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Nyheder2022september23

Volvo's New Electric Car Won't Drive if It Detects That You're Drunk
Imagine if your car was able to not only tell if you were too drunk — or sleepy, or distracted, or otherwise impaired — to drive, but could literally stop the vehicle. In a new statement , Volvo announced the specifics of its "driver understanding system," one of the coolest features of its forthcoming flagship EX90 electric SUV, which drops in early November as the company prepares to shift to a
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Wide-angle seismic reflections reveal a lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary zone in the subducting Pacific Plate, New Zealand | Science Advances
Abstract New wide-angle seismic reflection data from offshore New Zealand show that the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) is more structured than previously thought. Three distinct layers are interpreted within a 10- to 12-km-thick LAB zone beginning at a depth of ≈70 km: a 3 (±1)–km-thick layer at the bottom of the lithosphere with a P-wave ( V P ) azimuthal anisotropy of 14 to 17% and fa
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Simple process extracts valuable magnesium salt from seawater
Since ancient times, humans have extracted salts, like table salt, from the ocean. While table salt is the easiest to obtain, seawater is a rich source of different minerals, and researchers are exploring which ones they can pull from the ocean. One such mineral, magnesium, is abundant in the sea and increasingly useful on the land.
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New research finds that viruses may have 'eyes and ears' on us
New UMBC-led research in Frontiers in Microbiology suggests that viruses are using information from their environment to "decide" when to sit tight inside their hosts and when to multiply and burst out, killing the host cell. The work has implications for antiviral drug development.
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Wearable microneedle-based electrochemical aptamer biosensing for precision dosing of drugs with narrow therapeutic windows | Science Advances
Abstract Therapeutic drug monitoring is essential for dosing pharmaceuticals with narrow therapeutic windows. Nevertheless, standard methods are imprecise and involve invasive/resource-intensive procedures with long turnaround times. Overcoming these limitations, we present a microneedle-based electrochemical aptamer biosensing patch (μNEAB-patch) that minimally invasively probes the interstitial
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Best frequencies and temporal delays are similar across the low-frequency regions of the guinea pig cochlea | Science Advances
Abstract The cochlea maps tones with different frequencies to distinct anatomical locations. For instance, a faint 5000-hertz tone produces brisk responses at a place approximately 8 millimeters into the 18-millimeter-long guinea pig cochlea, but little response elsewhere. This place code pervades the auditory pathways, where neurons have "best frequencies" determined by their connections to the
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Bridging time scales of faulting: From coseismic to postseismic slip of the Mw 6.0 2014 South Napa, California earthquake | Science Advances
Abstract Transient fault slip spans time scales from tens of seconds of earthquake rupture to years of aseismic afterslip. So far, seismic and geodetic recordings of these two phenomena have primarily been studied separately and mostly with a focus on kinematic aspects, which limits our physical understanding of the interplay between seismic and aseismic slip. Here, we use a Bayesian dynamic sour
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Catastrophic growth of totally molten magma chambers in months to years | Science Advances
Abstract The vertical growth rate of basaltic magma chambers remains largely unknown with available estimates being highly uncertain. Here, we propose a novel approach to address this issue using the classical Skaergaard intrusion that started crystallizing from all margins inward only after it had been completely filled with magma. Our numerical simulations indicate that to keep the growing Skae
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The coral Acropora loripes genome reveals an alternative pathway for cysteine biosynthesis in animals | Science Advances
Abstract The metabolic capabilities of animals have been derived from well-studied model organisms and are generally considered to be well understood. In animals, cysteine is an important amino acid thought to be exclusively synthesized through the transsulfuration pathway. Corals of the genus Acropora have lost cystathionine β-synthase, a key enzyme of the transsulfuration pathway, and it was pr
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Self-assembling peptide nanofiber HIV vaccine elicits robust vaccine-induced antibody functions and modulates Fc glycosylation | Science Advances
Abstract To develop vaccines for certain key global pathogens such as HIV, it is crucial to elicit both neutralizing and non-neutralizing Fc-mediated effector antibody functions. Clinical evidence indicates that non-neutralizing antibody functions including antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) contribute to protection against several
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Addressing gain-bandwidth trade-off by a monolithically integrated photovoltaic transistor | Science Advances
Abstract The gain-bandwidth trade-off limits the development of high-performance photodetectors; i.e., the mutual restraint between the response speed and gain has intrinsically limited performance optimization of photomultiplication phototransistors and photodiodes. Here, we show that a monolithically integrated photovoltaic transistor can solve this dilemma. In this structure, the photovoltage
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Lattice strain modulation toward efficient blue perovskite light-emitting diodes | Science Advances
Abstract The successful implementation of perovskite light-emitting diodes (PeLEDs) in advanced displays and lighting has proven to be challenging because of the inferior performance of blue devices. Here, we point out that a strained system would lead to the quasi-degenerate energy state to enhance the excited-state transition due to the formation of double-polarized transition channel. The tens
