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Nyheder2022september20

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We've only just begun to examine the racial disparities of long covid
Liza Fisher is preparing for a busy day. In about an hour, her mother will drive her to a clinic, where she will receive IV fluids and iron treatments for her anemia. When the IV bag is empty, she'll head to an adaptive gym, where she'll don compression pants and take a class for people with disabilities. She'll also consult with a therapist familiar with postural tachycardia syndrome, a conditio
4min
Fish to help in search for MS drugs
The zebrafish serves as a model organism for researchers around the world: it can be used to study important physiological processes that also take place in a similar form in the human body. It is therefore routinely used in the search for possible active substances against diseases. Researchers have now described an innovative way to do this. In this process, the larvae fish are made a bit more '
18min
Telehealth makes hearing health care more equitable
Scientists explore how digital health solutions can expand audiology services in clinical and research settings. Audiology assessment via telehealth would allow patients to access care while a specialist is located hundreds of miles away and, as a research tool, telehealth would allow for more representative and decentralized data on hearing, without compromising results. The team is currently sca
18min
Passive cooling system could benefit off-grid locations
A new passive cooling system relies on evaporation and radiation and requires no electricity. The device can provide up to about 19 degrees Fahrenheit (9.3 degrees Celsius) of cooling from the ambient temperature, to help keep food fresh longer or supplement air conditioning.
18min
Adar-mediated A-to-I editing is required for embryonic patterning and innate immune response regulation in zebrafish
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-33260-6 Additional roles for A-to-I editing of RNA continue to be uncovered. Niescierowicz et al. report prevalent A-to-I editing in the zebrafish transcriptome, and the distinct maternal and zygotic functions of the editing enzyme Adar in embryonic patterning and in the regulation of innate immune response, respec
23min
Fish can help in the search for multiple sclerosis drugs
The zebrafish should be known to many aquarium enthusiasts, mainly because of its striking pigmentation. However, the characteristic black-blue stripes, to which the animal owes its name, only form over time. Its eyelash-sized larvae, on the other hand, are still more or less transparent. Many developmental processes in their bodies can therefore be observed under the light microscope. For this re
38min
From the atom to natural killer cell: The story of an unexpected protein structure
The discovery of a peculiar protein structure and the quest to confirm it has led to the description of interacting receptor clusters on natural killer (NK) cells. The study by the research team of Dr. Ondřej Vaněk from the Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Charles University, and his colleagues from the Institute of Biotechnology of the Czech Academy of Sciences in the center BIOCEV
49min
Silicon nanopillars for quantum communication
Across the world, specialists are working on implementing quantum information technologies. One important path involves light: Looking ahead, single light packages, also known as light quanta or photons, could transmit data that is both coded and effectively tap proof. To this end, new photon sources are required that emit single light quanta in a controlled fashion — and on demand. Only recently
1h
Statistical analysis aims to solve Greek volcano mystery
One of the largest volcanic eruptions in the Holocene epoch—as measured by the volume of material ejected—occurred on the Greek island of Santorini, traditionally known as Thera. It is considered a pivotal event in the prehistory of the Aegean and East Mediterranean region, with the city of Akrotiri, buried some 1,600 years before Pompeii, becoming one of the key archaeological sites of the second
1h
Lack of public appreciation contributes to loneliness in farming, study shows
A lack of public appreciation for farmers, and an understanding of the work they do and the pressures they're under contributes to feelings of loneliness, according to a new study. The paper, "It's a lonely old world": Developing a multidimensional understanding of loneliness in farming," is published in the journal Sociologia Ruralis.
1h
Drumming in woodpeckers is neurologically similar to singing in songbirds
Researchers led by Matthew Fuxjager at Brown University, U.S. and Eric Schuppe at Wake Forest University, U.S. have found regions in the woodpecker forebrain that show characteristics that until now have only been associated with vocal learning in animals and language in humans. Publishing in the open access journal PLOS Biology on September 20, the study shows that instead of being related to voc
1h
Super-resolved coherent Raman spectroscopy with quantum light
In recent years, entangled photons—a popular quantum light source—have been widely used in quantum imaging, optical interferometry, quantum computing, quantum communication, and other fields. Spontaneous parametric down-conversion generates the entangled photon pairs with conserved energy and momentum, so that the quantum correlation in space and time is encoded. Such a property enables a quantum
1h
Energy storage materials built from nano-sized molecular blocks
Molecules of the rare metallic element niobium can be used as molecular building blocks to design electrochemical energy storage materials. Mark Rambaran, Department of Chemistry at Umeå University, presents in his thesis a method for producing solid materials from aqueous solutions containing nano-sized niobium molecules, called polyoxoniobates.
1h
How two isomers of [IrC₄H₂]⁺ independently react with either methane or water
This study was led by Prof. Shaodong Zhou (College of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Zhejiang University) and Prof. Xiao-Nan Wu (Department of Chemistry, Fudan University). The experiments were performed by using an ion trap mass spectrometer equipped with a laser vaporization−supersonic expansion ion combined with quantum chemical calculations.
1h
New chemistry happens when dust meets pollution
It is a new chemistry found to take place in a cloud droplet, a wet aerosol, or on the surface of a dust particle. All that it takes to get started is natural events like dust storms, ocean wave action, volcanic eruptions, and wildfires, which increase the amount of aerosols in the atmosphere.
1h
Earth-like exoplanets unlikely to be another 'pale blue dot'
When searching for Earth-like worlds around other stars, instead of looking for the "pale blue dot" described by Carl Sagan, new research suggests that a hunt for dry, cold "pale yellow dots" might have a better chance of success. The near balance of land-to-water that has helped life flourish on Earth could be highly unusual, according to a Swiss-German study presented at the Europlanet Science C
1h
Geoengineering could destabilize tropical peat soils
The Earth is warming up at an increasing rate. A contributing factor is carbon dioxide (CO2), a greenhouse gas, prompting researchers to investigate methods to reduce levels. In her dissertation at the University of Bremen, Dr. Alexandra Klemme discovered that the "enhanced weathering" strategy—which, until now, has been considered a promising method—is not suitable for removing CO2 from tropical
1h
Despite frequent sightings, red squirrel habitats in Berlin are small and fragmented
Red squirrels are among the most commonly sighted wildlife in European big cities such as Berlin. However, their habitats are more reminiscent of a patchwork quilt full of challenges, a team of scientists led by the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) found out, with the help of computer models and red squirrel sightings by citizen scientists. The models link sightings to
1h
Home ownership leads to less happiness than expected
We aren't very good at predicting what will make us happy. That is one finding from a study by Basel economists. They investigated the effects of purchasing a home on life satisfaction. The positive effect on happiness did not last as long as people expected.
1h
Amphibian die-off leads to malaria spike in Latin America
Dozens of species of frogs, salamanders and other amphibians quietly disappeared from parts of Latin America in the 1980s and 2000s, with little notice from humans, outside of a small group of ecologists. Yet the amphibian decline had direct health consequences for people, according to a study from the University of California, Davis.
