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Nyheder2022september16

This artist is dominating AI-generated art. And he's not happy about it.
Those cool AI-generated images you've seen across the internet? There's a good chance they are based on the works of Greg Rutkowski . Rutkowski is a Polish digital artist who uses classical painting styles to create dreamy fantasy landscapes. He has made illustrations for games such as Sony's Horizon Forbidden West , Ubisoft's Anno , Dungeons & Dragons , and Magic: The Gathering . And he's become
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Synthesis, properties, and material hybridization of bare aromatic polymers enabled by dendrimer support
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-33100-7 Unsubstituted aromatic polymers are materials with multiple potential applications, but their preparation remains challenging. Here, the authors report a dendrimer-enabled synthesis of soluble bare aromatic polymers and explore their properties; these compounds can be further transformed into other material
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LATEST

The magneto-optic modulator
Many state-of-the-art technologies work at incredibly low temperatures. Superconducting microprocessors and quantum computers promise to revolutionize computation, but scientists need to keep them just above absolute zero (-459.67° Fahrenheit) to protect their delicate states. Still, ultra-cold components have to interface with room temperature systems, providing both a challenge and an opportunit
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Feeling out of equilibrium in a dual geometric world
Researchers have extended the utility of chemical reaction network theory beyond systems in equilibrium using a mathematical dual geometrical representation. This work may shed light on the nonequilibrium behavior of reaction networks in chemistry and biology.
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Nice Democracy You've Got Here. Shame If Something Happened to It.
The line between imagination and delusion is thin, as Donald Trump's initial reaction to an FBI search at Mar-a-Lago in August demonstrated. In the first days afterward, the former president saw the search as a political gift, not a blow: a chance to rally his base, put would-be challengers like Ron DeSantis in their place, and reconsolidate his eroding position as the leader of the Republican Pa
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NASA Seems Awfully Excited About Finding Organic Matter on Mars
The search for evidence ancient life on Mars is ramping up, as NASA's Perseverance rover has already secured some potentially revelatory samples containing organic matter. The presence of organic matter isn't slam dunk evidence of life on the Red Planet, but it is a distinctly promising sign — and, perhaps most tellingly, agency scientists seem uncharacteristically excited. Since July, the indefa
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OpenAI Chief Scientist: Should We Make Godlike AI That Loves Us, or Obeys Us?
AI Provocateur A leading artificial intelligence expert is once again shooting from the hip in a cryptic Twitter poll. In the poll, OpenAI chief scientist Ilya Sutskever asked his followers whether advanced super-AIs should be made "deeply obedient" to their human creators, or if these godlike algorithms should "truly deeply [love] humanity." In other words, he seems to be pondering whether we sh
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Deep learning reveals predictive sequence concepts within immune repertoires to immunotherapy | Science Advances
Abstract T cell receptor (TCR) sequencing has been used to characterize the immune response to cancer. However, most analyses have been restricted to quantitative measures such as clonality that do not leverage the complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) sequence. We use DeepTCR, a framework of deep learning algorithms, to reveal sequence concepts that are predictive of response to immunother
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Strain propagation in layered two-dimensional halide perovskites | Science Advances
Abstract Impulsive light excitation presents a powerful tool for investigating the interdependent structural and electronic responses in layered two-dimensional (2D) halide perovskites. However, detailed understanding of the nonlinear lattice dynamics in these soft hybrid materials remains limited. Here, we explicate the intrinsic strain propagation mechanisms in 2D perovskite single crystals usi
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Scale-reconfigurable miniature ferrofluidic robots for negotiating sharply variable spaces | Science Advances
Abstract Magnetic miniature soft robots have shown great potential for facilitating biomedical applications by minimizing invasiveness and possible physical damage. However, researchers have mainly focused on fixed-size robots, with their active locomotion accessible only when the cross-sectional dimension of these confined spaces is comparable to that of the robot. Here, we realize the scale-rec
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Oral zero-valent-molybdenum nanodots for inflammatory bowel disease therapy | Science Advances
Abstract Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) affects millions of people each year. The overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) plays a critical role in the progress of IBD and will be a potential therapeutic target. Here, we synthesize a kind of oral zero-valent-molybdenum nanodots (ZVMNs) for the treatment of IBD by scavenging ROS. These ultrasmall ZVMNs can successfully pass through the ga
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Molecular architecture of the autoinhibited kinesin-1 lambda particle | Science Advances
Abstract Despite continuing progress in kinesin enzyme mechanochemistry and emerging understanding of the cargo recognition machinery, it is not known how these functions are coupled and controlled by the α-helical coiled coils encoded by a large component of kinesin protein sequences. Here, we combine computational structure prediction with single-particle negative-stain electron microscopy to r
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Targeting OXPHOS de novo purine synthesis as the nexus of FLT3 inhibitor–mediated synergistic antileukemic actions | Science Advances
Abstract Using a genome-wide CRISPR screen, we identified CDK9 , DHODH , and PRMT5 as synthetic lethal partners with gilteritinib treatment in fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ( FLT3 )–internal tandem duplication (ITD) acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and genetically and pharmacologically validated their roles in gilteritinib sensitivity. The presence of FLT3 -ITD is associated with an increase in anaerobi
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Ketogenic diet uncovers differential metabolic plasticity of brain cells | Science Advances
Abstract To maintain homeostasis, the body, including the brain, reprograms its metabolism in response to altered nutrition or disease. However, the consequences of these challenges for the energy metabolism of the different brain cell types remain unknown. Here, we generated a proteome atlas of the major central nervous system (CNS) cell types from young and adult mice, after feeding the therape
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Rapamycin treatment during development extends life span and health span of male mice and Daphnia magna | Science Advances
Abstract Development is tightly connected to aging, but whether pharmacologically targeting development can extend life remains unknown. Here, we subjected genetically diverse UMHET3 mice to rapamycin for the first 45 days of life. The mice grew slower and remained smaller than controls for their entire lives. Their reproductive age was delayed without affecting offspring numbers. The treatment w
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Organic electronic transmembrane device for hosting and monitoring 3D cell cultures | Science Advances
Abstract 3D cell models have made strides in the past decades in response to failures of 2D cultures to translate targets during the drug discovery process. Here, we report on a novel multiwell plate bioelectronic platform, namely, the e-transmembrane, capable of supporting and monitoring complex 3D cell architectures. Scaffolds made of PEDOT:PSS [poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):polystyrene sulf
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Differential proinflammatory activities of Spike proteins of SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern | Science Advances
Abstract The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic turned the whole world upside down in a short time. One of the main challenges faced has been to understand COVID-19–associated life-threatening hyperinflammation, the so-called cytokine storm syndrome (CSS). We report here the proinflammatory role of Spike (S) proteins from different severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-C
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A flexible electronic strain sensor for the real-time monitoring of tumor regression | Science Advances
Abstract Assessing the efficacy of cancer therapeutics in mouse models is a critical step in treatment development. However, low-resolution measurement tools and small sample sizes make determining drug efficacy in vivo a difficult and time-intensive task. Here, we present a commercially scalable wearable electronic strain sensor that automates the in vivo testing of cancer therapeutics by contin
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The nonconducting W434F mutant adopts upon membrane depolarization an inactivated-like state that differs from wild-type Shaker-IR potassium channels | Science Advances
Abstract Voltage-gated K + (Kv) channels mediate the flow of K + across the cell membrane by regulating the conductive state of their activation gate (AG). Several Kv channels display slow C-type inactivation, a process whereby their selectivity filter (SF) becomes less or nonconductive. It has been proposed that, in the fast inactivation-removed Shaker-IR channel, the W434F mutation epitomizes t
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"Omics" data unveil early molecular response underlying limb regeneration in the Chinese mitten crab, Eriocheir sinensis | Science Advances
Abstract Limb regeneration is a fascinating and medically interesting trait that has been well preserved in arthropod lineages, particularly in crustaceans. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying arthropod limb regeneration remain largely elusive. The Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis shows strong regenerative capacity, a trait that has likely allowed it to become a worldwide invasive
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Algorithm decodes what dog brains see
Researchers have decoded visual images from a dog's brain. The work offers a first look at how the canine mind reconstructs what it sees. The results suggest that dogs are more attuned to actions in their environment rather than to who or what is doing the action. The researchers recorded the fMRI neural data for two awake, unrestrained dogs as they watched videos in three 30-minute sessions, for
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Is it really healthy to restrict protein intake for kidney transplant recipients?
