, it is anticipated that ovarian fibrosis may contribute to ovarian cancer risk. We recently reported that diabetic postmenopausal women using metformin had ovarian collagen abundance and organization

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Genome-wide in vivo screen of circulating tumor cells identifies SLIT2 as a regulator of metastasis | Science Advances

Abstract Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) break free from primary tumors and travel through the circulation system to seed metastatic tumors, which are the major cause of death from cancer. The identification of the major genetic factors that enhance production and persistence of CTCs in the bloodstream at a whole genome level would enable more comprehensive molecular mechanisms of metastasis to be

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Structure of the vasopressin hormone–V2 receptor–β-arrestin1 ternary complex | Science Advances

Abstract Arrestins interact with G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) to stop G protein activation and to initiate key signaling pathways. Recent structural studies shed light on the molecular mechanisms involved in GPCR-arrestin coupling, but whether this process is conserved among GPCRs is poorly understood. Here, we report the cryo–electron microscopy active structure of the wild-type arginine-

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Observation of competing, correlated ground states in the flat band of rhombohedral graphite | Science Advances

Abstract In crystalline solids, the interactions of charge and spin can result in a variety of emergent quantum ground states, especially in partially filled, topological flat bands such as Landau levels or in "magic angle" graphene layers. Much less explored is rhombohedral graphite (RG), perhaps the simplest and structurally most perfect condensed matter system to host a flat band protected by

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Enabling full-scale grain boundary mitigation in polycrystalline perovskite solids | Science Advances

Abstract There exists a considerable density of interaggregate grain boundaries (GBs) and intra-aggregate GBs in polycrystalline perovskites. Mitigation of intra-aggregate GBs is equally notable to that of interaggregate GBs as intra-aggregate GBs can also cause detrimental effects on the photovoltaic performances of perovskite solar cells (PSCs). Here, we demonstrate full-scale GB mitigation ran

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A red nucleus–VTA glutamate pathway underlies exercise reward and the therapeutic effect of exercise on cocaine use | Science Advances

Abstract Physical exercise is rewarding and protective against drug abuse and addiction. However, the neural mechanisms underlying these actions remain unclear. Here, we report that long-term wheel-running produced a more robust increase in c-fos expression in the red nucleus (RN) than in other brain regions. Anatomic and functional assays demonstrated that most RN magnocellular portion (RNm) neu

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Diamond formation kinetics in shock-compressed C─H─O samples recorded by small-angle x-ray scattering and x-ray diffraction | Science Advances

Abstract Extreme conditions inside ice giants such as Uranus and Neptune can result in peculiar chemistry and structural transitions, e.g., the precipitation of diamonds or superionic water, as so far experimentally observed only for pure C─H and H 2 O systems, respectively. Here, we investigate a stoichiometric mixture of C and H 2 O by shock-compressing polyethylene terephthalate (PET) plastics

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Seasonal changes in day length induce multisynaptic neurotransmitter switching to regulate hypothalamic network activity and behavior | Science Advances

Abstract Seasonal changes in day length (photoperiod) affect numerous physiological functions. The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN)–paraventricular nucleus (PVN) axis plays a key role in processing photoperiod-related information. Seasonal variations in SCN and PVN neurotransmitter expression have been observed in humans and animal models. However, the molecular mechanisms by which the SCN-PVN netwo

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Altered epidermal proliferation, differentiation, and lipid composition: Novel key elements in the vitiligo puzzle | Science Advances

Abstract Vitiligo is an acquired skin depigmentation disease involving multiple pathogenetic mechanisms, which ultimately direct cytotoxic CD8 + cells to destroy melanocytes. Abnormalities have been described in several cells even in pigmented skin as an expression of a functional inherited defect. Keratinocytes regulate skin homeostasis by the assembly of a proper skin barrier and releasing and

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On-chip scalable highly pure and indistinguishable single-photon sources in ordered arrays: Path to quantum optical circuits | Science Advances

Abstract Realization of quantum optical circuits is at the heart of quantum photonic information processing. A long-standing obstacle, however, has been the absence of a suitable platform of single photon sources (SPSs). Such SPSs need to be in spatially ordered arrays and produce, on-demand, highly pure, and indistinguishable single photons with sufficiently uniform emission characteristics to e

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Hydroxide films on mica form charge-stabilized microphases that circumvent nucleation barriers | Science Advances

Abstract Crystal nucleation is facilitated by transient, nanoscale fluctuations that are extraordinarily difficult to observe. Here, we use high-speed atomic force microscopy to directly observe the growth of an aluminum hydroxide film from an aqueous solution and characterize the dynamically fluctuating nanostructures that precede its formation. Nanoscale cluster distributions and fluctuation dy

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scAllele: A versatile tool for the detection and analysis of variants in scRNA-seq | Science Advances

Abstract Single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq) data contain rich information at the gene, transcript, and nucleotide levels. Most analyses of scRNA-seq have focused on gene expression profiles, and it remains challenging to extract nucleotide variants and isoform-specific information. Here, we present scAllele, an integrative approach that detects single-nucleotide variants, insertions, deletion

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Endogenous DOPA inhibits melanoma through suppression of CHRM1 signaling | Science Advances

Abstract Melanoma risk is 30 times higher in people with lightly pigmented skin versus darkly pigmented skin. Using primary human melanocytes representing the full human skin pigment continuum and preclinical melanoma models, we show that cell-intrinsic differences between dark and light melanocytes regulate melanocyte proliferative capacity and susceptibility to malignant transformation, indepen

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Conflictive home-host country relations have a strong, negative effect on policy risk

Policy risk negatively affects acquisition completion, but the strength of the effect is dependent on home-host country relations, according to new research published in Global Strategy Journal. The relationship between policy risk and cross-border acquisition completion is negative and strong under conflictive relations, weaker under cooperative relations, and weakest under ambivalent relations,

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White House Pushes to Delay Killer Asteroid Telescope

Doomsday Scenario NASA estimates there are around 25,000 asteroids big enough to prove dangerous in the event of a collision near Earth's orbit — so why isn't the White House interested in identifying them before it's too late? The Biden administration is intending to delay the launch of an infrared telescope that could seek out these potential killer asteroids, a move that one space policy advoc

23h

Someone's Making an Entire Movie Using Video Generated by AI

Outsider Art A guy with no background in film or artificial intelligence is working on making an entire movie — in a provocative attempt to demonstrate that generative AI art models can open ambitious levels of filmmaking to the masses. German tech entrepreneur Fabian Stelzer told PC Magazine that his 70s-style sci-fi film "Salt" will feature all artificial voices except his own, and that generat

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Investigating magnetic excitation-induced spin current in chromium trihalides

An ingenious approach toward developing low-power, high-speed, and high-density memory devices is based on spintronics, an emerging frontier in technology that harnesses a degree of freedom of electrons known as spin. Put simply, electrons, along with their negative charge, possess a spin whose orientation can be controlled using magnetic fields. This is particularly relevant for magnetic insulato

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New report on impact of pandemic on learning experiences of young people with disabilities

The first report to examine the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the learning experiences of young people with disabilities has been published. Researchers at University College Cork (UCC) examined how the COVID-19 pandemic has affected young people with disabilities' experience of learning and vocational training, and what we can learn from this about future education and employment practices w

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What's the future of work from home?

With rapidly evolving technology, the COVID-19 pandemic and shifting priorities, there have been major changes in recent years in how employers and employees think about work.