1h
Radical new treatment system lights up cancer therapy
One approach to treating cancer is photodynamic therapy using photo-uncaging systems, in which light is used to activate a cancer-fighting agent in situ at the tumor. However, suitable agents must be stable under visible light, have an anti-tumor effect in low-oxygen environments, and have the ability to be activated by low-energy tissue-penetrative red light—a combination of properties that is di
1h
Life on Earth might really have started with clay
Life on Earth may have gotten its start between mica sheets, Helen Hansma argues. In mythologies and origin stories around the world, various cultures and religions point to clay as the vessel of life, the primordial material that creator gods imbued with a self-sustaining existence. Nowadays we have biology to explain how life comes to be, but could these tales of old hit closer to the mark than
1h
Years after Flint water crisis began, locals face depression, PTSD
Data from the largest mental health survey of the Flint, Michigan community indicate that an estimated one in five adults, or roughly 13,600 people, had clinical depression, and an estimated one in four, or 15,000 people, had PTSD five years after the water crisis began. "The mental health burden of America's largest public-works environmental disaster clearly continues for many adults in Flint,"
1h
Researchers estimate there are 2.5m ants for every human across the planet
The analysis is based on 489 studies of ant populations spanning every continent where the insects live The world's human population is forecast to surpass 8bn in the coming months. Compared with ants, that is a mediocre milestone. Researchers have made the most thorough assessment to date of the global population of ants and the estimated total is a mind-blowing 20 quadrillion of them, or approx
1h
Workplace trauma can affect anyone in any occupation. How can we deal with it? | Ashwini Padhi
It doesn't just happen to emergency or frontline workers, and can stem from accidents, bullying, and even severe stress The modern mind is a column where experts discuss mental health issues they are seeing in their work With no apparent signs of trauma, Kate* is by all appearances a put-together woman in her early 40s: professional, well-spoken, immaculate and confident. When I ask her what has
1h
Math could help crack forensic genetic cases 10x faster
Researchers have a new strategy that could speed up cold case investigations. Solving crimes with forensic genetic genealogy is slow and complicated. The researchers' new mathematical analysis could crack cases 10 times faster. For nearly 37 years, she was known as Buckskin Girl—a young, anonymous murder victim found outside Dayton, Ohio, wearing a deer-hide poncho. Then, in April 2018, police an
2h
How Do Fireflies Flash in Sync? Studies Suggest a New Answer.
In Japanese folk traditions, they symbolize departing souls or silent, ardent love. Some Indigenous cultures in the Peruvian Andes view them as the eyes of ghosts. And across various Western cultures, fireflies, glow-worms and other bioluminescent beetles have been linked to a dazzling and at times contradictory array of metaphoric associations: "childhood, crop, doom, elves, fear, habitat change
2h
Save $50 and Protect Your Home with Eufy's Security Video Doorbell and Other Great Deals
Nobody wants to think about installing a video doorbell because the implication is you're worried about someone breaking into your home, but there are plenty of other useful (and not scary) reasons to get one. A video doorbell can tell you when a package arrived, and allow you to keep an eye on it until you get home. You'll be able to see when friends, family, and neighbors come over when you're
2h
We're Absolutely Fascinated by These Glow-in-the-Dark Lane Markings
Light Itself Images of glow-in-the-dark lane markings have gone viral this month, accumulating nearly 100,000 shares on Facebook, according to News.com.au — and they're fascinating to look at. The photoluminescent markings are part of a recently completed "trial run" by Tarmac Linemarking, a road construction company based in Victoria, Australia that's gotten some government funding to experiment
2h
Best Touch Screen Laptops in 2022
With so many touch screen laptops on the market, finding one that fits your needs and budget can be an overwhelming process. Although touch screen laptops are a narrower subset of the larger market, there is still significant variation amongst top models in their computing power, storage capacity, and design. The pressure to take each of these factors into careful consideration is compounded by t
2h
Tesla Supercharger Prices Surge In Europe
Supercharged Me Tesla is significantly hiking up the prices of its Supercharger network in Europe, in a response to the ongoing energy crisis that's hit the continent in the wake of Russia's invasion of Ukraine. That means topping up batteries has become a lot more expensive for Tesla owners, Electrek reports , with Supercharger stations charging $0.50 per kilowatt hour at many locations. Prices
2h
Biden Really Screwed Up When He Said the "Pandemic Is Over"
You'd think that in the two-plus years since March 2020, the US government might have learned a thing or two about the importance — and precarity — of public health messaging. Unfortunately, though, the gov's dismal initial response to monkeypox was only a sign of things to come. This weekend, President Joe Biden's declared on " 60 Minutes " that the "pandemic is over" — yet another galling high
2h
Plant breeding: Using 'invisible' chromosomes to pass on packages of positive traits
The ideal crop plant is tasty and high-yielding while also being resistant to diseases and pests. But if the relevant genes are far apart on a chromosome, some of these positive traits can be lost during breeding. To ensure that positive traits can be passed on together, researchers have used CRISPR/Cas molecular scissors to invert and thus genetically deactivate nine-tenths of a chromosome. The t
2h
How retail is using AI to prevent fraud
Retailers face an evolving landscape of fraud tactics each day. It's why companies are increasingly turning to AI to try and catch threat patterns never seen before, and block attacks before they ever happen. While this approach lends itself to efficiency, it's also one that relies on increasingly complex data profiles of consumers. In this episode, we peer into the world of retail fraud detectio
2h
Nvidia Announces Jetson Orin Nano, Updates Isaac Nova Orin Dev Kit
Nvidia announced its new Jetson Orin Nano system-on-module at GTC 2022. During the Nvidia keynote at GTC today, the company unveiled its new Jetson Orin Nano system-on-module (SOM) and announced updates to its Nova Orin robot reference platform. At $199, the new Orin Nano is more expensive than the older Xavier-based Jetson Nano. Nvidia claims that the new hardware is much faster, and the system
3h
Putin Is Cornered
President Volodymyr Zelensky is playing the role of a Ukrainian Churchill, minus some of the fantastical notions and with an infinitely better workout regimen. Like Churchill in 1940, he has been the indispensable man in a mortal crisis, without whom his country might well have been lost, and whose eloquence has rallied not only his fellow citizens but a larger democratic world. I recently met hi
3h
The Algorithm: AI-generated art raises tricky questions about ethics, copyright, and security
Welcome to The Algorithm 2.0! I'm Melissa Heikkilä, MIT Technology Review's senior reporter for AI. I'm so happy you're here. Every week I will demystify the latest AI breakthroughs and cut through the hype. This week, I want to talk to you about some of the unforeseen consequences that might come from one of the hottest areas of AI: text-to-image generation. Text-to-image AI models are a lot of
3h
Despite frequent sightings, red squirrel habitats in Berlin are small and fragmented
Red squirrels are among the most commonly sighted wildlife in European big cities such as Berlin. However, their habitats are more reminiscent of a patchwork quilt full of challenges, a team of scientists led by the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) found out, with the help of computer models and red squirrel sightings by citizen scientists. The models link sightings to
3h
Did my computer say it best?
