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Nyheder2022september09

Elon Musk Slams Fusion, Says Future of Energy Is Wind and Solar
Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk isn't convinced of the long-term prospects of fusion energy, the long-deferred dream of fusing atoms together under extreme conditions as a way to generate green electricity. As cool as that sounds, though, the richest man in the world is put off by the logistics and cost. "Fusion would be expensive energy, given difficulty of obtaining and transporting source fuel,
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First discovery of microplastics from water trapped on plant leaves
Although they have not been around for long, microplastics have found their way to almost every ecosystem on the planet. They have been discovered in the soil, in rivers, in our food and bottled water, and even in the human body. Recently, a team of researchers found, for the first time, microplastics in water trapped in plant leaf axils.
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LATEST

This "Can Crusher" Might Be the Weirdest SpaceX Flex We've Ever Seen
Crushed For a company whose whole job is badass rocketry, SpaceX sure does flex — as new footage of one of its ground-based monstrosities, known as the "Can Crusher," demonstrates yet again. In a video posted to Twitter, NASASpaceFlight managing editor Chris Bergin showed SpaceX's "Can Crusher" testing apparatus, a brutally colossal gadget designed to test rockets by squeezing them with incredibl
16min
Study: Students Are Very Good at Outsmarting Anti-Cheating Software
Cheat Day Proctorio — which admittedly sounds more like a Marvel villain than a computer program — is an expensive anti-cheating software that took off like wildfire during the pandemic. Kids were stuck at home for school, and teachers needed a way to hold them accountable during exams. But as spotted by Vice , a recent study shows that kids are actually pretty deft at getting around the program'
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Chemists reveal first pathway for selenium insertion into natural products
Researchers reveal a novel and widespread pathway for selenium insertion that involves two unusual selenium-carbon forming enzymes. The authors named them selenosugar synthase (SenB) and selenoneine synthase (SenA). Their work expands the known boundaries of selenium metabolism, previously thought to be confined to selenoprotein and selenonucleic acid biopolymers, which consist of primary metaboli
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Five new embryos created after 10th oocyte collection in northern white rhinoceroses
Three years after starting its ambitious program to save the northern white rhino from extinction through advanced assisted reproduction technologies, the BioRescue consortium draws a positive interim conclusion: Following the 10th event of harvesting immature egg cells (oocytes) in the northern white rhino female Fatu, the international team produced five additional embryos — bringing the total
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Front-loading calories early in the day reduces hunger but does not affect weight loss
There's the old saying in dieting that one must 'breakfast like a king, lunch like a prince, and dine like a pauper,' based on the belief that consuming the bulk of daily calories in the morning optimizes weight loss by burning calories more efficiently and quickly. But according to a new study, whether a person eats their largest meal early or late in the day does not affect the way their body me
22min
Chemists reveal first pathway for selenium insertion into natural products
Researchers reveal a novel and widespread pathway for selenium insertion that involves two unusual selenium-carbon forming enzymes. The authors named them selenosugar synthase (SenB) and selenoneine synthase (SenA). Their work expands the known boundaries of selenium metabolism, previously thought to be confined to selenoprotein and selenonucleic acid biopolymers, which consist of primary metaboli
22min
Stone age surgery: Earliest evidence of amputation found
Researchers have uncovered the oldest case of surgical amputation to date in Borneo. The find presents a remarkable feat in human prehistory. The discovery describes the skeletal remains of a young adult found in a cave in Borneo, who had part of the left lower leg and left foot amputated, probably as a child, at least 31,000 years ago. The person survived the surgical procedure, living for at lea
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DART sets sights on asteroid target
NASA's Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) spacecraft recently got its first look at Didymos, the double-asteroid system that includes its target, Dimorphos. On Sept. 26, DART will intentionally crash into Dimorphos, the asteroid moonlet of Didymos. While the asteroid poses no threat to Earth, this is the world's first test of the kinetic impact technique, using a spacecraft to deflect an aste
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The roots of biodiversity: How proteins differ across species
To better understand what drives biological diversity on Earth, scientists have historically looked at genetic differences between species. But this only provides part of the picture. The traits of a particular species are not merely the result of its genes but also the proteins those genes code for. Understanding the differences between species' proteomes—or all of the proteins that can be expres
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Why are we mourning the Queen when we didn't (really) know her? | Sarah Wayland
She may not have been part of our immediate family but many of us feel that, during her 70-year reign, we have 'grown up' with her Get our free news app , morning email briefing or daily news podcast The death of Queen Elizabeth II has prompted public displays of grief around the world – from public gatherings at Buckingham Palace in London, and condolences from world leaders, to individuals refl
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The roots of biodiversity: How proteins differ across species
To better understand what drives biological diversity on Earth, scientists have historically looked at genetic differences between species. But this only provides part of the picture. The traits of a particular species are not merely the result of its genes but also the proteins those genes code for. Understanding the differences between species' proteomes—or all of the proteins that can be expres
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The neuroconnectionist research programme
After joint work and endless discussions over the past year(s), we here present our thoughts on how neuro-inspired ANNs can aid brain science – a research programme we refer to as neuroconnectionism. In this preprint, we describe the newly emerging research landscape, the underlying logic of the approach, the tools employed, and clarify common misconceptions by grounding the research programme in
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Britain Is a Performance. The Queen Was Its Star.
There's an episode of—please bear with me here—the children's animated television series Peppa Pig in which Peppa, the fearless porcine queen of toddler hearts everywhere, meets another queen, one who lives in a palace and wears a crown, and might be, one of Peppa's friends suggests, "the boss of all the world." At first encounter, this queen sits on a throne, knitting; she speaks in clipped, com
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Making and breaking of chemical bonds in single nanoconfined molecules | Science Advances
Abstract Nanoconfinement of catalytically active molecules is a powerful strategy to control their chemical activity; however, the atomic-scale mechanisms are challenging to identify. In the present study, the site-specific reactivity of a model rhenium catalyst is studied on the subnanometer scale for complexes confined within quasi–one-dimensional molecular chains on the Ag(001) surface by scan
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Nanotoxoid vaccination protects against opportunistic bacterial infections arising from immunodeficiency | Science Advances
Abstract The rise in nosocomial infections caused by multidrug-resistant pathogens is a major public health concern. Patients taking immunosuppressants or chemotherapeutics are naturally more susceptible to infections. Thus, strategies for protecting immunodeficient individuals from infections are of great importance. Here, we investigate the effectiveness of a biomimetic nanotoxoid vaccine in de
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Pathogen effector AvrSr35 triggers Sr35 resistosome assembly via a direct recognition mechanism | Science Advances
Abstract Nucleotide-binding, leucine-rich repeat receptors (NLRs) perceive pathogen effectors to trigger plant immunity. The direct recognition mechanism of pathogen effectors by coiled-coil NLRs (CNLs) remains unclear. We demonstrate that the Triticum monococcum CNL Sr35 directly recognizes the pathogen effector AvrSr35 from Puccinia graminis f. sp . tritici and report a cryo–electron microscopy
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Polarization vision mitigates visual noise from flickering light underwater | Science Advances
Abstract In shallow water, downwelling light is refracted from surface waves onto the substrate creating bands of light that fluctuate in both time and space, known as caustics. This dynamic illumination can be a visual hindrance for animals in shallow underwater environments. Animals in such habitats may have evolved to use polarization vision for discriminating objects while ignoring the variat
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Evolving symbolic density functionals | Science Advances
Abstract Systematic development of accurate density functionals has been a decades-long challenge for scientists. Despite emerging applications of machine learning (ML) in approximating functionals, the resulting ML functionals usually contain more than tens of thousands of parameters, leading to a huge gap in the formulation with the conventional human-designed symbolic functionals. We propose a
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Super-resolution wearable electrotactile rendering system | Science Advances
Abstract The human somatosensory system is capable of extracting features with millimeter-scale spatial resolution and submillisecond temporal precision. Current technologies that can render tactile stimuli with such high definition are neither portable nor easily accessible. Here, we present a wearable electrotactile rendering system that elicits tactile stimuli with both high spatial resolution
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Transient RNA structures cause aberrant influenza virus replication and innate immune activation | Science Advances
Abstract During infection, the influenza A virus RNA polymerase produces both full-length and aberrant RNA molecules, such as defective viral genomes (DVGs) and mini viral RNAs (mvRNAs). Subsequent innate immune activation involves the binding of host pathogen receptor retinoic acid–inducible gene I (RIG-I) to viral RNAs. However, it is not clear what factors determine which influenza A virus RNA
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Design metastability in high-entropy alloys by tailoring unstable fault energies | Science Advances
Abstract Metastable alloys with transformation-/twinning-induced plasticity (TRIP/TWIP) can overcome the strength-ductility trade-off in structural materials. Originated from the development of traditional alloys, the intrinsic stacking fault energy (ISFE) has been applied to tailor TRIP/TWIP in high-entropy alloys (HEAs) but with limited quantitative success. Here, we demonstrate a strategy for
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Molecular beam homoepitaxy of N-polar AlN: Enabling role of aluminum-assisted surface cleaning | Science Advances
Abstract N-polar aluminum nitride (AlN) is an important building block for next-generation high-power radio frequency electronics. We report successful homoepitaxial growth of N-polar AlN by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on large-area, cost-effective N-polar AlN templates. Direct growth without any in situ surface cleaning leads to films with inverted Al polarity. It is found that Al-assisted clea
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The core PCP protein Prickle2 regulates axon number and AIS maturation by binding to AnkG and modulating microtubule bundling | Science Advances
Abstract Core planar cell polarity (PCP) genes, which are involved in various neurodevelopmental disorders such as neural tube closure, epilepsy, and autism spectrum disorder, have poorly defined molecular signatures in neurons, mostly synapse-centric. Here, we show that the core PCP protein Prickle-like protein 2 (Prickle2) controls neuronal polarity and is a previously unidentified member of th
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Fast acquisition of propagating waves in humans with low-field MRI: Toward accessible MR elastography | Science Advances
Abstract Most commonly used at clinical magnetic fields (1.5 to 3 T), magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) captures mechanical wave propagation to reconstruct the mechanical properties of soft tissue with MRI. However, in terms of noninvasively assessing disease progression in a broad range of organs (e.g., liver, breast, skeletal muscle, and brain), its accessibility is limited and its robustne
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Reduced plate motion controlled timing of Early Jurassic Karoo-Ferrar large igneous province volcanism | Science Advances
Abstract Past large igneous province (LIP) emplacement is commonly associated with mantle plume upwelling and led to major carbon emissions. One of Earth's largest past environmental perturbations, the Toarcian oceanic anoxic event (T-OAE; ~183 Ma), has been linked to Karoo-Ferrar LIP emplacement. However, the role of mantle plumes in controlling the onset and timing of LIP magmatism is poorly un
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Arabidopsis TIE1 and TIE2 transcriptional repressors dampen cytokinin response during root development | Science Advances
Abstract Cytokinin plays critical roles in root development. Cytokinin signaling depends on activation of key transcription factors known as type B Arabidopsis response regulators (ARRs). However, the mechanisms underlying the finely tuned regulation of type B ARR activity remain unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that the ERF-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif–containing protein T
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Heat selection enables highly scalable methylome profiling in cell-free DNA for noninvasive monitoring of cancer patients | Science Advances
Abstract Genome-wide analysis of cell-free DNA methylation profile is a promising approach for sensitive and specific detection of many cancers. However, scaling such assays for clinical translation is impractical because of the high cost of whole-genome bisulfite sequencing. We show that the small fraction of GC-rich genome is highly enriched in CpG sites and disproportionately harbors most of t
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Natural corrosion-induced gold nanoparticles yield purple color of Alhambra palaces decoration | Science Advances
Abstract Despite its fame as a chemically inert noble metal, gold (alloys) may suffer degradation under specific scenarios. Here, we show evidence of electrochemically corroded gilded tin plasterwork in the Alhambra (Granada, Spain) driving spontaneously made gold nanospheres with the optimal size (ca. 70 nm) to impart purple color at the surface. Purple gold on damaged artworks is found sparsely
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Proteotype coevolution and quantitative diversity across 11 mammalian species | Science Advances
Abstract Evolutionary profiling has been largely limited to the nucleotide level. Using consistent proteomic methods, we quantified proteomic and phosphoproteomic layers in fibroblasts from 11 common mammalian species, with transcriptomes as reference. Covariation analysis indicates that transcript and protein expression levels and variabilities across mammals remarkably follow functional role, w
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Inhibition of the Niemann-Pick C1 protein is a conserved feature of multiple strains of pathogenic mycobacteria
Nature Communications, Published online: 09 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-32553-0 Lipids shed by pathogenic mycobacteria have been shown to inhibit NPC1, a lysosomal membrane protein deficient in most cases of a rate inherited lysosomal storage disorder Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC). Here, authors utilise lipid extracts from clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains, and non-tuberc
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Fire in the sky: on the trail of space rocks with New Zealand's meteorite hunters
Weeks after installing a network of meteor-detecting cameras, the members of Fireballs Aotearoa were granted their dearest wish: a rock that fell to Earth It looks like a scene from a crime show as a search party in hi-vis jackets walks in formation, heads down, searching the brush for clues. But this group is not looking for evidence of a crime, they are after something harder to find: celestial
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Uber Eats to Begin Delivering Food with Autonomous Vehicles
Autonomous vehicles have been getting smarter and safer, but can they replace human drivers? We're about to find out with a new partnership between Uber and a robotic vehicle startup called Nuro. The two have signed a 10-year deal to have Nuro's robotic vehicles delivering Uber Eats orders, and it might save you some cash if you're lucky enough to have a robot deliver dinner. Nuro was founded in
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New Government Report Is Extremely Bad News for NASA
The United States Government Accountability Office (GAO) has never beat around the bush when it comes to NASA's planned Artemis missions to the Moon. Now, in a new report , the GAO criticized the space agency for not doing its homework. "NASA is using existing schedule management guidance developed for individual programs, not multi-program missions," the latest report reads. "Without guidance sp
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Longer, hotter and more frequent heat waves in cities
Hot days followed by sweltering nights without any temperature relief in between might become a new norm towards the end of the 21st century. Researchers have analyzed the frequency, intensity and length of such extreme events for five Swiss cities. Lugano and Geneva would be most affected.