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EP-WXT pathfinder catches first wide-field snapshots of X-ray universe

EP-WXT Pathfinder, the experimental version of a module that will eventually be part of the wide-field X-ray telescope (WXT) aboard the astronomical satellite Einstein Probe (EP), released its first results Aug. 27 from an earlier test flight. These include an 800-second X-ray time-lapse photograph of a region of the Galactic center, a dense area at the core of our home galaxy, the Milky Way.

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How historical precedents impeded recognition of airborne COVID-19 transmission

A comprehensive historical assessment of knowledge and beliefs about disease transmission sheds light on why influential institutions worldwide took too long to recognize that COVID-19 is primarily airborne. The authors trace this deadly resistance one hundred years back in history, to the rejection of sickly air called 'miasma,' the rise of germ theory and our own stubborn tendency to retain beli

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Boy's discovery reveals highly complex plant-insect interaction

When eight-year-old Hugo Deans discovered a handful of BB-sized objects lying near an ant nest beneath a log in his backyard, he thought they were a type of seed. His father, Andrew Deans, professor of entomology at Penn State, however, knew immediately what they were—oak galls, or plant growths triggered by insects. What he didn't realize right away was that the galls were part of an elaborate re

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Dual-polarization two-dimensional valley photonic crystals

The introduction of topology in photonic systems has attracted considerable attention not only for the elaborate molding of light but also for its practical applications in novel photonic devices. Originally, the quantum Hall effect of light was realized in photonic crystals (PCs) by introducing external electric or magnetic fields to break the time-reversal symmetry (TRS).

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Boy's discovery reveals highly complex plant-insect interaction

When eight-year-old Hugo Deans discovered a handful of BB-sized objects lying near an ant nest beneath a log in his backyard, he thought they were a type of seed. His father, Andrew Deans, professor of entomology at Penn State, however, knew immediately what they were—oak galls, or plant growths triggered by insects. What he didn't realize right away was that the galls were part of an elaborate re

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EU guidelines for procurement during the COVID-19 crisis may lead to increased corruption

Shouldn't common provisions for procurement within the EU lead to increased central control and better coordination? Yes, but the guidelines introduced during the COVID-19 crisis were at the same time so flexible that they can also result in increased corruption and reduced legitimacy. This is shown by Brigitte Pircher, associate professor of political science, in a new research article.

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Experts Puzzled by Harvard Scientist Looking for Alien Wreckage in Ocean

In the search for extraterrestrial intelligence, most eyes are on the sky. At least one scientist, though, thinks we should be searching the ocean floor. That researcher, Avi Loeb — who we've interviewed before — is a highly regarded professor at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Loeb's not your average nut, but he has been much more vocal about the possibility of alien life than m

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Guy Who Has to Move NASA Moon Rocket Back to Hangar Very Annoyed

Behemoth on Wheels The launch of NASA's Artemis 1 mission has been delay to September 3 , or perhaps further. It's an anticlimactic setback for all involved, but there's one man who's particularly aggrieved by the situation: John Giles, the crawler overseer. The crawlers, as they're called, are NASA's gargantuan vehicles — 131 feet long and 114 feet wide and supported by suitably massive treads —

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Largest database on mammals in Portugal now available

The research team of the Red List of Mammals in Portugal, which is working on reviewing the threat and conservation status of these species in this country, carried out an "unprecedented compilation" of data on georeferenced occurrences of mammals in mainland Portugal and the Azores and Madeira.

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An Astronomer Is Privately Funding a Search for Alien Technology on the Ocean Floor

Meteors have been raining down on Earth since time immemorial, but we are only beginning to understand that some of them have very exotic origins. In 2014, a small space rock hit the atmosphere and broke apart like so many others, but upon investigating this event, astronomers realized it came from beyond our solar system. Now, Harvard astronomer Avi Loeb is putting together a privately funded ex

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Researchers study how urban trees affect environment

Everyone knows that trees provide shade. What may be less obvious are their contributions to evaporative cooling. Think of tree roots drawing water from the ground and pumping it to their leaves, which effectively sweat H2O, cooling the air around them in the process.

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Motion of DNA linked to its damage response, ability to repair itself

A multidisciplinary team of Indiana University researchers have discovered that the motion of chromatin, the material that DNA is made of, can help facilitate effective repair of DNA damage in the human nucleus—a finding that could lead to improved cancer diagnosis and treatment. Their findings were recently published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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What capitalism gets right — and governments get wrong | Katherine Mangu-Ward

Is capitalism a good thing? Journalist Katherine Mangu-Ward makes the case that "weirdos" left alone to innovate and explore far-out ideas in a free market system are our best hope for the future. She asks us to reconsider our qualms about capitalism, failure and corporate death, analyzing the recent history of General Motors and Facebook to illustrate why we're better off with a lot less governme

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Motion of DNA linked to its damage response, ability to repair itself

A multidisciplinary team of Indiana University researchers have discovered that the motion of chromatin, the material that DNA is made of, can help facilitate effective repair of DNA damage in the human nucleus—a finding that could lead to improved cancer diagnosis and treatment. Their findings were recently published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Putting the food system in context

Innovations that make the food supply chain more "responsible"—eco-friendly, good for public health, fairer to farmers—will come faster if the contexts that set the stage for them are better understood, according to a new Université de Montréal study.

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Team gauges moon's shadowed side for future landings

With the help of artificial intelligence, researchers have explored the moon's permanently shadowed regions. The information they have obtained about the area's surface properties will help to identify suitable locations for future lunar missions. With China having landed a robot—and raised its flag—on the far side of the Moon in 2020, NASA is planning for its Artemis program to land in the lunar

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Chinese Astronauts Successfully Grow Rice Seedlings on New Space Station

Rice Rice Baby Big things are happening at China's Tiangong Space Station. The state-owned newspaper China Daily reports that Chinese astronauts onboard the craft have successfully hatched rice seedlings in space. As the ability to grow food in-orbit is one of the greatest obstacles to long-term space travel, this is no small feat . Zheng Huiqiong, a molecular plant science researcher at the Chin

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Best Laptop Stands in 2022

The portability of laptops is one of their main assets, but you'll need a laptop stand to make the most of the device. Laptops are becoming more and more powerful, with specs that are on par with many tower-style PCs. A good laptop stand helps you get the most out of your portable powerhouse, whether it's giving your device a place to perch next to a larger screen, or a docking station that allow

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Second monkeypox strain found in the UK

Individual hospitalised with the virus had recently travelled to west Africa, say public health officials A second monkeypox strain has been identified in the UK, linked with travel to west Africa, public health officials have said. According to the UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA), an individual who had recently travelled to west Africa has been admitted to the high consequence infectious disea

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Hidden acid-base clusters drive rapid formation of atmospheric ultrafine particles

A joint research team led by Dr. Jingkun Jiang from Tsinghua University and Dr. Markku Kulmala from the University of Helsinki has reported an efficient mechanism for gaseous sulfuric acid and bases to form atmospheric ultrafine particles. The findings explain the rapid formation of secondary ultrafine particles, which could further influence air quality and the climate.

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Physicists develop a linear response theory for open systems having exceptional points

Linear analysis plays a central role in science and engineering. Even when dealing with nonlinear systems, understanding the linear response is often crucial for gaining insight into the underlying complex dynamics. In recent years, there has been a great interest in studying open systems that exchange energy with a surrounding reservoir. In particular, it has been demonstrated that open systems w

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Resolving the evolutionary history of the closest algal relatives of land plants

An international team of scientists led jointly by the Universities of Göttingen and Cologne has deciphered the evolutionary history of zygnematophytes. Their results reveal the internal relationships in this group of algae using state-of-the-art phylogenomic analyses and pinpoint the emergences of algal multicellularity. The results have been published in the article "A phylogenomically informed

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A new catalyst to slow down global warming

Russian scientists have developed a new, highly efficient catalyst for carbon dioxide industrial processing that makes the process simple and inexpensive. Scientists from MISIS University, Lomonosov Moscow State University and Zelinsky Institute of Organic Chemistry took part in the study. The results have been published in Materials.