It is commonly believed that patients with chronic kidney disease should limit their protein intake given that excessive protein worsens kidney function. However, a new study indicates that changes in skeletal muscle mass are positively correlated with protein intake, suggesting the necessity of adequate protein intake to improve muscle mass after kidney transplantation.
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An unstable, flake-like network in the making
During development, the cells of an embryo divide until a fully functional organism emerges. One component of the cell is especially important during this process: the cell cortex. This fine network of hair-like filament structures (called actin) just below the cell membrane is the main determinant of cell shape and is involved in almost everything a cell does, such as moving, dividing, or sensing
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Russia Issues Veiled Thread to Shoot Down Pesky SpaceX Satellites
Russia's delegation at the United Nations General Assembly released an eyebrow-raising statement condemning the United States for allowing private satellites to crowd Earth's orbit, arguing that they could become a "legitimate target" if they were to ever be used against Russia. While the statement doesn't directly name SpaceX's Starlink satellite constellation by name, it's almost certainly the
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The physics of the premature lung: Why mechanical ventilation can harm preterm lungs
In Germany, about ten per cent of all children are born before the 37th week of pregnancy and are thus considered premature. Many of these premature babies require help with breathing due to their underdeveloped lungs. However, clinical practice shows that mechanical ventilation can cause irreversible damage to the lungs, although the exact causes are not yet known. In an interdisciplinary study,
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Don't Trash Your Old Phone—Give It a Second Life
The original iPhone SE is a great little phone, and I love it. It has a headphone jack—remember those? It fits in a butt pocket. It was announced in the Obama era. Sure, the first one I owned, which I purchased in 2017, had only 16GB of storage. And yes, I was forced to stop using it after a terrifying incident in which it refused to update to the latest iOS, even after I deleted nearly everythin
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The physics of the premature lung: Why mechanical ventilation can harm preterm lungs
In Germany, about ten per cent of all children are born before the 37th week of pregnancy and are thus considered premature. Many of these premature babies require help with breathing due to their underdeveloped lungs. However, clinical practice shows that mechanical ventilation can cause irreversible damage to the lungs, although the exact causes are not yet known. In an interdisciplinary study,
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Structure-based discovery of small molecules that disaggregate Alzheimer's disease tissue derived tau fibrils in vitro
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-32951-4 Evidence suggests that fibrous aggregates of protein tau may be the proximal cause of Alzheimer's disease. Here, using atomic structures of tau fibrils from brains of people with Alzheimer's disease, the authors have found small-molecule drug leads that disaggregate tau fibrils in vitro.
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Drivers Sue Tesla Because Full Self-Driving Isn't Actually Full Self-Driving
Null Self-Driving Tesla is being sued for misleading the public by calling its controversial driver assistance features "Autopilot" and "Full Self-Driving," Reuters reports . According to the complaint filed in a San Francisco federal court this week, Tesla CEO Elon Musk has been deceiving its customers by promising that fully-fledged, autonomous driving is "just around the corner." And that's no
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New Treatment Turns Cancer Genes Into "Eat Me" Signs For Immune System
If our immune system could easily detect cancer cells, it could supercharge new treatments for the disease . What if a drug could cause cancer cells to reveal themselves to the immune system, which could then target and kill them? That's essentially the approach that a burgeoning form of cancer treatment — yet to be tested in humans — is adopting, as described in a new study published in the peer
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Cutting edge science reveals Gribshunden's shipwrecked secrets
New excavations have coaxed more secrets from Gribshunden, the flagship of the Danish-Norwegian King Hans which mysteriously sank in 1495 off the coast of Ronneby, Sweden. The wreck is internationally significant as the world's best-preserved ship from the Age of Exploration—a proxy for the vessels of Christopher Columbus and Vasco da Gama.
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Beads show European trade in African interior used Indigenous routes
Tiny glass beads discovered in mountain caves about 25 miles from the shores of Lake Malawi in eastern-central Africa provide evidence that European trade in the continent's hinterland was built on Indigenous trade routes from the coast to the interior that had existed for centuries, according to a study co-authored by Yale anthropologist Jessica Thompson.
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When did dinosaurs go extinct? The theories on how it happened and what survived
In the film "Jurassic Park," billionaire John Hammond, played by Richard Attenborough, brings paleontologists Alan Grant, played by Sam Neill, and Ellie Sattler, played by Laura Dern, as well as mathematician Ian Malcolm, played by Jeff Goldblum, to help him bring dinosaurs back to life for his dinosaur theme park. Hammond's fascination and desire to revive dinosaurs backfires when many of them br
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When did dinosaurs go extinct? The theories on how it happened and what survived
In the film "Jurassic Park," billionaire John Hammond, played by Richard Attenborough, brings paleontologists Alan Grant, played by Sam Neill, and Ellie Sattler, played by Laura Dern, as well as mathematician Ian Malcolm, played by Jeff Goldblum, to help him bring dinosaurs back to life for his dinosaur theme park. Hammond's fascination and desire to revive dinosaurs backfires when many of them br
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A third of Aussies fear losing their homes to climate change
Six in 10 Australians (62%) expect climate change will have a severe effect in their area over the next 10 years and globally across 34 countries more than 71%, including a majority in every single country, expect the same, a new study conducted by Ipsos for the World Economic Forum finds.
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Decoupling engineering of formamidinium–cesium perovskites for efficient photovoltaics
Metal halide perovskites (ABX3) have emerged as promising candidates for various optoelectronic applications due to their excellent optoelectronic properties and low-cost fabrication. At present, the light-absorbing layer of the highest-efficiency single-junction perovskite solar cells (PSCs) is almost all based on FAPbI3 perovskite, achieving power conversion efficiency (PCE) that is comparable t
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A new strategy to speed up cold case investigations
For nearly 37 years, she was known as Buckskin Girl—a young, anonymous murder victim found outside Dayton, Ohio, wearing a deer-hide poncho. Then, in April 2018, police announced that the mystery of her identity had been solved. Her name was Marcia L. King, and she had been identified by linking a snippet of her DNA to one of her cousins.
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The U.S. and the Holocaust Reveals the Dark Limits of Democracy
Many works of history are much less about the past than they are about the present. People contemplate past events to understand current problems, and in today's fractured America, the Civil War would surely be a resonant topic for an eminent documentarian to explore. But Ken Burns has been there and done that. Instead, in our bifurcated country, where the past is relitigated daily in state legis
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How to gain a competitive edge in grant writing
Nature, Published online: 16 September 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-02958-4 Examining funded proposals enables grant writers to produce more compelling proposals, say Orit Rapaport, Justin Crest and Crystal Botham.
