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Nyheder2022september21

New clues about early atmosphere on Mars suggest a wet planet capable of supporting life

New research published in Earth and Planetary Science Letters suggests that Mars was born wet, with a dense atmosphere allowing warm-to-hot oceans for millions of years. To reach this conclusion, researchers developed the first model of the evolution of the Martian atmosphere that links the high temperatures associated with Mars's formation in a molten state through to the formation of the first o

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Usually You Can't See Rings on Neptune. With the James Webb, Though… Wow

Put a Ring On It Jupiter who? The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) just captured Neptunes's rings — yep, that's right, Neptune has rings, too — in all of their splendor. And they're absolutely beautiful. If it's news to you that Neptune even has rings, we don't blame you. They're quite close to its atmosphere, and thus are easily obscured by the gas giant's brightness — in fact, this is the firs

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Best USB Microphones in 2022

If you're online, you'll eventually need a USB microphone. Whether you're all business or an aspiring e-celebrity, good sound quality is necessary nowadays if you want to be seen and heard. High quality and dependable audio capture is possible with a solid microphone that conveniently plugs into your PC or laptop via USB. Many of these options are well within any budget, though, there are a few o

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Try it: Map rates how well your neighborhood protects cognition

Access to civic and social organizations, cultural centers such as museums and art galleries, and recreation centers may help protect against cognitive decline as a person ages, a new study suggests. A new interactive map allows you to plug in your address and assess how your neighborhood could support healthy cognitive aging, a theory the researchers call "cognability." The study in Social Scien

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Many school uniforms contain dangerous 'forever chemicals'

Children who wear stain-resistant school uniforms may be exposed to potentially harmful levels of chemicals, according to a new study. About a quarter of US children wear school uniforms, according to a survey from Statista . One-fifth of US public schools require uniforms, with the greatest prevalence in elementary and low-income schools. They are even more common in Catholic and other private s

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Mexico ups protection at pre-Hispanic ceremonial site

Mexico has declared a pre-Hispanic site in the central state of Guanajuato as an archaeological monument zone protecting it from the possibility of encroaching development and expressing a commitment to continue excavating the ancient ruins.

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The Space Force Just Unveiled Its "Official Song" and Our Skin Is Crawling With Secondhand Embarrassment

Semper Supra We do sympathize with the Space Force. Seriously. They're not taken very seriously , and it can't be easy to watch pretty much every other branch of the US military be immortalized in glory and splendor in an endless stream of shows and films while you get one dud of a Steve Carrell series that just makes fun of you. It's difficult, however, to retain sympathy when the Space Force co

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Organoid-on-a-chip model of human ARPKD reveals mechanosensing pathomechanisms for drug discovery | Science Advances

Abstract Organoids serve as a novel tool for disease modeling in three-dimensional multicellular contexts. Static organoids, however, lack the requisite biophysical microenvironment such as fluid flow, limiting their ability to faithfully recapitulate disease pathology. Here, we unite organoids with organ-on-a-chip technology to unravel disease pathology and develop therapies for autosomal recess

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Analysis of sloppiness in model simulations: Unveiling parameter uncertainty when mathematical models are fitted to data | Science Advances

Abstract This work introduces a comprehensive approach to assess the sensitivity of model outputs to changes in parameter values, constrained by the combination of prior beliefs and data. This approach identifies stiff parameter combinations strongly affecting the quality of the model-data fit while simultaneously revealing which of these key parameter combinations are informed primarily by the d

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Tunable topological Dirac surface states and van Hove singularities in kagome metal GdV6Sn6 | Science Advances

Abstract Transition-metal-based kagome materials at van Hove filling are a rich frontier for the investigation of novel topological electronic states and correlated phenomena. To date, in the idealized two-dimensional kagome lattice, topologically Dirac surface states (TDSSs) have not been unambiguously observed, and the manipulation of TDSSs and van Hove singularities (VHSs) remains largely unex

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Bayesian analyses of direct radiocarbon dates reveal geographic variations in the rate of rice farming dispersal in prehistoric Japan | Science Advances

Abstract The adoption of rice farming during the first millennium BC was a turning point in Japanese prehistory, defining the subsequent cultural, linguistic, and genetic variation in the archipelago. Here, we use a suite of novel Bayesian techniques to estimate the regional rates of dispersal and arrival time of rice farming using radiocarbon dates on charred rice remains. Our results indicate s

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FBXO42 facilitates Notch signaling activation and global chromatin relaxation by promoting K63-linked polyubiquitination of RBPJ | Science Advances

Abstract Dysregulation of the Notch–RBPJ (recombination signal-binding protein of immunoglobulin kappa J region) signaling pathway has been found associated with various human diseases including cancers; however, precisely how this key signaling pathway is fine-tuned via its interactors and modifications is still largely unknown. In this study, using a proteomic approach, we identified F-box only

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Electrochemiluminescence in paired signal electrode (ECLipse) enables modular and scalable biosensing | Science Advances

Abstract Electrochemiluminescence (ECL) has an inherently low background and enables precise chemical reactions through electrical control. Here, we report an advanced ECL system, termed ECLipse (ECL in paired signal electrode). We physically separated ECL generation from target detection: These two processes were carried out in isolated chambers and coupled through an electrode. The strategy all

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Spin homojunction with high interfacial transparency for efficient spin-charge conversion | Science Advances

Abstract High interfacial transparency is vital to achieve efficient spin-charge conversion for ideal spintronic devices with low energy consumption. However, in traditional ferromagnetic/nonmagnetic heterojunctions, the interfacial Rashba spin-orbit coupling brings about spin memory loss (SML) and two-magnon scattering (TMS), quenching spin current crossing the heterointerfaces. To address the i

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Optical gradient force on chiral particles | Science Advances

Abstract When a chiral nanoparticle is optically trapped using a circularly polarized laser beam, a circular polarization (CP)–dependent gradient force can be induced on the particle. We investigated the CP-dependent gradient force exerted on three-dimensional chiral nanoparticles. The experimental results showed that the gradient force depended on the handedness of the CP of the trapping light a

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The adipocyte-enriched secretory protein tetranectin exacerbates type 2 diabetes by inhibiting insulin secretion from β cells | Science Advances

Abstract Pancreatic β cell failure is a hallmark of diabetes. However, the causes of β cell failure remain incomplete. Here, we report the identification of tetranectin (TN), an adipose tissue–enriched secretory molecule, as a negative regulator of insulin secretion in β cells in diabetes. TN expression is stimulated by high glucose in adipocytes via the p38 MAPK/TXNIP/thioredoxin/OCT4 signaling

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The structure of a polyketide synthase bimodule core | Science Advances

Abstract Polyketide synthases (PKSs) are predominantly microbial biosynthetic enzymes. They assemble highly potent bioactive natural products from simple carboxylic acid precursors. The most versatile families of PKSs are organized as assembly lines of functional modules. Each module performs one round of precursor extension and optional modification, followed by directed transfer of the intermed

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SARS-CoV-2 disrupts respiratory vascular barriers by suppressing Claudin-5 expression | Science Advances

Abstract In the initial process of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infects respiratory epithelial cells and then transfers to other organs the blood vessels. It is believed that SARS-CoV-2 can pass the vascular wall by altering the endothelial barrier using an unknown mechanism. In this study, we investigated the effect of SARS-CoV

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Kinetics of laser-induced melting of thin gold film: How slow can it get? | Science Advances

Abstract Melting is a common and well-studied phenomenon that still reveals new facets when triggered by laser excitation and probed with ultrafast electron diffraction. Recent experimental evidence of anomalously slow nanosecond-scale melting of thin gold films irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses motivates computational efforts aimed at revealing the underlying mechanisms of melting. Atomisti

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Gene drive mosquitoes can aid malaria elimination by retarding Plasmodium sporogonic development | Science Advances

Abstract Gene drives hold promise for the genetic control of malaria vectors. The development of vector population modification strategies hinges on the availability of effector mechanisms impeding parasite development in transgenic mosquitoes. We augmented a midgut gene of the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae to secrete two exogenous antimicrobial peptides, magainin 2 and melittin. This small

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PKM2 promotes pulmonary fibrosis by stabilizing TGF-β1 receptor I and enhancing TGF-β1 signaling | Science Advances