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US Life Expectancy Falls to Lowest Level Since 1996

(Photo: National Cancer Institute) A new analysis has revealed a disappointing drop in Americans' life expectancy. The average person born in the US in 2021 can now be expected to live for 76.1 years—the shortest lifespan recorded since 1996. The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), which collects, analyzes, and disseminates the country's official vital statistics, released its provision

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Resolving the evolutionary history of the closest algal relatives of land plants

An international team of scientists led jointly by the Universities of Göttingen and Cologne has deciphered the evolutionary history of zygnematophytes. Their results reveal the internal relationships in this group of algae using state-of-the-art phylogenomic analyses and pinpoint the emergences of algal multicellularity. The results have been published in the article "A phylogenomically informed

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From wound healing to regeneration

The phenomenon of regeneration was discovered over 200 years ago in the freshwater polyp Hydra. Until now, however, it was largely unclear how the orderly regeneration of lost tissues or organs is activated after injury. In its investigations of Hydra, an interdisciplinary research team was able to show how wound healing signals released upon injury are converted into specific signals of pattern f

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Quantum materials: Entanglement of many atoms discovered

Be it magnets or superconductors: materials are known for their various properties. However, these properties may change spontaneously under extreme conditions. Researchers have discovered an entirely new type of such phase transitions. They display the phenomenon of quantum entanglement involving many atoms, which previously has only been observed in the realm of few atoms.

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Did primitive cetaceans feed like marine reptiles?

Did the first ancestors of whales pick up where the mosasaurs left off 66 million years ago, after the extinction of all the large predatory marine reptiles? A study has looked into the possible convergences in morphology and behavior that may exist between these two groups of large marine predatory animals.

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New treatment could result in more donor lungs

A large amount of lungs donated cannot be used for transplantation. Researchers have conducted an animal study bringing hope that more donor lungs could be used in the future. The researchers have launched a pilot study to investigate whether the treatment will have the same positive effects on human beings.

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COVID rekindled an appreciation of nature for many

The pandemic has impacted our lives in a multitude of ways, many of which will no doubt be felt for years to come. While many of those effects are clearly negative, researchers have identified at least one positive impact — our perception of natural spaces changed.

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'Plug-and-play' plasmonic metafibers for ultrafast fiber lasers

Integrating plasmonic metasurfaces on optical fiber tips forming so-called metafibers enriches the functionalities of an ordinary optical fiber, yielding a variety of advanced applications such as planar waveshaping, super-resolution imaging, and ultracompact sensing. However, to date, plasmonic metafibers have predominantly explored separate bare fibers, and little attention has been paid to thei

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From wound healing to regeneration

The phenomenon of regeneration was discovered over 200 years ago in the freshwater polyp Hydra. Until now, however, it was largely unclear how the orderly regeneration of lost tissues or organs is activated after injury. In its investigations of Hydra, an interdisciplinary research team at Heidelberg University was able to show how wound healing signals released upon injury are converted into spec

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From wound healing to regeneration

The phenomenon of regeneration was discovered over 200 years ago in the freshwater polyp Hydra. Until now, however, it was largely unclear how the orderly regeneration of lost tissues or organs is activated after injury. In its investigations of Hydra, an interdisciplinary research team at Heidelberg University was able to show how wound healing signals released upon injury are converted into spec

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Study finds students self-sort in active learning spaces, with potential to push women out

A recent trend in higher education has seen universities install more active learning spaces, in which students can move their seats, collaborate and interact with one another, as opposed to more traditional lecture halls. But, as space in the former is limited, little is known about which students choose them. A new study from the University of Kansas found that students initially choose based on

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Less is more: Dimensionality reduction as a general strategy for more precise luminescence thermometry

Temperature and heat exchange are at the base of biological processes throughout the realm of Nature. Several of these biological processes are associated with temperature changes on the order of a few degrees or even below 0.1 degrees Celsius. For example, in reptiles a difference of less than one degree in the egg incubation temperature determines the sex of the newborn. The human body is no exc

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More than 90% of identifiable trash in North Pacific Garbage Patch comes from just six countries

A team of researchers with the Ocean Cleanup project and Wageningen University, both in the Netherlands, has found via sampling and testing that more than 90% of the identifiable trash swirling around in the North Pacific Garbage Patch (NPGP) comes from just six countries, all of which are major industrialized fishing nations. They have published their research in Scientific Reports.

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New method to systematically find optimal quantum operation sequences for quantum computers developed

Computer scientists have succeeded in developing a method for systematically finding the optimal quantum operation sequence for a quantum computer. They have developed a systematic method that applies optimal control theory (GRAPE algorithm) to identify the theoretically optimal sequence from among all conceivable quantum operation sequences. This method is expected to become a useful tool for med

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Making stable molecules reactive with light

Researchers at Linköping University have used computer simulations to show that stable aromatic molecules can become reactive after absorbing light. The results, published in The Journal of Organic Chemistry, may have long-term applications in such areas as the storage of solar energy, pharmacology, and molecular machines.

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Exploring the relationship between attosecond optical interference and attosecond quantum interference

A research team of RIKEN center for Advanced Photonics and the University of Tokyo has developed a novel type of interferometer to resolve the fringes originating from both optical interference of attosecond pulses and quantum interference of electronic states in a matter. They have demonstrated the feasibility of their interferometer by post-generation splitting of high-order harmonic pulse with

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A new way to produce pheromones as a crop pest repellent

A team of researchers from Sweden, China and the U.S. has developed a much cheaper way to produce pheromones as a crop pest repellent. In their paper published in the journal Nature Sustainability, the group describes how they genetically altered a plant to force it to produce a pheromone that could be used as a pest repellent. Johnathan Napier with Rothamsted Research, in the U.K., has published

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Turning a blind eye to image-based abuse

Image-based abuse, also commonly known as "revenge pornography" involves three main behaviors—non-consensually taking or creating nude or sexual images, threatening to share or distribute nude or sexual images, and non-consensually sharing or distributing nude or sexual images.

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Equipment Failure? No Problem for Sig and Keith | Deadliest Catch

Stream Deadliest Catch on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/deadliest-catch #DeadliestCatch #Discovery #DiscoveryPlus Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Disco

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Why I got my one-year-old vaccinated against polio

It's a Thursday afternoon, and I should be at work. Instead, I'm chasing my toddler around the small, disheveled garden behind my doctor's office, along with around 15 other parents. We're all here for the same reason—to get our young children vaccinated against polio. "We're doing about 200 children today," the nurse tells me. My youngest daughter—who is currently running around the garden point

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Biden Gambles That 'We the People' Still Exist

The principles of classical liberalism that underlie the American political system emerged in an era, the late 17th century, when people were exhausted by violent religious wars. The philosophy that eventually created our democracy was therefore designed to "lower the temperature of politics," as Francis Fukuyama has recently written , to take issues of existential truth off the table so that peo

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The Boundaries a Romance Novel Can Break

In Corinne Hoex's Gentlemen Callers , sex is a dream. The book's protagonist floats between abstract, ethereal trysts. When she visits a gas-station attendant in her sleep, she is a soapy sponge in his hands. Caressed by a pet groomer, she purrs; she's his cat. Her liaisons are absurd and illicit—yet, crucially, never dangerous. Gentlemen Callers is not a classic romance novel or a straightforwar

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The Books That Help Me Raise Children in a Broken World

In the introduction to her book Essential Labor: Mothering as Social Change , Angela Garbes describes these times as "strange and difficult years of instability, loss, and grief—both general and intimate." That's it , I thought. Sometimes it feels as though decades of tragedy and erasure have been smashed into the past 30 months. During the upheaval of the summer of 2020 , for example, my son als

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What Babies Hear When You Sing to Them

Randy Lubin recalls the exact moment his life became an improvised musical. The 35-year-old game designer from San Francisco never used to sing, not even in the shower or alone in the car. At his wife's request, he would perform the kiddush, a Jewish prayer sung each week during Shabbat, but that was it. "Singing wasn't something I sought out or particularly found a lot of joy in," Lubin told me.