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Save $400 on the Latest 14-inch MacBook Pro and More With Today's Deals from Best Buy
Apple never discounts its hardware, but most of the company's MacBook Pro laptops are currently $400 off at Best Buy. You can find Best Buy MacBook Pro deals on different configurations of the latest 14-inch and 16-inch MacBook Pros or the previous-generation 13-inch MacBook Pro, which was released in late 2020. Most people will be fine with the base model of these machines, but it's nice that yo
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Parent-Teacher Messaging App Hacked to Send Mom and Dad Horrifying Images
Do Not Click Users of the popular parent-teacher app Seesaw were in for a truly shocking surprise this week. The app was reportedly hacked by bad actors, who used the tech's messaging feature to send horribly explicit, NSFW memes to unassuming parents. "DO NOT OPEN ANY 'BITLY' LINKS sent in Seesaw as a message from another school family," read one Illinois school district's warning message . "DEL
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Best USB-C Chargers in 2022
Sooner or later, you will need a USB-C charger to give your devices much-needed juice. Many popular devices on the market today are powered up via USB-C, including Samsung Galaxy, MacBook Pro, and consoles like Nintendo Switch. If you have a portable device, and it needs power, a solid USB-C charger will provide it. But which device is best for your needs? Here's a thorough round-up of the best U
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Palm oil's implications on the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals
From the second half of the twentieth century onwards, there has been an exponential increase in the production of palm oil, which has proven to be very versatile; so much so that it has become a common ingredient in many food products, such as margarine, biscuits, bread, cakes, chocolate, ice cream and non-food products such as detergents and cosmetics. Palm oil has also historically been used as
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Examining the roots of great wine tourism
Establishing a sense of place—letting visitors dig right into the soil and smell the earth where the grapes are grown for their wine—is one strategy wineries can use to revive lagging tourism numbers coming out of the pandemic, new research from UBC Okanagan reveals.
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Towards a better understanding of depression
Human beings and fruit flies have very little in common — at first sight. However, studying these flies it is in fact possible to find out more about human nature, particularly when it comes to depressive disorders. It is on this basis that scientists are attempting to gain a better understanding of depression-like states and thus improve means of treating them.
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Researchers identify a gene therapy target for polycystic kidney disease
Blocking the inhibition of PKD1 and PKD2 gene expression by deleting a binding site for microRNAs hindered the formation and growth of kidney cysts in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) models, researchers reported. The findings suggest a strategy for gene therapy with the potential to arrest or cure ADPKD.
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A stable alternative to an explosive synthetic reaction
Nature, Published online: 16 September 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-02952-w The ozonolysis reaction is a classic of organic synthesis, but involves the formation of potentially explosive reaction intermediates. A modern, safer spin on this process makes use of previously overlooked chemistry.
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How dance can unleash your inner joy | Ryan Heffington
"We all have our own beautiful ways of moving, and this is worth celebrating," says dancer and choreographer Ryan Heffington. Inviting you to reconsider your connection to dance, he shows how even everyday experiences — tying your shoes, rocking a baby, whisking up some mac and cheese — can offer choreographic inspiration and help you find joy and release when you need it most. After the talk, d
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People who get periodontal care fare better after heart attack
People who have received periodontal maintenance care stayed in the hospital for the shortest time after a heart attack, a new study shows. The conventional wisdom is that medical and dental care are related, but less is known about how dental care relates to health outcomes after acute incidents like heart attacks. To that end, researchers studied patients receiving periodontal care , dental cle
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Many kids with hay fever and asthma don't receive needed care
The majority of children with asthma also have allergic rhinitis, or hay fever, researchers report. Their new study also shows these kids have worse asthma outcomes. Symptoms of hay fever include runny nose, sneezing, congestion and sinus pressure, and can contribute to asthma. For the study in the Journal of Asthma , researchers reviewed data from three NIH-funded trials of 1,029 Rochester, New
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Thinking about quiet quitting? Here's why—and how—you should talk to your boss instead
Quiet quitting is a catchy name, popularized on social media, for something we've all probably done. Its popularity is probably down to the inevitable and much-needed pushback against "hustle culture", where younger workers are encouraged to over-function and engage in unsustainable "performative productivity"—looking like you are working harder than you are—to get ahead in their careers. This com
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Microbially induced carbonate precipitation can improve coarse-grained, salty soil
Microbially induced carbonate precipitation (MICP) is a cost-effective and environmentally friendly technology to improve saline soil. It aims to use urease generated by bacteria to catalyze urea hydrolysis and produce carbonate, which combines with calcium ion in the cementation solution to form calcium carbonate precipitates and calcite crystal.
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Simulations show increased jet stream waviness due to asymmetric rise in global temperatures
A quartet of researchers, two with the Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics and two with Pukyong National University, has created a group of simulations of changes to the jet stream under global warming. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes using math theory to describe wind motion under given circumstances to create their simulations
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Parenting alone isn't to blame for gender inequality
New research shows parents are largely not to blame for economic inequality between men and women in Aotearoa New Zealand. Other factors in society, outside parents' control, are contributing more to ongoing harmful economic gender inequality, meaning men have better economic outcomes than women.
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Some microbes lie in wait until their hosts unknowingly give them the signal to start multiplying and kill them
After more than two years of the COVID-19 pandemic, you might picture a virus as a nasty spiked ball—a mindless killer that gets into a cell and hijacks its machinery to create a gazillion copies of itself before bursting out. For many viruses, including the coronavirus that causes COVID-19, the "mindless killer" epithet is essentially true.
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What Do Dogs Know About Us?
Quid and I have struck a deal. Every morning she flies up the stairs, leaps onto our bed, and attacks my nose with her sharp little teeth. And I am awakened. Oh wait, no; we don't have a deal. She just does that. It is vexing and charming at once. Just at the moment of nose-attack I can smell the sleep collected on her breath and fur. It mingles with the odor of the other dogs in the room and is
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Hundreds of Americans Will Die From COVID Today
Over the past week, an average of 491 Americans have died of COVID each day, according to data compiled by The New York Times . The week before, the number was 382. The week before that, 494. And so on. For the past five months or so, the United States has trod along something of a COVID-death plateau. This is good in the sense that after two years of breakneck spikes and plummets, the past five
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A New Generation of Pop Stars Are Dancing With the Devil
Though we live in a supposedly secular era , at least one spiritual tradition appears to be thriving: pop musicians flouting the devout. In the past few years, Lil Nas X has given Satan a lap dance , Demi Lovato has posed in S&M-ish restraints on a crucifix bed , and Beyoncé has commanded churchgoers to gyrate in a manner that led one pastor to level accusations of soul-selling . When supposedly
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Historical Fiction Turns a Life Into a Story
When Queen Elizabeth II died on September 8, production temporarily stopped on the sixth season of Netflix's popular historical drama The Crown , which charts the second Elizabethan age in the United Kingdom. It was done out of respect, a Netflix source said, but it also highlights the strange relationship the real crown has with The Crown. The series depends on actual people and events, but the
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Polio Is Exploiting a Very Human Weakness
In 1988, the World Health Assembly announced a very ambitious goal : Polio was to be vanquished by the year 2000. It was a reach, sure, but feasible. Although highly infectious, polioviruses affect only people, and don't hide out in wild animals; with two extraordinarily effective vaccines in regular use, they should be possible to snuff out. Thanks to a global inoculation campaign, infections ha
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Harvey Weinstein's Rotting Teeth Reveal a Lot About Prison Healthcare
Disgraced mega-producer and convicted rapist Harvey Weinstein's health has dwindled in recent years , at least according to himself and his lawyers — the former film exec, who now uses a wheelchair, is said to be losing his vision and has complained of a number of dental ailments as well. And now, as Weinstein awaits a slew of upcoming court proceedings, he's allegedly begging the court to releas
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The koala: When it's smart to be slow
The koala was clinging to an old tree stag while stranded in the Murray River, on the border between New South Wales and Victoria. A team of students from La Trobe University noticed its predicament as they were paddling by in canoes.