Abstract Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive interstitial lung disease, and the molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Our findings demonstrated that pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) promoted fibrosis progression by directly interacting with Smad7 and reinforcing transforming growth factor–β1 (TGF-β1) signaling. Total PKM2 expression and the portion of the tetrameric form elevat

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PD-1/PD-L1 blockade abrogates a dysfunctional innate-adaptive immune axis in critical β-coronavirus disease | Science Advances

Abstract Severe COVID-19 is associated with hyperinflammation and weak T cell responses against SARS-CoV-2. However, the links between those processes remain partially characterized. Moreover, whether and how therapeutically manipulating T cells may benefit patients are unknown. Our genetic and pharmacological evidence demonstrates that the ion channel TMEM176B inhibited inflammasome activation t

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Semirational bioengineering of AAV vectors with increased potency and specificity for systemic gene therapy of muscle disorders | Science Advances

Abstract Bioengineering of viral vectors for therapeutic gene delivery is a pivotal strategy to reduce doses, facilitate manufacturing, and improve efficacy and patient safety. Here, we engineered myotropic adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors via a semirational, combinatorial approach that merges AAV capsid and peptide library screens. We first identified shuffled AAVs with increased specificity

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Reduced dopant-induced scattering in remote charge-transfer-doped MoS2 field-effect transistors | Science Advances

Abstract Efficient doping for modulating electrical properties of two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenide (TMDC) semiconductors is essential for meeting the versatile requirements for future electronic and optoelectronic devices. Because doping of semiconductors, including TMDCs, typically involves generation of charged dopants that hinder charge transport, tackling Coulomb scatterin

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An in situ study of abyssal turbidity-current sediment plumes generated by a deep seabed polymetallic nodule mining preprototype collector vehicle | Science Advances

Abstract An in situ study to investigate the dynamics of sediment plumes near the release from a deep seabed polymetallic nodule mining preprototype collector vehicle was conducted in the Clarion Clipperton Zone in the Pacific Ocean 4500-m deep. The experiments reveal that the excess density of the released sediment-laden water leads to a low-lying, laterally spreading turbidity current. At the t

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Apolipoprotein E mediates cell resistance to influenza virus infection | Science Advances

Abstract Viruses exploit host cell machinery to support their replication. Defining the cellular proteins and processes required for a virus during infection is crucial to understanding the mechanisms of virally induced disease and designing host-directed therapeutics. Here, we perform a genome-wide CRISPR-Cas9–based screening in lung epithelial cells infected with the PR/8/NS1-GFP virus and use

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The genetic architecture of phenotypic diversity in the Betta fish (Betta splendens) | Science Advances

Abstract The Betta fish displays a remarkable variety of phenotypes selected during domestication. However, the genetic basis underlying these traits remains largely unexplored. Here, we report a high-quality genome assembly and resequencing of 727 individuals representing diverse morphotypes of the Betta fish. We show that current breeds have a complex domestication history with extensive introg

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We Don't Need to Reinvent the Planet; We Need to Rewild It

This article was created with Re:wild as part of Recurrent 's charitable partnerships initiative, which supports non-profits that champion sustainable solutions for the planetary crises of climate change, pollution, and biodiversity loss. The solution to our carbon emissions problem isn't a new technology that sucks carbon from the air. It's an ancient one—nearly 4 billion years old, in fact. It

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NASA Convenes Experts to Discuss James Webb Camera "Anomaly"

World Wide Webb NASA has assembled an "anomaly review board" and paused some of the James Webb Space Telescope's operations after discovering a glitch with one of the expensive craft's integral imaging instruments. In an update yesterday , the agency said that the extremely expensive and delicate telescope's Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) camera and spectrograph appear to have developed an issue

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Steroid Use Linked to a Bunch of Very Bad Brain Problems

Several new studies appear to confirm that steroids — both those used for bodybuilding and those prescribed for conditions including asthma and allergies — are absolutely terrible for brain health. Like, shockingly bad. As it may go without saying, it doesn't feel terribly farfetched that the athlete-favored anabolic-androgenic steroids used for muscle building and athletic performance might resu

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Patients immersed in virtual reality during surgery may need less anesthetic

Immersing patients in virtual reality could help reduce the amount of local anesthetic needed for surgery, a new study has found. A team of researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston split 34 patients undergoing elective hand surgery into two equal-size groups. One group was given a VR headset and offered a range of relaxing immersive programs to view during surgery, while the

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Improved air quality accelerates global warming in recent decades

An international research team has used satellite data to demonstrate that concentrations of pollutant particles have decreased significantly since the year 2000. This is desirable due to their impact on health. But it is also of great significance for another reason, since it has reduced the particles' cooling effect on the climate.

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Now you don't have to wait for smoke to know where fires are likely to occur

Scientists have developed a way to forecast which of the Great Basin's more than 60 million acres have the highest probability of a large rangeland fire. The forecasts come from a model developed by the researchers that combines measures of accumulated annual and perennial grass vegetation that is potential fire fuel with recent weather and climate data. When integrated, this information can be tr

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Hibernating bears' ability to regulate insulin narrowed down to eight proteins

Feeding honey to hibernating bears helped researchers find the potential genetic keys to the bears' insulin control, an advance that could ultimately lead to a treatment for human diabetes. Every year, bears gain an enormous amount of weight, then barely move for months, behavior that would spell diabetes in humans, but not for bears whose bodies can turn insulin resistance on and off almost like

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Scientists test new vaccine strategy to help the body target HIV

Researchers have discovered how the immune system can transform into an antibody-making machine capable of neutralizing one of the most elusive viruses out there: HIV. This finding is an important step toward developing effective, long-lasting vaccines against pathogens such as HIV, influenza, malaria, and SARS-CoV-2.

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Attention and running influence individual brain cells independently

Neuroscientists have explored how individual neurons in mice are influenced by two different cognitive and behavioral states — attention and running. These two states were once thought to share a common mechanism. However, in a new study published today in Neuron, researchers found that spatial attention and running influence individual neurons independently with different dynamics.

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Rising sea temperatures threaten Atlantic populations of Bulwer's petrels

The impact of the rise in sea temperatures predicted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) could affect the survival of the North Atlantic populations of Bulwer's petrel in the Azores, Canary Islands and Cape Verde, according to a study conducted by the Seabird Ecology Group of the Faculty of Biology and the Biodiversity Research Institute (IRBio) of the University of Barcelona.

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Four-legged jumping robots to explore the moon

A four-legged robot trained through artificial intelligence has learned the same lesson as the Apollo astronauts—that jumping can be the best way to move around on the surface the moon. An update on LEAP (Legged Exploration of the Aristarchus Plateau), a mission concept study supported by ESA to explore some of the most challenging lunar terrains, has been presented today at the Europlanet Science

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Simulator illuminates the search for life around the Milky Way's most common stars

Italian researchers have demonstrated experimentally for the first time that microorganisms can photosynthesize using the infrared-dominated light emitted by the most common type of star in the Milky Way. The results from the Star Light Simulator, presented at the Europlanet Science Congress (EPSC) 2022, suggest that life could develop around stars different from our Sun and produce oxygen-rich wo

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Insular cortical circuits as an executive gateway to decipher threat or extinction memory via distinct subcortical pathways

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-33241-9 Ensembles of fear and extinction memories compete and interact to drive opposing behaviors. Here the authors identified insular cortical circuits as an executive gateway that decipher between fear and extinction memories via distinct subcortical pathways.

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VAL1 acts as an assembly platform co-ordinating co-transcriptional repression and chromatin regulation at Arabidopsis FLC

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-32897-7 Cold-induced silencing of Arabidopsis FLC requires the binding of VAL1 to an intronic motif. Here, the authors show that ASAP and PRC1, two interacting partner complexes of VAL1, mediate co-transcriptional repression and chromatin modulation to effectively co-ordinate different steps in FLC silencing.