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The Justification for Biden's Speech

President Joe Biden last night used the backdrop of Philadelphia's Independence Hall to accuse his political opponents of betraying American democracy. The complaints from GOP leaders are loud . How dare Biden use this birthplace of the republic to speak that way about former President Donald Trump and his tens of millions of supporters? During his presidency, Trump repeatedly used places of nati

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Don't Believe the Generals

A T-shirt that was popular with veterans for much of America's nearly 20-year war in Afghanistan showed a helicopter in flight with the caption We Were Winning When I Left . U.S. generals seem to be the only ones who didn't get the joke. On the first anniversary of our botched withdrawal, the military leaders most responsible for America's disastrous outcome in Afghanistan have continued to loudl

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What If Joan of Arc Wasn't a Woman?

Does it matter if Joan of Arc was not a woman? "Our new play I, Joan shows Joan as a legendary leader who uses the pronouns 'they/them,'" announced Shakespeare's Globe theater in London on August 11 . "We are not the first to present Joan in this way, and we will not be the last." That strange tone—half punk, half defensive—is more explicable in light of the backlash that followed. Many British f

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A new way to produce pheromones as a crop pest repellent

A team of researchers from Sweden, China and the U.S. has developed a much cheaper way to produce pheromones as a crop pest repellent. In their paper published in the journal Nature Sustainability, the group describes how they genetically altered a plant to force it to produce a pheromone that could be used as a pest repellent. Johnathan Napier with Rothamsted Research, in the U.K., has published

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COVID rekindled an appreciation of nature for many

The pandemic has impacted our lives in a multitude of ways, many of which will no doubt be felt for years to come. While many of those effects are clearly negative, UConn researchers have identified at least one positive impact—our perception of natural spaces changed. The findings are published in Scientific Reports.

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Can training cut bias among probation, parole officers?

Short online trainings show promise for reducing mental health bias among probation and parole officers, findings indicate. Studies show having mental illness can affect the chances of someone on probation or parole getting out from under government supervision. To combat this, it's not only important that individuals have access to mental health resources, but also that the officers involved kno

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Anti-insulin protein drives queen ant longevity

An insulin-suppressing protein may be the fountain of youth for ants and provides clues about aging in other species, according to a new study. Published in Science , the study shows that queen ants exhibit high metabolism for reproduction without undergoing aging by generating an anti-insulin protein that blocks only part of the insulin pathway that is responsible for aging. In many animals, hav

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Toxins in old toys an obstacle for circular economy

When researchers tested a large number of old toys and dress-up items made of plastic, 84 per cent of the items were found to contain toxins that can disrupt growth and development and reproductive capacities in children. These toxins are an obstacle for the circular economy in the future involving reuse and recycling, the researchers explain.

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Making stable molecules reactive with light

Researchers have used computer simulations to show that stable aromatic molecules can become reactive after absorbing light. The results may have long-term applications in such areas as the storage of solar energy, pharmacology, and molecular machines.

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Criticisms of academic freedom miss the mark and risk the integrity of scholarship

In the era of today's heated culture wars, the concepts of academic freedom and freedom of expression have become increasingly conflated. Divisive political debates around critical race theory, Québec's Bill 32 and talk of establishing "free speech guardians" are just some recent examples. Academic freedom is being subsumed into the oftentimes polarizing rhetoric concerning what is commonly referr

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Individual risk-factor data could help predict the next Ebola outbreak

Researchers have examined how social and economic factors, such as level of education and general knowledge of Ebola, might contribute to 'high-risk behaviors' that may bring individuals into contact with potentially infected animals. A focus on geographical locations with high concentrations of individuals at high-risk could help public health officials better target prevention and education reso

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This Two-Seater eVTOL Will Be Used to Train Pilots for Flying Taxis

A Jetsons -inspired future where people zip around the skies in flying cars seems to still be a long way off, but that's not stopping people from designing, launching, and even starting production of personal aircraft. Now London-based SkyFly is joining the fray; the company recently started taking pre-orders on a personal eVTOL it calls the Axe . The Axe is different from other personal aircraft

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Designing a way to make oxygen injectable

What if emergency medical personnel could treat a desperately ill patient in need of oxygen with a simple injection instead of having to rely on mechanical ventilation or rush to get them onto a heart-lung bypass machine?

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Untangled blinking: Fluorescence patterns aid medical diagnostics

Researchers have partners detected unique fluorescence blinking patterns in experiments of electron transfer to single DNA molecules. They used these patterns to identify mRNA glioma point mutations in cell culture. The results of this work could help simplify surgical biopsies, enable real-time targeted therapy, and advance scientific understanding of cancer progression.

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Untangled blinking: Fluorescence patterns aid medical diagnostics

Researchers have partners detected unique fluorescence blinking patterns in experiments of electron transfer to single DNA molecules. They used these patterns to identify mRNA glioma point mutations in cell culture. The results of this work could help simplify surgical biopsies, enable real-time targeted therapy, and advance scientific understanding of cancer progression.

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Review suggests 'parent-centred' approach to medical imaging can enhance emotional connection to the unborn baby during pregnancy

A systematic review of twenty-three studies suggests that, during pregnancy, expectant parents' feelings towards their unborn baby (fetus) can be positively enhanced by sonographers (specialist healthcare professionals who are trained to perform pregnancy ultrasound scans) making imaging examinations a truly parent-centred experience. Such an experience can allay feelings of anxiety and stress in

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New fur for the quantum cat: Entanglement of many atoms discovered for the first time

Be it magnets or superconductors, materials are known for their various properties. However, these properties may change spontaneously under extreme conditions. Researchers at the Technische Universität Dresden (TUD) and the Technische Universität München (TUM) have discovered an entirely new type of these phase transitions. They display the phenomenon of quantum entanglement involving many atoms,

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Perseverance Mars Experiment Capable of Producing as Much Oxygen as a Single Tree

NASA's Perseverance rover is a lot of things: a nuclear-powered planetary explorer, the first step in returning Mars samples to Earth , and a communications platform that enables the first-ever helicopter to fly on an alien world . It is, apparently, also a mechanized tree. The team behind Persverance's MOXIE project has announced it can produce as much oxygen on Mars as a respectable tree here o

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A bitter mystery: Scientists sequence world's oldest plant genome from 6,000-year-old watermelon seeds

In a new paper published in the journal Molecular Biology and Evolution, scientists from the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew and partners in the U.K., Germany and the U.S. have decoded the world's oldest plant genome, using Neolithic-era watermelon seeds collected at an archaeological site in the Sahara Desert in Libya.