With autocorrect and auto-generated email responses, algorithms offer plenty of assistance to help people express themselves. But new research shows people who rely on algorithms for assistance with language-related, creative tasks didn't improve their performance and were more likely to trust low-quality advice.
3h
Can eyes on self-driving cars reduce accidents?
Robotic eyes on autonomous vehicles could improve pedestrian safety, according to a new study. Participants played out scenarios in virtual reality (VR) and had to decide whether to cross a road in front of a moving vehicle or not. When that vehicle was fitted with robotic eyes, which either looked at the pedestrian (registering their presence) or away (not registering them), the participants were
3h
New study explains link between diabetes and UTIs
Lower immunity and recurring infections are common in type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Researchers now show that the immune system of people with diabetes has lower levels of the antimicrobial peptide psoriasin, which compromises the urinary bladder's cell barrier, increasing the risk of urinary tract infection.
3h
Plant breeding: Using 'invisible' chromosomes to pass on packages of positive traits
The ideal crop plant is tasty and high-yielding while also being resistant to diseases and pests. But if the relevant genes are far apart on a chromosome, some of these positive traits can be lost during breeding. To ensure that positive traits can be passed on together, researchers have used CRISPR/Cas molecular scissors to invert and thus genetically deactivate nine-tenths of a chromosome. The t
3h
Radical new treatment system lights up cancer therapy
One approach to treating cancer is photodynamic therapy using photo-uncaging systems, in which light is used to activate a cancer-fighting agent in situ at the tumor. However, suitable agents must be stable under visible light, have an anti-tumor effect in low-oxygen environments, and have the ability to be activated by low-energy tissue-penetrative red light—a combination of properties that is di
3h
Kanye West Was Right(ish)
Underneath his misguided, inflammatory bluster about MAGA and slavery, Kanye holds a radical vision for a Black future.
4h
Why you should pay attention to fly vomit
New research concerning 'synanthropic' flies — or the non-biting flies that live with us — argues that we need to pay far more attention to them as disease carriers. While epidemiologists have focused their attention on the biting flies that can spread diseases by transferring infected blood from host to host, it turns out that what the non-biting flies regurgitate is a far greater risk to human
4h
Capturing ocean turbulence at the underbelly of sea ice
Turbulence in the sea plays a key role in mixing ocean waters and transporting nutrients, heat, and dissolved gases. Sources of ocean turbulence are highly varied and include wind, currents, heating and cooling cycles, and more. The Arctic Ocean features a distinct cause of turbulence: drifting sea ice.
4h
Astronomers find a sun-like star orbiting a nearby black hole
In 1916, Karl Schwarzchild theorized the existence of black holes as a resolution to Einstein's field equations for his theory of general relativity. By the mid-20th century, astronomers began detecting black holes for the first time using indirect methods, which consisted of observing their effects on surrounding objects and space. Since the 1980s, scientists have studied supermassive black holes
4h
New tool for early detection of hypertension
Russian scientists have come up with a new tool for early detection of hypertension. They applied surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy powered by silver nanoparticles to detect hypertension-induced molecular changes in blood cells at early stages of the disease. The study was published in Biosensors.
4h
Exploring how neurons in human skin affect pigmentation
Your skin forms the physical boundary between you and the outside world, yet it still holds a surprising number of secrets. Now, researchers from Japan have discovered that sensory nerve cells in the skin do more than just help us feel our way around.
4h
Study investigates longer life due to faulty RNA processing
The control of RNA metabolism is crucial to the regulation of animal longevity, researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Biology of Aging in Cologne have now discovered. They found that worms live longer when certain RNAs are processed differently during RNA maturation. This could be an additional way for organisms to control the aging process.
4h
Your phone could measure your blood oxygen level
A new proof-of-principle study shows a smartphone's camera and flash can detect blood oxygen saturation levels down to 70%. That's the lowest value that pulse oximeters should be able to measure, as recommended by the US Food and Drug Administration. When we breathe in, our lungs fill with oxygen, which is distributed to our red blood cells for transportation throughout our bodies. Our bodies nee
4h
Study investigates longer life due to faulty RNA processing
The control of RNA metabolism is crucial to the regulation of animal longevity, researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Biology of Aging in Cologne have now discovered. They found that worms live longer when certain RNAs are processed differently during RNA maturation. This could be an additional way for organisms to control the aging process.
4h
Your invitation to disrupt philanthropy | Sara Lomelin
Philanthropy disruptor Sara Lomelin thinks communities can build power through collective giving and the model of "giving circles": groups of people with shared values who come together to make change, strengthen their social fabric and help diverse solutions get funded. Learn the four steps to start a thriving giving circle in your community — and see how thousands of people worldwide are alread
4h
'Lab-Grown' Dairy Products Replace Cows With Yeast
(Photo: Engin Akyurt/Unsplash) The last several years have seen a sharp increase in the number of milk alternatives hitting supermarket shelves. Where cow's milk once sat alone now sits soy, almond, oat, macadamia, coconut, hemp, cashew, and even pea milks. But as much as these products aim to replicate the smooth texture and slightly-sweet taste of cow's milk, most are far from the "real thing."
4h
Tracking a network of 100,000 mutants
What fundamentally sets a human being apart from every other living creature comes down to differences in DNA sequences—a set of genetically-inherited molecules found in every cell of every organism. These differences have accumulated over millions of years, mainly via random mutations—basically errors in how the DNA was copied. Most of these mutations negatively impact the organism and will likel
4h
Advanced imaging sheds light on immune escape of shape-shifting fungus
Fungal pathogens have a major global impact upon human health—they are often difficult to diagnose and treat, and there is an urgent need for better diagnostics and more effective antifungal treatments. Using newly developed imaging technologies, Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute researchers have today revealed how Candida albicans, a common fungus, evades immune responses. According to the r
4h
Tracking a network of 100,000 mutants
What fundamentally sets a human being apart from every other living creature comes down to differences in DNA sequences—a set of genetically-inherited molecules found in every cell of every organism. These differences have accumulated over millions of years, mainly via random mutations—basically errors in how the DNA was copied. Most of these mutations negatively impact the organism and will likel
4h
Silicon nanopillars for quantum communication
Around the world, specialists are working on implementing quantum information technologies. One important path involves light: Looking ahead, single light packages, also known as light quanta or photons, could transmit data that is both coded and effectively tap proof. To this end, new photon sources are required that emit single light quanta in a controlled fashion—and on demand. Only recently ha
4h
Parts of many coastal cities are sinking faster than the sea is rising
A team of researchers at Nanyang Technological University, working with a group at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and another colleague at ETH Zürich, has found evidence showing that parts of many big coastal cities are sinking faster than the sea is rising. In their paper published in the journal Nature Sustainability, the group describes using satellite-based radar to measure the degree of lan
4h
Advanced imaging sheds light on immune escape of shape-shifting fungus
Fungal pathogens have a major global impact upon human health—they are often difficult to diagnose and treat, and there is an urgent need for better diagnostics and more effective antifungal treatments. Using newly developed imaging technologies, Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute researchers have today revealed how Candida albicans, a common fungus, evades immune responses. According to the r
4h
How retail can pivot to autonomous stores
Thank you for joining us on "The cloud hub: From cloud chaos to clarity." Retailers are considering autonomous store technology as an alternative to manned stores. This paper explores the challenges, the customer journey, the different concepts of autonomous stores, and steps that can be taken to maximize the benefits of autonomous technology. Click here to continue.