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A multi-adenylate cyclase regulator at the flagellar tip controls African trypanosome transmission
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-33108-z Trypanosomes can sense signal molecules and coordinate their movement in response to such signals, a phenomenon termed social motility (SoMo). Here, Bachmaier et al show that cyclic AMP response protein 3 (CARP3) localization to the flagellar tip and its interaction with a number of different adenylate cycl
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This Week in Space: Honors Aboard the International Space Station
Happy Friday, dear reader. Welcome back to This Week in Space, where we round up the major happenings from LEO to the Oort Cloud and all points west. NASA is still working to get the Artemis moon rocket into the air, but they've set another launch date. In contrast, the European Space Agency will make history next week when Samantha Cristoforetti becomes commander of the International Space Stati
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Removing author fees can help open access journals make research available to everyone
Open access (OA) journals are academic, peer-reviewed journals that are free and available for anyone to read without paying subscription fees. To make up for lost subscription revenue, many journals instead charge author fees to researchers who wish to publish in them. These fees can reach thousands of dollars per article, paid out of publicly funded research grants.
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Researchers find neuronal pathway in rats that drives social grooming
A team of researchers affiliated with multiple institutions in Hungary, working with two colleagues from Spain and one each from the U.S. and Germany, has discovered the neuronal pathway in the rat brain that is responsible for social grooming. In their paper published in the journal Current Biology, the group describes using injections and whole cell patch recording techniques to capture brain ac
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Response to environmental damage hints at your empathy overall
People who respond less emotionally to images of damage to the environment are also less emotional and empathic in general, according to a new study. Differences in political ideology can limit policy adjustments that address climate change. Researchers and practitioners often raise concern by appealing to people's empathy . However, some people appear less emotionally affected by environmental d
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Researchers find neuronal pathway in rats that drives social grooming
A team of researchers affiliated with multiple institutions in Hungary, working with two colleagues from Spain and one each from the U.S. and Germany, has discovered the neuronal pathway in the rat brain that is responsible for social grooming. In their paper published in the journal Current Biology, the group describes using injections and whole cell patch recording techniques to capture brain ac
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Training for Dixie Fire survivors sheds light on the long road to recovery
Deep within the Sierra Nevada mountains, Greenville is a small town of about 1,100 people in the northern part of Plumas County, California. It was founded in the era of the Gold Rush—a mining settlement turned logging settlement turned historical landmark, known for its well-preserved 19th-century storefronts and century-old ranches. That is, until the summer of 2021 put Greenville on the map for
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Research shows constituents ask female legislators to do more
Despite the strides made in electing women to office, women are still grossly underrepresented in all levels of government. Women make up just over a quarter of all members of the 117th Congress (147 of the total 535 seats), which is more than double the number of women serving in Congress 20 years ago (72).
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Q&A: What explains 'quiet quitting' in the workplace?
YoungAh Park is a professor of labor and employment relations at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign who studies work stress and recovery. Park spoke with News Bureau business and law editor Phil Ciciora about "quiet quitting" at work.
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Researchers find the cell cortex is activated by thousands of short-lived protein condensates
During development, the cells of an embryo divide until a fully functional organism emerges. One component of the cell is especially important during this process: the cell cortex. This fine network of hair-like filament structures (called actin) just below the cell membrane is the main determinant of cell shape and is involved in almost everything a cell does, such as moving, dividing, or sensing
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Image: UK heat wave
This summer, heat waves struck Europe, North Africa, the U.S. and Asia with temperatures reaching over 40°C in places—breaking many long-standing records. Images from the Copernicus Sentinel-3 mission show the scale of Britain's heat wave as it baked in extreme temperatures in August.
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Surprise hydrological shifts imperil water resources
From 1997 to 2010, southeastern Australia experienced its worst drought on record. The "Millennium" drought severely strained municipal and agricultural water supplies—and despite a return to near-predrought rainfall levels, some of the region's watersheds have not yet recovered. The extended dry spell delivered two surprises: streamflows that were surprisingly low during the drought, even conside
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Researchers find the cell cortex is activated by thousands of short-lived protein condensates
During development, the cells of an embryo divide until a fully functional organism emerges. One component of the cell is especially important during this process: the cell cortex. This fine network of hair-like filament structures (called actin) just below the cell membrane is the main determinant of cell shape and is involved in almost everything a cell does, such as moving, dividing, or sensing
5h
Data science reveals universal rules shaping cells' power stations
Mitochondria are compartments—so-called "organelles"—in our cells that provide the chemical energy supply we need to move, think, and live. Chloroplasts are organelles in plants and algae that capture sunlight and perform photosynthesis. At a first glance, they might look worlds apart. But an international team of researchers, led by the University of Bergen, have used data science and computation
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Does exercise drive development? In the sea anemone, the way you move matters
As humans, we know that an active lifestyle gives us some control over our form. When we hit the pavement, track our steps, and head to the gym, we can maintain muscle development and reduce body fat. Our physical activity helps shape our physical figure. But what if we sustained similar aerobics in our earlier forms? Is it possible that our embryos also exercised?
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Huge Swells Force the Saga Back to the Harbor! | Deadliest Catch
Stream Deadliest Catch on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/deadliest-catch #DeadliestCatch #Discovery #DiscoveryPlus Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Disco
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One of the Best-Preserved Dinosaurs Of All Time Found in Canada
Professor Brian Pickles and paleontologist Caleb Brown stand next to the exposed parts of their newly-discovered fossil. (Photo: Melissa Dergousoff/University of Reading) When we think of dinosaur fossils, we often think of footprints preserved in sandstone, or bones carefully displayed inside a museum. But what about mummified dinosaurs? That's what researchers think they've found lodged into a
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Bill Gates Sounds Moderately Horrified by How Civilization Is Going
Bill of Fail If you see Bill Gates, maybe don't ask him about the state of the world. He's really going through it . And honestly, we get it. Back in 2015, the UN made a list of 17 sustainability goals — to "end poverty, fight inequality and stop climate change by 2030," as The New York Times explains . No small dice. Upon that UN announcement, Gates and ex-wife Melinda decided to focus The Bill
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Data science reveals universal rules shaping cells' power stations
Mitochondria are compartments—so-called "organelles"—in our cells that provide the chemical energy supply we need to move, think, and live. Chloroplasts are organelles in plants and algae that capture sunlight and perform photosynthesis. At a first glance, they might look worlds apart. But an international team of researchers, led by the University of Bergen, have used data science and computation
5h
Does exercise drive development? In the sea anemone, the way you move matters
As humans, we know that an active lifestyle gives us some control over our form. When we hit the pavement, track our steps, and head to the gym, we can maintain muscle development and reduce body fat. Our physical activity helps shape our physical figure. But what if we sustained similar aerobics in our earlier forms? Is it possible that our embryos also exercised?