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Molecular atlas of an Australian dragon's brain sheds new light on more than 300 million years of brain evolution

These days, dragons are keeping "Game of Thrones" fans on their toes. But they are also providing important insights into vertebrate brain evolution, as revealed by the work of Max Planck scientists on the brain of the Australian bearded dragon Pogona vitticeps. Vertebrate evolution took a major turn 320 million years ago when early tetrapods (animals with four limbs) transitioned from water to la

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The first spatiotemporal map of brain regeneration in the axolotl

A multi-institute research team led by BGI-Research has used BGI Stereo-seq technology to construct the world first spatiotemporal cellular atlas of the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) brain development and regeneration, revealing how a brain injury can heal itself. The study was published as a cover story in the latest issue of Science.

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New theory for detection of terahertz electromagnetic waves gives hope for advances in IT and medicine

Detecting electromagnetic waves in the terahertz frequency range remains a challenging problem. Researchers from the University of Cambridge, together with physicists from the University of Augsburg, have recently discovered a new physical effect which could change that. In a new study, the scientists are now developing a theory explaining the mechanism behind it. Their findings make it possible t

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Molecular atlas of an Australian dragon's brain sheds new light on more than 300 million years of brain evolution

These days, dragons are keeping "Game of Thrones" fans on their toes. But they are also providing important insights into vertebrate brain evolution, as revealed by the work of Max Planck scientists on the brain of the Australian bearded dragon Pogona vitticeps. Vertebrate evolution took a major turn 320 million years ago when early tetrapods (animals with four limbs) transitioned from water to la

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Stickleback fish refute 'hopeless monster' theory

A series of experiments that included stickleback fish hookups, CRISPR, and lake hopping has confirmed a long-standing, yet unproven, assumption about natural evolution. It also debunks a talking point favored by proponents of intelligent design, who have argued that naturally occurring mutations will only damage or destroy an animal and can't lead to useful new traits and body structures. The re

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Ugens debat: Computere skal ikke ordne alt i skoleklassen

Lektor ved datalogisk institut Torben Ægidius Mogensen satte spørgsmålstegn ved, om det faktisk er nødvendigt eller ønskeligt at integrere brugen af computere i stort set al undervisning. På ing.dk reagerede læserne meget forskelligt på det spørgsmålstegn.

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New granular hydrogel bioink could expand possibilities for tissue bioprinting

Every day in the United States, 17 people die waiting for an organ transplant, and every nine minutes, another person is added to the transplant waiting list, according to the Health Resources and Services Administration. One potential solution to alleviate the shortage is to develop biomaterials that can be three-dimensionally (3D) printed as complex organ shapes, capable of hosting cells and for

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Less risk, less costs: Portable spectroscopy devices could soon become real

Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is an analytical tool with a wide range of applications, including the magnetic resonance imaging that is used for diagnostic purposes in medicine. However, NMR often requires powerful magnetic fields to be generated, which limits the scope of its use. Researchers have now discovered potential new ways to reduce the size of the corresponding devices and also the po

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The Download: Twitter's edit button, and cleaning up fossil fuels

This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. An edit button won't fix Twitter's problems The lowdown: After years of requests, Twitter is finally introducing an edit button, giving its users the ability to change their tweets up to 30 minutes after they've been sent. But the feature is unlikely to solve

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Gift i gamla leksaker riskerar barns hälsa

Att låta barnen leka med ärvda plastleksaker kan vara en risk. När forskare testade gamla leksaker och utklädningsföremål i plast innehöll 84 procent av föremålen gifter som kan orsaka störningar i utvecklingen och fortplantningsförmågan hos barn. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .

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Partiledare som är goda förlorare bra för demokratin

Partiledare som trots politiska nederlag, talar om för sin väljare att allt gått rätt till, minskar misstron mot det politiska systemet, visar forskning. Men innan ett goda-förlorare-budskap måste partiledaren alltid bekräfta att det förlorande lägret har rätt i sak. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .

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Algorithms Still Reinforce Echochambers

Why do societies collapse? This is an interesting question, and as you might imagine the answer is complex . There are multiple internal and external reasons, but a core features seems to be that a combination of factors were simultaneously at work – a crisis that the society failed to deal with adequately because of dysfunctional institutions and political infrastructure. All societies face chal

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The internet is teeming with bad spider info

Don't automatically believe what you read online about spiders, say researchers. "The quality of spider information in the global press is rather poor—errors and sensationalism are rampant," says Stefano Mammola of the National Research Council, Verbania Pallanza, Italy, and University of Helsinki's Finnish Museum of Natural History. "Spider-related information in the press flows through a highly

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Prevent tree extinctions or face global ecological catastrophe, scientists warn

New paper issues 'warning to humanity' as it calls for urgent action to protect world's 60,000 tree species Scientists have issued an urgent "warning to humanity" about the global impact of tree extinctions. A new paper predicts severe consequences for people, wildlife and the planet's ecosystems if the widespread loss of trees continues. "Last year, we published the State of the World's Trees re

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This Week in Space: NASA Scrambles to Troubleshoot Moon Rocket

NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) rocket with the Orion spacecraft aboard is seen atop the mobile launcher as it moves up the ramp at Launch Pad 39B, Wednesday, Aug. 17, 2022, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA's Artemis I mission is the first integrated test of the agency's deep space exploration systems: the Orion spacecraft, SLS rocket, and supporting ground systems. Launch of the

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Link between disrupted enzyme and intellectual disability revealed

A new study reveals how a rare genetic mutation leads to intellectual disability. The P212L mutation in an enzyme called CaMKIIalpha, which is important for learning and memory, is known to be linked to intellectual disability. However, the exact process by which the mutation affected the enzyme's activity was unclear, until now.

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What particle physics can do to improve diversity

Nature, Published online: 02 September 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-02800-x Kétévi Assamagan describes how US particle physicists are trying to make their field work for people of all genders, ethnicities and backgrounds.

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Abortion Could Define California's Elections

CERRITOS, Calif.—Abortion rights dominated the message when the Democratic congressional candidate Jay Chen sent off a small group who had gathered to canvass for him here early on Sunday morning. "A right that we had all assumed we would have, the right of a woman to have control of her own health-care decisions, was taken away after 50 years," Chen told the volunteers. He reminded them that his

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The US agency in charge of developing fossil fuels has a new job: cleaning them up

In his first month in office, US President Joe Biden signed an executive order calling for the nation to eliminate carbon pollution from the electricity sector by 2035 and achieve net-zero emissions across the economy by 2050. That move redefined the mandate of the US Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy, the research agency whose mission has been to develop more effective ways of produ

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how much damage does years of dopamine spiking do?

Hello everyone, I was wondering what would happened to your neurotransmitter after years of spiking your dopamine through the means of drugs? I smoked a pack of cigarettes a day for about 5-6 years. I stopped smoking a few years ago I smoked weed multiple times a week for a few years. I stopped smoking weed over a year ago. I was addicted and abusing Adderalls for 2 years in college. The usage ra

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What Is an Old-Growth Tree Actually Worth?

In setting fines for timber poaching, experts are experimenting with different ways to calculate the financial value of trees that go beyond market-based valuations to consider North American forests as complex ecosystems with cultural value as well.

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Barnens blodprover ökar kunskapen om hur typ 1-diabetes utvecklas

Vad är det som gör att vissa får typ 1-diabetes medan andra inte får sjukdomen? Forskare runtom i världen söker gemensamt efter ett svar på den svårlösta frågan. Diabetesforskare vid Lunds universitet bidrog nyligen med data till en studie som visar att sjukdomen utvecklar sig på tre olika sätt hos barn. Den ökade kunskapen gör det möjligt att genomföra nya typer studier som går ut på att förebygg

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Why are Pakistan's floods so extreme this year?

Nature, Published online: 02 September 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-02813-6 One-third of the country is under water, following an intense heatwave and a long monsoon that has dumped a record amount of rain.