4h
AI is more than a buzzword: It's now being deployed on ships and golf carts
Thank you for joining us on "The cloud hub: From cloud chaos to clarity." Platform as a service (PaaS) solutions allow for higher-level programming with dramatically reduced complexity; the application's overall development can be more efficient. This article shares two compelling examples showing how a PaaS solution developed in the cloud was transferred to the edge—involving a naval vessel and
4h
Improving CO2 Conversion
Carbon is an extremely useful element. Carbon-containing compounds can be food, fuel, fertilizer, or building material. We also have an overabundance of carbon in the form of CO2 in the atmosphere, with industry producing over 34 billion tons per year. This is why one of the current technological "holy grails" is to develop a cost and energy efficient method of recapturing that carbon and feeding
4h
Pandemic did not weaken student trust in higher education overall
Despite major COVID-19 disruptions, a survey study involving more than 8,300 students at 29 colleges and universities revealed that most maintained their trust in their institutions, at least in the early pandemic months. The researchers found steady trust among many student demographics including white and Hispanic students even as the pandemic started moving many campuses online. There were nota
5h
Heart medication shows potential as treatment for alcohol use disorder
A medication for heart problems and high blood pressure may also be effective for treating alcohol use disorder, according to a new study. The study presents converging evidence from experiments in mice and rats, as well as a cohort study in humans, suggesting that the medication, spironolactone, may play a role in reducing alcohol drinking.
5h
Elusive atmospheric wave detected during 2022 Tonga volcanic eruption
The catastrophic eruption of the Hunga Tonga — Hunga Ha'apai volcano in 2022 triggered a special atmospheric wave that has eluded detection for the past 85 years. Researchers relied on state-of-the-art observational data and computer simulations to discover the existence of Pekeris waves — fluctuations in air pressure that were theorized in 1937 but never proven to occur in nature, until now.
5h
Geologists mapped how metal pollutants have traveled across the city
Pittsburgh's steel industry may be largely in the past, but its legacy lives on in city soils. Geologists now show how historical coking and smelting dropped toxic metals in Pittsburgh's soil, particularly in the eastern half of the city. With samples from 56 parks, cemeteries and other sites around the city, the team was able to pinpoint some of those polluting factors.
5h
A better understanding of crop yields under climate change
Researchers use satellites to measure soil moisture around certain crops to solve a long-standing mystery about how water impacts agricultural production. The researchers found that models using soil moisture explain 30% to 120% more of the year-to-year variation in yield across crops than models that rely on rainfall. The research give scientists a better understanding of how crop yields will cha
5h
Plant breeding: Using 'invisible' chromosomes to pass on packages of positive traits
The ideal crop plant is tasty and high-yielding while also being resistant to diseases and pests. But if the relevant genes are far apart on a chromosome, some of these positive traits can be lost during breeding. To ensure that positive traits can be passed on together, researchers at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have used CRISPR/Cas molecular scissors to invert and thus genetically de
5h
Plant breeding: Using 'invisible' chromosomes to pass on packages of positive traits
The ideal crop plant is tasty and high-yielding while also being resistant to diseases and pests. But if the relevant genes are far apart on a chromosome, some of these positive traits can be lost during breeding. To ensure that positive traits can be passed on together, researchers at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have used CRISPR/Cas molecular scissors to invert and thus genetically de
5h
Scientists Have Long Dreamed of a Memory Prosthesis. The First Human Trials Look Promising
Memories are finicky. I've been touring Atlantic Canada for the past three weeks, and already my recollection of the trip—dates, places, foods, adventures—doesn't match up with pins on Google Maps or journal entries. My brain was learning new experiences and encoding memories—just not strongly enough to last even a week. Memory retention gets worse with age. For people with brain injuries, such a
5h
CIO vision 2025: Bridging the gap between BI and AI
Nearly a decade after they emerged from science labs, AI and machine learning are firmly embedded in enterprise technology environments and are starting to generate value for many businesses. It is increasingly difficult to find organizations that have not at least explored AI use in their business in some way. In a survey, conducted by MIT Technology Review Insights, of 600 CIOs and other techno
5h
Trans guys deserve thoughtful counseling about fertility
There are no standards on comprehensive counseling for transgender men on how to preserve their fertility while undergoing gender-affirming medical procedures, according to a new study. The study, published in the journal F&S Reports , lists guidelines that health care providers can follow to effectively counsel transgender men on fertility preservation to help them make informed decisions regard
5h
Check out the first image of the Orion Nebula
Researchers have just revealed the first images of the Orion Nebula captured by the James Webb Space Telescope. The Orion Nebula is the richest and closest star nursery in the solar system. Located in the constellation of Orion, 1,350 light years from Earth, the Orion Nebula is an area rich in matter where many stars form. Its environment is similar to the environment in which our solar system wa
5h
The Banned Books You Haven't Heard About
At a packed school-board meeting near Rockford, Illinois, earlier this year, a woman waved blown-up images from Maia Kobabe's illustrated memoir Gender Queer in front of the Harlem School District board. "If my neighbor were to give this to my child, guess what? He would be in jail," she said to scattered applause. She was among dozens of students, parents, and community members who'd shown up to
5h
The Man Who Could End the Netanyahu Era
"Let us," I said, "talk about the Netanyahu inevitability factor." Yair Lapid dead-eyed me as he formulated a comeback. "Will you be kind enough," he finally said, smiling, "to describe to the very smart readers of The Atlantic the office in which you are raising this issue?" We were seated in the office of the Israeli prime minister. Not the principal office of the prime minister, in Jerusalem,
5h
How the Australian ant-slayer spider captures ants
A team of researchers at Macquarie University, in Australia, working with two colleagues from Universität Hamburg, in Germany, has uncovered the means by which the Australian ant-slayer spider is able to capture and eat the much larger banded sugar ant. Their study is published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
5h
Fossil fuel reserves contain 3.5 tn tonnes of CO2: database
Burning the world's remaining fossil fuel reserves would unleash 3.5 trillion tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions—seven times the remaining carbon budget to cap global heating at 1.5C—according to the first public inventory of hydrocarbons released Monday.