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It's Just Fraud All the Way Down

At times in his prepresidential life, Donald Trump represented himself as a real-estate mogul, a television star, a business visionary, and a salesman par excellence. But according to a complaint filed today by New York Attorney General Letitia James , the Trump Organization was actually just a massive fraud with incidental sidelines in property development, merchandising, and entertainment. The

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The Kremlin Must Be in Crisis

If an American president announced a major speech, booked the networks for 8 p.m., and then disappeared until the following morning, the analysis would be immediate and damning: chaos, disarray, indecision . The White House must be in crisis. In the past 24 hours, this is exactly what happened in Moscow. The Russian president really did announce a major speech, alert state television, warn journa

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Killed for Walking a Dog

Photographs by Benjamin Rasmussen T here is no particular reason people should care about the shooting of Isabella Thallas, which is why, as far as I can tell, not many people did. She was the only casualty, and there was no mystery as to who killed her, and in a country in which more than 40,000 people are shot to death every year—well, who has the time to stop and mourn for just one of them? Bu

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Differentiating right- and left-handed particles using the force exerted by light

Researchers investigated the polarization-dependence of the force exerted by circularly polarized light (CPL) by performing optical trapping of chiral nanoparticles. They found that left- and right-handed CPL exerted different strengths of the optical gradient force on the nanoparticles, and the D- and L-form particles are subject to different gradient force by CPL. The present results suggest tha

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Rising sea temperatures threaten Atlantic populations of Bulwer's petrels

The impact of the rise in sea temperatures predicted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) could affect the survival of the North Atlantic populations of Bulwer's petrel in the Azores, Canary Islands and Cape Verde, according to a study conducted by the Seabird Ecology Group of the Faculty of Biology and the Biodiversity Research Institute (IRBio) of the University of Barcelona.

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First 3D renders from JunoCam data reveal 'frosted cupcake' clouds on Jupiter

Animations of the relative heights of the cloud tops of Jupiter reveal delicately textured swirls and peaks that resemble the frosting on top of a cupcake. The results have been presented today by citizen scientist and professional mathematician and software developer, Gerald Eichstädt, at the Europlanet Science Congress (EPSC) 2022 in Granada.

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A virtual hiking map for Jezero crater, the Mars 2020 Perseverance rover landing site

Prospective Mars explorers can now take a hike around the landing site of NASA's Mars 2020 Perseverance rover with an interactive map loaded with orbital imagery, terrain data as well as synthetic and real 3D panoramic views of Jezero crater and its surrounding area. The map, which can be accessed through a normal web browser, has been presented today at the Europlanet Science Congress (EPSC) 2022

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The anglo-saxon migration: New insights from genetics

In the largest early-medieval population study to date, an interdisciplinary team consisting of geneticists and archaeologists analyzed over 400 individuals from ancient Britain, Ireland, Germany, Denmark and the Netherlands. The results show in detail one of the largest population transformations in the post-Roman world.

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Quantifying hierarchy and dynamics in US faculty hiring and retention

Nature, Published online: 21 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-05222-x An analysis of the academic employment and doctoral education of faculty members at all PhD-granting US universities from 2011 to 2020 shows that a small minority of universities (20.4%) supply a large majority of faculty members (80.0%).

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Andor Is Star Wars at Its Most Mature

When George Lucas first started envisioning the story of Star Wars , he researched kids' films to understand "how myths work," he told The Atlantic in 1979 . He seemingly wanted to build a sci-fi fairy tale, the kind with dichotomies—good versus evil, right versus wrong, light versus dark—that children could easily grasp. The heroes would be obviously gracious, self-sacrificing, and resourceful;

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Newly formed craters located on Mars

An international team of researchers with NASA's InSight mission located four new craters created by impacts on the surface of Mars. Using data from a seismometer and visuals acquired from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, the team successfully calculated and confirmed the impact locations. Researchers have now captured the dynamics of an impact on Mars.

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Experts: Today's public health crises are just the beginning

Two experts offer insights on what seems to be a particularly troubling time for public health, both in the US and internationally. The first US case of polio in ten years was diagnosed in New York. There have been a number of unexplained cases of hepatitis in children. Tuberculosis cases are on the rise. And there's been an uptick in cases of scarlet fever in the United Kingdom. What's going on?

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Improved air quality found to have accelerated global warming in recent decades

An international research team led by Leipzig University has used satellite data to demonstrate that concentrations of pollutant particles have decreased significantly since the year 2000. This is necessary due to their impact on health. But it is also of great significance because it has reduced the particles' cooling effect on the climate. The study findings have been published in the journal At

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Energy crisis: How the EU hopes to tackle high power prices while protecting its cross-border electricity market

Europe is getting more of its power from renewable sources every year but, as the current crisis has shown, power markets remain at the mercy of increasingly volatile gas prices. The EU Commission has recently proposed a plan to relieve the crisis by decoupling electricity and gas prices. But the plan must strike a balance between addressing skyrocketing prices and protecting the cross-border powe

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Can offering choice to researchers reduce researcher bias?

High-quality peer review has never been more important to validate the science we publish. With research integrity regularly hitting the headlines, especially since the COVID pandemic, publishers and reviewers play a pivotal role in ensuring robust, reliable research gets published, and flawed works do not.

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Predicting migration pathways of mule deer without GPS collars

How do researchers understand where big-game animals migrate across vast landscapes each spring and fall? That is the question asked by biologists from the University of Wyoming and Idaho Department of Fish and Game in a study published in the journal Methods in Ecology and Evolution.

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How we're reshaping global water storage

Globally, humans use about 4 trillion cubic meters of fresh water each year for everything from crop irrigation to cooling manufacturing equipment to generating electricity. In a recent study published in Earth's Future, Kåresdotter et al. modeled how our unquenchable demand for water affects four hydrological variables: runoff, evapotranspiration, soil moisture, and total water storage.

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What teachers think of children and young people's technology use

Mobile phones, computers, social media and the internet are part of the daily lives of children and young people, including at school. Concerns over the risks of too much screen time or online activity for children and young people have been tempered by the reality of technology use in education and leisure.

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African ubuntu can deepen how research is done

Many academic studies have been centered on Western theories and methodologies for a long time. This approach to research is broadly defined as "universalist." It assumes that "one-size-fits-all" and set norms can be applied across cultures. For example, Western ideas about identity revolve around the individual. That shapes how research is conducted: it focuses mainly on the individual and emphas

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Stressed out, burned out and dropping out: Why teachers are leaving the classroom

Many school districts across the United States are in the midst of a crisis: a teacher shortage. Part of the problem is due to the COVID-19 pandemic, but there are other reasons why teachers are leaving their jobs at higher rates than before. On Aug. 29, 2022, SciLine interviewed Tuan Nguyen, an assistant professor in the College of Education at Kansas State University, about why teachers are quit

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No evidence that dehorning black rhinos negatively impacts the species' reproduction or survival, study finds

There are no statistically significant differences in key factors of population growth—breeding, birth, survival, life span and death—between dehorned or horned black rhinos new research, conducted by the University of Bristol Vet School, Namibian Ministry of Environment, Forestry and Tourism, and Save the Rhino Trust has found.

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Watch this team of drones 3D-print a tower

A mini-swarm's worth of drones have been trained to work together to 3D-print some simple towers. One day, the method could help with challenging projects such as post-disaster construction or even repairs on buildings that are too high to access safely, the team behind it hopes. Inspired by the way bees or wasps construct large nests, the process has multiple drones work together to build from a

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FDA Warns Americans to Stop Cooking Chicken in NyQuil

It seems like every year there's a new — or old but resurfaced— social media challenge that coaxes kids into putting their health at risk. This one, though, may take the cake. NyQuil chicken, also known as "Sleepytime Chicken," is now bubbling back up on the sordid depths of platforms like TikTok, where impressionable kids are encouraged — intentionally or otherwise — to cook chicken marinated in

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Best Laptops for Music Production

Music production is one of the creative tasks that has been democratized by the rise of consumer technology. Tasks like editing and adding effects to multitrack recordings once required a room's worth of equipment, but can now be done from an airplane seat by someone with a laptop and headphones. Don't get us wrong, the skills required to pull off music production still require years of effort an

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The JWST's Data Is So Incredible That Even Those Who Built It Are Questioning Previous Science

UC Santa Cruz astronomer Garth Illingworth, former Deputy Director of the Space Telescope Science Institute, has had a hell of a career. He's dedicated decades to the pursuit of finding and understanding the most distant galaxies, and was a leader on the team that built the Hubble Space Telescope. And before the Hubble was even in the sky, he'd already started to develop the James Webb Space Tele

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Keith's Huge Crab Haul in Freezing Temperatures! | Deadliest Catch

Stream Deadliest Catch on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/deadliest-catch #DeadliestCatch #Discovery #DiscoveryPlus Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Disco

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NASA's Mars InSight Lander Lets You Hear the Sound of Meteoroid Impacts

NASA's InSight mission on Mars is wrapping up, but it's had quite a ride on the red planet. It recorded marsquakes, sent back Martian weather reports, and it even heard the sound of meteorite impacts. Scientists from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) confirm that InSight picked up audio from four separate impacts between 2020 and 2021. Yet another first for the mission. The first detected impac

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Antibody targeting of E3 ubiquitin ligases for receptor degradation

Nature, Published online: 21 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-05235-6 Membrane-bound E3 ubiquitin ligases RNF43 and ZNRF3 are overexpressed in colorectal cancer, and can be repurposed using proteolysis-targeting antibodies (PROTABs) to selectively degrade cell-surface receptors in tumours.