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Schneider Shorts 2.09.2022 – Criminal Science Publishing Gangs

Schneider Shorts 2.09.2022 – a papermill hero from Magdeburg arrives to save science, a blonde WomenInSTEM hero sues SUNY for discrimination, a dead OA hero resurrected as Frontiers editor, with retractions post-mortem and pre-sacking, amazing science on Alzheimer's, tea drinking, TCM and smelly foreigners, and with unknown unknowns of your conflicts of interests.

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Cranky Uncle getting ever more multi-lingual with Spanish and Portuguese added!

As of August 20, 2022, the Cranky Uncle game is available in English, Dutch, German, Spanish and Portuguese and can be played on iOS or Android devices as well as in the browser . More languages are already in the queue and this blog post will be updated whenever a new language gets launched. In addition, there'll be language specific announcements linked via the flag-icons at the top. These will

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Toxins in old toys an obstacle for circular economy

Letting children play with hand-me-down plastic toys could constitute a health risk. When researchers at the University of Gothenburg tested a large number of old toys and dress-up items made of plastic, 84% of the items were found to contain toxins that can disrupt growth and development and reproductive capacities in children. These toxins are an obstacle for the circular economy in the future i

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Mangel på psykiatere skaber ukollegial lønspiral

Efterspørgslen på speciallæger i psykiatri er nu så stor, at vikarbureauer lokker med op mod en million kroner mere om året oven i lægernes eksisterende løn. Manglen på psykiatere betyder, at regionerne nu konkurrerer sig selv i sænk, siger sundhedsøkonom.

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Lægeforeningen: Et vanvittigt tilbud

Lægeforeningens formand, Camilla Rathcke, og Overlægeforeningens formand, Susanne Wammen, kalder vikarbureauernes tilbud til psykiaterne for 'voldsomme' og 'vanvittige'. De afviser, at den enkelte læge har et ansvar for udviklingen i brugen af lægevikarer i psykiatrien.

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Giver Grønland glæde? Givetvis

KRONIK: I USA anslås det, at omkring 50 pct. af alle medicinstuderende og læger lider af 'physician burnout', udbrændthed. I 2020 vurderede KBU-læger arbejdsmiljøet på danske hospitaler til 6,4 ud af 10, mens over en tredjedel af danske overlæger er stressede. Hvordan forholder det sig i det grønlandske sundhedsvæsen?

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Variation matters: Genetic effects in interacting species jointly determine ecological outcomes

The greatest diversity of life is not counted in the number of species, says an evolutionary geneticist, but in the diversity of interactions among them. He says it's often unclear if the outcome of an interaction, such as whether a microbe can infect a host, is the same for all members of a species or depends on the genetic makeup of the specific individuals involved. A new study addresses that k

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NASA's Webb takes its first-ever direct image of distant world

Astronomers have used NASA's James Webb Space Telescope to take a direct image of a planet outside our solar system. The exoplanet is a gas giant, meaning it has no rocky surface and could not be habitable. The image shows how Webb's powerful infrared gaze can easily capture worlds beyond our solar system, pointing the way to future observations that will reveal more information than ever before a

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Stem cell biologists create new human cell type for research

Scientists have managed to generate a new type of human cell in the lab using stem cells. The new cells closely resemble their natural counterparts in early human embryos. As a result, researchers can now better study what happens just after an embryo implants in the womb.

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How 'prediction markets' could improve climate risk policies and investment decisions

A market-led approach could be key to guiding policy, research and business decisions about future climate risks, a new study outlines. Now that organizations appreciate how essential it is to consider climate risks within their strategic plans, the pressing need for forward-looking, reliable information is growing. However, researchers say current climate-risk forecasts that guide key business an

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Researchers report encouraging immunotherapy option for relapsed myeloma patients

Researchers have published results that show encouraging therapeutic options for patients with the blood cancer multiple myeloma after first-line treatment with bispecific antibodies fails. Bispecific antibodies are a type of antibody that can bind to two different antigens at the same time — they are meant to enhance the immune system's destruction of tumor cells.

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These mice grow bigger on the rainier sides of mountains: It might be a new rule of nature

Scientists studying mice from the Andes Mountains in Patagonia noticed something they couldn't explain: the mice from the western side of the mountains were bigger than the ones from the east, but DNA said that they were all from the same species. The researchers examined the skulls of 450 mice from the southern tip of South America, and found that existing biological laws didn't explain the size

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Neural networks predict forces in jammed granular solids

Granular matter is all around us. Examples include sand, rice, nuts, coffee and even snow. These materials are made of solid particles that are large enough not to experience thermal fluctuations. Instead, their state is determined by mechanical influences: shaking produces 'granular gases' whilst by compression one gets 'granular solids'. An unusual feature of such solids is that forces within th

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New granular hydrogel bioink could expand possibilities for tissue bioprinting

Every day in the United States, 17 people die waiting for an organ transplant, and every nine minutes, another person is added to the transplant waiting list, according to the Health Resources and Services Administration. One potential solution to alleviate the shortage is to develop biomaterials that can be three-dimensionally (3D) printed as complex organ shapes, capable of hosting cells and for

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How the DOJ Used Trump's Methods Against Him

This is an edition of The Atlantic Daily, a newsletter that guides you through the biggest stories of the day, helps you discover new ideas, and recommends the best in culture. Sign up for it here . "Trump can't hide from the Mar-a-Lago photo," my colleague David A. Graham wrote yesterday . I called David today to talk about what makes the DOJ's latest filing so powerful. But first, here are thre

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Republicans Have Only Themselves to Blame for Their Alaskan Defeat

Updated at 4:50 p.m. ET on September 1, 2022. Mary Peltola was declared the winner of Alaska's special congressional election last night, defeating the former GOP vice-presidential nominee Sarah Palin. A Democrat hasn't held the seat in 49 years, and Peltola will be the first Alaska Native elected to Congress. The election was the first in Alaska to utilize ranked-choice voting , a system adopted

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Don't Worry About Corn Kid

A viral video starring an adorable child has briefly united the world in shared understanding: "It's corn!" The child, whose first name is Tariq and whose last name is unknown, but who also goes by "CEO of Corn," appeared in a video on a popular Instagram account called Recess Therapy . (Recess Therapy is a man-on-the-street-style interview show on which all the guests are children.) Tariq is mis

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New Details Emerge About NASA's Lab to House Martian Samples

Martian Plague To bring a Martian rock sample to Earth without setting loose any potential Red Planet pathogens, NASA will need to go where no space agency has gone before — a special containment lab that doesn't exist yet. This week, the New York Times reported additional details about an upcoming NASA mission that hopes to bring rock samples from Mars back to our own planet by 2033. Long story

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Former NCI postdoc faked data, says federal watchdog

A former postdoc at the National Cancer Institute faked 15 figures and a movie in grant applications, presentations, a paper, and an unpublished manuscript, according to a federal watchdog. The finding from the U.S. Office of Research Integrity (ORI) comes more than a year after PLOS Biology retracted a 2016 paper and noted that the … Continue reading

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Guy Who Just Visited the Titanic in a Submarine Now Headed to Space

Up and Down There's little question that Alan Stern, a planetary scientist who leads NASA's New Horizons mission to Pluto and the Kuiper Belt, can claim he's truly been everywhere — from the depths of the ocean to the edges of space. Yesterday, Stern wrote about his recent visit to the decaying wreck of the Titanic for The Hill , giving us terra-bound plebeians a peek at what human exploration co

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Investor Warns That a "Superbubble" May Be About to Burst in a Financial "Tragedy"