5h
Hurricane season remains far from over, due to dry climate
The arrival of Hurricane Fiona and the devastation it has already caused to Puerto Rico is an important reminder that hurricane season is far from over, says Virginia Tech hurricane expert Stephanie Zick. "While it's been a quiet hurricane season so far, it only takes one storm to make the season impactful."
5h
Selective cancer nanoparticle targeting under the microscope
Nanoparticles can be used as powerful vehicles to administer vaccines and prevent serious illness, as with the treatment of COVID-19 and to deliver chemotherapeutic drugs to cancer cells with goal of eradicating the cancer cells and leaving the healthy cells unharmed. For cancer patients, this has the potential to reduce severe side effects that originate from the toxicity of chemotherapeutics. Un
5h
Microbes' sensitivity to environmental change depends on soil depth
Bacteria in surface-level soil affect the global carbon cycle. These microbes break down dead leaves and stems, pumping carbon into the atmosphere and the soil. However, microbes are sensitive to changes in their environment. Predicting how the carbon cycle may shift under climate change requires scientists to understand how soil microbes respond to environmental shocks such as drought and wildfir
5h
Livshotande sepsis när immunförsvaret överreagerar
När en infektion utvecklas till sepsis kan tillståndet för patienten snabbt bli livshotande. Trots att sepsis är relativt vanligt finns det få behandlingar. – Sepsis är kraftigt underforskat, säger infektionsläkare Adam Linder. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
5h
Det går lika bra att läsa med öronen
Ljudboken har beskrivits som "fusk" och anklagats för att driva litteraturen mot botten. Men är det egentligen någon skillnad på att lyssna till en bok och att läsa den? Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
5h
Exkludering i arbetslivet inte individens fel
Att ha ett jobb är inte alltid en garanti för att komma undan exkludering. Ansvaret för att människor blir exkluderade läggs alltför ofta på individen istället för samhället. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
5h
Israeli archaeologists find traces of opium in 3,500-year-old pottery
Archaeologists say find supports theory that drug was used in burial rituals, possibly to 'enter ecstatic state' Israeli archaeologists have discovered opium residue in 3,500-year-old pottery pieces, providing evidence to support the theory that the hallucinogenic drug was used in ancient burial rituals. The joint investigation by the Israel Antiquities Authority and Weizmann Institute of Science
5h
God save the Queue: how the wait to see the Queen's coffin transformed people | Stephen Reicher
A week certainly is a long time in monarchy. It was fascinating to see individuals actively changed by this experience A strange thing has happened since last week, when I wrote about how myself and other social psychologists were studying the crowds of people queueing to watch the ceremonials following the death of Queen Elizabeth – finding out the many reasons and motivations for taking part in
5h
Controversial Call Between Daddy Dave & Ryan Martin! | Street Outlaws No Prep Kings
Stream Street Outlaws: No Prep Kings on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/street-outlaws-no-prep-kings #StreetOutlaws #Streetracing #discovery Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter:
5h
Wearable sensor tracks cancer tumor growth
A small, autonomous device with a stretchable and flexible sensor that adheres to the skin can measure the changing size of tumors below the surface, a new study with mice shows. The non-invasive, battery-operated device is sensitive to one-hundredth of a millimeter (10 micrometers) and can beam results to a smartphone app wirelessly in real time with the press of a button. In practical terms, th
5h
Microbes' sensitivity to environmental change depends on soil depth
Bacteria in surface-level soil affect the global carbon cycle. These microbes break down dead leaves and stems, pumping carbon into the atmosphere and the soil. However, microbes are sensitive to changes in their environment. Predicting how the carbon cycle may shift under climate change requires scientists to understand how soil microbes respond to environmental shocks such as drought and wildfir
6h
The growing awareness and prominence of environmental sustainability
I know that there is a great deal of ideological intensity in our culture today: our attention is constantly drawn to distinctions between red states and blue states and between conservatives and liberals. While conservatives often oppose government action to remedy problems, most environmental problems are plain to see, and there is more consensus than you'd think on the need to keep our air, wat
6h
Center of the Coma cluster explored with AstroSat
Using India's AstroSat spacecraft, astronomers have investigated a central field of a cluster of galaxies known as the Coma cluster. Results of the study, presented in a paper published September 13 on arXiv.org, deliver important insights into the properties and nature of this galaxy cluster.
6h
Importance of gender-affirming school culture to reduce peer victimization among gender-nonconforming youth
Gender nonconforming youth are often subject to bullying and harassment, but the negative effects of this experience are not well understood. Previous studies have found that gender-nonconforming youth are at heightened risk of depression, social withdrawal and avoidance behavior compared to gender-conforming youth. The association between gender nonconformity and psychological distress has been f
6h
The Download: AI-generated art and YouTube's algorithm
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. This artist is dominating AI-generated art. And he's not happy about it. Those cool AI-generated images you've seen across the internet? There's a good chance they are based on the works of Greg Rutkowski. Rutkowski is a Polish digital artist who uses classica
6h
Climate change may impact marine environments more than anything else
Promoting the sustainable development of marine environments requires planning, just as we have long had spatial planning for land-based activities. Now researchers from the University of Gothenburg and elsewhere are showing that marine planning must take climate change into consideration—something that it does not currently do. The researchers' models show that changes to temperature and salt con
6h
Molecular tags reveal how damaged lysosomes are selected and marked for clearance
Autophagy is a self-degradation process that cells use to remove unneeded or damaged components. There are several forms of autophagy, including macroautophagy, which is a bulk degradation system used to target materials in the cell's cytosol to organelles called lysosomes for enzymatic breakdown. However, even lysosomes themselves sometimes need to be degraded. Recently, Osaka University research
6h
Climate change may impact marine environments more than anything else
Promoting the sustainable development of marine environments requires planning, just as we have long had spatial planning for land-based activities. Now researchers from the University of Gothenburg and elsewhere are showing that marine planning must take climate change into consideration—something that it does not currently do. The researchers' models show that changes to temperature and salt con
7h
Mysterious soil virus gene seen for first time
In every handful of soil, there are billions of bacteria, fungi, and viruses, all working to sustain the cycle of life. Understanding how these microorganisms interact with one another helps scientists analyze soil health, soil carbon and nutrient cycling, and even the ways in which dead insects decompose.
7h
Under pressure: Solid matter takes on new behavior
Investigating how solid matter behaves at enormous pressures, such as those found in the deep interiors of giant planets, is a great experimental challenge. To help address that challenge, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers and collaborators took a deep dive in understanding these extreme pressures.