5h
Synthesis of bare aromatic polymers with dendrimer support allows the creation of unique hybrid materials
Bare aromatic polymers have the potential to be used in a wide range of high-performance and functional materials. However, their synthesis is hindered by the poor solubility of their parent compounds. Scientists from Nagoya University in Japan have overcome this problem by synthesizing bare aromatic polymers using a dendrimer support. Using the high solubility enabled by dendrimer support, the ba
5h
Hubble captures galaxy NGC 1961
The galaxy NGC 1961 unfurls its gorgeous spiral arms in this newly released image from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. Glittering, blue regions of bright young stars dot the dusty spiral arms winding around the galaxy's glowing center.
5h
Researchers who collaborate with others in multiple research areas found to publish more highly cited papers
A small team of researchers at Beijing Normal University working with a colleague from Bar-Ilan University has found that researchers who collaborate with other researchers in multiple research areas tend to publish more highly cited papers than do those who generally only work with others in their field. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group descri
5h
A new holographic microscope allows scientists to see through the skull and image the mouse brain
Researchers led by Associate Director Choi Wonshik of the Center for Molecular Spectroscopy and Dynamics within the Institute for Basic Science, Professor Kim Moonseok of The Catholic University of Korea, and Professor Choi Myunghwan of Seoul National University developed a new type of holographic microscope. It is said that the new microscope can "see through" the intact skull, and is capable of
5h
Scientists reveal the true identity of a Chinese octopus
A team of researchers came across a new-to-science species of octopus from Dongshan island in China's Fujian Province. At less than 40 g in its adult stage, Callistoctopus xiaohongxu is considered a small to moderate-sized octopus. The species, known to locals but long mistaken for a different species, has smooth skin and reddish-brown color.
5h
This Sleek Solar Car Goes 600 Miles on a Charge and Is Gearing Up for Production
Last month, California became the first US state to ban the sale of combustion-engine cars after 2035. But its transition to electric vehicles will probably be tricky. The state's electrical grid is experiencing instability even without the extra demand that will come from EVs; earlier this month, for example, parts of the Bay Area narrowly avoided rolling blackouts during a record-breaking heatw
6h
Meeting 2030 goal for electric cars could be impossible
The US government has set a national goal of reaching 50% penetration of plug-in electric vehicles by 2030, but meeting the goal is unlikely unless the cars become more affordable, research shows. "We need to focus policy makers, automakers, and electric utilities on how to stimulate consumer demand for—and automaker offerings of— affordable electric vehicles ," says John D. Graham, professor in
6h
China Discovers Mineral on the Moon That Could be Used for Nuclear Fusion
The moon is our nearest celestial neighbor and the only body aside from Earth where humans have ever set foot, but there's still a great deal we don't know about it. China's Chang'e-5 mission in 2020 returned the first lunar samples since the end of the Apollo program in 1976, and scientists now report the discovery of a new mineral in the payload. Even more interesting, the tiny crystallized min
6h
Feeling out of equilibrium in a dual geometric world: A novel theory for nonlinear dissipative phenomena
Losing energy is rarely a good thing, but now, researchers in Japan have shown how to extend the applicability of thermodynamics to systems that are not in equilibrium. By encoding the energy dissipation relationships in a geometric way, they were able to cast the physical constraints in a generalized geometric space. This work may significantly improve our understanding of chemical reaction netwo
6h
The number of ancient Martian lakes might have been dramatically underestimated by scientists
Lakes are bodies of water fed by rainfall, snowmelt, rivers and groundwater, through which, Earth is teeming with life. Lakes also contain critical geologic records of past climates. Though Mars is a frozen desert today, scientists have shown that Mars contains evidence of ancient lakes that existed billions of years ago, which could contain evidence for ancient life and climate conditions on the
6h
Germ cells move like tiny bulldozers
During fruit fly embryo formation, primordial germ cells—the stem cells that will later form eggs and sperm—must travel from the far end of the embryo to their final location in the gonads. Part of the primordial germ cell migration is passive; the cells are simply pushed into place by the movements of other cells. But at a certain point in development, the primordial germ cells must move on their
6h
A closer look at third-hand smoke and its risks
Using state-of-the-art techniques, researchers have gained a better understanding of the complex mix of hazardous chemicals in third-hand smoke—the residual contamination from cigarette smoking—which can linger long after smoking has occurred and pose health risks to non-smokers.
6h
Refreezing Earth's poles feasible and cheap, new study finds
The poles are warming several times faster than the global average, causing record smashing heatwaves that were reported earlier this year in both the Arctic and Antarctic. Melting ice and collapsing glaciers at high latitudes would accelerate sea level rise around the planet. Fortunately, refreezing the poles by reducing incoming sunlight would be both feasible and remarkably cheap, according to
6h
Global energy spectrum of the general oceanic circulation
For the first time, University of Rochester researchers have quantified the energy of ocean currents larger than 1,000 kilometers. In the process, they and their collaborators have discovered that the most energetic is the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, some 9,000 kilometers in diameter.
6h
Germ cells move like tiny bulldozers
During fruit fly embryo formation, primordial germ cells—the stem cells that will later form eggs and sperm—must travel from the far end of the embryo to their final location in the gonads. Part of the primordial germ cell migration is passive; the cells are simply pushed into place by the movements of other cells. But at a certain point in development, the primordial germ cells must move on their
6h
Gut microbes and humans on a joint evolutionary journey
The human gut microbiome is composed of thousands of different bacteria and archaea that vary widely between populations and individuals. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Biology in Tübingen have now discovered gut microbes that share a parallel evolutionary history with their human hosts: the microorganisms co-evolved in the human gut environment over hundreds of thousands of years. I
6h
Gut microbes and humans on a joint evolutionary journey
The human gut microbiome is composed of thousands of different bacteria and archaea that vary widely between populations and individuals. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Biology in Tübingen have now discovered gut microbes that share a parallel evolutionary history with their human hosts: the microorganisms co-evolved in the human gut environment over hundreds of thousands of years. I
6h
The Download: discovering proteins, and Pakistan's climate crisis
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. An AI that can design new proteins could help unlock new cures and materials What's happened? : A new AI tool could help researchers discover previously unknown proteins and design entirely new ones. When harnessed, it could help unlock the development of more
6h
Imprinting fidelity in mouse iPSCs depends on sex of donor cell and medium formulation
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-33013-5 Reprogramming somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is associated with epigenetic alterations. Here the authors assess DNA methylation in detail in multiple female and male mouse iPSC lines generated with different protocols and find that defects depend on the sex of donor cells and can be
7h
Electrostatic and steric effects underlie acetylation-induced changes in ubiquitin structure and function
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-33087-1 Ubiquitin is not only a posttranslational modifier but itself is subject to modifications, such as acetylation. Characterization of distinct acetylated ubiquitin variants reveals that each acetylation site has a particular impact on ubiquitin structure and its protein-protein interaction properties.
7h
Enzymatic synthesis of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids using a parallel cascade strategy and tyrosinase variants
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-33122-1 Pharmaceuticals derived from benzylisoquinoline alkaloids find application in modern medicine. Here, the authors report the design of a parallel enzymatic cascade to generate halogenated benzylisoquinoline alkaloids, that included engineering of tyrosinase mutants to enhance substrate capabilities.
7h
Water regulates the residence time of Benzamidine in Trypsin
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-33104-3 Water is an essential part of any biological system, yet many aspects of its role remain elusive. Here the authors show, in a paradigmatic ligand-protein system, that water modulates the ligand residence time in a complex and non-local way, with possible implications in drug design.