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A cellular hierarchy in melanoma uncouples growth and metastasis

Nature, Published online: 21 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-05242-7 A hierarchical model of melanoma tumour growth mirrors the cellular and molecular logic of cell-fate specification and differentiation of the underlying embryonic neural crest, and suggests that the ability to support growth and metastasis are limited to distinct pools of cells.

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Plant receptor-like protein activation by a microbial glycoside hydrolase

Nature, Published online: 21 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-05214-x A structural analysis focusing on plant immunity reveals how LRR-containing receptor-like proteins recognize pathogenic ligands and consequently become activated, with the data suggesting that these proteins target pathogens through two different mechanisms.

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CLN3 is required for the clearance of glycerophosphodiesters from lysosomes

Nature, Published online: 21 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-05221-y The lysosomal transmembrane protein CLN3 is required for the lysosomal clearance of glycerophosphodiesters in mice and in human cells, suggesting that the loss of CLN3 causes Batten disease in children due to defects in glycerophospholipid metabolism.

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Aerial additive manufacturing with multiple autonomous robots

Nature, Published online: 21 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04988-4 An additive manufacturing method using a team of autonomous aerial robots allows for scalable and adaptable three-dimensional printing, and is used to deposit building materials during flight.

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Unified rhombic lip origins of group 3 and group 4 medulloblastoma

Nature, Published online: 21 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-05208-9 Multi-omic mapping shows that group 3 and group 4 medulloblastomas have a common, human-specific developmental origin in the cerebellar rhombic lip, providing a basis for their ambiguous molecular features and overlapping anatomical location, and for the difficulty of modelling these tumours in mice.

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The origins of medulloblastoma tumours in humans

Nature, Published online: 21 September 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-02951-x How certain subgroups of a childhood brain tumour called a medulloblastoma arise has been unclear. Evidence now implicates a cell type found only in developing human brains as the originator of these tumours.

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Ancient DNA reveals details about early medieval migration into England

Nature, Published online: 21 September 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-02269-8 After the Roman Empire collapsed, Europe underwent substantial cultural changes and saw large-scale migrations. A genome-wide ancient-DNA analysis of hundreds of individuals from early medieval England shows that they derived an average of 76% of their ancestry from people from Europe. Burial practices varied slightly bet

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Interfaces boost response to electric fields in layered oxides

Nature, Published online: 21 September 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-02948-6 A structure with precisely engineered layers produces a giant strain in an electric field. The interplay between structural distortions and electric dipoles at the interfaces between layers could aid material and device design.

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Programmable material learns to morph

Nature, Published online: 21 September 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-02265-y A soft sheet has been constructed that can be driven by electromagnetic forces to continuously change its shape, mimicking the behaviour of soft tissues in living organisms. The control system uses imaging data and an optimization algorithm to enhance the material's morphing ability.

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How fear memories get stuck in some brains

Researchers have discovered a biological mechanism that increases the strength with which fear memories are stored in the brain. The study, done in rats, provides new knowledge on the mechanisms behind anxiety-related disorders, and identifies shared mechanisms behind anxiety and alcohol dependence.

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Advanced imaging sheds light on immune escape of shape-shifting fungus

Fungal pathogens have a major global impact upon human health — they are often difficult to diagnose and treat, and there is an urgent need for better diagnostics and more effective antifungal treatments. Using newly developed imaging technologies, researchers have now revealed how Candida albicans, a common fungus, evades immune responses. According to the researchers this involves an 'alien-lik

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Sensory Neurons in Human Skin Play Key Role in Pigmentation

A research group has found that sensory neurons play an important role in human skin pigmentation and physiology. Specifically, the neurons secrete a protein known as Repulsive Guidance Molecule B (RGMB), which stimulates melanocytes (the cells in skin that produce melanin, which is responsible for skin coloration). This study could lead to the development of new drugs to treat pigmentation disord

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You don't have to leave your neighborhood to live in a better one | Majora Carter

Low-status neighborhoods in the US are often stuck between stagnating assistance from the government and gentrification at the hands of real estate developers. The result is that the brightest minds are convinced that "success" means leaving town. Urban revitalizer Majora Carter has a solution: What if we treated these communities like struggling companies? She presents a restorative economic appr

5h

Dinosaurs survived when CO2 was extremely high. Why can't humans?

How did plants and animals survive around 200 million years ago when the carbon dioxide concentration went up to 6,000 parts per million? Paul Olsen, a geologist and paleontologist at Columbia Climate School's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, walked us through what scientists know about carbon dioxide levels over time.

5h

New clue found in 'alien goldfish' suggests it may have been a mollusk

A pair of researchers, one with the University of Cambridge, the other the Royal Ontario Museum, has found a clue that might help place Typhloesus wellsi, nicknamed the "alien goldfish," on the tree of life. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, Simon Conway Morris and Jean-Bernard Caron, describe their study of several samples of a 330-million-year-old fossil and what they disc

5h

Physicists make molecular vibrations more detectable

In molecules, the atoms vibrate with characteristic patterns and frequencies. Vibrations are therefore an important tool for studying molecules and molecular processes such as chemical reactions. Although scanning tunneling microscopes can be used to image individual molecules, their vibrations have so far been difficult to detect.

5h

Hair finds new roots as urban farming growth medium

The clumps of discarded hair on the salon floor could one day help to grow your lunchtime salad, thanks to scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore), who have created the growth medium used in urban farming—known as hydroponics substrates—using keratin extracted from human hair.

5h

A new way to tell if that plastic bottle or bag has recycled material in it

To encourage more recycling, the U.K. taxes single-use plastic products containing less than 30% recycled material. But aside from a manufacturer's word, there isn't an easy way to verify this composition. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering have developed a simple, fraud-resistant technique to evaluate the recycled content of new plastic products. They added a fl

5h

Child stars: The power and the price of cuteness

Anyone who was paying attention to North American pop culture in the late 1990s and early 2000s will remember that it was a moment fascinated with childhood. The most mainstream entertainment revolved around idealized images of predominantly white children and young teens. From the appealing cast of the Harry Potter franchise to fresh faced pop princesses, and child characters in shows for young a

5h

The Anglo-Saxon migration: New insights from genetics

Almost 300 years after the Romans left, scholars like Bede wrote about the Angles and the Saxons and their migrations to the British Isles. Scholars of many disciplines, including archaeology, history, linguists and genetics, have debated what his words might have described, and what the scale, the nature and the impact of human migration were at that time.

5h

Scientists expose vulnerabilities of critical Antarctic ice shelf

Pine Island Ice Shelf in West Antarctica, which holds back enough ice to raise sea levels by 0.5 meters, could be more vulnerable to complete disintegration than previously thought. A new study led by British Antarctic Survey (BAS) scientists shows two processes, whose recent enhancement already threatens the stability of the shelf can interact to increase the likelihood of collapse.