7h
Molecular tags reveal how damaged lysosomes are selected and marked for clearance
Autophagy is a self-degradation process that cells use to remove unneeded or damaged components. There are several forms of autophagy, including macroautophagy, which is a bulk degradation system used to target materials in the cell's cytosol to organelles called lysosomes for enzymatic breakdown. However, even lysosomes themselves sometimes need to be degraded. Recently, Osaka University research
7h
Hoverbike Makes Its US Debut at Detroit Auto Show
(Photo: AERWINS) This year's North American International Auto Show in Detroit demoed a very special vehicle: the XTURISMO hoverbike. A lot of the things we talk about here on ExtremeTech look like they were born from old sci-fi films, but few things ever get that comparison in writing. XTURISMO is one of them. Its appearance and gravity-defying ability to glide above the ground have already earn
7h
Possible Alien World Discovered Thanks to Orbiting Debris
The universe is teeming with exoplanets , based on our current (very limited) ability to detect them. Instruments like the brand new James Webb Space Telescope might help us spot more, but maybe we've been looking in the wrong place. A study in The Astrophysical Journal Letters details a new method for spotting the youngest planets. According to the study, looking for areas of gravitational equil
7h
Structural materials with afterglow room temperature phosphorescence activated by lignin oxidation
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-33273-1 Sustainable afterglow room temperature phosphorescence (RTP) Structural materials are difficult to achieve. Here, the authors demonstrate a wood based RTP material by oxidation of lignin to realize an afterglow RTP material with a lifetime of ~ 408 ms.
8h
QuasAr Odyssey: the origin of fluorescence and its voltage sensitivity in microbial rhodopsins
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-33084-4 The authors present an in-depth investigation of excited state dynamics and molecular mechanism of the voltage sensing in microbial rhodopsins. Using a combination of spectroscopic investigations and molecular dynamics simulations, the study proposes the voltage-modulated deprotonation of the chromophore as
8h
An EGFR/HER2-targeted conjugate sensitizes gemcitabine-sensitive and resistant pancreatic cancer through different SMAD4-mediated mechanisms
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-33037-x Chemoresistance is a main limitation for the treatment of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Here, the authors show that an antibody drug conjugate-like compound targeting both EGFR and HER2 overcomes gemcitabine resistance in PDAC preclinical models by mechanisms involving the tumour suppressor SMAD4
8h
Ron DeSantis Can't Troll His Way Into the White House
This week, like almost every week, federal agents will drop hundreds of people at the bus station in Brownsville, Texas. Those people will complete some paperwork, then board a bus—or sometimes a flight from Brownsville's airport—to other destinations across the United States. On a busy day, as many as 600 people might transit through the city, Mayor Trey Mendez told me last week. "These are real
8h
Old Anti-abortion Laws Are Taking on Unintended Meanings
Abortion opponents seem not to have expected some of the more draconian consequences of the Dobbs decision—that anti-abortion laws would prevent pregnant women who were not seeking abortions from receiving needed treatment for miscarriages, or that women facing dire medical complications from their pregnancies would not be able to get proper care. After all, the anti-abortion laws that were in fo
8h
John Roberts's Long Game
T he Supreme Court delivered appalling decisions in June—on abortion, guns, and environmental regulation—but the conservative supermajority is poised to strike an even greater blow against American democracy. The justices now have the Voting Rights Act of 1965 in their sights. On October 4, the second day of the new term, they will hear Alabama's challenge to a federal district court's finding th
8h
'I Have Spent Most of My Life Worrying About Nuclear War'
We Have No Nuclear Strategy The U.S. can't keep ignoring the threat these weapons pose, Tom Nichols wrote in the July/August issue. Tom Nichols provides a sobering reminder that the threat of nuclear catastrophe did not recede with the fall of the Soviet Union, but actually grew—even as public engagement diminished. And yet, Nichols's article is itself partially trapped in cobwebbed Cold War thin
8h
Publishing a pandemic
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-33051-z Over the last two and a half years, Nature Communications has received thousands of submissions related to the COVID-19 pandemic and accepted hundreds for publication. To showcase the breadth and quality of this work, we are now launching a COVID-19 Collection , and here we reflect on our editorial processe
10h
Black carbon and dust alter the response of mountain snow cover under climate change
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-32501-y Black carbon and dust deposition advanced the end of the snow season by 17 days on average over the last 40 years in the French Alps and the Pyrenees. The warming-induced snow cover decline was partly offset by decreases in black carbon deposition observed since the 1980s.
10h
Diabetes downregulates the antimicrobial peptide psoriasin and increases E. coli burden in the urinary bladder
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-32636-y Patients with diabetes have an increased susceptibility to infections. Here the authors show that high glucose impairs innate immunity through reduced levels of the antimicrobial peptide psoriasin and impaired epithelial barrier function, resulting in an increased risk of urinary tract infection.
10h
An anti-inflammatory activation sequence governs macrophage transcriptional dynamics during tissue injury in zebrafish
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-33015-3 Macrophages are important for tissue regeneration after injury. Here, using a single cell sequencing approach in a zebrafish injury model, the authors show that macrophages transition through a three stage process during tissue regeneration after hair cell damage.
10h
Drought decimates Texas' key cotton crop
On Sutton Page's ravaged cotton fields, there is almost nothing left to pick. The Texas farmer managed to salvage maybe a fifth of his crop, but the rest was lost to the severe drought that has taken a steep toll across the region.
11h
Hated that video? YouTube's algorithm might push you another just like it.
YouTube's recommendation algorithm drives 70% of what people watch on the platform. That algorithm shapes the information billions of people consume, and YouTube has controls that purport to allow people to adjust what it shows them. But, a new study finds, those tools don't do much. Instead, users have little power to keep unwanted videos —including compilations of car crashes, livestreams from
11h
Allergic to the world: can medicine help people with severe intolerance to chemicals?
Whether it's organic or psychosomatic or something in between, multiple chemical sensitivity can cause chronic illness, and its sufferers often feel abandoned Sharon calls herself a universal reactor. In the 1990s, she became allergic to the world, to the mould colonising her home and the paint coating her kitchen walls, but also deodorants, soaps and anything containing plastic. Public spaces ri
11h
Human composting: California clears the way for greener burial method
State is the fifth to legalize environmentally friendly process that allows for natural reduction of human remains to soil California lawmakers have approved a new way of returning those who have died to the earth, after Gavin Newsom signed into law a bill allowing human composting on Sunday. Cremation, which accounts for more than half of burials, is an energy-intensive process that emits chemic
11h
Updated climate models are clouded by scientific biases, researchers find
Clouds can cool or warm the planet's surface, a radiative effect that contributes significantly to the global energy budget and can be altered by human-caused pollution. The world's southernmost ocean, aptly named the Southern Ocean and far from human pollution but subject to abundant marine gases and aerosols, is about 80% covered by clouds. How does this body of water and relationship with cloud
12h
The neurocentric worldview – please turn around!