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Newly identified genes may help protect crops against flooding, researchers say
Flooding is a global risk, according to the World Bank, with the lives and property of billions of people threatened. Even more people are at risk of starvation as a knock-on effect of floods: the waters can drown crops. Now, researchers are getting closer to identifying the molecular processes underlying how floods deprive plants of oxygen — and how to engineer hardier crops.
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Circalunar clocks: Using the right light
How animals are able to interpret natural light sources to adjust their physiology and behavior is poorly understood. Researchers have now revealed that a molecule called L-cryptochrome (L-Cry) has the biochemical properties to discriminate between different moon phases, as well as between sun- and moonlight. Their findings show that L-Cry can interpret moonlight to entrain the monthly (circalunar
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Climate change is affecting drinking water quality
The water stored in reservoirs ensures our supply of drinking water. Good water quality is therefore important — but is at significant risk due to climate change. In a model study of the Rappbode reservoir in the Harz region, a research team demonstrated how the climate-related disappearance of forests in the catchment area for Germany's largest drinking water reservoir can affect water quality.
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Tumors: Not just a backup — the dual specificity of UBA6
Researchers have unveiled the crystal structures of UBA6 in complex with either ATP or the ubiquitin-like protein FAT10. These results provide the foundation to study the individual roles of UBA6 towards the attachment of either ubiquitin or FAT10 to target proteins and the downstream cellular pathways with possible implications for the etiology of certain tumors.
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Frank Drake Has Passed Away, but His Equation for Alien Intelligence Is More Important Than Ever
How many intelligent civilizations should there be in our galaxy right now? In 1961, the US astrophysicist Frank Drake, who passed away on September 2 at the age of 92, came up with an equation to estimate this . The Drake equation, dating from a stage in his career when he was "too naive to be nervous" (as he later put it), has become famous and bears his name. This places Drake in the company o
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Are Annual COVID Shots a Good Idea?
School is in session, pumpkin spice is in season, and Americans are heading to pharmacies for what may soon become another autumn standby: your annual COVID shot. On Tuesday, the White House announced the start of a "new phase" of the pandemic response, one in which "most Americans" will receive a COVID-19 vaccine just "once a year, each fall." In other words, your pandemic booster is about to be
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Welcome to Saturday Night in America
Photographs by Ash Adams, Nabil Harb, Timothy Ivy, Sylvia Jarrus, Stacy Kranitz, Chris Perez, Adali Schell, and Anne Vetter Each day demands its own body language, and Saturday night, I think, is best expressed through outstretched arms. This is the posture of revelers reaching for drinks across the bar or for friends across the dance floor. That body language—loose-limbed, open, seeking—is not l
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Man Loses Control of Hydrogen Balloon, Helplessly Drifts Almost 200 Miles
Puff Up A hydrogen balloon expedition turned dangerous in China when the passenger lost control, leading too a two-day, nearly 200-mile detour. As CNN reports , based on Chinese media, the man was on a work trip to harvest pine nuts near the country's coast last weekend when he and a colleague lost control of the hydrogen balloon. Though his colleague was able to jump to safety, the man reportedl
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Risk factors for heart disease and stroke largely similar in men and women globally
Women and men share most of the same risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD), a large international study has found — the first such study to include people not only from high income countries, but also from low- and middle-income countries where the burden of CVD is the greatest. The global study assessed risk factors, including metabolic (such as high blood pressure, obesity and diabetes)
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Astronomy: Is over-eating to blame for bulges in Milky Way bar?
A new simulation conducted on the world's most powerful supercomputer dedicated to astronomy has produced a testable scenario to explain the appearance of the bar of the Milky Way. Comparing this scenario to data from current and future space telescopes will help clarify the evolution of our home Galaxy.
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A little strain goes a long way in reducing fuel cell performance
Researchers report that strain caused by just a 2% reduction in the distance between atoms when deposited on a surface leads to a whopping 99.999% decrease in the speed at which the materials conduct hydrogen ions, greatly reducing the performance of solid oxide fuel cells. Developing methods to reduce this strain will help bring high-performance fuel cells for clean energy production to a wider n
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Exploring an ancestral Maya neighborhood
We stand in the open fields of Spanish Lookout, a modernized Mennonite farming community in Central Belize, looking at what remains of ancestral Maya homes. White mounds, the remnants of these houses, pock the landscape as far as the eye can see, a stark reminder of what existed more than 1,000 years ago. The collapsed buildings look like smudges on an aerial photograph, but as archaeologists, we
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Preparing the MTG-I1 weather satellite for launch
Before Europe's first Meteosat Third Generation Imager leaves the south of France at the end of the month aboard a ship bound for French Guiana, this remarkable new weather satellite has been taking center stage at Thales Alenia Space's facilities in Cannes.
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Innovative liquid-lithium charge stripper boosts accelerator performance
The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) accelerates heavy-ion beams at beam power up to 400 kilowatts into a target to create rare isotopes for scientific research. A charge stripper plays an essential role in this process. It strips additional electrons from the charged-particle beam to accelerate it more efficiently.
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New guidance published on how to best support qualitative researchers
New guidance—devised by a group of twelve researchers from various disciplines and institutions—is published today in the International Journal of Qualitative Methods. It provides diverse experiences from the co-authors about their research into sensitive, challenging, and difficult areas, and suggests practical principles to overcome issues to ensure the highest safety and well-being of qualitati
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A little strain goes a long way in reducing fuel cell performance
Researchers report that strain caused by just a 2% reduction in the distance between atoms when deposited on a surface leads to a whopping 99.999% decrease in the speed at which the materials conduct hydrogen ions, greatly reducing the performance of solid oxide fuel cells. Developing methods to reduce this strain will help bring high-performance fuel cells for clean energy production to a wider n
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Scientists Just Made Hydrogen Fuel With Nothing But Air and Solar Power
Hydrogen is likely to play a crucial role in our efforts to wean ourselves off fossil fuels, but making it in an environmentally friendly way requires huge amounts of water. Now researchers have developed a new technique that makes hydrogen fuel out of thin air in even the driest climates. While renewable energy and battery technology are making big strides in decarbonizing large parts of the pow
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Climate change is affecting drinking water quality
Heat waves, drought, floods, forest fires—the consequences of climate change are increasing and are changing our environment. A prime example is the countryside in the catchment area for the Rappbode reservoir in the eastern Harz region. This is the largest drinking water reservoir in Germany and provides drinking water for roughly 1 million people.
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Numerical modeling for predicting the degradation of historical oil paintings
A large number of historical oil paintings from museum collections worldwide show signs of deterioration due to metal soap formation. Metal soaps affect the structural integrity and visual appearance of these paintings. Understanding the influence of metal soap formation on the mechanical response of the paintings can help with the long-term conservation and preservation of these valuable works of
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Roblox's avatars are about to get more expressive
Roblox users will soon be able to give their avatars facial expressions that mimic the player's own, the platform announced today. The update, announced today at the Roblox Developer Conference, will be available only to select creators on the platform for now, but is expected to be widely available to all Roblox users by early 2023. Roblox, an online game platform on which people can either play
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Anti-correlated plasma and THz pulse generation during two-color laser filamentation in air
The strong terahertz (THz) waves generated by femtosecond laser pulse induced gas plasma have drawn extensive attention owing to the ultra-wide spectral bandwidth, the high electric field strength, and no material damage threshold. However, the abundant and multi-dimensional cross-scale light-matter interactions during filamentation intertwine, interact and restrict mutually, which not only puts t
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What's the best way to combine sports and school?
Some youth go all in to excel at a sport. But having a backup plan is a smart move. One day your athletic career will probably end, no matter how good you are. You'll have done yourself a favor by acquiring an education as well.
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Everyone can participate in building the metaverse | Sutu
The promise of the metaverse extends far beyond digital spaces — it can transform and enrich how we experience the material world, too. From video games that bring communities together to digital art that collides with physical spaces, augmented reality designer Sutu shares some of the incredible creativity that's sparked by AR metaverse technology and invites us all to participate in building it
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Targeted immunotherapy against distinct cancer-associated fibroblasts overcomes treatment resistance in refractory HER2+ breast tumors
Nature Communications, Published online: 09 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-32782-3 A substantial proportion of HER2+ breast cancer patients do not benefit from HER2-targeted therapy. Here, the authors identify a population of cancer-associated fibroblasts involved in the suppression of trastuzumab-induced ADCC that can be pharmacologically targeted to raise treatment effectiveness in unre
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Topographic design in wearable MXene sensors with in-sensor machine learning for full-body avatar reconstruction
Nature Communications, Published online: 09 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-33021-5 Wearable sensors with edge computing are desired for human motion monitoring. Here, the authors demonstrate a topographic design for wearable MXene sensor modules with wireless streaming or in-sensor computing models for avatar reconstruction.
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The origins of donkey domestication
The donkey has shaped the history of humankind, both as a source of power for farm work, and of transportation in sometimes hard to reach areas. To understand the origins of it domestication, scientists built and analyzed the most complete panel of genomes ever studied for this animal. The researchers reveal that the donkey was first domesticated in Africa in 5,000 B.C.E.
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Sex-determination mechanisms in birds
Scientists have known that sex-determination in vertebrates happens in the germ cells, a body's reproductive cells, and the somatic cells, the cells that are not reproductive cells. Yet they have not fully understood the mechanisms by which it happens. To better grasp the process of the germ cell's sex determination, a research team has analyzed germ cells in chickens using RNA-sequencing to predi
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Scientists Discover Nearby "Super-Earth" That May Support Life
Super-Earth Me Scientists have discovered two nearby planets — in the grand scheme of things, at least — that are like Earth but bigger. And one of them, in major SETI news, may be able to sustain life. In a press release , a Belgian-led team of international scientists announced that they'd found two "Super-Earth" planets, which are larger than Earth but smaller than icy giants like Neptune and
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SpaceX Tested Starship's Engines and Accidentally Caused a Large Fire
SpaceX is still hard at work trying to get its first orbital flight-ready Starship prototype ready for their big day. While much bigger news stole the limelight from the company's testing — Queen Elizabeth II's death proved to be quite the distraction — SpaceX engineers at the company's testing facilities near Boca Chica, Texas pulled off a series of successful static fire tests of the experiment
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Best Privacy Screen Protectors of 2022
Today, most, if not all, of our vital personal information is digitally stored across an increasing number of devices, and as a result, privacy screen protection is of utmost importance. Technological and storage improvements in all types of devices, from laptops to wearables, have resulted in unprecedented access to a variety of sensitive, personal and professional information. While there have
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Malaria vaccine booster prolongs protection
Nature, Published online: 09 September 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-02902-6 Vaccine candidate provides two years of protection in young children when boosted, but larger trials are needed before it can be rolled out.