5h

Study of USPS statistics suggests working in high temperatures leads to more harassment and discrimination

An economist at Harvard University has found that on hot days, people working for the U.S. Postal Service are more likely to harass a colleague or discriminate against them. In her paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Ayushi Narayana describes her analysis of Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) reports made by people working for USPS and compared them with

5h

Naming unnamed species of bacteria in the age of big data

In a paper recently published in the International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology, researchers in the U.K. and Austria have named more than 65,000 different kinds of microbes. The study, led by Professor Mark Pallen at the Quadram Institute in Norwich, draws on a long tradition of creating well-formed but arbitrary Latin names for new species, but applies this approach at a sc

5h

Manchin's New Bill Could Lead to One Big Climate Win

Sign up for The Weekly Planet, Robinson Meyer's newsletter about living through climate change, here. About a year ago, one of the worst things that can happen to any climate journalist happened to me: I started to care about power lines. I began to care, specifically, about transmission lines, the subset of power lines that traverse great distances and carry electricity from one region of the co

5h

New clue found in 'alien goldfish' suggests it may have been a mollusk

A pair of researchers, one with the University of Cambridge, the other the Royal Ontario Museum, has found a clue that might help place Typhloesus wellsi, nicknamed the "alien goldfish," on the tree of life. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, Simon Conway Morris and Jean-Bernard Caron, describe their study of several samples of a 330-million-year-old fossil and what they disc

5h

Guy Blamed for Crypto Crash Says He Isn't Fleeing Arrest Warrant, But Isn't Turning Himself In to Cops Either

Extremely Believable Do Kwon, creator of the apocalyptically failed Terra-Luna "stablecoins," is still missing. Er, well, not missing missing, just avoiding the warrant for his arrest filed by Seoul Southern District Prosecutors Office last Wednesday, according to The Washington Post . And knowing where he is an invasion of privacy, actually! "You have no business knowing my GPS coordinates," the

6h

A consistent lack of sleep negatively impacts immune stem cells, increasing risk of inflammatory disorders and heart disease

Chronic, insufficient sleep can negatively affect immune cells, which may lead to inflammatory disorders and cardiovascular disease, according to a new study. More specifically, consistently losing an hour and a half of sleep a night potentially increases the risk. The study also shows catching up on sleep doesn't reverse possible negative effects on cellular level.

6h

Celebrating with green, eye-catching sparklers

Sparklers can be a lot of fun — glimmering, fizzing and spitting out arcs of light from handheld sticks or tubes on the ground. But the metals that they're usually made with limit what the sparks can look like. Now, researchers report that rare-earth metals in alloy powders can produce flashes that shift from golden to green and continuously branch.

6h

Heart attack risk increased among people with HIV and hepatitis C as they aged

The risk of heart attack was about 30% higher with each decade of age as people with HIV got older. However, that risk increased 85% with each decade among people who also have untreated hepatitis C, according to a new analysis of more than 23,000 people receiving HIV treatment in North America. These findings indicate HIV and hepatitis C status, as well as more traditional heart disease risk fact

6h

How old is that fingerprint?

Forensic dramas on TV make it seem easy to determine when fingerprints were left at the scene of a crime. In reality, the oils in fingerprints degrade over time, and it's difficult to figure out their age. Now, researchers have discovered molecular markers for changes to these oils over a seven-day time period — information that could be used to estimate fingerprints' ages more accurately.

6h

Less abortion stigma means better survey answers

New research offers ideas for making people more willing to disclose abortion on surveys. Even before the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade in June, many people taking surveys didn't report their abortion experiences, a phenomenon that has long compromised research on abortion and a range of related topics. A new study in the journal Culture, Health & Sexuality suggests several strategies that

6h

High-Temperature Superconductivity Understood at Last

For decades, a family of crystals has stumped physicists with its baffling ability to superconduct — that is, carry an electric current without any resistance — at far warmer temperatures than other materials. Now, an experiment years in the making has directly visualized superconductivity on the atomic scale in one of these crystals, finally revealing the cause of the phenomenon to nearly… Sou

6h

Daily briefing: How AI dreams up never-before-seen proteins

Nature, Published online: 16 September 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-02995-z Researchers are using deep neural networks to invent proteins that are shaped unlike anything in nature. Plus, donated COVID-19 drugs have started flowing to poor nations, and remembering SETI pioneer Frank Drake.

6h

Naming unnamed species of bacteria in the age of big data

In a paper recently published in the International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology, researchers in the U.K. and Austria have named more than 65,000 different kinds of microbes. The study, led by Professor Mark Pallen at the Quadram Institute in Norwich, draws on a long tradition of creating well-formed but arbitrary Latin names for new species, but applies this approach at a sc

6h

The modern enterprise imaging and data value chain

During the past two decades, the health care sector has undergone a rapid and far-reaching digital transformation. But digitalization has generated a new challenge: information overload. According to one estimate, the volume of health care-related data being generated digitally doubles every 73 days . Much of it is stored in discrete silos—such as digital imaging and communications in medicine (D

6h

A Massive Carbon Capture Plant in Wyoming Will Pull 5 Million Tons of CO2 From the Air Each Year

Though it's still a controversial technology, direct air capture—also called carbon capture —is gaining traction. In the last few years, carbon capture plants have sprung up in Switzerland, Iceland, the US, and Canada. Now a facility that will dwarf all the rest is being built in the Cowboy State: Wyoming. Project Bison will aim to remove five million tons of atmospheric CO2 annually by 2030. Giv

6h

Celebrating with green, eye-catching sparklers

Sparklers can be a lot of fun — glimmering, fizzing and spitting out arcs of light from handheld sticks or tubes on the ground. But the metals that they're usually made with limit what the sparks can look like. Now, researchers report that rare-earth metals in alloy powders can produce flashes that shift from golden to green and continuously branch.

6h

How old is that fingerprint?

Forensic dramas on TV make it seem easy to determine when fingerprints were left at the scene of a crime. In reality, the oils in fingerprints degrade over time, and it's difficult to figure out their age. Now, researchers have discovered molecular markers for changes to these oils over a seven-day time period — information that could be used to estimate fingerprints' ages more accurately.

6h

The Fatal Error of an Ancient, HIV-Like Virus

Many, many millions of years ago, an HIV-like virus wriggled its way into the genome of a floofy, bulgy-eyed lemur, and got permanently stuck. Trapped in a cage of primate DNA, the virus could no longer properly copy itself or cause life-threatening disease. It became a tame captive, passed down by the lemur to its offspring, and by them down to theirs. Today, the benign remains of that microbe a

6h

Xinjiang Has Produced Its James Joyce

O ne hundred years ago , James Joyce's Ulysses collapsed Dublin (plus all of Western civilization) into a single day's epic stroll. The radical, kaleidoscopic novel ended not with that famous final "Yes," but with the coordinates of its lengthy composition: "Trieste-Zurich-Paris 1914–1921." It was a record of endurance and exile (the odyssey as much Joyce's as his hero, Bloom's), and a way to put

6h

New study explains mechanisms of salt transport and could help treat cystic fibrosis

In a recently published research article, Pablo Artigas, Ph.D., from the Center for Membrane Protein Research at the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center (TTUHSC) School of Medicine's Department of Cell Physiology and Molecular Biophysics, and a team of collaborators applied functional and structural analyses to investigate what structural features of proton/potassium (H+/K+) pumps and sod

6h

Larger and more life-like: What is the future of bioprinted organs?

How advanced is the technology for creating live, moving organs for the human body using 3D printers? Bioprinting research in engineering tissues with bioink containing living cells has been on the rise. Depending on the method for assembling bioprinted tissues, larger tissues or organs can be created, which is leading to a new era of personalized treatment for patients.

6h

New study explains mechanisms of salt transport and could help treat cystic fibrosis

In a recently published research article, Pablo Artigas, Ph.D., from the Center for Membrane Protein Research at the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center (TTUHSC) School of Medicine's Department of Cell Physiology and Molecular Biophysics, and a team of collaborators applied functional and structural analyses to investigate what structural features of proton/potassium (H+/K+) pumps and sod

7h

Larger and more life-like: What is the future of bioprinted organs?

How advanced is the technology for creating live, moving organs for the human body using 3D printers? Bioprinting research in engineering tissues with bioink containing living cells has been on the rise. Depending on the method for assembling bioprinted tissues, larger tissues or organs can be created, which is leading to a new era of personalized treatment for patients.