7h
Flera brytpunkter i jordens klimat vid 1,5 graders uppvärmning
Parisavtalets mål – att den globala uppvärmningen ska understiga 2 grader – är otillräckligt, enligt en ny analys. Flera brytpunkter för klimatet, så kallade tipping points, kan överskridas om jordens medeltemperatur ökar med mer än 1,5 grader. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
7h
Muntligt berättande viktigt i undervisningen
Anekdoter, historier och berättelser kan väcka elevernas intresse, ge nya perspektiv på ämnet och stärka relationen mellan lärare och elever. Det visar en avhandling från Göteborgs universitet. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
7h
Green Transition Will Save Money
It is difficult to project costs into the future, because there are many variables and small errors magnify over time. But still, statistical modeling can be done and validated to produce reliable estimates that can at least inform our discussion. There have been many methods of modeling the cost of global warming vs the cost of transitioning to net-zero carbon. In general they find that, while t
8h
An Ode to Being Read To
I fixed my insomnia with whiskey and audiobooks. Seriously. I was a terrible non-sleeper, once upon a time. In the small hours, in the little pointy hours, wife asleep, son asleep, dog asleep, when the whole apartment seemed to creak and bulge like a vessel rigged for oblivion, I would creep onto the couch and torture myself with last-man-in-the-worldness. But then I discovered it. I synthesized
8h
'Aural tattoos': sperm whales use sounds to signal social identity, say scientists
Research says clicks emitted from whales' heads are symbolic marking like human social expression Sperm whales are among the deepest divers on the planet. They are natural submarines, spending 70% of their time foraging for squid in the dark ocean for up to 80 minutes at a time. When they break through what Herman Melville called "the ocean's skin" , they socialise, twisting and turning their gre
8h
Perseverance Mars Rover Finds Exciting Organics in Ancient River Delta
The Perseverance rover has been exploring Jezero Crater since it arrived on Mars in early 2021. It made its way across the floor of the crater until this summer when it arrived at the river delta, which was NASA's reason for visiting Jezero in the first place. That decision appears to be paying off. NASA reports that Perseverance has collected several samples with the most abundant organic detect
9h
Stressful start causes chromosome errors in human embryos
Nature, Published online: 16 September 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-02949-5 Analysis of early human embryos reveals that DNA duplication after fertilization is highly inefficient. This causes DNA damage, chromosome breaks and abnormal numbers of chromosomes, impairing embryo development.
9h
The Checkup: What minimally conscious brains can do
Hello, and welcome to this first edition of The Checkup! Every week I'll be covering what I think are the most exciting, fascinating, and controversial developments in health, medical science, and biotech—and how they might help diagnose, treat, enhance, or even harm us. Thanks for joining me! (If you want to be among the first people to read these posts, make sure you sign up to the newsletter h
9h
What to Teach Young Kids About Gender
F or the foreseeable future , parents and educators will be grappling with this polarizing question: What, if anything, should prepubescent public-school students be taught about gender identity? "Resources and lesson plans for those who want to teach about gender identity are becoming much more common," The Washington Post reported in June. "Seven states now require that curriculums include LGBT
9h
Quiet Quitting Is a Fake Trend
Sign up for Derek's newsletter here . The hottest labor narrative right now is that everybody's "quiet quitting." Starting this summer, popular videos on TikTok with millions of views have used the term to refer to the art of having a job without letting it take over your life. The alliteration crawled out of that social-media petri dish into the mainstream-media landscape. Since August, The Wall
9h
Gen Z Never Learned to Read Cursive
I t was a good book , the student told the 14 others in the undergraduate seminar I was teaching, and it included a number of excellent illustrations, such as photographs of relevant Civil War manuscripts. But, he continued, those weren't very helpful to him, because of course he couldn't read cursive. Had I heard him correctly? Who else can't read cursive? I asked the class. The answer: about tw
9h
Palliativ immunterapi til patienter med lungekræft giver flere langtidsoverlevere
Dansk studie peger på, at palliativ behandling med immunterapi til patienter med ikke-småcellet lungekræft giver klart bedre overlevelsesrater, når man sammenligner med historiske data fra patienter behandlet med kemoterapi. Studiet viser også, at immunterapi både i første og senere linjer bevirker, at nogle patienter bliver langtidsoverlevere, hvilket bekræfter data fra kliniske studier og er utr
11h
Humanity must return to Agrarianism
Modern technology is not sustainable. As recent events in Russia show, shutting down even a single oil pipeline can devastate economies from thousands of miles away, soaring inflation, and even cause economic recession. The fact is that we have too many computer chips making complex decisions, they're buying and selling commodities, they're manipulating the price of stocks, they're replacing jobs
12h
Book Review: Exploring the Root of What Ails Us
In "The Myth of Normal," physician Gabor Maté argues that we've created a world that's fundamentally unhealthy for us. He suggests everything from trauma and depression to hypertension and even some forms of cancer are symptoms of living in a society that runs counter to our biological needs.
13h
Self-heating hotspots in superconducting nanowires cooled by phonon black-body radiation
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-32719-w Unlocking the ultimate potential of superconducting nanowire single photon detectors requires engineering their thermal properties. Here, the authors improve our understanding of heat flow in these devices and suggest routes to improved performance.
13h
Conserved features of TERT promoter duplications reveal an activation mechanism that mimics hotspot mutations in cancer
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-33099-x TERT promoter mutations are the most common noncoding alterations in cancers, although some remain to be characterised. Here, the authors identify TERT promoter duplications across seven cancer types that are functionally equivalent to well-known hotspot TERT mutations and are clonal in a multifocal gliobla
13h
Media-saturation challenges trust in European democracy
Between doomscrolling and disinformation, our media-saturated world makes it difficult to know who to trust. To mark today's International Day of Democracy we spoke to a journalism researcher about the role of media in a healthy democracy.
14h
Kong Søren den første
Magt­analyse. Efter flere års tilløb som nummer to på listen over de mest magtfulde personer i den danske sundhedssektor er Sundhedsstyrelsens direktør Søren Brostrøm strøget forbi statsminister Mette Frederiksen, og er i år nummer ét på listen.
14h
Formanden, der kæmper for den nære relation
Selvom det lå i kortene, at Jørgen Skadborg ­skulle være formand for PLO, blev formandsskiftet mere hektisk end planlagt. Timingen var elendig, men det var hans tur. I forhandlingsrummet kæmper han for at ­bevare retten til den nære patientkontakt.
14h
»Jeg er stolt af det, jeg har opnået i min karriere«
Som 37-årig troede Susanne Axelsen, at hun skulle dø af kræft. Mere end to årtier senere forsøger hun stadig at nå det hele på den halve tid. Det er en drivkraft, der har været med til at gøre den 60-årige urogynækolog til en af sundheds­væsenets markante skikkelser, men som også til tider har gjort det svært at sige stop og selv 'vælge klogt'.
14h
SOSU'ernes frontkæmper fandt sin egen vej til indflydelse
MAGTENS TOP 100: Torben K. Hollmann går forrest i SOSU'ernes kamp for at ændre samfundet og give en stemme til en af de faggrupper, der ofte bliver glemt i sundhedsvæsenet. I folkeskolen på Falster spåede en lærer ham små chancer for en karriere, men som tillidsmand i psykiatrien fandt den nuværende sektorformand i FOA sin vej til indflydelse.
14h
Hastrups hastige himmelflugt
MAGTENS TOP 100: Ældre Sagens administrerende direktør, Bjarne Hastrup, er i år kravlet op på top 10-listen over de mest magtfulde mennesker i det danske sundhedsvæsen.