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How She Did It
It's a crazy system. The symbol of the state, the theoretical supreme executive of the country, is chosen by birth order within a single family. If that system produces an extreme dud, he or she may be maneuvered off the throne, as the late Queen Elizabeth's uncle David—who reigned as Edward VIII—was maneuvered off in 1936. But Edward was recklessly irresponsible and weak-willed. The normal rule
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What the Student-Loan Debate Overlooks
A core conservative critique of President Joe Biden's executive action on student-debt forgiveness is that the plan requires blue-collar Americans to subsidize privileged children idly contemplating gender studies or critical race theory at fancy private colleges. That idea, articulated by Senators Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio , among others, aims to portray the GOP as the party of working Americans
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How Writers Revise the World
Works of fiction don't always appear out of thin air. Sometimes writers draw from older stories—myths, histories, ancient epics—when crafting new ones. One might find in that rewriting an opportunity to recast a celebrated figure as a villain, as in Daisy Lafarge's novel, Paul , which "uses the thoroughly contemporary story of a traumatized graduate on her European gap year to boldly reinterpret
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Fear has negative impact on mitigation behavior toward climate change
In a study published in Climatic Change, researchers from the Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden (XTBG) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences tried to explore how emotions of fear or hope affect curriculum-based climate change education. They designed a curriculum focusing on factual knowledge of climatic change, coupled with a video clip pro for the knowledge lectures intended to instill emotio
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COVID-19 drugs persist in wastewater, may pose risk to aquatic organisms
Certain drugs used to treat COVID-19 patients—including remdesivir, dexamethasone and antibiotics for associated bacterial infections—persist through wastewater treatment and may occur in waterways at levels high enough to negatively affect aquatic organisms, according to a new study led by researchers at Penn State. The findings highlight the broad utility of wastewater surveillance as a tool for
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Wildfire poses greater threat to cannabis than other California crops
Wildfires are an increasing threat to people's lives, property and livelihoods, especially in rural California communities. Cannabis, one of California's newer and more lucrative commercial crops, may be at a higher risk of loss from wildfire because it is mostly confined to being grown in rural areas, according to new research by scientists in the Department of Environmental Science Policy and Ma
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Swapping meat for seafood could improve nutrition and reduce emissions
Sustainable seafood could provide more nutrition to people than beef, pork and chicken, while reducing greenhouse gas emissions, reports an article published online in Communications Earth & Environment. The findings suggest that policies to promote seafood in diets as a substitute for other animal protein could improve future food security and help address climate change.
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Seven points about flooding, infrastructure and climate change
Extreme storms and intense floods have disrupted communities across the country this summer. Death Valley, Yellowstone, eastern Kentucky, St. Louis, Dallas and Denver have all experienced heavy rainfall and flooding, leading to damage, deaths and displacement—and now in Jackson, Mississippi, a major water crisis is affecting hundreds of thousands of people.
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COVID-19 drugs persist in wastewater, may pose risk to aquatic organisms
Certain drugs used to treat COVID-19 patients—including remdesivir, dexamethasone and antibiotics for associated bacterial infections—persist through wastewater treatment and may occur in waterways at levels high enough to negatively affect aquatic organisms, according to a new study led by researchers at Penn State. The findings highlight the broad utility of wastewater surveillance as a tool for
4h
Wildfire poses greater threat to cannabis than other California crops
Wildfires are an increasing threat to people's lives, property and livelihoods, especially in rural California communities. Cannabis, one of California's newer and more lucrative commercial crops, may be at a higher risk of loss from wildfire because it is mostly confined to being grown in rural areas, according to new research by scientists in the Department of Environmental Science Policy and Ma
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Ammonia: 'A trump card for the energy transition process'
During his internship as a Chemical Technology student at Danish company Haldor Topsøe, UT Ph.D. researcher Kevin Rouwenhorst realized the many opportunities offered by ammonia. At the moment, it is principally used to manufacture artificial fertilizer and therefore has a bad name. But ammonia is also one of seven chemicals that form the basis of all chemical products, and it helps to feed around
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Astronaut Says He Had Religious Experience During Spacewalk
It's easy to imagine a spacewalk being trippy or even jaw-droppingly frightening, but for one American astronaut it was nothing short of religious. In an interview with Kingsport, Tennessee's Times-News paper , astronaut Barry "Butch" Wilmore described a spiritual experience he felt while fixing an issue on the outside of the International Space Station during his third trip up in 2014. Wilmore w
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Walking robots could aid research on other planets
Today NASA uses wheeled rovers to navigate the surface of Mars and conduct planetary science, but research involving Texas A&M University scientists will test the feasibility of new surface-exploration technology: walking robots.
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Why plants worldwide became woody
Why do some plants grow into large woody shrubs or colossal trees, while others remain small and never produce wood in their stems? It's an evolutionary puzzle that baffled Charles Darwin more than 160 year ago. Now, scientists from the Netherlands and Germany present the first global overview of woodiness evolution on islands, which will finally help solve the puzzle.
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3D nanoprinting using semiconductor quantum dots to create optoelectrical materials
A team of researchers from Tsinghua University, working with a colleague from Jilin University, has developed a new 3D nanoprinting technique that uses semiconducting quantum dots. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their new technique and provides examples of resulting 3D objects. Jia-Ahn Pan and Dmitri Talapin with the University of Chicago provide a Perspective
5h
Team investigates sex-determination mechanisms in birds
Scientists have known that sex-determination in vertebrates happens in the germ cells, a body's reproductive cells, and the somatic cells, the cells that are not reproductive cells. Yet they have not fully understood the mechanisms by which it happens. To better grasp the process of the germ cell's sex determination, a research team has analyzed germ cells in chickens using RNA-sequencing to predi
6h
Optofluidic force induction allows for real-time nanoparticle characterization
A team of researchers at Brave Analytics GmbH, working with a colleague from the Gottfried Schatz Research Center and another from the Institute of Physics, all in Austria, has developed a device that is capable of conducting real-time nanoparticle characterization. The group published their work in the journal Physical Review Applied.
6h
The long and short of a supergene for efficient pollination
Scientists have solved the century-old mystery of a supergene that causes efficient cross-pollination in flowers. The results show that sequence length variation at the DNA level is important for the evolution of two forms of flowers that differ in the length of their sexual organs. The study is published today in Current Biology.
6h
Machine learning model can evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies for wildfire prevention
Wildfires are a growing threat in a world shaped by climate change. Now, researchers at Aalto University have developed a neural network model that can accurately predict the occurrence of fires in peatlands. They used the new model to assess the effect of different strategies for managing fire risk and identified a suite of interventions that would reduce fire incidence by 50–76%.
6h
Team investigates sex-determination mechanisms in birds
Scientists have known that sex-determination in vertebrates happens in the germ cells, a body's reproductive cells, and the somatic cells, the cells that are not reproductive cells. Yet they have not fully understood the mechanisms by which it happens. To better grasp the process of the germ cell's sex determination, a research team has analyzed germ cells in chickens using RNA-sequencing to predi
6h
Former NASA Scientist Slams Kamala Harris Meeting as "Photo Op"
Space Cancelled A former NASA scientist-turned-vocal critic of the space agency is once again throwing shade on his erstwhile employer — this time for creating a council whose sole purpose, he suggests, is to provide "photo ops." That former NASA employee, Keith Cowing, noted in a recent NASA Watch post that the White House's notice about White House National Space Council (NSC), set to take plac
6h
The Summer Bay Has No Steering! | Deadliest Catch
Stream Deadliest Catch on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/deadliest-catch #DeadliestCatch #Discovery #DiscoveryPlus Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Disco
6h
NASA's AIRS instrument records Typhoon Hinnamnor before landfall
NASA's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument aboard the Aqua satellite captured imagery of Typhoon Hinnamnor in the West Pacific Ocean just before 2 p.m. local time on Sept. 5. Typhoon Hinnamnor was one of the strongest in South Korea's recorded history, dropping some 40 inches (102 centimeters) of rain and unleashing record winds.
6h
Light-sensitive molecule helps marine animals synchronize their reproductive cycle
How animals are able to interpret natural light sources to adjust their physiology and behavior is poorly understood. The labs of Kristin Tessmar-Raible (Max Perutz Labs Vienna, Alfred Wegener Institut, University of Oldenburg) and Eva Wolf (Johannes Gutenberg University and Institute of Molecular Biology Mainz) have now revealed that a molecule called L-cryptochrome (L-Cry) has the biochemical pr
6h
A quantum network of entangled atomic clocks
For the first time, scientists at the University of Oxford have been able to demonstrate a network of two entangled optical atomic clocks and show how the entanglement between the remote clocks can be used to improve their measurement precision, according to research published this week by Nature.
6h
Intel Confirms Raptor Lake Launch to Include 6 CPUs
Intel is on the cusp of launching its 13th Generation Raptor Lake CPUs. These chips are an evolution of its Alder Lake architecture, with more efficiency cores, higher clocks, and other mild upgrades—the sort of "tock" refinement of a technology we've seen in previous years. As the company prepares to launch, it's begun training its sales staff with new talking points for Raptor Lake. This obviou
6h
Study gauges Americans' views on military intervention
The United States public prefers when the country works with other military powers, protects civilians, and resolves conflict peacefully, research finds. Songying Fang, an associate professor of political science at Rice University, and Jared Oestman, an assistant professor of political science at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, specifically examined public opinion on military intervention i
6h
Light-sensitive molecule helps marine animals synchronize their reproductive cycle
How animals are able to interpret natural light sources to adjust their physiology and behavior is poorly understood. The labs of Kristin Tessmar-Raible (Max Perutz Labs Vienna, Alfred Wegener Institut, University of Oldenburg) and Eva Wolf (Johannes Gutenberg University and Institute of Molecular Biology Mainz) have now revealed that a molecule called L-cryptochrome (L-Cry) has the biochemical pr
6h
Is climate change disrupting maritime boundaries?
Coral reef islands and their reefs—found across in the Indo-Pacific—naturally grow and shrink due to complex biological and physical processes that have yet to be fully understood. Now, climate change is disrupting them further, leading to new uncertainties for legal maritime zones and small island states.
6h
Physics publisher retracting nearly 500 likely paper mill papers
A physics publisher is retracting 494 papers after an investigation "indicated that some papers may have been created, manipulated, and/or sold by a commercial entity" – aka a paper mill. The vast majority – 463 articles – are from the Journal of Physics: Conference Series, while 21 are from IOP Conference Series: Materials Science & … Continue reading
7h
Cli­mate change threat­ens ice caves in Aus­tria
Eight ice caves in four Austrian federal states: A team of geologists has comprehensively documented the loss and gain of ice in Alpine ice caves over the last 2000 years for the first time. The geologists warn: The ice of smaller caves especially is in danger of disappearing in the near future and with it a valuable climate archive.
7h
Spectroscopy used to look for life on Mars by rovers capable of probing deeper sediments
An international team of researchers has found evidence indicating that despite the hostile environmental conditions on Mars, the equipment used by rovers on its surface should be capable of detecting evidence of life if it ever existed there. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes how they subjected sample materials to Mars-like conditions and then tested th
7h
Where the Hatred Comes From
Updated at 10:36 a.m. ET on September 9, 2022. When I told a few friends that I wanted to write a short piece about the assault on Salman Rushdie, they warned me to be careful—even though, for about 15 years, I have been protected by bodyguards assigned to me by the Turkish government. They are right to be concerned. It has been depressing to see the way the attack has been received with some app
7h
Crypto's Core Values Are Running Headfirst Into Reality
Crypto was taking off, and governments were finally starting to act like it. In 2013, when a young writer and software developer named Vitalik Buterin wrote an impassioned screed defending the blockchain gospel for his publication, Bitcoin Magazine , cryptocurrencies were still a niche curiosity. But a series of regulations was spooking the nascent industry, threatening the sort of anti-governmen
7h
Why do we mourn people we don't know?
The death of Queen Elizabeth II has prompted public displays of grief around the world—from public gatherings at Buckingham Palace in London, and condolences from world leaders, to individuals reflecting on social media about what she meant to them.