7h

Examining molecular components that are responsible for generating the action potential in the Venus flytrap

To hunt flies and other small animals, the Venus flytrap has to be faster than its prey. To do so, it has developed a catching organ that can snap shut in a fraction of a second and is controlled by the fastest signaling networks known in plants. An electrical signal known as the action potential is at the heart of this network. When a fly touches one of the six sensory hairs of the Venus flytrap,

7h

The Widow's Elegy

At the funeral, the widow hands out onion-skin sheets scrawled with the poem she calls "My favorite poem he wrote." It is an inside joke, but this is the nature of mourning. No one is there to get it. She has no answer to the why of it—"Why this poem?"—except to say, "Look how narrowly it falls down the page. You can tell it is all spirit." Said with a tremor in her voice, her face netted in a bl

7h

Examining molecular components that are responsible for generating the action potential in the Venus flytrap

To hunt flies and other small animals, the Venus flytrap has to be faster than its prey. To do so, it has developed a catching organ that can snap shut in a fraction of a second and is controlled by the fastest signaling networks known in plants. An electrical signal known as the action potential is at the heart of this network. When a fly touches one of the six sensory hairs of the Venus flytrap,

7h

Brain evolution clarifies why woodpeckers peck

Researchers say they've discovered new insights into how the woodpecker's brain works. A woodpecker's drumming may have evolved through vocal learning, the same way that songbirds learn to make their own more melodious songs, their new study suggests. While a woodpecker's bill-hammering is a familiar sound—and sometimes too familiar, for those who've had a woodpecker take up residence in their ya

7h

Chattbotar vet när du kommer att skratta

Försöker du dra ett dåligt skämt åt en chattbot på internet? Snart kan den skratta med. Boten vet dessutom när du kommer att skratta innan du själv ens fattat det. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .

7h

Insights into the mechanism of ultraviolet light damage and cancer lesions may contribute to anticancer therapy

A team led by researchers from Nagoya University in Japan has discovered new pathways that cells use to repair themselves following exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light, and a new agent involved in these pathways known as RFWD3. This could lead to future treatments for people with photosensitive diseases and prompt the development of better anticancer medicines. "We believe our findings provide a ne

7h

Fiber-optic sensing probe: Quasi-3D plasmonic structures on fiber tips

Miniaturized sensors mounted upon optical fibers are widely recognized as an important future solution to instant and point-of-care medical diagnosis and on-site agricultural produce inspection. Plasmonic devices on the flat end-facets of single-mode fibers use fiber-optic devices' convenient and rapid operation capabilities to the fullest. They can be directly dipped into minute samples or insert

7h

New binary pulsar detected with CHIME

Using the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME), astronomers have detected a new radio pulsar in a binary system with a massive non-degenerate companion star. The discovery of the pulsar, which received designation PSR J2108+4516, was detailed in a paper published September 14 on the arXiv pre-print server.

7h

Mimicking the Earth's crust: Examining solidification of building material candidates by cold sintering

Ceramic materials are ubiquitous in the world of construction. Building materials such as cement, bricks, tiles, or electrical insulators like porcelain are all ceramic products that we rely on in our daily lives. These ceramics are manufactured by a method called sintering—the process of turning powdery solids into a hardened mass by applying pressure or temperature. Most sintering processes invo

7h

Differential dysregulation of granule subsets in WASH-deficient neutrophil leukocytes resulting in inflammation

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-33230-y Responsive exocytosis in neutrophil leukocytes involves actin depolymerisation-dependent sequential release of gelatinase granules, then strongly pro-inflammatory azurophilic granules. Here authors show that the actin nucleator protein WASH facilitates the initial step of innate immune activation by gelatin

7h

Sustainable production of hydrogen with high purity from methanol and water at low temperatures

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-33186-z Carbon neutrality initiative has stimulated the development of the sustainable methodologies for hydrogen generation and safe storage. Here the authors demonstrate that the dual-active sites of Pt single-atoms and frustrated Lewis pairs on porous nanorods of CeO2 enable the efficient additive-free H2 genera

7h

Insights into the mechanism of ultraviolet light damage and cancer lesions may contribute to anticancer therapy

A team led by researchers from Nagoya University in Japan has discovered new pathways that cells use to repair themselves following exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light, and a new agent involved in these pathways known as RFWD3. This could lead to future treatments for people with photosensitive diseases and prompt the development of better anticancer medicines. "We believe our findings provide a ne

7h

Soft devices, powered by 'stressed' algae, glow in the dark when squished or stretched

Researchers at the University of California San Diego have developed soft devices containing algae that glow in the dark when experiencing mechanical stress, such as being squished, stretched, twisted or bent. The devices do not require any electronics to light up, making them an ideal choice for building soft robots that explore the deep sea and other dark environments, researchers said.

7h

Soft devices, powered by 'stressed' algae, glow in the dark when squished or stretched

Researchers at the University of California San Diego have developed soft devices containing algae that glow in the dark when experiencing mechanical stress, such as being squished, stretched, twisted or bent. The devices do not require any electronics to light up, making them an ideal choice for building soft robots that explore the deep sea and other dark environments, researchers said.

8h

Studies showcase long-term effects of drought

With the effects of climate change underway, drought is becoming an increasing problem in many parts of the world. Michael Bahn, researcher from the Department of Ecology at the University of Innsbruck, was involved in several studies on the impact of drought on ecosystems. These studies, recently published in leading scientific journals, give insight into the complexity of processes underlying ec

8h

Embryo blood cells are stem cell–independent

The fetal liver is the major hematopoietic organ during the embryonic stage. It is generally believed that hematopoietic hierarchy in the fetal liver is established through the differentiation of fetal hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). This view assumes that the relationship between HSCs and descendant progenitors is conserved from embryo to adult.

8h

The Download: long covid inequality, and connecting Native communities

This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. We've only just begun to examine the racial disparities of long covid Liza Fisher is preparing for a busy day. In about an hour, her mother will drive her to a clinic, where she will receive IV fluids and iron treatments for her anemia. When the IV bag is empt

8h

Are adult children close with their stepparents?

To evaluate closeness in stepfamilies, researchers measured how much time they spend together. Researchers have been concerned that as the makeup of America's families grows more complex, adult children in stepfamilies may not be as willing as those in biological families to care for aging parents. The researchers' findings, published in the journal Demography , challenge the view that ties with

8h

US Legislators Set to Phase Down Use of HFCs

(Photo: @pixel6propix/Unsplash) The Senate is expected to ratify a treaty amendment this week that would officially phase out the use of certain heavy pollutants. Hydrofluorocarbons, or HFCs, are industrial chemicals most frequently used in air conditioning and refrigeration. Though each type of HFC has a different impact on the environment, the category is overall considered far more damaging to

8h

Study finds high levels of PFAS in school uniforms

In yet another example of the prevalence of the hazardous chemicals known as PFAS (per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances) in consumer products, industrial products and textiles, researchers have found notably high levels in school uniforms sold in North America.

9h

How old is that fingerprint?

Forensic dramas on TV make it seem easy to determine when fingerprints were left at the scene of a crime. In reality, the oils in fingerprints degrade over time, and it's difficult to figure out their age. Now, researchers reporting a small-scale study in ACS Central Science have discovered molecular markers for changes to these oils over a seven-day time period—information that could be used to e

9h

Cat's Eye Nebula seen in 3D

Researchers have created the first computer-generated three-dimensional model of the Cat's Eye Nebula, revealing a pair of symmetric rings encircling the nebula's outer shell. The rings' symmetry suggests they were formed by a precessing jet, providing strong evidence for a binary star at the center of the nebula. The study was led by Ryan Clairmont, who recently completed secondary school in the

9h

Björk Is Building a Matriarchy

M idday on a Monday in Iceland's capital of Reykjavík, Björk walked into a coffee shop and gave me a riddle. Just that morning, our interview had been rescheduled to an hour earlier than originally planned so that we could travel to a location unknown to me. Upon arriving at the plant-filled café where we'd agreed to meet, Björk thanked me for my flexibility. "We had to set our clock to the tide,

9h

The Honey Badger Don't Care—But I Do

A few questions come to mind now that Steve Bannon is back in the news. After surrendering to New York authorities earlier this month to face charges of fraud and money laundering, will he be found guilty ? How many shirts at once is one allowed to wear in prison? My own question, though, relates to a more tangential, nonlegal complaint concerning the former Donald Trump adviser. Bannon has long

9h

Trump Endorsed QAnon Because He's Stuck

For a man who believes in nothing, has no coherent ideology or value system except his own continuing relevance, obsesses over conspiracies, and subsists on grievance and anger, Donald Trump took a long time to fully embrace QAnon. For some time, the former president has been flirting with the cult—which believes, among other preposterous things , that Democrats are part of a global child-sex-tra

9h

How Not to Talk About the Holocaust

It's rarely a good sign when the Holocaust trends on social media, and this week was no exception. On Sunday, in an interview with 60 Minutes , Iranian President Ebrahim Raisi declared that he needed more evidence to determine whether the Holocaust took place. "There are some signs that it happened," he said . "If so, they should allow it to be investigated and researched." That same day, on Twit

9h

What Don't People Get About Your Job?