Boom and Burst A famous investor is warning his clients that a financial "superbubble" is getting ready to burst — and that the "epic finale" to this saga is gonna suck. As Jeremy Grantham, the founder of the prominent GMO asset management firm, argued in an announcement to investors this week, there's ample writing on the wall to suggest that not only is the stock market in a "superbubble," but

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Keeping bulk magnesium diboride superconducting at higher current densities

Magnesium diboride superconductors show great promise for large-scale applications. However, its critical current density (the current density above which superconductivity vanishes), Jc , at high magnetic fields in bulk form is not sufficiently high. An international research team has devised a recipe for enhancing Jc based on optimum sintering conditions and addition of nanoscale boron and dyspr

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Improving foam stability in disinfectants with high ethanol concentrations

As the world adapts to the post-COVID era, disinfectants have become an irreplaceable part of life. Foam disinfectants are excellent but suffer from foam destabilization when mixed with high ethanol concentrations. To address this issue, researchers from Japan have added an anionic surfactant, a long-chain alcohol, and an inorganic electrolyte to aqueous solutions with high ethanol concentrations,

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Scientists discover new kind of synapse in neurons' tiny hairs

Scientists have discovered a new kind of synapse in the tiny hairs on the surface of neurons. The commonly overlooked protrusions called primary cilia contain special junctions that act as a shortcut for sending signals quickly and directly to the cell's nucleus, inducing changes to the cell's chromatin that forms chromosomes.

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Less risk, less costs: Portable spectroscopy devices could soon become real

Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is an analytical tool with a wide range of applications, including the magnetic resonance imaging that is used for diagnostic purposes in medicine. However, NMR often requires powerful magnetic fields to be generated, which limits the scope of its use. Researchers have now discovered potential new ways to reduce the size of the corresponding devices and also the po

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NASA Paying SpaceX Half of Boeing's Price to Launch Astronauts

Expensive Tickets NASA is will be paying Boeing twice as much for each Starliner seat to the International Space Station than it's paying SpaceX for equivalent Crew Dragon tickets, Ars Technica reports , in a price differential that's becoming increasingly difficult to reconcile as Boeing has yet to successfully launch a single astronaut into orbit. This week, the space agency confirmed that it h

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Best Night-Vision Monoculars in 2022

While we may associate night vision with covert military operations, there are plenty of good reasons for the average person to have an instrument that allows them to see objects and animals in the darkness. Night-vision monoculars work by collecting infrared light from the moon and the stars, and amplifying it, allowing you to see distances up to three football fields long at night. Whereas nigh

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Elon Musk's Two-Year-Old Son Frustrated When Toy Rocket Won't Reach Orbit

Too Heavy Elon Musk and musician Claire "Grimes" Boucher's child X Æ A-12 — or just "X" for short — is already having trouble getting rockets off of the ground, much like his father during the early days of SpaceX. "'Fuckin' rocket is too fuckin heavy,'" Grimes says their offspring explained "after his toy rocket failed to reach orbit." The esoteric tidbit certainly raises questions. For one, roc

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A therapy found to improve cognitive function in patients with Down syndrome

Scientists have tested the efficacy of GnRH injection therapy in order to improve the cognitive functions of a small group of patients with Down syndrome. First the scientists revealed a dysfunction of the GnRH neurons in an animal model of Down syndrome and its impacts on the cognitive function impairment associated with the condition. Then a pilot study testing GnRH pulsatile injection therapy w

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New method eradicates deadly brain tumors by 'starving' them of energy source

In a new study, researchers report that they effectively eradicated glioblastoma, a highly lethal type of brain cancer. The researchers achieved the outcome using a method they developed based on their discovery of two critical mechanisms in the brain that support tumor growth and survival: one protects cancer cells from the immune system, while the other supplies the energy required for rapid tum

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COVID radar: Genetic sequencing can help predict severity of next variant

As public health officials around the world contend with the latest surge of the COVID-19 pandemic, researchers have created a computer model that could help them be better prepared for the next one. Using machine learning algorithms, trained to identify correlations between changes in the genetic sequence of the COVID-19 virus and upticks in transmission, hospitalizations and deaths, the model ca

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New photodetector design inspired by plant photosynthesis

Researchers have developed a new type of high-efficiency photodetector inspired by the photosynthetic complexes plants use to turn sunlight into energy. Photodetectors are used in cameras, optical communication systems and many other applications to turn photons into electrical signals. The new detector design uses unique quasiparticles known as polaritons to achieve long-range energy transport in

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Researchers propose new framework for regulating engineered crops

A Policy Forum article calls for a new approach to regulating genetically engineered (GE) crops, arguing that current approaches for triggering safety testing vary dramatically among countries and generally lack scientific merit — particularly as advances in crop breeding have blurred the lines between conventional breeding and genetic engineering.

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Global analysis identifies at-risk forests

Researchers quantify the risk to forests from climate change along three dimensions: carbon storage, biodiversity and forest loss from disturbance, such as fire or drought. The results show forests in some regions experiencing clear and consistent risks. In other regions, the risk profile is less clear, because different approaches that account for disparate aspects of climate risk yield diverging

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Global fish stocks can't rebuild if nothing done to halt climate change and overfishing

Global fish stocks will not be able to recover to sustainable levels without strong actions to mitigate climate change, a new study has projected. Researchers projected the impact that different global temperature increases and ranges of fishing activity would have on biomass, or the amount of fish by weight in a given area, from 1950 to 2100. Their simulations suggest that climate change has redu

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Turning CO2 and methane into valuable products, effectively

CO2 and methane can be turned into valuable products. But there is a problem with the catalysts required for this: They end up being covered in a layer of carbon, losing their effectivity. A new catalyst has now been developed which solves this problem and can be used for a long time.

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A sustainable battery with a biodegradable electrolyte made from crab shells

Accelerating demand for renewable energy and electric vehicles is sparking a high demand for the batteries that store generated energy and power engines. But the batteries behind these sustainability solutions aren't always sustainable themselves. Scientists have now create a zinc battery with a biodegradable electrolyte from an unexpected source — crab shells.

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SU(N) matter is about 3 billion times colder than deep space

Physicists have opened an unexplored realm of quantum magnetism by creating the universe's coldest fermions — atoms about 3 billion times colder than interstellar space. The team published a groundbreaking quantum simulation of a complex 'SU(N) Hubbard' model offering new insights into magnetic materials.

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A sustainable battery with a biodegradable electrolyte made from crab shells

Accelerating demand for renewable energy and electric vehicles is sparking a high demand for the batteries that store generated energy and power engines. But the batteries behind these sustainability solutions aren't always sustainable themselves. Scientists have now create a zinc battery with a biodegradable electrolyte from an unexpected source — crab shells.

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Authorities Plead: Please Stop Eating Critically Endangered Giant Tortoises

Tortious Interference The Ecuadorian government is begging people to stop poaching the Galapagos islands' famed giant tortoises and eating them, in a disturbing testament to just how endangered the ancient creatures, once beloved by Charles Darwin, have become. As CNN reports , the attorney general of Ecuador issued a statement saying that the agency sent a team of investigators to the Galapagos

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How does low-impact development help manage stormwater?

Cities can have many benefits when designed well, including reducing carbon imprints. Another way cities can improve their environmental impact is by using "low-impact development" with regard to water management. It is also called "green stormwater infrastructure."

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Rethinking indoor air chemistry

People typically spend 90% of their lives inside, at home, at work, or in transport. Within these enclosed spaces, occupants are exposed to a multitude of chemicals from various sources, including outdoor pollutants penetrating indoors, gaseous emissions from building materials and furnishings, and products of our own activities such as cooking and cleaning. In addition, we are ourselves potent mo

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Full 3-D view of binary star-planet system

Astronomers using the VLBA have produced a full, 3-D view of a binary star system with a planet orbiting one of the stars. Their achievement promises important new insights into the process of planet formation.