The #neurocentric #worldview – please turn around! Last stop "Target station": The #paradigm #shift as a change from the "#neurocentric" to the "#neuro-#ecological" #worldview In the penultimate part of the essay I tried to work out "The turning point in the neurocentric worldview". At the last stop of the essay, the "target station", I will now try to present the paradigm shift that I believe to
12h
In Pakistan, 33 Million People Have Been Displaced in Floods
An erratic monsoon followed by flooding isn't new in Pakistan, but the scale of devastation caused by the 2022 floods is unprecedented. Even though the rains have slowed, the floodwaters haven't receded and major health risks are emerging out of every disaster-hit corner in the country.
12h
OH spectator at IrMo intermetallic narrowing activity gap between alkaline and acidic hydrogen evolution reaction
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-33216-w While alkaline water electrolysis offers a green means for hydrogen production, H2-evolving catalysts typically show worse activities in alkaline media than in acid. Here, authors examine IrMo intermetallics as electrocatalysts and identify a stably-adsorbed OH spectator in promoting performances.
12h
Deciphering multi-way interactions in the human genome
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-32980-z Mapping higher order chromatin architecture is important. Here the authors use long sequencing reads to map genome-wide multi-way contacts and investigate higher order chromatin organisation; they use hypergraph theory for data representation and analysis, and apply this to different cell types.
12h
The Polypill Comes of Age
The polypill is effective for secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. By combining drugs in a single pill, it improves convenience and compliance. The post first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .
13h
I'm a parent of two children with a brain cancer diagnosis. We're in the middle of a long and tiring journey | Dominic Santangelo
There are many story angles surrounding childhood cancer, but rarely mentioned is the burden of illness on everyday life As a parent of two young children with a high-risk brain cancer diagnosis, it's wonderful to see donation drives soar and yellow ribbons promote empathy for my family's situation during childhood cancer awareness month. However, I'm also acutely attuned to important story angle
13h
Were you a 'parentified child'? What happens when children have to behave like adults
When parents cast a child into the role of mediator, friend and carer, the wounds are profound. But recovery is possible I came to research the emotional neglect of children by accident. More than a decade ago, I wrote my master's thesis on the relationship between the personal and professional lives of psychotherapists. How did they manage to keep the distress they heard in their clinics from af
13h
Photoinduced loading of electron-rich Cu single atoms by moderate coordination for hydrogen evolution
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-33275-z While atomically dispersed metals can maximize reaction catalytic sites, it is challenging to achieve high atomic densities without agglomeration. Here, authors prepared Cu single-atoms on black phosphorous using a photochemical strategy and auxiliary H2 as proton reduction electrocatalysts.
14h
Systematic profiling of conditional degron tag technologies for target validation studies
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-33246-4 Conditional Degron Tags are a valuable tool to validate and study novel therapeutic targets. Here, the authors compared 5 orthogonal tags across 16 unique proteins and provide a panel of vectors for users to systematically screen the tags with their own protein of interest.
14h
How will Jacob Rees-Mogg tackle the energy and climate crises?
Against a backdrop of a cost of living crisis caused in part by soaring energy prices, the UK's new prime minister, Liz Truss, appointed MP Jacob Rees-Mogg as secretary of state for business and energy. In this role, Rees-Mogg will have to tackle these issues while being responsible for the UK's legally binding target of net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. It is a goal he has previously des
15h
How will Jacob Rees-Mogg tackle the energy and climate crises? | podcast
Against a backdrop of a cost of living crisis caused in part by soaring energy prices, the UK's new prime minister, Liz Truss, appointed MP Jacob Rees-Mogg as secretary of state for business and energy. In this role, Rees-Mogg will have to tackle these issues while being responsible for the UK's legally binding target of net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. It is a goal he has previously de
15h
'Out of control': rise in STDs, including 26% syphilis spike, sparks US alarm
The rate of syphilis cases has hit its highest in three decades as officials work on new solutions such as at-home test kits Sharply rising cases of some sexually transmitted diseases, including a 26% rise in new syphilis infections reported last year, are prompting US health officials to call for new prevention and treatment efforts. "It is imperative that we … work to rebuild, innovate, and exp
17h
Night owls may be more prone to heart disease and diabetes, study finds
Research shows early birds more sensitive to insulin levels and burn more fat at rest and during exercise Night owls may be more prone to heart disease and diabetes than early birds because their bodies are less able to burn fat for energy, US researchers say. People who rise early rely more on fat as an energy source, and are often more active in the day, than those who stay up later, meaning fa
19h
Guy Who Invented the Word "Metaverse" Building His Own Metaverse
The science fiction icon who coined and popularized the term "metaverse" is pausing his literary career to build his own. As revealed by Wired , "Snow Crash" author and cyberpunk pioneer Neal Stephenson is working with a crypto bro to create an open metaverse platform that will, its creators hope, be a more decentralized version of the types of Big Tech metaverses like those run by Fortnite and F
20h
Trump's New Recruits
This is an edition of The Atlantic Daily, a newsletter that guides you through the biggest stories of the day, helps you discover new ideas, and recommends the best in culture. Sign up for it here . Speaking in Ohio on Saturday, Trump tried to energize QAnon on his behalf—a new phase in his campaign of threats against the government and the people of the United States. But first, here are three n
20h
Former Google CEO Issues Dire Warning About China
A new report warns that China could soon be able to rule over the US economy and military using cutting edge tech — a sign that the country is increasingly concerned about China's recent leaps in technological advancements. The report was compiled, notably, by the think tank Special Competitive Studies Project (SCSP), which is chaired by former Google CEO Eric Schmidt. The report concluded that t
20h
Why you should pay attention to fly vomit
New research from the University of Massachusetts Amherst concerning "synanthropic" flies—or the non-biting flies that live with us—argues that we need to pay far more attention to them as disease carriers. While epidemiologists have focused their attention on the biting flies that can spread diseases by transferring infected blood from host to host, it turns out that what the non-biting flies reg
22h
Why you should pay attention to fly vomit
New research from the University of Massachusetts Amherst concerning "synanthropic" flies—or the non-biting flies that live with us—argues that we need to pay far more attention to them as disease carriers. While epidemiologists have focused their attention on the biting flies that can spread diseases by transferring infected blood from host to host, it turns out that what the non-biting flies reg
22h
Elusive atmospheric wave detected during Tonga volcanic eruption
The catastrophic eruption of the Hunga Tonga–Hunga Haʻapai volcano in 2022 triggered a special atmospheric wave that has eluded detection for the past 85 years. Researchers from the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, Japan Agency for Marine–Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC), and Kyoto University relied on state-of-the-art observational data and computer simulations to discover the existence of P
22h
Research team creates new magnetic quasiparticle
From The City College of New York's Center for Discovery and Innovation and the Physics Department comes news of a new type of magnetic quasiparticle created by coupling light to a stack of ultrathin two-dimensional magnets. This achievement sprouting from a collaboration with the University of Texas at Austin lays the foundation for an emergent strategy to artificially design materials by ensurin
23h
Research team looks to past for insights on future of megafauna
Are elephants important? How about rhinoceros? Or lions? What happens if Earth loses its last remaining large animals? New research by Professor of Biology Felisa Smith at the University of New Mexico shows the profound impacts of losing large-bodied mammals, or megafauna, in ecosystems.