This is Work in Progress, a newsletter by Derek Thompson about work, technology, and how to solve some of America's biggest problems. Sign up here to get it every week . Several years ago, I asked readers to tell me what other people didn't understand or appreciate about their job. I got hundreds of fascinating, funny, outraged, counterintuitive, and illuminating replies. Now I want to do it agai

9h

Broadband funding for Native communities could finally connect some of America's most isolated places

The rolls of fiber-optic cable currently unwinding in a remote corner of northwest Montana represent a vital, long-overdue change for the region. Rural and Native communities in the US have long had lower rates of cellular and broadband connectivity than urban areas, where four out of every five Americans live. Outside the cities and suburbs, which occupy barely 3% of US land, reliable internet s

9h

Preclinical and randomized clinical evaluation of the p38α kinase inhibitor neflamapimod for basal forebrain cholinergic degeneration

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-32944-3 The authors show in an animal model and in a study in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) that the drug neflamapimod has potential to treat diseases, such as DLB, associated with loss of neurons that produce the neurotransmitter acetylcholine.

9h

The SARS-CoV-2 Omicron BA.1 spike G446S mutation potentiates antiviral T-cell recognition

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-33068-4 Mutations in the spike of SARS-CoV-2 can result in the escape of the neutralising antibody response but may retain susceptibility to the cellular immune response. Here the authors show the G446S mutation in the spike protein of Omicron BA.1 is associated with altered antigen presentation and potentiates act

9h

Magnitude of venous or capillary blood-derived SARS-CoV-2-specific T cell response determines COVID-19 immunity

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-32985-8 The presence of SARS-CoV-2-specific antibodies alone is not an accurate determinant of immunity. In this work, the authors investigate if whole-blood based measurement of SARS-CoV-2 specific T cell responses could prognosticate the risk of possible SARS-CoV-2 infection, and recapitulate their findings in a

9h

Characterizing DNA methylation signatures of retinoblastoma using aqueous humor liquid biopsy

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-33248-2 Retinoblastoma response to treatment is difficult to predict. Here, the authors show that DNA methylation of cfDNA from aqueous humour is altered in retinoblastoma patients and can be used to identify the molecular subtypes and potentially predict treatment response.

9h

'Virtual Brain Modelling for Epilepsy' with Philippe Ryvlin and Viktor Jirsa

A third of epilepsy patients are resistant to drugs, and surgical removal of the area of the brain where seizures emerge is often the only option. However, the targeting of the epileptogenic tissue must be extremely precise, and current success rates still average at 60%. Ongoing Human Brain Project research is dedicated to improving the surgery success rate for epileptic patients, by using extre

9h

'What are they thinking?': toxic 'forever chemicals' found in school uniforms

More than a third of children's clothing tested in a study detected PFAS, which are used to make textiles stain resistant Toxic PFAS chemicals are frequently used to make children's clothing and textiles resist water and stains, but exposure to the compounds in clothes represents a serious health risk, a new peer-reviewed study finds. The study, published in the Environmental and Science Technolo

10h

First Mars Images from Webb Telescope Reveal Clues About Its Atmosphere

Mars from Hubble: Astronomers took advantage of a rare close approach by Mars in 2001. When the Red Planet was just 43 million miles away, Hubble snapped this picture with the WFPC2. It has a surface resolution of just 10 miles. This is the best image we've gotten of Mars that didn't involve sending a robot there. The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) was designed to pick out the faintest signals

10h

The controversial embryo tests that promise a better baby

Nature, Published online: 21 September 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-02961-9 Some companies offer tests that rank embryos based on their risk of developing complex diseases such as schizophrenia or heart disease. Are they accurate — or ethical?

11h

Reaction-based fluorogenic probes for detecting protein cysteine oxidation in living cells

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-33124-z Fluorogenic detection of H2O2 in cells is established, but equivalent tools to monitor its cellular targets remain in their infancy. Here authors develop fluorogenic probes for detecting cysteine sulfenic acid, a redox modification inextricably linked to H2O2 signalling and oxidative stress.

11h

Plentiful water offers relief in Vienna

As Europe suffered its worst drought in centuries, residents in Austria's capital were feeling fortunate for their plentiful water supply that courses from streams in the green forests of the Alps.

11h

Bad dreams in middle age could be sign of dementia risk, study suggests

Research finds people who had them at least once a week were four times more likely to experience cognitive decline People who experience frequent bad dreams in middle age may experience a faster rate of cognitive decline and be at higher risk of dementia as they get older, data suggests. If confirmed, the research could eventually lead to new ways of screening for dementia and intervention to sl

12h

What is rule-based symbol manipulation in regards to mind?

I'm a bit stumped on what rule-based symbol manipulation is (or rather, isn't) in regards to the cognition. Is it a model of learning? I might be very, very wrong, but I think that rule-based symbol manipulation is inferred knowledge derived by logical "manipulation" of knowledge previously learned. For example, addition. Say that x + y = z. A calculator would be following rule-based symbol manip

13h

'Alien goldfish' may have been unique mollusc, say scientists

Researchers think they may have solved enduring mystery of where Typhloesus wellsi sits on tree of life The mystery of a bizarre creature dubbed the "alien goldfish", which has baffled fossil experts for decades, may have been solved, according to scientists who say the animal appears to have been some sort of mollusc. Typhloesus wellsi lived about 330m years ago and was discovered in the Bear Gu

14h

Neural probe system for behavioral neuropharmacology by bi-directional wireless drug delivery and electrophysiology in socially interacting mice

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-33296-8 Technologies for monitoring electrophysiological effects of drugs in behaving animals have limitations. Here the authors report a wireless neural probe system with drug delivery capability for real-time monitoring of drug effects.

14h

Study finds potentially dangerous levels of arsenic in California prison drinking water

Ten years after the state of California recognized the human right to water, hundreds of thousands of residents still rely on drinking water that contains dangerous levels of contaminants, including the highly toxic mineral arsenic. Many of them live in low-income and rural communities that struggle to afford the necessary infrastructure to remove arsenic from drinking water.

16h

Sea turtles swim easier as poaching declines

Nature, Published online: 20 September 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-02983-3 An estimated 1.1 million sea turtles were illegally harvested from 1990 to 2020 — but today poaching poses less of a threat to these endangered reptiles.

17h

Walmart App Virtually Tries Clothes on Your Body… If You Strip

Wardrobe Function Shopping for clothes online is always a gamble. Sure, you might find better prices, but you won't know if the fit is right until you try it on for real. Enter Walmart's proposed solution: a just- launched feature in its iOS app, Walmart's " Be Your Own Model " allows customers to virtually try on its selection of clothes. Rather than clunkily superimposing the clothes over a pic

18h

James Webb Targets Mars, Showing Catastrophic Ancient Damage

Mars Scars The James Webb Space Telescope has captured its first images of Mars , providing crisp new observations of a damaged planet. Using the scope's Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam), astronomers got a new look at the Hellas Basin, believed to have formed some four billion years ago when an unknown object of gargantuan proportions smashed into Mars' surface when the poor planet was still young.