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AMA about our podcast focusing on AI and Internet Health

Mozilla Foundation's Insight team is hosting an AMA today at 12:00pm ET over at r/IAmA . The team has produced four insightful podcast episodes based on Mozilla's fifth Internet Health Report, focusing 100% on AI and the technology we should, and should not, build in future. So join us over at r/IAmA and ask us anything! submitted by /u/Mozilla-Foundation [link] [comments]

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Rethinking indoor air chemistry

People typically spend 90% of their lives inside, at home, at work, or in transport. Within these enclosed spaces, occupants are exposed to a multitude of chemicals from various sources, including outdoor pollutants penetrating indoors, gaseous emissions from building materials and furnishings, and products of our own activities such as cooking and cleaning. In addition, we are ourselves potent mo

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Team identifies more genes linked to autism

The largest genetic analysis to date to understand the genetics behind autism and other neurodevelopmental conditions reveals 185 genes associated with autism, many for the first time. Autism spectrum disorder affects about 2% of children in the United States. While most cases are inherited, a small number are the result of rare genetic variations. The study, published in Nature Genetics , examin

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AI-Generated Painting Wins State Fair Fine Arts Competition

AI Win Somebody entered the Colorado State Fair's fine art competition with an AI-generated painting — and won first prize, Vice reports , pissing off artists everywhere. The artwork, titled "Théâtre D'opéra Spatial," depicts a scifi-inspired scene of an opera performance. But Jason Allen, who submitted the artwork, used AI image generator Midjourney to create it. The incident goes to show just h

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NASA Flew an MIT Device to Mars, Where It's Been Cranking Out Breathable Oxygen for More Than a Year

Fresh Air A crewed trip to Mars will require more preparation than a packed lunch and a good queue of podcasts. Among others, one major obstacle will be oxygen: how do you transport enough of the stuff to a planet some 140 million miles away, and what happens when it runs out? NASA and MIT have been working on an answer, by way of a groundbreaking device — currently located on the Red Planet, not

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Synthetic protein binds to VX nerve agent

A new synthetic protein quickly detects molecules of a deadly nerve agent, VX. The development could pave the way for a new generation of tailor-made biosensors and treatments that could be deployed against the chemical warfare agent. As described in Science Advances , the team created the protein through a special design on high-speed computers. "We've made an artificial protein that binds a che

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Laser melting: Fewer unknowns in the laser nanosynthesis of composites

Composite particles with submicron sizes can be produced by irradiating a suspension of nanoparticles with a laser beam. Violent physical and chemical processes take place during irradiation, many of which have been poorly understood to date. Recently completed experiments, carried out at the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Cracow, have shed new light on some of t

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Fatty acid feedstocks enable a highly efficient glyoxylate‐TCA cycle for high‐yield production of β‐alanine

This study is led by Dr. Yong Tao (Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences), Dr. Weifeng Liu (Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences) and Dr. Bo Liu (Microcyto Co. Ltd.,). Fatty acids are promising alternative feedstocks to glucose and can be easily obtained from various sources, including waste oil, crude oil, and oil by‐products. In recent years, Prof. Yong Tao 's

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Fatty acid feedstocks enable a highly efficient glyoxylate‐TCA cycle for high‐yield production of β‐alanine

This study is led by Dr. Yong Tao (Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences), Dr. Weifeng Liu (Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences) and Dr. Bo Liu (Microcyto Co. Ltd.,). Fatty acids are promising alternative feedstocks to glucose and can be easily obtained from various sources, including waste oil, crude oil, and oil by‐products. In recent years, Prof. Yong Tao 's

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New study suggests lacustrine shale reserves can bolster China's energy independence

Shale oil exploration has rapidly expanded since the beginning of the 21st century, particularly in North America. Since 2010, the production of marine shale oil has increased at an average rate of more than 25% annually, making the US the global leader in production with total recoverable resources pegged at approximately 20.7 billion tons. Developing shale oil resources has significant potential

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School wellness centers: An innovative response to student stress and suicide

The wellness center at Utah's Westlake High School is a port in the storm of adolescence. With comfortable couches, soft lighting, nature sounds, healthy snacks and an array of sensory activities like Buddha Boards and puzzles, the wellness center offers overwhelmed students a place to relax and refocus, practice healthy coping mechanisms or talk with a counselor.

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Ultra-processed food linked to men's colorectal cancer risk

Men who take in high rates of ultra-processed foods are at 29% higher risk for developing colorectal cancer than men who eat much smaller amounts, research finds. The study did not find the same association in women. Colorectal cancer is the third most diagnosed cancer in the United States. "We started out thinking that colorectal cancer could be the cancer most impacted by diet compared to other

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Improving foam stability in disinfectants with high ethanol concentrations

Since the outbreak of COVID-19, the importance of wearing masks and disinfection of items has become paramount. As a result, there is now a greater need for effective, potent, and simple-to-apply disinfectants. Foam-type disinfectants are a leading candidate in this regard since they do not drip, keep the disinfected area visible, and are less likely to reach the user's eyes.

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Hormone therapy may boost brain function for people with Down's syndrome, study finds

Men given a dose of gonadotropin-releasing hormone every two hours showed improvements in cognitive function in small-scale trial Regular doses of a hormone may help to boost cognitive skills in people with Down's syndrome, a pilot study has suggested. Researchers fitted seven men who have Down's syndrome with a pump that provided a dose of GnRH, a gonadotropin-releasing hormone, every two hours

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Global analysis identifies at-risk forests

Forests are engaged in a delicate, deadly dance with climate change, sucking carbon dioxide out of the air with billions of leafy straws and hosting abundant biodiversity, as long as climate change, with its droughts, wildfires and ecosystem shifts, doesn't kill them first.

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Researchers propose new framework for regulating engineered crops

A Policy Forum article published today in Science calls for a new approach to regulating genetically engineered (GE) crops, arguing that current approaches for triggering safety testing vary dramatically among countries and generally lack scientific merit—particularly as advances in crop breeding have blurred the lines between conventional breeding and genetic engineering.

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Rapid loss of China's pollinator diversity | Science

Pollinators play an irreplaceable role in ensuring food security and maintaining ecosystem stability. Worldwide, 87.5% of angiosperms, more than 70% of crops, and more than 35% of food production depend on animal pollination, primarily by insects (1–3). However, pollinator populations and diversity are declining across the globe (4). The situation is particularly dire in China, where the distribut

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Denmark passes total ban of leaded ammunition | Science

The use of leaded ammunition has caused collapses of raptor populations worldwide due to secondary lead poisoning (1–3). In Europe, lead kills millions of wild birds each year, and the losses in biodiversity, environmental health, and socio-economic activities are estimated to be more than 1 billion EUR (4). There is no tolerable lead intake for humans (5). In June, Denmark took an important step

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Test Patagonia's raptors for rodenticides | Science

FULL ACCESSLetter Share on Test Patagonia's raptors for rodenticidesMiguel D. Saggese, Pablo Plaza, Laura Casalins, Gala Ortiz, and Valeria Ojeda [email protected]Science1 Sep 2022Vol 377, Issue 6610p. 1054DOI: 10.1126/science.ade2357 PREVIOUS ARTICLEReadings for a season of reflectionPreviousNEXT ARTICLEDenmark passes total ban of leaded ammunitionNext References and NotesBarn owls (Tyto alba …

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