14h
Hellere tage en risiko end sige nej bare for en sikkerheds skyld
MAGTENS TOP 100: Dette er historien om den flittige Herning-pige, der voksede op i den midtjyske middelklasse for siden at drage til København med ambitioner om at gøre en forskel. Med en placering som nummer 17 på Dagens Medicins magtliste 2022 har Lif-direktør Ida Sofie Jensen ifølge Magtpanelet aldrig haft større indflydelse på dansk sundhed.
14h
Magtliste afspejler nye tendenser
LEDER: Den massive mangel på arbejdskraft i sundhedssektoren i disse år betyder, at de tektoniske magtplader under sundhedsvæsenet er ved at forskyde sig i en retning, der potentielt kan give de forskellige faggrupper meget mere magt, end de har i dag.
14h
Mexican government says train poses no threat to skeleton
Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History said Thursday that a prehistoric human skeleton found recently in a flooded cave system along the country's Caribbean coast was actually registered by the institute in 2019 and would not be threatened by a nearby tourist train project.
14h
Constipated scorpions, love at first sight inspire Ig Nobels
The sex lives of constipated scorpions, cute ducklings with an innate sense of physics, and a life-size rubber moose may not appear to have much in common, but they all inspired the winners of this year's Ig Nobels, the prize for comical scientific achievement.
14h
Photos of the Week: Cliff Diving, Bull Chasing, River Ballet
A fossilized dinosaur skull in Paris, protests over high fuel prices in Haiti, wildfires and mudflows in California, continued warfare in eastern Ukraine, a music festival in Rio de Janeiro, drag racing in Thailand, mourning for Queen Elizabeth in the United Kingdom, and much more
15h
Schneider Shorts 16.09.2022 – Targeted Harassment
Schneider Shorts 16.09.2022 – Israelis solve COVID-19 and lab-grown meat, Danes solve obesity and autism, a Californian Persian solves diabetes, with a harassed editor, an unretractable Schrödinger's paper, Temple fraud on national news, how much Dr Oz loves puppies, more eugenics endorsement from EMBL, and a persecuted dirty old man in Marseille with a sperm bank.
15h
Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2022 – winning images
Some of the winning images from the Royal Observatory Greenwich's 14th Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition. The selection includes the winning image by Gerald Rhemann, Disconnection Event, a rare photograph of a piece of Comet Leonard's gas tail being disconnected and carried away by the solar wind The images will be on display as part of an exhibition, which opens at the National Mari
15h
Magten og æren
Med magtlisten må vi tænke på, at en stor del af disse indflydelsesrige personer netop sidder med magten og ansvaret for, at vi får et sundhedsvæsen i balance. Der er ikke nemme løsninger, og dogmer og privilegier kan blive udfordret. Men vil vi have et bæredygtigt sundhedsvæsen, hvor opgaver og ressourcer er i balance, så skal der ske noget.
16h
Seismic device made for extraterrestrial research can help tackle climate change on Earth
Underground carbon sequestration is a promising approach to fight climate change, yet there are major obstacles to overcome before this technology can be applied on a large scale. A new study from Japan may address one such obstacle by identifying how to continuously and affordably monitor carbon reservoirs to detect leaks or other changes that require attention. The article, "4 cm Portable Active
16h
Is Biden the Most Pro-Union President in History?
For now, the country's railroads will continue to run. A national strike—which would've started at midnight tonight and disrupted both freight and passenger rail—was averted by a tentative deal between union leaders and railroad management. That deal still needs to be ratified by the union members themselves. President Joe Biden praised the agreement as "a big win for America." The president "bas
18h
Beyond AlphaFold: A.I. excels at creating new proteins
Over the past two years, machine learning has revolutionized protein structure prediction. Now there's a similar revolution in protein design. Biologists show that machine learning can be used to create protein molecules much more accurately and quickly than previously possible. By creating new, useful proteins not found in nature, they hope this advance will lead to many new vaccines, treatments,
19h
Scientists discover novel mechanism that causes rare brain disease
A rare but potentially debilitating brain disorder finally has a definitive cause, thanks to research teams working on opposite sides of the globe. A mutation in the gene that manages the transportation out of cells of zinc, an essential dietary micronutrient, is responsible for the disorder, called hypomyelinating leukodystrophy.
19h
Beyond AlphaFold: A.I. excels at creating new proteins
Over the past two years, machine learning has revolutionized protein structure prediction. Now there's a similar revolution in protein design. Biologists show that machine learning can be used to create protein molecules much more accurately and quickly than previously possible. By creating new, useful proteins not found in nature, they hope this advance will lead to many new vaccines, treatments,
20h
Physicists demo method for designing topological metals
Physicists have demonstrated a design principle for predicting whether metallic compounds are likely to host topological states that arise from strong electron interactions. The method cross-references theoretical models for 'Weyl-Kondo semimetals' that are based on realistic crystal structures with information from a materials database.
20h
Saturn Might Be Hiding Remains of a Secret, Massive Moon in Its Rings
Secret Moon A team of astronomers at MIT suspect Saturn may be hiding the remains of an ancient moon in its rings — which could explain the planet's unusual tilt. In a new paper published in the journal Science this week, the team suggests there may have been a sizable satellite dubbed Chrysalis orbiting the gas giant for several billion years, a tantalizing new theory that could explain why the
20h
Is Current Understanding of Physics Sufficient to Understand the Brain?
I am interested in your takes and any journals/works related to this question. Is it assumed that what we know of physics is enough to understand the brain and behavior or is it known that there are brain functions/activities that physics cannot adequately explain? Not necessarily meaning to go down the hard problem of consciousness rabbit hole, but I'm open to discuss it. Thanks. submitted by /u
21h
Roger Federer's Other Legacy
Of all the achievements that Roger Federer has notched during his stellar tennis career, his 19 consecutive ATP Fans' Favourite awards are particularly telling. The accolades are not remotely as consequential as his 20 Grand Slam titles (the third-most ever) or the 310 weeks he spent ranked No. 1 in the world (the second-most ever). The Fans' Favourite award is essentially an annual popularity co
21h
Why America's Floors Turned Gray
This is an edition of The Atlantic Daily, a newsletter that guides you through the biggest stories of the day, helps you discover new ideas, and recommends the best in culture. Sign up for it here . Today our staff writer Amanda Mull answers my questions about her recent article exploring gray floors, house flipping, and how America fell under HGTV's spell. But first, here are three new stories f
21h
Japanese professor wins Ig Nobel prize for study on knob turning
Annual satirical awards laud little-known research topics such as why ducklings swim in a line formation It is one of life's overlooked arts: the optimal way to turn a knob. Now an investigation into this neglected question has been recognised with one of science's most coveted accolades: an Ig Nobel prize. After a series of lab-based trials, a team of Japanese industrial designers arrived at the
22h
Videos on healthy eating can help obese children lose weight, study finds
Doctor says findings show online healthcare can be as effective as face-to-face appointments Watching videos about how to cook, eat less and choose healthier foods can help obese children lose weight, reduce their risk of diabetes and become happier, a study has found. The doctor behind the findings believes they can help in treating childhood obesity because they show that online healthcare can
22h
Joe Biden Mocked for Tweeting About EVs With Pic of Gas Car
Pure Optimism It's no secret that US president Joe Biden is prone to gaffes . But confusing a gas-guzzling Corvette sports car for an electric vehicle has us stumped. "You all know I'm a car guy," Biden tweeted this week . "Today I visited the Detroit Auto Show and saw firsthand the electric vehicles that give me so many reasons to be optimistic about our future." Confoundingly, though, the image
22h
Inside the Minds of the Short Men Who Get Their Legs Broken to Add 3-6 Inches of Height
Some short men are so insecure about their height that they're quite literally allowing doctors to break their bones during surgical leg-lengthening procedures. As GQ reports , the excruciating surgery can involve a year of "relentless, ambient" pain during healing — though the orthopedic surgeons who do the leg-lengthening often give their patients pain medicine, per a man who got it done, which
22h
Immunotherapy reduces lung and liver fibrosis in mice
Chronic diseases often lead to fibrosis, a condition in which organ tissue suffers from excessive scarring. Researchers have now developed an immunotherapy that specifically targets the cause — activated fibroblasts — while leaving normal connective tissue cells unharmed. If this approach is also found to work in humans, it could lead to an effective treatment for fibrosis.