18h

Former Iranian government official up to two retractions, five corrections

A lung specialist who has held positions in Iran's Ministry of Health and National Medical Council now has two retractions and five corrections of his published papers for re-using text. In the case of the retractions, the re-used text was an entire paper. Esmaeil Idani (who also spells his last name "Eidani"), now affiliated with … Continue reading

18h

Fundamental research improves understanding of new optical materials

Research into the synthesis of new materials could lead to more sustainable and environmentally friendly items such as solar panels and light emitting diodes (LEDs). Scientists have developed a colloidal synthesis method for alkaline earth chalcogenides. This method allows them to control the size of the nanocrystals in the material and study the surface chemistry of the nanocrystals.

19h

China Report: What's up with all of Biden's executive orders on China?

Welcome to the very first China Report newsletter! I'm Zeyi Yang, and every Tuesday I'll bring you news about China's technology industry. This week, let's unpack recent actions on China from the Biden administration. Lately, President Biden has been getting busy with executive orders that are, without naming China, very related to China. In the past three weeks, there have been at least three or

20h

The Problem With New Cars

This is an edition of The Atlantic Daily, a newsletter that guides you through the biggest stories of the day, helps you discover new ideas, and recommends the best in culture. Sign up for it here . Our writer Ian Bogost wrote two articles last month that both left me wondering: What do our modes of transportation say about who we are? I chatted with Ian about the end of the stick shift , the wob

21h

Mark Zuckerberg Is in Big, Big Trouble

Billionaire Wipeout It's no secret that Meta-formerly-Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg's metaverse pivot isn't exactly paying off yet. The billionaire's fortune has dropped by a whopping $71 billion — leaving him with a piddling $55.9 billion left over — this year, Bloomberg reports , rendering him only the 20th richest person in the world. Sure, that's still plenty of pocket money. But it's the lowe

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Fundamental research improves understanding of new optical materials

Research into the synthesis of new materials could lead to more sustainable and environmentally friendly items such as solar panels and light emitting diodes (LEDs). Scientists from Ames National Laboratory and Iowa State University have developed a colloidal synthesis method for alkaline earth chalcogenides. This method allows them to control the size of the nanocrystals in the material. They wer

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Watching Spirited Away Again, and Again

Spirited Away came out in 2001, when I was 8. After watching it in a Japanese cineplex, I stumbled out into a wall of late-summer heat, shaken by what I had just seen: the grotesque transformation of parents into pigs, the vomiting faceless monsters, the evolution of a sniveling girl to a brave heroine. The way a dragon could be a boy magician and also a river, how the story seemed held together

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Let Puerto Rico Be Free

Photographs by Christopher Gregory-Rivera I n 2017 , as summer ends, when news anchors first mention the oncoming Hurricane Irma, the people go to the big-box store or the Econo supermarket just a few minutes from home. They try to stock up, but by the time they arrive, the lines are long and most of the shops are running low. They get what they can: some food, a few gallons of water, a portable

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Jetpack Pilot Leaps Incredible Gaps Between Platforms, Like Mario

It's-a Me! A video of Gravity Industries founder — and jetpack inventor — Richard Browning performing some daring stunts at this year's International Manufacturing Technology Show in Chicago went viral over the weekend. Instead of simply zipping back and forth over a desolate mountainside , city river , or lake , Browning mixed it up this time, with astonishing results. The video shows him leap f

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US Military Annoyed When Facebook and Twitter Removed Its PSYOP Bots

Inspector Gadget If spy literature has taught us anything, it's that covert operators sure do love their toys. They also, apparently, really don't like when you threaten to take their toys away. Case in point: per The Washington Post , the Pentagon is to conduct a "sweeping audit" of the US military's social media-driven psychological operations (PSYOP) practices, following efforts by Facebook an

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Scientists Have Grim News for Southern Florida

Miami Plans If you're planning a trip to Miami or the Florida Keys, you may want to book tickets sooner rather than later. Experts are warning that if climate change continues unchecked, most of Florida's southern coast will be underwater in just a few decades. "The tide is coming in and eventually it's not going to go back out," Harold Wanless, a University of Miami geologist and professor of ge

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Chinese Company Launching Solar Panels to Space, Where They'll Beam Energy Down to Earth

Beam Me Down A leading Chinese solar power company says it's sending panels to orbit in an effort to establish a 24/7 operation harvesting the bright solar energy up there and beaming it back to Earth. As Bloomberg reports , the Xi'an-based Longi Green Energy Technology Company's proposal is garnering interest because of its deceptively simple value prospect — that it can harness solar power all

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As Deadline Looms, Elon Musk Re-Assigns Autopilot Team to Humanoid Robot

Optimus Time Tesla CEO Elon Musk is doubling down on the company's efforts to develop a working prototype of its much-hyped and much-criticized Optimus humanoid robot — so much so that he's willing to borrow workers from the carmaker's Autopilot department to speed things up. "Note, Autopilot/AI team is also working on Optimus and (actually smart) summon/autopark, which have end of month deadline

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Will rapid COVID tests be able to detect new variants?

New research evaluates how rapid tests will perform when challenged with future SARS-CoV-2 variants. The availability of rapid antigen tests has significantly advanced efforts to contain the spread of COVID-19. But every new variant of concern raises questions about whether diagnostic tests will still be effective. The new study in Cell attempts to answer these questions. The researchers develope

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Did life get its start in micaceous clay?

In mythologies and origin stories around the world, various cultures and religions point to clay as the vessel of life, the primordial material that creator gods imbued with a self-sustaining existence. Nowadays we have biology to explain how life comes to be, but could these tales of old hit closer to the mark than we think?

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Proving that quantum entanglement is real: Researcher answers questions about his historical experiments

In the 1930's when scientists, including Albert Einstein and Erwin Schrödinger, first discovered the phenomenon of entanglement, they were perplexed. Entanglement, disturbingly, required two separated particles to remain connected without being in direct contact. Einstein famously called entanglement "spooky action at a distance," since the particles seemed to be communicating faster than the spee

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Drumming in woodpeckers is neurologically similar to singing in songbirds

Researchers led by Matthew Fuxjager at Brown University, U.S. and Eric Schuppe at Wake Forest University, U.S. have found regions in the woodpecker forebrain that show characteristics that until now have only been associated with vocal learning in animals and language in humans. Publishing in the open access journal PLOS Biology on September 20, the study shows that instead of being related to voc

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There Are Other Fish in the Sea: Social Density Measurement by the Neuropeptide Pth2

http://www.iBiology.org How do animals cope with stressful and anxiety-producing situations like social isolation? In this 2022 Share Your Research Talk, Lukas Anneser, PhD describes his PhD research on how social isolation alters gene transcription in the brain of a tiny vertebrate, the zebrafish. He discovered that changes in gene expression of a particular gene, the neuropeptide Pth2, translat

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Accelerated Development of Papaya Ringspot Virus (PRSV) Resistance in Squash

http://www.iBiology.org Profitable production of squash in the growers field is threatened by a virus called Papaya Ringspot Virus (PRSV). In this 2022, Share Your Research Talk, Swati Shrestha describes her research on developing virus-resistant squash. As a researcher from Nepal which is an agricultural country, Swati has always been passionate about developing disease resistant crop varieties

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Neural Underpinnings of Individual Recognition in the Brain

http://www.iBiology.org Do birds know who they are talking to? How do we know who we are talking to? In this 2022 Share Your Research Talk, Isabella Catalano untangles the use of auditory and visual modalities to answer the questions behind what happens in the brain to make recognition possible. Her thesis research uses zebra finches as a model system to study individual recognition in the brain.

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Fish can help in the search for multiple sclerosis drugs

The zebrafish should be known to many aquarium enthusiasts, mainly because of its striking pigmentation. However, the characteristic black-blue stripes, to which the animal owes its name, only form over time. Its eyelash-sized larvae, on the other hand, are still more or less transparent. Many developmental processes in their bodies can therefore be observed under the light microscope. For this re

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From the atom to natural killer cell: The story of an unexpected protein structure

The discovery of a peculiar protein structure and the quest to confirm it has led to the description of interacting receptor clusters on natural killer (NK) cells. The study by the research team of Dr. Ondřej Vaněk from the Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Charles University, and his colleagues from the Institute of Biotechnology of the Czech Academy of Sciences in the center BIOCEV

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