7h
Not just a backup—the dual specificity of UBA6
Researchers at the Rudolf Virchow Center of the University of Würzburg have unveiled the crystal structures of UBA6 in complex with either ATP or the ubiquitin-like protein FAT10. These results provide the foundation to study the individual roles of UBA6 towards the attachment of either ubiquitin or FAT10 to target proteins and the downstream cellular pathways with possible implications for the et
7h
Not just a backup—the dual specificity of UBA6
Researchers at the Rudolf Virchow Center of the University of Würzburg have unveiled the crystal structures of UBA6 in complex with either ATP or the ubiquitin-like protein FAT10. These results provide the foundation to study the individual roles of UBA6 towards the attachment of either ubiquitin or FAT10 to target proteins and the downstream cellular pathways with possible implications for the et
7h
People resort to risky ways of keeping homes warm
More than half of all low-income households use coping strategies to reduce their energy bills that could lead to significant physical and financial risks, according to a new study. Those strategies may include accruing debt, forgoing expenses on food, and using space heaters or ovens to warm their home. Published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , the research could have di
7h
How cholesterol encourages a cell to bulk up
Nature, Published online: 09 September 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-02773-x The molecule binds to a cellular protein, setting off a cascade of molecular activity that leads to cell growth.
7h
Unique ferroelectric microstructure revealed for first time
A team of researchers have observed and reported for the first time the unique microstructure of a novel ferroelectric material, enabling the development of lead-free piezoelectric materials for electronics, sensors, and energy storage that are safer for human use. This work was led by the Alem Group at Penn State and in collaboration with research teams at Rutgers University and the University of
7h
Lattice distortion of perovskite quantum dots induces coherent quantum beating
A research group led by Prof. Wu Kaifeng from the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), in collaboration with Dr. Peter C. Sercel from the Center for Hybrid Organic Inorganic Semiconductors for Energy, recently reported the utilization of lattice distortion in lead halide perovskite quantum dots (QDs) to control their exciton fine structure.
7h
A plastic film that can kill viruses using room lights
Researchers at Queen's University Belfast have developed a plastic film that can kill viruses that land on its surface with room light. The self-sterilizing film is the first of its kind—it is low cost to produce, can be readily scaled and could be used for disposable aprons, tablecloths, and curtains in hospitals. It is coated with a thin layer of particles that absorb UV light and produce reacti
7h
A plastic film that can kill viruses using room lights
Researchers at Queen's University Belfast have developed a plastic film that can kill viruses that land on its surface with room light. The self-sterilizing film is the first of its kind—it is low cost to produce, can be readily scaled and could be used for disposable aprons, tablecloths, and curtains in hospitals. It is coated with a thin layer of particles that absorb UV light and produce reacti
8h
Soil temps predict where pest can survive and spread
Soil temperature can effectively monitor and predict the spread of the corn earworm, a pest that ravages corn, cotton, soybeans, peppers, tomatoes, and other vegetable crops, a new study shows. The ability to better monitor the pest and make predictions about where it will appear could help farmers control the pest more effectively, which would reduce the financial and environmental impacts of pe
8h
Unge læger går grædende hjem fra vagt
På flere af landets akutmodtagelser er arbejdspresset især om natten for de yngre hospitalslæger så stort, at det medfører mental mistrivsel og sygemeldinger. I Slagelse har man haft succes med at gøre arbejdsmiljøet mere attraktivt.
8h
A warm intrusion in the Arctic causes extreme pollution levels
During the MOSAiC research expedition, conducted in the Arctic pack ice between 2019 and 2020, EPFL scientists observed an atmospheric perturbation triggered by the intrusion of a highly polluted warm air-mass. A first study providing further insight into the phenomenon and its potential implications has just been published.
8h
Menstrual pad could one day detect HPV
A new study demonstrates the feasibility of using menstrual blood and a new detection pad to screen for human papillomavirus. The hope is that, one day, menstruating people can swap pap smears for a detection system that's more convenient and just as accurate. That could mean more time for patients to have meaningful conversations with their physicians and, possibly a reduction in the stigma arou
8h
Dust-length pipes could deliver drugs without leaks
Researchers have engineered a way to ensure microscopic pipes only a millionth as wide as a single strand of human hair are safe from the tiniest of leaks. Leak-free piping, made with nanotubes that self-assemble, self-repair, and can connect themselves to different biostructures, is a significant step toward creating a nanotube network that one day might deliver specialized drugs, proteins, and
8h
Daily briefing: 'Scientists should consider civil disobedience'
Nature, Published online: 08 September 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-02901-7 Six researchers argue that it is justified to participate in civil disobedience to press for urgent climate action. Plus, evidence of the first-known surgical limb removal and Chilean researchers respond to the rejection of a draft constitution.
8h
This Week in Space: Crickets, Cosmic Spiders, and Sass About the SLS
Image: NASA/Joel Kowsky Good morning, everyone, and welcome to This Week in Space. Normally we've got a diverse set of space news and rocket launches to discuss. But since the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket's inaugural launch was scrubbed twice last week, it's like everyone at NASA is running around with their hair on fire. They've been mum since Saturday, and in the silence, you can practicall
8h
The Download: conservative book bans, and restricting crypto
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. How conservative Facebook groups are changing what books children read in school Conservative Facebook groups that rate and review children's books are being used as a way to campaign for restricting certain books in school libraries—or getting them removed al
8h
A Nearby Super-Earth May Be Suitable for Life
The number of planets in just our galaxy is unfathomably large, but so far, scientists have only confirmed about 5,000 of them. Even this small fraction of the total has revealed intriguing worlds, some of which might even support life. You can add two more to the list today. An international team of astronomers, led by astrophysicist Laetitia Delrez from the University of Liège, has confirmed tw
8h
Neanderthal Brains
Neanderthals (Homo neanderthalensis) is the closest evolutionary cousin to modern humans (Homo sapiens). In fact they are so close there has been some debate about whether or not they are truly a separate species from humans or if they are a subspecies (Homo sapiens neanderthalensis), but it seems the consensus has moved toward the former recently. They are not our ancestors – humans did not evol
8h
Infektion under graviditet ingen ökad risk för autism
Infektioner hos gravida har kopplats till ökad risk för neuropsykiatriska tillstånd, som autism, hos barnet senare i livet. Men det verkar inte vara infektionerna i sig som orsakar autism, visar ny forskning. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
8h
1.8m-year-old tooth of early human found on dig in Georgia
Student's find provides new evidence region may be one of first places early humans settled outside Africa Archaeologists in Georgia have found a 1.8m-year-old tooth belonging to an early species of human that they say cements the region as the home of one of the earliest prehistoric human settlements in Europe, and possibly anywhere outside Africa. The tooth was discovered near the village of Or
9h
What is DOMS?
Wondering what is DOMS? We're getting to the bottom of what this exercise-induced condition is and how you can avoid it
9h
Zero COVID Has Outlived Its Usefulness. Here's Why China Is Still Enforcing It.
The world has moved on from the coronavirus pandemic—except for China. Chinese leaders continue to lock down some of the country's largest cities, spend millions of dollars on testing, and hunt down individual case after individual case. Nothing—neither a sinking economy nor the availability of vaccines and improved treatments nor the country's growing isolation—has persuaded the leadership to ch
9h
The Problem With Kindergarten
When Ojeya Cruz Banks moved to Ohio from New Zealand several years ago, she was overwhelmed by the logistics of uprooting her life. But Cruz Banks, a Denison University professor and a single mom, who is also my neighbor and friend, was relieved to find a house next to a public elementary school. She assumed that she would be able to walk to pick up her daughter—a needed convenience given that sh
9h
Your Career Is Just One-Eighth of Your Life
Sign up for Derek's newsletter here . Career advice as a genre is almost fatally flawed. With 160 million American workers across thousands of occupations in hundreds of industries, saying anything that is of use to all of them is practically impossible. The most common counsel is almost always too personal to be broadly applicable. My toes curl with embarrassment when successful people say anyth
10h
Ian McEwan's Anti-Memoir
I an McEwan , slumped on a comfortable couch in the large formal sitting room of his Cotswolds manor house, dazzling early-summer sun filtering through the tall, narrow windows, tells me he has been suffering from a protracted bout of pessimism. "I got totally obsessed with Russia invading Ukraine," he says, an unfamiliar note of pain in his voice. "From February onwards, it filled my thoughts. M
10h
A new x-ray technique for detecting explosives could also identify tumors
A new x-ray technique that works alongside a deep-learning algorithm to detect explosives in luggage could eventually catch potentially deadly tumors in humans. Concealing explosives inside electronics and other objects can make it difficult to detect them using conventional x-ray techniques. But the new method was able to detect explosives with 100% accuracy under test conditions, according to r
10h
Exclusive: NIH researcher resigned amid retractions, including Nature paper
A tenure-track investigator at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), a division of the National Institutes of Health, resigned in March, as questions mounted about her work, Retraction Watch has learned. Jennifer Martinez has retracted at least two papers, including a 2016 Nature paper with the chair of the immunology department at St. … Continue reading
11h
How conservative Facebook groups are changing what books children read in school
Conservative Facebook groups that rate and review children's books are being used as a way to campaign for restricting certain books in school libraries or removing them altogether. It's the latest development in a debate tearing up the US in recent weeks as schools open for the new year. In October 2021, Matt Krause, a Republican member of the Texas state legislature, created a spreadsheet of bo
12h
Hospitalers 72-timers behandlingsansvar har fået blandet modtagelse
Siden 1. februar har kommunale sygeplejersker i Region Hovedstaden haft en direkte linje til den hospitalsafdeling, der har udskrevet patienten til de kommunale døgnpladser. Det har skabt større tryghed i Ballerup Kommune, hvor afstanden til lægen tidligere virkede lang, men muligheden har også skabt mere travlhed på hospitalsgangene.
12h
Vad händer i leden vid artros?
När artros drabbar en led påverkas hela leden, det vill säga brosk, ledhinna, ledkapsel, ledvätska, menisk, ligament, muskler och skelett. Exakt i vilken ordning leden påverkas är inte fastställd och kan säkert variera, men det huvudsakliga tecknet på sjukdomen är att ledbrosket tunnas ut och blir ojämnt, vilket ytterligare försämrar ledens funktion.
12h
Book Excerpt: Rituals and the Search for Order
Research suggests that we spontaneously engage in ritualized behaviors when we face stressful and uncertain situations, and we intuitively expect those ritualized actions to have an effect. But if this sense of control is illusory, what could possibly be the benefit?
13h
Researchers suggest novel way to generate a light source made from entangled photons
Entanglement is a strange phenomenon in quantum physics where two particles are inherently connected to each other no matter the distance between them. When one is measured, the other measurement is instantly a given. Researchers from Purdue University have proposed a novel, unconventional approach to generate a special light source made up of entangled photons. On Sept. 6, 2022, they published th
13h
September full moon 2022: how to take a good photograph of the harvest moon on your phone or camera
Guardian Australia picture editor Carly Earl explains the dos and don'ts of photographing the moon Get our free news app , morning email briefing or daily news podcast With the September 2022 full moon rising, many people will pull out their mobile phones to try and get an Instagram-worthy photograph, but unfortunately the moon is really challenging to get a great photo of. Two reasons: it is ver
14h
Reasons to avoid false balance and fake debates
The following text is an adapted version of pages 8 and 9 of The Consensus Handbook published in 2018 by John Cook, Sander van der Linden, Ed Maibach and Stephan Lewandowsky. The excerpt is published to make it easy to share this important information about false balance and fake debates and why both should be avoided when it comes to scientific topics where an expert consensus has already been e
14h
CtIP-dependent nascent RNA expression flanking DNA breaks guides the choice of DNA repair pathway
Nature Communications, Published online: 09 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-33027-z RNA has been implicated in DNA repair. This work shows that the interplay of RNAPII-generated nascent RNA, RNA:DNA hybrids and the resection factor CtIP guide DNA double strand break repair pathway choice towards error-free homologous recombination.
15h
Biofeedback electrostimulation for bionic and long-lasting neural modulation
Nature Communications, Published online: 09 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-33089-z Designing wereable neural invasive electrical stimulation system remains a challenge. Here, researchers provide an effective technology platform for the elimination of tricky neural stimulus-inertia using bionic electronic modulation, which is a significant step forward for long-lasting treatment of nervous
15h
Integrating and formatting biomedical data as pre-calculated knowledge graph embeddings in the Bioteque
Nature Communications, Published online: 09 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-33026-0 Biomedical data is accumulating at a fast pace and integrating it into a unified framework is a major challenge. Here, the authors present a resource that contains pre-calculated biomedical descriptors derived from a very large knowledge graph.