23h
How many ants are there on Earth?
How many stars are there in our galaxy? How many grains of sand in the Sahara? How many ants live on Earth? These are all questions that seem impossible to answer. However, through intensive and extensive data analysis, science is coming amazingly close to finding the solutions. When it comes to ants, a team led by Würzburg biologists Sabine Nooten and Patrick Schultheiss has done just that.
23h
Amino acid supplement is a key to reproductive health in dairy cows
Lysine is an essential amino acid for dairy cows, helping boost milk production when added to the diet at adequate levels. But could lysine benefit cows in other ways? A new University of Illinois study shows rumen-protected lysine can improve uterine health if fed during the transition period. The study, "Effect of feeding rumen-protected lysine through the transition period on postpartum uterine
23h
Researchers transplant the RNA editing machine of moss into human cells
If everything is to run smoothly in living cells, the genetic information must be correct. But unfortunately, errors in the DNA accumulate over time due to mutations. Land plants have developed a peculiar correction mode: They do not directly improve the errors in the genome, but rather elaborately in each individual transcript. Researchers at the University of Bonn have transplanted this correcti
23h
A better understanding of crop yields under climate change
You don't need a Ph.D. in agriculture to know that water is critical to crop production. But for years, people like Jonathan Proctor, who has a Ph.D. in Agriculture and Resource Economics from the University of California Berkeley, have been trying to explain why the importance of water isn't showing up in statistical models of crop yield.
23h
How many ants are there on Earth?
How many stars are there in our galaxy? How many grains of sand in the Sahara? How many ants live on Earth? These are all questions that seem impossible to answer. However, through intensive and extensive data analysis, science is coming amazingly close to finding the solutions. When it comes to ants, a team led by Würzburg biologists Sabine Nooten and Patrick Schultheiss has done just that.
23h
Amino acid supplement is a key to reproductive health in dairy cows
Lysine is an essential amino acid for dairy cows, helping boost milk production when added to the diet at adequate levels. But could lysine benefit cows in other ways? A new University of Illinois study shows rumen-protected lysine can improve uterine health if fed during the transition period. The study, "Effect of feeding rumen-protected lysine through the transition period on postpartum uterine
23h
Undergrad publishes theory on immune dysfunction in space
It's been known for decades that though astronauts' immune systems become suppressed in space, leaving them vulnerable to disease, the exact mechanisms of immune dysfunction have remained a mystery. Now a Cornell undergraduate has found a potential solution.
23h
Researchers transplant the RNA editing machine of moss into human cells
If everything is to run smoothly in living cells, the genetic information must be correct. But unfortunately, errors in the DNA accumulate over time due to mutations. Land plants have developed a peculiar correction mode: They do not directly improve the errors in the genome, but rather elaborately in each individual transcript. Researchers at the University of Bonn have transplanted this correcti
23h
Wildfire smoke may have amplified Arctic phytoplankton bloom
Smoke from a Siberian wildfire may have transported enough nitrogen to parts of the Arctic Ocean to amplify a phytoplankton bloom, according to new research from North Carolina State University and the International Research Laboratory Takuvik (CNRS/Laval University) in Canada. The work, which appears in Communications Earth & Environment, sheds light on some potential ecological effects from Nort
23h
Researcher helps identify new evidence for habitability in ocean of Saturn's moon Enceladus
The search for extraterrestrial life has just become more interesting as a team of scientists, including Southwest Research Institute's Dr. Christopher Glein, has discovered new evidence for a key building block for life in the subsurface ocean of Saturn's moon Enceladus. New modeling indicates that Enceladus's ocean should be relatively rich in dissolved phosphorus, an essential ingredient for li
23h
Student evaluations show bias against female professors
Despite earning more than half of all doctoral degrees conferred in the U.S., women are significantly underrepresented in faculty positions at colleges and universities. This is particularly true in tenure-track and tenured positions, with women making up just over a third of all full professors. Women are also less likely to receive tenure or be promoted to full professor, a situation known as th
23h
Oops! Ethereum's Merge May Cause Huge Problems With the SEC
Ethereum, the second-largest cryptocurrency by trading volume, has officially switched from a proof-of-work to a proof-of-stake system, a major upgrade called "the Merge" that dramatically cuts its carbon footprint by cutting out the role of crypto miners. But the change may have had another unintended consequence: regulators are now pondering whether they should treat ether as a security followi
23h
Google Accidentally Sends Bored Ape Engineer $250,000
Wrong Button Everybody makes mistakes. Even Google. And sometimes, apparently, Google's mistakes include accidentally handing a self-described hacker and BAYC-creating Yuga Labs security engineer nearly $250k. According to a tweet from Sam Curry , the engineer in question, the mystery payment appeared in his bank account a few weeks ago. Figuring it was likely an error on Google's end, he filed a
23h
Best Smart Thermostats in 2022
Smart thermostats are the only way to heat or cool your home in the age of Alexa. A smart thermostat is WiFi-enabled, so you can adjust the temperature of your home at any given moment from anywhere in the world. You can also monitor changes, schedule temperature changes days or weeks in advance, and most importantly, heat or cool your spaces as efficiently as possible. But which smart thermostat
23h
Now You Can Kill KKK Klansmen in Virtual Reality
Bad Guys Ever wanted to inflict vengeance against the Ku Klux Klan? Thanks to a new virtual reality mod, you can — in excruciatingly brutal detail. "I have always wanted to do that!" exhorted modder JackTheFallout in a video of their private mod of the medieval fantasy VR game "Blade and Sorcery," which, as of now, is only available to those who can prove that they can handle its "controversial"
23h
A stem cell roadmap of ribosome heterogeneity reveals a function for RPL10A in mesoderm production
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-33263-3 How ribosomes differ in composition and function to regulate gene expression is poorly understood. Here, the authors show that ribosome composition changes during stem cell differentiation and identify a ribosomal protein that regulates production of the mesoderm lineage.
23h
Angiocrine extracellular vesicles impose mesenchymal reprogramming upon proneural glioma stem cells
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-33235-7 Glioma stem-like cells (GSCs) exhibit plasticity during proneural-to-mesenchymal transition. Here the authors show that extracellular vesicles from endothelial cells can promote this transition of GSCs through activation of MMPs and NFkB, and inactivation of NOTCH.
23h
Researchers create new magnetic quasiparticle
A new type of magnetic quasiparticle has been created by coupling light to a stack of ultrathin two-dimensional magnets. This achievement lays the foundation for an emergent strategy to artificially design materials by ensuring their strong interaction with light.
23h

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