22h
People who receive periodontal care have better outcomes after heart attack, study finds
Researchers studied patients receiving periodontal care, dental cleanings or no dental care during 2016-2018 and who had acute myocardial infarction (heart attack) in 2017. They found that patients who had heart attacks and received periodontal maintenance care had the shortest length of stay in the hospital, and more follow-up visits. The longest length of stay was experienced by the no-dental-ca
23h
Should Your Flu and COVID Shots Go in Different Arms?
At a press briefing earlier this month, Ashish Jha, the White House's COVID czar, laid out some pretty lofty expectations for America's immunity this fall. "Millions" of Americans, he said, would be flocking to pharmacies for the newest version of the COVID vaccine in September and October, at the same appointment where they'd get their yearly flu shot. "It's actually a good idea," he told the pr
23h
The "fingerprints" of climate change are clear in Pakistan's devastating floods
Climate change very likely intensified the South Asian monsoon that flooded Pakistan in recent weeks, killing more than 1,000 people and destroying nearly 2 million homes. That's according to a new analysis by World Weather Attribution, a network of scientists who use climate models, weather observations, and other tools to determine whether global warming increased the likelihood or severity of
23h
Video Shows Vivid Green Meteor Screaming Over Residential Area
Fly-By On Wednesday night, thousands of onlookers in Ireland and the UK watched in awe as the green fireball of a low flying meteor streaked across the night sky of residential areas. First spotted after nightfall, the fireball spurned over 1,000 reports to the International Meteor Organization. In other words, there were a lot of eyeballs on this burning space debris. And luckily for all of us a
23h
Best LG Sound Bars of 2022
Home theater sound systems with sound bars have succeeded in creating immersive audio that transformed our living rooms into personal cinemas. Suddenly, the nightly news and the big game had the same booming, dramatic sound reproduction as blockbuster action movies. But sound bars aren't simply a way to recreate a cinema sound experience in the home. As audio technologies have leapt forward — to
23h
Researchers discover expanding and intensifying low-oxygen zone in the Arabian gulf
A team of researchers from the Arabian Center for Climate and Environmental Sciences (ACCESS) at NYU Abu Dhabi (NYUAD) studied the evolution of dissolved oxygen in the Arabian Gulf over three decades and discovered a significant decline in oxygen concentrations and the expansion of the seasonal near-bottom hypoxic zone (lower oxygen levels near the bottom of the Gulf in certain seasons). The resea
23h
Cracking the secrets to earthquake safety, one shake simulation at a time
To make sure our buildings and infrastructure are earthquake-safe, we must understand how seismic activity affects different structures. Miniature models and historical observations are helpful, but they only scratch the surface of understanding and quantifying a geological event as powerful and far-reaching as a major earthquake.
23h
New, comprehensive framework could better inform carbon-cutting policies
Researchers have developed an integrated framework to take into account the many variables relevant to accurate carbon emissions modeling, allowing for policy makers to see a fuller picture to choose the best path forward. They applied this framework to model transportation energy emissions for China's 31 regions.
23h
Better screening could predict and prevent sudden cardiac death in young people
Nearly nine in ten cases of sudden cardiac death (SCD) due to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) in young people are preceded by symptoms, ECG abnormalities or a positive family history, according to a new study. Those findings suggest that expanding cardiac screening beyond competitive athletes could aid in the prevention of SCD in the young population with HCM.
23h
Why Elon Musk Said a Remote Controlled Sex Toy Was Used to Cheat at a Chess Tournament
Fact-Checkmate Before you say anything: yes, this is beneath us. But news is news, and this ongoing chess drama demands to be unpacked. And so it's with great regret that we break down why, exactly, Elon Musk accused a young chess player of using vibrating, remote-controlled anal beads to beat the game's current No. 1 star. "If they want me to strip fully naked, I will do it," the young champion
1d
Save Hundreds on the Best Desktop Gaming PCs in September
Summer is finally winding down, and there are few things as satisfying as gaming during "pumpkin spice" months. The temperatures cooling off mean you can finally game on your PC without the fear of your desktop overheating. Still, if your go-to device is a little less than powerful, there's a sale on tower gaming PCs going on right now so you can be ready for all the fun the season has to offer.
1d
Ether Price Falls After "Merge" to Cut Its Environmental Toll
Post-Merge The Ethereum blockchain has finally completed its long-awaited "Merge ," switching from a proof-of-work to proof-of-stake system, a change that has allowed it to become substantially more environmentally friendly. It's a pivotal moment in the history of the tech, with experts hailing it as the "biggest event in crypto since the creation of bitcoin and Ethereum," as Jon Charbonneau, a r
1d
Fireball seen over UK confirmed as meteor after day of confusion
Experts revise initial assumption that sighting was space junk linked to Elon Musk's satellite programme A fireball seen over many parts of the northern UK has been confirmed as a meteor after a day of confusion about its identity. The fireball was visible above northern England, Northern Ireland and Scotland as it blazed across the clear night sky just after 10pm on Wednesday night. Continue rea
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Researchers use purified liquid xenon to search for mysterious dark matter particles
Sitting a mile below ground in an abandoned gold mine in South Dakota is a gigantic cylinder holding 10 tons of purified liquid xenon closely watched by more than 250 scientists around the world. That tank of xenon is the heart of the LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) experiment, an effort to detect dark matter—the mysterious invisible substance that makes up 85% of the matter in the universe.
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Study shows potential of Southern cattail for phytoremediation of areas contaminated by mine tailings
Typha domingensis, the Southern cattail, a reedy marsh plant that inhabits fresh to slightly brackish waters and is about 2.5 m tall, can scavenge up to 34 times more manganese from contaminated soil than other plants found in similar environments. In a recent study, it accumulated between 10 and 13 times more manganese than other naturally occurring wetland plants such as hibiscus, sedges and rus
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How songbirds' striking colors put them at risk
Bright, uniquely colored songbirds are at higher risk of extinction and more likely to be traded as pets. Researchers also predict that almost 500 additional bird species, most of them living in the tropics, are at risk of future trade based on their unique and desirable coloration.
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When microbiomes collide
Researchers used data from over 300 human fecal microbiota transplants to understand what happens when two gut microbiomes mix together. The answer could inform better therapeutic strategies for gut disorders and provide a richer understanding of how microbes behave and interact in complex natural ecosystems.
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New signal for triggering human immune response
Researchers found that disruption of a cellular structure, known as the actin cytoskeleton, is a 'priming signal' for the body to respond to a virus. These findings potentially lay the groundwork for development of new anti-viral vaccines and treatments.
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Study tracks waterbird use of Chicago-area wetlands
A three-year study in northeastern Illinois and northwestern Indiana found that — even at small scales — emergent wetlands or ponds support many wetland bird species. The study also found that, at least in the years surveyed, the level of urbanization had little effect on most of the studied species' use of such sites, provided the right kinds of habitat were available.
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