15h
Photos of the Week: Drum Major, Ox Catch, Ferret Race
A scorched forest in France, a crowd of mourners outside Buckingham Palace, an earthquake in China, flooding in Mexico and Bulgaria, a scene from the 79th Venice International Film Festival, a heat wave in California, continued fighting in Ukraine, a runway show at China Fashion Week, and much more
15h
Schneider Shorts 9.09.2022 – Prize Before The Fall
Schneider Shorts 9.09.2022 – a Nobel man retracts four papers, professor XYZ retracts one, UCL being their usual greedy crooked racist self, with a cancer cure from Karolinska, an anti-aging solution from Brazil, the dangers of blue screens, a Romanian genius in England, and a dirty old man in Marseille cornered.
16h
Scientific 'detective work' with South American mummies reveals they were brutally murdered
How frequent was violence in prehistoric human societies? One way to measure this is to look for trauma in prehistoric human remains. For example, a recent review of pre-Columbian remains found evidence of trauma from violence in 21% of males. So far, most studies of this kind have focused on skulls and other parts of the skeleton, but a potentially richer source of information are mummies, with t
16h
'An amazing gift': Australia's first uterus transplants to take place in 2023
A dozen women to receive womb transplants as part of clinical trials at Royal Women's hospital in Sydney Get our free news app , morning email briefing or daily news podcast A dozen Australian women will become Australia's first recipients of uterus transplants after a research project was granted approval to begin trials next year. A dozen women will become Australia's first recipients of uterus
17h
Shocking the brain to protect your memories
by JC Gorman Have you tried turning it on and off again? You may be *shocked* to hear it, but recent studies have shown that administering small electric currents to the brain could protect older people from memory loss. A research paper that came out this month showed an even more acute way to prevent […]
19h
The Silent Sovereign
This is an edition of The Atlantic Daily, a newsletter that guides you through the biggest stories of the day, helps you discover new ideas, and recommends the best in culture. Sign up for it here . Queen Elizabeth II, who died today at age 96, was a "north star" for her subjects through seven decades of transformation. Our London-based staff writer Helen Lewis corresponded with me this afternoon
20h
Collaborative machine learning that preserves privacy
Researchers developed a system that streamlines the process of federated learning, a technique where users collaborate to train a machine-learning model in a way that safeguards each user's data. The system reduces communication costs of federated learning and boosts accuracy of a machine-learning model trained using this method, which would make federated learning more feasible to implement in re
21h
Weedy rice has become herbicide resistant through rapid evolution
Weedy rice is a closely related cousin of crop rice. It aggressively competes with cultivated rice in the field, leading to loss of yield and reductions in harvest quality that compromise market value. Biologists used whole-genome sequences of 48 contemporary weedy rice plants to show how herbicide resistance evolved by gene flow from crop rice. Almost all other cases of herbicide resistance in ag
21h
Bird neurons use three times less glucose than mammalian neurons
Birds have impressive cognitive abilities and show a high level of intelligence. Compared to mammals of about the same size, the brains of birds also contain many more neurons. Now a new study helps to explain how birds can afford to maintain more brain cells: their neurons get by on less fuel in the form of glucose.
21h
What makes the 'Appalachian truffle' taste and smell delicious
A hallmark of a truly luxurious meal is a sprinkling of truffle shavings — the fungal kind, not the chocolate. Nicknamed 'diamonds' of the culinary world, these fanciful fungi are prized for their unique flavor and scent. But newer truffle species are fighting to achieve that same gourmet status. Now, researchers have performed the first full aroma characterization of the Appalachian truffle, unl
22h
What makes the 'Appalachian truffle' taste and smell delicious
A hallmark of a truly luxurious meal is a sprinkling of truffle shavings — the fungal kind, not the chocolate. Nicknamed 'diamonds' of the culinary world, these fanciful fungi are prized for their unique flavor and scent. But newer truffle species are fighting to achieve that same gourmet status. Now, researchers have performed the first full aroma characterization of the Appalachian truffle, unl
22h
Key protein that drives rheumatoid arthritis damage
Scientists have identified a protein known as sulfatase-2 that plays a critical role in the damage caused by rheumatoid arthritis. The researchers' discovery sheds new light on the molecular processes that drive inflammation seen in rheumatoid arthritis. It could also someday lead to improved treatment of the disease, which currently has no cure.
22h
Physicists invoke the cosmological collider to explain why matter, and not antimatter, dominates the universe
Early in its history, shortly after the Big Bang, the universe was filled with equal amounts of matter and 'antimatter' — particles that are matter counterparts but with opposite charge. But then, as space expanded, the universe cooled. Today's universe is full of galaxies and stars which are made of matter. Where did the antimatter go, and how did matter come to dominate the universe? This cosmi
22h
Hubble finds spiraling stars, providing window into early universe
Stars are the machines that sculpt the universe, yet scientists don't fully know how they form. To understand the frenzied 'baby boom' of star birth that occurred early in the universe's history, researchers turned to the Small Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy of the Milky Way. This nearby galaxy has a simpler chemical composition than the Milky Way, making it similar to the galaxies found in
22h
Modern humans generate more brain neurons than Neanderthals
The question of what makes modern humans unique has long been a driving force for researchers. Comparisons with our closest relatives, the Neanderthals, therefore provide fascinating insights. The increase in brain size, and in neuron production during brain development, are considered to be major factors for the increased cognitive abilities that occurred during human evolution. However, while bo
23h
Ecological tipping point: 5+ El Niño events per century controls coastal biotic communities
Many models predict that climate change will fuel stronger and more frequent El Niño events. However, our knowledge of ENSO and its influence on ecosystems only extends back about 200 years, making it difficult to understand what the long-term future will hold. In the new study, the authors leveraged a coastal rockshelter site called Abrigo de los Escorpiones, one of the largest and best-dated col
23h
Jason Momoa So Furious About Environment That He Shaved His Head
New Look Jason Momoa, of "Baywatch," "Game of Thrones," and, um, cruel pranks fame, has taken to Instagram to ferociously protest single-use plastics by… shaving his hair off? "Aloha everyone," Momoa said in the now-viral video. "I'm shaving off the hair. Doing it for single-use plastics. I'm tired of these plastic bottles, we gotta stop, plastic forks, all that shit, it just goes into our land
23h
Nobody Is Sure What Queen Elizabeth II Died From
Queen Elizabeth II, the UK's longest-serving monarch, has passed away at the age of 96 after a brief illness . A noted omission from any official communication or reporting on the death so far, though lingers: the cause of her death, even in approximate terms. On its own, that's not entirely unusual. The medical condition of British monarchs has historically been kept under tight wraps. For a pro
23h
Unraveling a mystery surrounding cosmic matter
Early in its history, shortly after the Big Bang, the universe was filled with equal amounts of matter and "antimatter"—particles that are matter counterparts but with opposite charge. But then, as space expanded, the universe cooled. Today's universe is full of galaxies and stars that are made of matter. Where did the antimatter go, and how did matter come to dominate the universe? This cosmic or
1d
Elon Musk Predicted "World War III" in Just-Released Text Message
Slow Your Roll Today in news that seems stranger than fiction: a possibly out-of-context text message, sent by SpaceX and Tesla CEO Elon Musk, in which the mercurial billionaire claims he was reconsidering his deal to buy Twitter because of the possibility of "World War III." As the Wall Street Journal reports , Musk made the comment to one of his Morgan Stanley lenders in early May — a mere two
1d
Bring the Action With the Best Mini Projectors in 2022
Mini projectors let you enjoy a smack of movie magic literally anywhere. Any bedroom, living room, and in fact, backyard can instantly turn into a theater with just a little imagination, a bucket of buttery popcorn, and one of these incredibly portable devices. Unlike the massive home projectors that will run you thousands of dollars, many of these mini projectors scream "impulse buy," and let yo
1d
Digging a little deeper: New study explores the nanoscale properties of the Gulong shale oil reservoir
Shale oil, a type of crude oil similar to petroleum, is found between layers of organic-rich shale. It can be refined into petrol, diesel, and other products, making it a sought-after resource. The Qingshankou Formation in the Gulong Sag of the Songliao Basin in China is a large geological body of shale deposits formed at the bottom of an ancient lake. These deposits contain about 15.3 billion ton
1d
Researchers report on live intracellular imaging with new, conditionally active immunofluorescence probe
Recent advances in imaging technology have made it possible to visualize intracellular dynamics, which offers a better understanding of several key biological principles for accelerating therapeutic development. Fluorescent labeling is one such technique that is used to identify intracellular proteins, their dynamics, and dysfunction. Both internal as well as external probes with fluorescent dyes
1d
New approach more than doubles stem cell editing efficiency, researchers report
A Penn State-led team of interdisciplinary researchers has developed techniques to improve the efficiency of CRISPR-Cas9, the genome editing technique that earned the Nobel Prize in 2020. While CRISPR-Cas9 is faster, less expensive and more accurate than other gene-editing methods, according to project leader Xiaojun "Lance" Lian, associate professor of biomedical engineering and biology at Penn S
1d
New advances in stem-cell derived mouse embryo model
Just two weeks after announcing the development of a mouse embryo model, complete with beating hearts and the foundations for a brain and other organs, from mouse stem cells, researchers in the laboratory of Magdalena Zernicka-Goetz, Bren Professor of Biology and Biological Engineering, have published new findings about another mouse embryo model reaching similar developmental stages, but created
1d
New approach more than doubles stem cell editing efficiency, researchers report
A Penn State-led team of interdisciplinary researchers has developed techniques to improve the efficiency of CRISPR-Cas9, the genome editing technique that earned the Nobel Prize in 2020. While CRISPR-Cas9 is faster, less expensive and more accurate than other gene-editing methods, according to project leader Xiaojun "Lance" Lian, associate professor of biomedical engineering and biology at Penn S
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New advances in stem-cell derived mouse embryo model
Just two weeks after announcing the development of a mouse embryo model, complete with beating hearts and the foundations for a brain and other organs, from mouse stem cells, researchers in the laboratory of Magdalena Zernicka-Goetz, Bren Professor of Biology and Biological Engineering, have published new findings about another mouse embryo model reaching similar developmental stages, but created
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Researchers report on live intracellular imaging with new, conditionally active immunofluorescence probe
Recent advances in imaging technology have made it possible to visualize intracellular dynamics, which offers a better understanding of several key biological principles for accelerating therapeutic development. Fluorescent labeling is one such technique that is used to identify intracellular proteins, their dynamics, and dysfunction. Both internal as well as external probes with fluorescent dyes
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Military Horrified to Discover Its Most Expensive Jet Has a Part Made in China
No Fly Zone The Pentagon has halted deliveries of the F-35 — the nation's most expensive jet, used by the Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps — after discovering that a component of its engine is actually made in China. That component, according to Politico , is a metal alloy that makes up part of an important magnet, embedded into the F-35 turbomachine's pumps. As far as Things That You Hope Work g
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The impact of repeated rapid test strategies on the effectiveness of at-home antiviral treatments for SARS-CoV-2
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-32640-2 Antiviral treatments for SARS-CoV-2 infection are only beneficial when used early in infection, so early case detection is important. Here, the authors assess the frequency of testing needed to achieve population-level benefits and demonstrate the importance of high coverage and short delays from test to tr
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Allophycocyanin A is a carbon dioxide receptor in the cyanobacterial phycobilisome
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-32925-6 The transfer of electronic energy through a photosystem can harm the photosynthetic apparatus when not balanced with CO2 fixation. Here, the authors show that CO2 modulates electronic energy transfer in cyanobacteria by binding to and enhancing the activity of the light-harvesting complex.
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Regulation associated modules reflect 3D genome modularity associated with chromatin activity
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-32911-y Here the authors report histone modifications show a modular pattern referred to as 'regulation associated modules' (RAMs) that reflect the spatial modularity of chromatin. They find enhancer-promoter interactions and extrachromosomal DNAs (ecDNAs) occur more often within the same RAMs than within the same
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Pharmacogenomics polygenic risk score for drug response prediction using PRS-PGx methods
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-32407-9 To try to predict an individual's drug response using genetic data, most studies have used traditional polygenic risk score (PRS) methods. Here, the authors develop a pharmacogenomics-specific PRS method, which can improve drug response prediction and patient stratification in pharmacogenomics studies.
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Electrocatalytic hydrogenation of quinolines with water over a fluorine-modified cobalt catalyst
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-32933-6 Selective hydrogenation of quinolines with easy-to-handle hydrogen donors and cost-effective catalysts is desirable. Here electrocatalytic quinoline hydrogenation to 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinolines is reported with water over a fluorine-modified cobalt.
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Rab35 governs apicobasal polarity through regulation of actin dynamics during sprouting angiogenesis
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-32853-5 The promiscuous GTPase Rab35 has been shown to be involved in many important cellular functions. In this article, Francis et al. illustrate how Rab35 acts as a critical brake to actin remodeling during sprouting angiogenesis and how it is necessary for proper blood vessel development.
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The Queen of the World
Q ueen Elizabeth II's longevity alone places her in the pantheon of royal greats. At the time of her death, at Balmoral Castle today, she had served 70 years as Queen—the longest of any sovereign in the English monarchy's 1,000-year history. But it is not simply her longevity that marks her for greatness, but her ability to stay relevant as the world changed around her. She was the product of anc
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The iPhone Isn't Cool
I cradled my first iPhone like an egg after I bought it. The year was 2011; the season was winter. The ground was slushy, but I was too nervous to take the thing on the subway. It was an absolute luxury, by far the fanciest and, I felt, most fragile thing I owned—more Fabergé than farmstand. The precise model was the iPhone 4, which looked like an ice-cream sandwich from the side and felt about a
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Photos: The Remarkable Life of Queen Elizabeth II
Britain's Queen Elizabeth II, the longest-reigning British monarch in history, died at Balmoral Castle in Scotland today. Born to the Duke and Duchess of York in 1926, Elizabeth lived a life in the public eye from a very young age, ascended to the throne at 25, and went on to serve as Queen for more than 70 years. Below, a collection of images of Elizabeth's remarkable life, from age 5 to 96.
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The Second Elizabethan Age Has Ended
T he first Elizabethan era ended on March 24, 1603, when 69-year-old Queen Elizabeth I died in her sleep at Richmond Palace. "This morning, about three o'clock, her Majesty departed from this life, mildly like a lamb, easily like a ripe apple from the tree," the lawyer John Manningham wrote in his diary. Elizabeth I's 45-year reign was a "golden age," a course of events that no one would have pre
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Crypto Miners Terrified by Ethereum's Imminent Move to Proof of Stake
Stake in the Heart Ethereum, the second biggest cryptocurrency in terms of trade volume, is about to implement a huge change dubbed "The Merge" — a shift that has crypto miners shaking in their boots, Gizmodo reports . "It's a lot of uncertainty," one miner told Bloomberg earlier this summer. "No one really knows what's going to happen. There are a lot of people who I think are in denial." The Et
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NASA's Battering Ram Now Has Asteroid It'll Smash in Its Sights
Target Acquired NASA is planning to smash a battering ram spacecraft into a sizable asteroid to test whether it could deflect any future civilization-killer asteroids from impacting with the Earth later this month. Now, as its Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) spacecraft bears down on its target, the binary asteroid system Didymos — a pair of space rocks classified as "potentially hazardous
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Brazil has two populations of American bullfrogs, an exotic species that transmits a deadly fungus
Researchers at the University of São Paulo (USP) and the State University of Campinas (UNICAMP) have conducted the most comprehensive genetic analysis ever of the American bullfrog (Aquarana catesbeiana) in Brazil, concluding that there are two populations of the species here, living on frog farms or invading local ecosystems. Bullfrogs are considered the world's main invasive amphibian.
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Polytitanium chloride pre-coagulation for fouling control of ceramic membrane
Membrane technology is widely applied in water treatment for removing suspended particles, colloids, and organic pollutants from polluted water. As a typical representative of inorganic membrane with advantages such as high flux and chemical resistance, ceramic membrane has massive potential value in the treatment of surface water, municipal wastewater, and drinking water.
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Brazil has two populations of American bullfrogs, an exotic species that transmits a deadly fungus
Researchers at the University of São Paulo (USP) and the State University of Campinas (UNICAMP) have conducted the most comprehensive genetic analysis ever of the American bullfrog (Aquarana catesbeiana) in Brazil, concluding that there are two populations of the species here, living on frog farms or invading local ecosystems. Bullfrogs are considered the world's main invasive amphibian.
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Restore China's coastline from the ground up | Science
In China, decades of industrialization and growing cities have replaced coastal mudflats, sandy beaches, mangroves, and rocky reefs with engineered structures such as seawalls, break walls, and dikes (1–3). The loss of coastal wetlands exposes coastal cities and communities to substantial damages from storms (4) and extreme events, which are increasing in frequency, intensity, and scale (5). The d
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Adaptive wildfire mitigation approaches | Science
Wildfires have been increasing in frequency, severity, and intensity in many landscapes worldwide. The trends are driven by climate change (1), changes in land management (2) and land cover (3), logging (4), and ineffective fire mitigation actions (5). As a result, extensive parts of some landscapes are now extremely flammable and will remain so for decades to come (6). Improving fire management,
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Joint protection of a crucial reef ecosystem | Science
FULL ACCESSLetter Share on Joint protection of a crucial reef ecosystemYoufang Sun, Lintao Huang, Laurence J. McCook, and Hui Huang [email protected]Science8 Sep 2022Vol 377, Issue 6611p. 1163DOI: 10.1126/science.abo0166 PREVIOUS ARTICLEA tale of troubled watersPreviousNEXT ARTICLEAdaptive wildfire mitigation approachesNext References and NotesChina has taken steps to protect the South China Se…
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COVID-19 and children | Science
FULL ACCESSPerspectiveViewpoints: COVID-19 Share on COVID-19 and childrenCarl A. Pierce, Kevan C. Herold [email protected], Betsy C. Herold [email protected], Janet Chou [email protected], Adrienne Randolph, Binita Kane [email protected], Sammie McFarland, Deepti Gurdasani [email protected], Christina Pagel [email protected], Peter Hotez [email protected], Sarah Cobey [email protected], and Scott
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News at a glance | Science
FULL ACCESSIn BriefSCI COMMUN Share on News at a glanceScience8 Sep 2022Vol 377, Issue 6611pp. 1130-1131DOI: 10.1126/science.ade7659 PREVIOUS ARTICLEProtect the vulnerable from monkeypoxPreviousNEXT ARTICLETwisty device explores alternative path to fusionNext Webb telescope snaps its first exoplanetLung cells give yaks a high-altitude edgeNext U.K. PM a cipher on scienceEarliest known amputatio…
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Protect the vulnerable from monkeypox | Science
Recent declines in monkeypox infections have elicited comments such as "cautiously optimistic" and "we're turning a corner." Indeed, this trend in large cities in the United States and Europe, as well as a global decline in new cases of 21% (according to …
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Climate simulation reveals precipitation isotope changes in Asian monsoon and arid regions for the past 300,000 years
Stable isotopes in precipitation are important indicators for studying changes in the Earth's water cycle and reconstructing the paleoclimate history. Previous studies have shown that the precipitation stable isotopes in Asia recorded in stalagmites and other sediments have prominent periodic change patterns on the 10,000-year scale (orbital scale) in geological periods, but in the scientific comm
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Minority, immigrant populations faced misinformation, hostility when seeking COVID-19 information online
When the COVID-19 pandemic swept the globe, many people turned to online sources to find health information. That was also largely the case for racial and ethnic minority populations in the United States, and a new study from the University of Kansas found they faced many of the same challenges such as encountering misinformation online, but also unique factors such as harassment, hostility and ra
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World on brink of five 'disastrous' climate tipping points, study finds
Giant ice sheets, ocean currents and permafrost regions may already have passed point of irreversible change The climate crisis has driven the world to the brink of multiple "disastrous" tipping points, according to a major study. It shows five dangerous tipping points may already have been passed due to the 1.1C of global heating caused by humanity to date. Continue reading…
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Study reveals striking differences in brains of modern humans and Neanderthals
Results believed to be first compelling evidence that modern humans were cognitively better than Neanderthals Neanderthals have long been portrayed as our dim-witted, thuggish cousins. Now groundbreaking research has – while not confirmed the stereotype – revealed striking differences in the brain development of modern humans and Neanderthals. The study involved inserting a Neanderthal brain gene
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The link between mental health and social conditions | Letters
Readers and healthcare professionals respond to Dr Sanah Ahsan's article which argued that for too long, the dominant mental health narrative has located problems in individuals, and not in social injustice or inequality Like Dr Sanah Ahsan ( I'm a psychologist – and I believe we've been told devastating lies about mental health, 6 September ), I too work as a clinical psychologist and I see ever
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Modern humans generate more brain neurons than Neandertals
The question of what makes modern humans unique has long been a driving force for researchers. Comparisons with our closest relatives, the Neandertals, therefore provide fascinating insights. The increase in brain size, and in neuron production during brain development, are considered to be major factors for the increased cognitive abilities that occurred during human evolution. However, while bot
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Review paper: Tiny biohybrid robots for intelligent drug delivery
A review paper by scientists at Zhejiang University summarized the development of continuum robots from the aspects of design, actuation, modeling and control. The new review paper, published on Jul. 26 in the journal Cyborg and Bionic Systems, provided an overview of the classic and advanced technologies of continuum robots, along with some prospects urgently to be solved.
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Agriculture drives more than 90% of tropical deforestation
A new study published September 8 in Science finds that between 90 and 99% of all deforestation in the tropics is driven directly or indirectly by agriculture. Yet only half to two-thirds of this results in the expansion of active agricultural production on the deforested land.
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Surprise finding suggests 'water worlds' are more common than we thought
Water is the one thing all life on Earth needs, and the cycle of rain to river to ocean to rain is an essential part of what keeps our planet's climate stable and hospitable. When scientists talk about where to search for signs of life throughout the galaxy, planets with water are always at the top of the list.
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Gender inequities in mentoring may disproportionately affect women researchers
A new analysis of mentoring relationships in academic research finds that gender inequities in the resources available to women mentors in the life sciences appear to disproportionately affect the subsequent careers of women trainees. Leah Schwartz and colleagues at Oregon Health and Science University present these findings on September 8th in the open-access journal PLOS Biology.
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Ecological tipping point: 5+ El Nino events per century controls coastal biotic communities
The El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is a global climate phenomenon most famous for the El Niño phase characterized by warm sea surface temperatures in the eastern Pacific Ocean, intense winter storms and high precipitation. El Niño impacts plants, animals and people around the world by devastating Pacific fisheries, sparking droughts in some parts of the world and causing massive flooding in o
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Modern humans generate more brain neurons than Neandertals
The question of what makes modern humans unique has long been a driving force for researchers. Comparisons with our closest relatives, the Neandertals, therefore provide fascinating insights. The increase in brain size, and in neuron production during brain development, are considered to be major factors for the increased cognitive abilities that occurred during human evolution. However, while bot
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Risk of multiple climate tipping points escalates above 1.5°C global warming
Multiple climate tipping points could be triggered if global temperature rises beyond 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels, according to a major new analysis published in the journal Science. Even at current levels of global heating the world is already at risk of passing five dangerous climate tipping points, and risks increase with each tenth of a degree of further warming.
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Chiral quasi bound states in the continuum for a high-purity circularly polarized light source
An ultracompact circularly polarized light source is a crucial component for the applications of classical and quantum optics information processing. The development of this field relies on the advances of two fields: quantum materials and chiral optical cavities. Conventional approaches for circularly polarized photoluminescence suffer from incoherent broadband emission, limited DOP, and large ra
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Green hydrogen: Short-term scarcity, long-term uncertainty
Green hydrogen from renewable electricity and derived e-fuels are uniquely valuable for achieving climate neutrality. They can replace fossil fuels in industry or long-distance transport where direct electrification is infeasible. However, even if production capacities grow as fast as wind and solar power, the growth-rate champions, green hydrogen supply remains scarce in the short-term and uncert
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Scientists see spins in a 2D magnet
Research shows that spinning quasiparticles, or magnons, light up when paired with a light-emitting quasiparticle, or exciton, with potential quantum information applications.
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Racketeering Lawsuit Accuses Elon Musk of Pumping Up Dogecoin Value
Hype Man This racketeering lawsuit against Elon Musk and his many companies just keeps getting bigger. This week, Reuters reported that seven new investor plaintiffs and six new defendants, including Musk's tunnel-building enterprise The Boring Company , were included in an amended complaint filed Tuesday in Manhattan federal court. The plaintiffs say Musk used Tesla, SpaceX and other businesses
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Research improves upon conventional LED displays
LED lights have become ubiquitous lighting solutions for homes and businesses, but when it comes to large, high-resolution displays, traditional LEDs have documented disadvantages. LED displays use a high voltage and a factor called the internal power conversion efficiency is low, which means the energy costs to run the displays are high, the displays do not last as long, and they can run too hot.
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What makes the 'Appalachian truffle' taste and smell delicious?
A hallmark of a truly luxurious meal is a sprinkling of truffle shavings—the fungal kind, not the chocolate. Nicknamed "diamonds" of the culinary world, these fanciful fungi are prized for their unique flavor and scent. But newer truffle species are fighting to achieve that same gourmet status. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Omega have performed the first full aroma characterization of the Appa
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New kit enables study of microplastics in the ocean
New equipment designed by British Antarctic Survey is helping scientists to study the impact of microplastics in the ocean. The Ocean Plastic Incubator Chamber (OPIC) exposes various types of plastics to oceanic conditions for predetermined lengths of time to measure weathering rates. Lots of discarded plastic ends up in the ocean, where it remains, so it's important to understand how plastic may
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Molecular mechanisms of spawning habits for adaptive radiation of endemic East Asian cyprinid fishes
Adaptive radiations represent rapid branching in the tree of life and are recognized as critical drivers of biodiversity. Studies on them is central to understand the mechanisms that drive speciation, diversification, and many associated ecological and evolutionary processes. During adaptive radiations, traits related to ecological and reproductive isolation play a major role in shaping biodiversi
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Examining the trends Europe's agriculture will have to cope with
Climate change, environmental and animal welfare policies, aging farmers: Europe's agriculture is facing enormous challenges, which vary diametrically depending on the region. Where will farming soon become unprofitable? Where are laws forcing them to change their practices? A study co-led by the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research WSL has now investigated this for all
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A new road towards spin-polarized currents
The second half of the 20th century was the age of electronics, electronic devices became miniaturized and even more complex, creating problems for their energy consumption and waste heat. Spintronics promises to store or transport information based on spins alone, which would work faster with much less energy. Unfortunately it is still a challenge to control spin in a material by external fields
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What makes the 'Appalachian truffle' taste and smell delicious?
A hallmark of a truly luxurious meal is a sprinkling of truffle shavings—the fungal kind, not the chocolate. Nicknamed "diamonds" of the culinary world, these fanciful fungi are prized for their unique flavor and scent. But newer truffle species are fighting to achieve that same gourmet status. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Omega have performed the first full aroma characterization of the Appa
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Molecular mechanisms of spawning habits for adaptive radiation of endemic East Asian cyprinid fishes
Adaptive radiations represent rapid branching in the tree of life and are recognized as critical drivers of biodiversity. Studies on them is central to understand the mechanisms that drive speciation, diversification, and many associated ecological and evolutionary processes. During adaptive radiations, traits related to ecological and reproductive isolation play a major role in shaping biodiversi
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Examining the trends Europe's agriculture will have to cope with
Climate change, environmental and animal welfare policies, aging farmers: Europe's agriculture is facing enormous challenges, which vary diametrically depending on the region. Where will farming soon become unprofitable? Where are laws forcing them to change their practices? A study co-led by the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research WSL has now investigated this for all
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Magma and ice
Let's pretend it's the Late Cretaceous, roughly 66 to 100 million years ago. We've got dinosaurs roaming the land and odd-looking early species of birds, although the shark as we know it is already swimming in the prehistoric oceans — which cover 82% of Earth. Redwood trees and other conifers are making their debut, as are roses and flowering plants, and with them come bees, termites and ants. Mo
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Aggression de-escalation gene identified in fruit flies
The brain mechanisms that cause aggressive behavior have been well studied. Far less understood are the processes that tell the body when it's time to stop fighting. Now, a new study identifies a gene and a group of cells in the brain that play a critical role in suppressing aggression in fruit flies. The findings have implications for disorders such as Parkinson's disease, which can sometimes cau
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How marine predators find food hot spots in open ocean 'deserts'
A new study finds that marine predators, such as tunas, billfishes and sharks, aggregate in anticyclonic, clockwise-rotating ocean eddies (mobile, coherent bodies of water). As these anticyclonic eddies move throughout the open ocean, the study suggests that the predators are also moving with them, foraging on the high deep-ocean biomass contained within.
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Botany: From the soil to the sky
Every day, about one quadrillion gallons of water are silently pumped from the ground to the treetops. Earth's plant life accomplishes this staggering feat using only sunlight. It takes energy to lift all this liquid, but just how much was an open question until this year.
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Converting 3D-printed polymer into a 100-times stronger, ductile hybrid carbon microlattice material
Developing a lightweight material that is both strong and highly ductile has been regarded as a long-desired goal in the field of structural materials, but these properties are generally mutually exclusive. Researchers recently discovered a low-cost, direct method to turn commonly used 3D printable polymers into lightweight, ultra-tough, biocompatible hybrid carbon microlattices, which can be in a
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Do art museums prioritize visitor well-being enough?
By design, art museums are meant to showcase beautiful objects and their creators, offer insight into history, and elicit wonder and awe. A recent study by Penn's Katherine Cotter and James Pawelski revealed that people who visit art museums experience a range of benefits from doing so.
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Plant growth stimulation by high CO2 depends on phosphorus homeostasis in chloroplasts
While increased carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere encourage plant growth, they also reduce the nutritional value of plants, which can have a larger impact on nutrition and food safety worldwide. Researchers at Michigan State University discovered a new way plants are adapting to the changing climate—information that can be used to help plants grow strong while also maintaining their nutritio
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Converting 3D-printed polymer into a 100-times stronger, ductile hybrid carbon microlattice material
Developing a lightweight material that is both strong and highly ductile has been regarded as a long-desired goal in the field of structural materials, but these properties are generally mutually exclusive. Researchers recently discovered a low-cost, direct method to turn commonly used 3D printable polymers into lightweight, ultra-tough, biocompatible hybrid carbon microlattices, which can be in a
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City digital twins help train deep learning models to separate building facades
To automatically generate data for training deep convolutional neural network models to segment building facades, researchers used a three-dimensional model and game engine to generate digital city twin synthetic training data. They found that a model trained on these data mixed with some real data was competitive with a model trained on real data alone, revealing the potential of digital twin dat
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Elevated cholesterol found in GenX Exposure Study participants
Elevated levels of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) were associated with higher total cholesterol and non-HDL cholesterol in GenX Exposure Study participants' blood. The legacy PFAS chemicals PFOS and PFNA were most strongly associated with elevated cholesterol compared to the other chemicals, and the effects were more pronounced in older people.
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Mirror image molecules reveal drought stress in forests
Worldwide, plants emit about 100 million tons of monoterpenes into the atmosphere each year. These volatile organic molecules include many fragrances such as the molecule pinene — known for its pine fresh scent. Since these molecules are highly reactive and can form tiny aerosol particles that can grow into nuclei for clouds droplets, natural emissions play an important role in our climate. There
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Users care about assistive devices' look, feel and smell
Findings from a review of users' online review of two assistive devices reveal key aesthetic characteristics that users care about as well as the language they're using to describe them — factors that could be important for manufacturers to consider in product development.
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Plant growth stimulation by high CO2 depends on phosphorus homeostasis in chloroplasts
While increased carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere encourage plant growth, they also reduce the nutritional value of plants, which can have a larger impact on nutrition and food safety worldwide. Researchers at Michigan State University discovered a new way plants are adapting to the changing climate—information that can be used to help plants grow strong while also maintaining their nutritio
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Ludicrously Close Up Shots of the Sun Look Nothing Like You'd Expect
Mug Shot Big year for space photos! New imagery from the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Inouye Solar Telescope — the world's most powerful solar scope — shows some incredibly close up shots of our Sun's fiery, plasma-laden surface. The images are absolutely breathtaking, and once again demonstrate that up close, the Sun looks nothing at all like we might imagine a giant, burning ball of gas
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Good Buys: Tentree's InMotion Leggings Prove Sustainability Looks and Feels Great
Finding a high-quality, well-fitting pair of leggings can make the difference between reaching enlightenment during a yoga session and splitting a seam mid-Downward Dog — but as this review of Tentree inMotion Leggings will demonstrate, help is at hand. To get the most out of your gym workout, stretch, or run, the comfort and fit of your clothes should be at the top of your priorities — you won't
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Atlantic Editions, Imprint of The Atlantic and Zando, Announces Three New Titles
Atlantic Editions, a first-of-its-kind book imprint launched as a partnership between The Atlantic and the independent publisher Zando, announced today three upcoming titles set to publish in April 2023 from Atlantic writers: On Grief , by Jennifer Senior ; On Work , by Derek Thompson ; and On Nobody Famous , by Kaitlyn Tiffany and Lizzie Plaugic . All six current Atlantic Editions titles are ava
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Researchers Release 8K Footage of the Decaying Titanic
The RMS Titanic's bow. (Photo: OceanGate Expeditions) The sinking of the RMS Titanic has managed to remain in the public conscience for more than a century. Between James Cameron's Titanic and various traveling artifact exhibitions (not to mention countless "Jack could have fit on the door" analyses), this North Atlantic tragedy has been romanticized, meme-ified, and studied across multiple gener
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Models oversimplify how melting glaciers deform land
Around 21,000 years ago, ice sheets retreated from the Northern Hemisphere, and great swaths of land were unburdened by the weight of glaciers. Even today, Earth's shape is still changing as the land rebounds, causing effects like shoreline migration that are observable on human timescales. This process is called glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA), and although the effect is well documented, the d
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The energy transition needs to be climate-proofed
Record-breaking weather events are becoming more common, costly, and extreme. Not only do these extreme weather events destroy lives and homes. Less talked about is how they can also disrupt the deployment of renewable energy infrastructure that's vital to preventing climate conditions from getting even worse.
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Science uncovers the secret to superb shots in soccer
Soccer, also known as football, is the most popular sport in 57 countries, and its players are among the most highly paid athletes in the world; therefore, every shot is valuable. Knowing how to adjust foot orientation and swing when kicking the ball can help players understand how to improve their shots on goal, giving them a competitive edge.
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Upgraded laser facility paves the way for next-generation particle accelerators
Researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have completed a major expansion of one of the world's most powerful laser systems, creating new opportunities in accelerator research for the future of high-energy physics and other fields. The expansion created a second beamline for the petawatt laser at the Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA) Center, enabling the development
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Enhancing our physical understanding of climatic processes using improved climate models
More frequent extreme climate events have become a major global challenge. To mitigate the human and economic costs of these events, climatologists consistently create future climate predictions. These projections help policy makers develop actionable climate policies to avoid the most dangerous climate change effects. Because of the high data volume required for accurate forecasts, scientists rel
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Stem cell–derived liver cells give new clues to Ebola
Ebola virus causes serious infections in humans and in fatal cases, damage and dysfunction of the liver is often present, suggesting that the liver plays a decisive role in disease outcome. Although the liver can become directly infected, it is not well understood how liver cells respond to the Ebola virus, and if liver injury is directly caused by the infection or is secondary to other disease pr
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Longer, hotter and more frequent heat waves in Swiss cities
Hot days followed by sweltering nights without any temperature relief in between might become a new norm towards the end of the 21st century. Researchers from the University of Zurich have analyzed the frequency, intensity and length of such extreme events for five Swiss cities. Lugano and Geneva would be most affected.
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Book reflects on 'overlapping pandemics'
COVID-19 and HIV offer lessons for the monkeypox pandemic, says microbiologist Joseph Osmundson. Osmundson has been drawn to microbes—particularly viruses—since he was a kid, in part from growing up in the 1980s in the shadow of HIV. ("A virus with nine genes that could kill you? How could that type of mystery not astound and shock?" he explains.) In college, he began studying the evolution of vi
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Researchers discover potential treatment for Chagas disease
Researchers have discovered a potential treatment for Chagas disease, marking the first medication with promise to successfully and safely target the parasitic infection in more than 50 years. Human clinical trials of the drug, an antiparasitic compound known as AN15368, will hopefully begin in the next few years.
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Suffocating cancer cells
Development of medical treatment against cancer is a major research topic worldwide — but cancer often manages to circumvent the solutions found. Scientists have now taken a closer look at the cancer's countermeasures and aim to stop them. By disrupting the cellular components that are responsible for converting oxygen into chemical energy, they have demonstrated initial success in eliminating ce
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Eating behaviors of parents play a role in teens' emotional eating
Emotional eating, or eating as a coping mechanism for negative, positive, or stress-driven emotions, is associated with unhealthy dietary patterns and weight gain. A research article discusses adolescent vulnerability to emotional eating and how various feeding practices used by parents, such as restriction, food as reward, and child involvement, influence eating behavior.
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Self-assembling molecules could help in cancer therapy
Treatment of cancer is a long-term process because remnants of living cancer cells often evolve into aggressive forms and become untreatable. Hence, treatment plans often involve multiple drug combinations and/or radiation therapy in order to prevent cancer relapse. To combat the variety of cancer cell types, modern drugs have been developed to target specific biochemical processes that are unique
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Stem cell–derived liver cells give new clues to Ebola
Ebola virus causes serious infections in humans and in fatal cases, damage and dysfunction of the liver is often present, suggesting that the liver plays a decisive role in disease outcome. Although the liver can become directly infected, it is not well understood how liver cells respond to the Ebola virus, and if liver injury is directly caused by the infection or is secondary to other disease pr
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Researchers identify Ku proteins as new co-sensors of cyclic GMP-AMP synthase
The initiation of the innate immune responses relies on the detection of microbes by multiple pattern recognition receptors. Among these receptors, cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) has been identified as a major and universal cytosolic DNA sensor that is independent of specificity of DNA sequence and/or cell type. However, previous studies have suggested that the binding affinity of cGAS to DNA is r
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Previously unknown species of dinosaur identified in southwestern Germany
Paleontologists at the University of Tübingen's Senckenberg Center for Human Evolution and Palaeoenvironment have discovered a hitherto unknown genus and species of dinosaur. Tuebingosaurus maierfritzorum lived about 203 to 211million years ago in the region now known as Swabian Alb and was a herbivore. The new species displays similarities with the large long-necked dinosaurs known as sauropods,
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One of Coinbase's First Investors Says Crypto Is Worthless and Should Be Shut Down
Angel Dusted After turning a $10,000 investment in mainstream cryptocurrency exchange Coinbase into a smooth $6 million, 34-year-old angel investor Liron Shapira has had enough. In a scathing new interview with Insider , Shapira took a swipe at the wider cryptocurrency space, calling it "essentially worthless" and opining that it "should all be shut down" — which is rather convenient, it's worth
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Queen Elizabeth II Is Reportedly Very Sick
Update: Queen Elizabeth II has passed away . According to officials at Buckingham Palace, Queen Elizabeth II, the second longest reigning monarch in history , is not doing well. "Following further evaluation this morning, the Queen's doctors are concerned for Her Majesty's health and have recommended she remain under medical supervision," reads a statement from Buckingham Palace. Underlining the
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A plant auxin-binding protein resurfaces after a deep dive
Nature, Published online: 08 September 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-02339-x The hormone auxin regulates plant growth through nuclear co-receptors. A rapid response also occurs at the cell surface after auxin is perceived by the receptor TMK1 and a co-receptor protein. Is ABP1 this co-receptor?
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Researchers identify Ku proteins as new co-sensors of cyclic GMP-AMP synthase
The initiation of the innate immune responses relies on the detection of microbes by multiple pattern recognition receptors. Among these receptors, cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) has been identified as a major and universal cytosolic DNA sensor that is independent of specificity of DNA sequence and/or cell type. However, previous studies have suggested that the binding affinity of cGAS to DNA is r
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Previously unknown species of dinosaur identified in southwestern Germany
Paleontologists at the University of Tübingen's Senckenberg Center for Human Evolution and Palaeoenvironment have discovered a hitherto unknown genus and species of dinosaur. Tuebingosaurus maierfritzorum lived about 203 to 211million years ago in the region now known as Swabian Alb and was a herbivore. The new species displays similarities with the large long-necked dinosaurs known as sauropods,
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Planting trees not always an effective way of binding carbon dioxide
Tree-planting has been widely seen as an effective way of binding carbon as carbon dioxide levels rise in the atmosphere. But now researchers from the University of Gothenburg and elsewhere are warning that forests on nutrient-poor land won't be an additional carbon sink in the long term. As forests age, their uptake of CO2 declines and, each time forests are planted, there is a risk of additional
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Self-assembling molecules could help in cancer therapy
Treatment of cancer is a long-term process because remnants of living cancer cells often evolve into aggressive forms and become untreatable. Hence, treatment plans often involve multiple drug combinations and/or radiation therapy in order to prevent cancer relapse. To combat the variety of cancer cell types, modern drugs have been developed to target specific biochemical processes that are unique
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Link found between parenthood and social conservatism
An international team of researchers has found a possible link between having children and degrees of social conservatism in people. In their paper published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes the research they conducted through surveys and interviews and what they learned.
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Archeologists Discover 17th Century Remains of Suspected 'Vampire'
(Photo: Mirosław Blicharski/Aleksander Poznań) Archeologists in Poland recently made an unexpected discovery: the remains of a 17th-century female who was suspected of being a vampire. The skeleton was found during an excavation near the city of Bydgoszcz. Early medieval graves had been uncovered in the area more than a decade before, when archeologists found jewelry, semi-precious stones, and re
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Bird neurons use three times less glucose than mammalian neurons
Birds have impressive cognitive abilities and show a high level of intelligence. Compared to mammals of about the same size, the brains of birds also contain many more neurons. Now a new study reported in Current Biology on September 8 helps to explain how birds can afford to maintain more brain cells: their neurons get by on less fuel in the form of glucose.
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How a human rights approach to climate change can spark real change
On Dec. 7, 2005, Canadian-born mother and grandmother Sheila Watt-Cloutier filed a 163-page petition with the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights arguing that the impacts of climate change violated the "fundamental human rights" of Indigenous Inuit people like her across the Arctic.
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Bird neurons use three times less glucose than mammalian neurons
Birds have impressive cognitive abilities and show a high level of intelligence. Compared to mammals of about the same size, the brains of birds also contain many more neurons. Now a new study reported in Current Biology on September 8 helps to explain how birds can afford to maintain more brain cells: their neurons get by on less fuel in the form of glucose.
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Encrypted, one-touch, human-machine interface technology unveils user physiology
Researchers at UCLA and Stanford University have developed a secure, noninvasive, one-touch technology using hydrogel-coated chemical sensors and a signal-interpretation framework. It can present detailed information about an individual's blood composition—such as metabolites, hormones, nutrients and pharmaceuticals, as well as blood oxygen—all through the press of a finger.
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Researchers generate fusion at 100 million Kelvin for 20 seconds
A team of researchers affiliated with multiple institutions in South Korea working with two colleagues from Princeton University and one from Columbia University has achieved a new milestone in the development of fusion as an energy source—they generated a reaction that produced temperatures of 100 million Kelvin and lasted for 20 seconds. In their paper published in journal Nature, the group desc
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Cravings for fatty foods traced to gut-brain connection
A dieter wrestling with cravings for fatty foods might be tempted to blame their tongue: the delicious taste of butter or ice cream is hard to resist. But new research investigating the source of our appetites has uncovered an entirely new connection between the gut and the brain that drives our desire for fat.
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How green hydrogen could end the fossil fuel era | Vaitea Cowan
As climate change accelerates, finding clean alternatives to fossil fuels is more urgent than ever. Social entrepreneur Vaitea Cowan believes green hydrogen is the answer. Watch as she shares her team's work mass producing electrolyzers — devices that separate water into its molecular components: hydrogen and oxygen — and shows how they could help make green, carbon-free fuel affordable and acce
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Life Is an Accident of Space and Time
Like many people on planet Earth, I have been spellbound by the first pictures from the James Webb Space Telescope : the lacelike windings of galaxies, the apricot filaments of nebulae , the remnants of exploded stars . A less picturesque, but still revolutionary, part of Webb's mission is the search for signs of life elsewhere in the universe. The telescope goes about this momentous quest by ana
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The Right to Free Speech Is Not the Right to Monologue
I n August, the author Salman Rushdie was stabbed in the neck. The novelist has spent decades living under the threat of a hit put out by Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini in 1989. The religious directive was a response to Rushdie's novel The Satanic Verses , which Khomeini regarded as blasphemous. For many, the attack was an opportunity to reflect on the importance of free expression, and a reminder o
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Wild fish thrive despite 'hopeless monster' mutations, according to study
A series of experiments led by researchers at Stanford Medicine that included fish hookups, CRISPR and lake hopping has confirmed a long-standing, yet unproven, assumption about natural evolution. It also debunks a talking point favored by proponents of intelligent design, who have argued that naturally occurring mutations will only damage or destroy an animal and can't lead to useful new traits a
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Soil microbiota can boost the growth of invasive plant species and provide defense against herbivores
Soil microbes can have a great impact on the spread of harmful invasive species as they can either hinder or facilitate the plant's growth. Researchers at the Department of Biology of the University of Turku, Finland, studied the role of soil microbiota in the success of garden lupine, which is an invasive species in the Finnish nature.
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Wild fish thrive despite 'hopeless monster' mutations, according to study
A series of experiments led by researchers at Stanford Medicine that included fish hookups, CRISPR and lake hopping has confirmed a long-standing, yet unproven, assumption about natural evolution. It also debunks a talking point favored by proponents of intelligent design, who have argued that naturally occurring mutations will only damage or destroy an animal and can't lead to useful new traits a
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A first glimpse at the high-productivity star factory in the galactic center
With the help of detailed observations, astronomers have managed to get a first representative glimpse of the numerous young stars in the central regions of our home galaxy. The observations provide evidence for star formation in the galactic center having started off near the center and then worked its way outwards. This confirms a mode of star formation that had earlier been found in the centers
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Why are the glaciers in southeast Tibet melting so fast?
Millions of people depend on water from the glaciers of High-Mountain Asia. South-eastern Tibet, however, has some of the most rapidly melting glaciers in Asia. This is due to less summer snowfall, as a study led by the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research WSL shows.
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Opinion: The CDC needs these 4 reforms
The CDC should undergo four vital reforms, write Sandro Galea , dean of Boston University's School of Public Health and Georgetown University's Lawrence O. Gostin : On August 17, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Director Rochelle Walensky acknowledged the CDC's flawed response to the COVID-19 pandemic and announced an agency-wide restructuring. We applaud Walensky for the cour
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Weedy rice has become herbicide resistant through rapid evolution
In a paper published in the journal Communications Biology, scientists from Washington University in St. Louis and the University of Arkansas report that a crop pest called weedy rice has become widely herbicide resistant in regions where herbicide-resistant rice is planted. The study highlights challenges facing U.S. rice farmers when they battle a weedy enemy that is closely related to a desirab
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Weedy rice has become herbicide resistant through rapid evolution
In a paper published in the journal Communications Biology, scientists from Washington University in St. Louis and the University of Arkansas report that a crop pest called weedy rice has become widely herbicide resistant in regions where herbicide-resistant rice is planted. The study highlights challenges facing U.S. rice farmers when they battle a weedy enemy that is closely related to a desirab
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A Black Hole's Orbiting Ring of Light Could Encrypt Its Inner Secrets
When photons hurtle toward a black hole, most are sucked into its depths, never to return, or gently deflected away. A rare few, however, skirt the hole, making a series of abrupt U-turns. Some of these photons keep circling the black hole practically forever. Described by astrophysicists as a "cosmic movie camera" and an "infinite light trap," the resulting ring of orbiting photons is among the.
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Bee biodiversity is one way nature 'diversifies its portfolio'
Biodiversity of the bee population is critical to maintaining the ecosystem function of crop pollination, which in turn is crucial to our food supply, research shows. The new study shows how many more species of bees are needed to maintain crop yields when considering a longer-term time frame. "We found that biodiversity plays a key role in the stability of ecosystems over time," says Natalie Lem
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Biologists discover genetic pathways linking the immune and circulatory systems of mosquitoes during infection
Vanderbilt biologists have discovered the genetic pathways that link the immune and circulatory systems of mosquitoes during the fight against infection. A mosquito fighting infection of malaria or bacteria attracts immune cells to its heart that filter microbes that are flowing in its blood, called hemolymph. The discovery of two pathways that link immunity and hemolymph circulation is a major co
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