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A single intravenous injection of cyclosporin A–loaded lipid nanocapsules prevents retinopathy of prematurity | Science Advances
Abstract Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a retinal disease that threatens the vision of prematurely born infants. Severe visual impairment up to complete blindness is caused by neovascularization and inflammation, progressively destroying the immature retina. ROP primarily affects newborns in middle- and low-income countries with limited access to current standard treatments such as intraocul
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Selective dehydrogenation of small and large molecules by a chloroiridium catalyst | Science Advances
Abstract The dehydrogenation of abundant alkane feedstocks to olefins is one of the mostly intensively investigated reactions in organic catalysis. A long-standing, pervasive challenge in this transformation is the direct dehydrogenation of unactivated 1,1-disubstituted ethane, an aliphatic motif commonly found in organic molecules. Here, we report the design of a diphosphine chloroiridium cataly
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Influence of voids on the thermal and light stability of perovskite solar cells | Science Advances
Abstract The formation of voids in perovskite films close to the buried interface has been reported during film deposition. These voids are thought to limits the efficiency and stability of perovskite solar cells (PSCs). Here, we studied the voids formed during operation in perovskite films that were optimized during the solution deposition process to avoid voids. New voids formed during operatio
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Self-aligned patterning technique for fabricating high-performance diamond sensor arrays with nanoscale precision | Science Advances
Abstract Efficient, nanoscale precision alignment of defect center creation in photonics structures in challenges the realization of high-performance photonic devices and quantum technology applications. Here, we propose a facile self-aligned patterning technique based on conventional engineering technology, with doping precision that can reach ~15 nm. We demonstrate this technique by fabricating
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Geographically resolved social cost of anthropogenic emissions accounting for both direct and climate-mediated effects | Science Advances
Abstract The magnitude and distribution of physical and societal impacts from long-lived greenhouse gases are insensitive to the emission source location; the same is not true for major coemitted short-lived pollutants such as aerosols. Here, we combine novel global climate model simulations with established response functions to show that a given aerosol emission from different regions produces
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Binance Guy Says the Crypto Crash is Good, Actually
Oh, Okay One trillion dollars vaporized to nothing? Down payments and Bachelorette dads' savings lost to the wind? Sounds terrible. But not to crypto celeb and Binance CEO Changpeng "CZ" Zhao ! According to the man at the helm of the world's largest crypto exchange by volume, the devastating crypto bear market is ultimately good — "healthy," even — for the market. "Price corrections are actually
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Chinese Rover Discovers Evidence of Ancient Ocean on Mars
Water Signs China's Mars orbiter and rover have together captured possible evidence of an ancient ocean on the Red Planet — signs that could bolster case that Earth's dried out neighbor had a lush, watery past. As China's state-run CGTN news channel reports , the country's adorable Zhurong rover and accompanying Tianwen-1 orbiter collected data from Mars' vast Utopia Planitia plain that includes
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The Glory of Feeling Fine
A few months ago, I got food poisoning. The sequence of events that led to my downfall began with a carton of discounted grocery-store sushi purchased and consumed on a Thursday, which led to me waking up a little queasy on a Friday, which devolved into a 12-hour stretch of me vomiting and holding myself in a fetal position, until my legs ached from dehydration. On Saturday the smell of my partne
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What Is Harry Styles Doing in Don't Worry Darling?
The world of Don't Worry Darling is picture-perfect at a glance: a company town called Victory, California, where a bunch of mid-century-modern homes have magically sprouted in the desert. Imagine someone opened a Mad Men theme park in Palm Springs, with the men outfitted in skinny ties and horn-rimmed glasses, and the women in glitzy dresses keeping everyone's martinis fresh. It's a specific kin
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JetBlue, Virgin Strike Deal to Buy Jet Fuel Made From Recaptured CO2
Jet Fuel Emissions are complicated, but one thing's for sure: jetliners — and their fuel — are terrible for the climate. But in a bright hint of a more environmental future, several airlines are now signing deals with a company that might just lessen their environmental toll. To wit, Reuters reports that JetBlue and Virgin Atlantic just inked multi-year contracts with a startup called Air Company
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CRISPR could make testing for SARS-CoV-2 fast and easy
An engineered CRISPR-based method that finds RNA from SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, promises to make testing for that and other diseases fast and easy, researchers report. The researchers further engineered the RNA-editing CRISPR-Cas13 system to boost their power for detecting minute amounts of the SARS-CoV-2 virus in biological samples without the time-consuming RNA extraction and
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Researchers uncover how to 3D-print one of the strongest stainless steels
For airliners, cargo ships, nuclear power plants and other critical technologies, strength and durability are essential. This is why many contain a remarkably strong and corrosion-resistant alloy called 17-4 precipitation hardening (PH) stainless steel. Now, for the first time ever, 17-4 PH steel can be consistently 3D-printed while retaining its favorable characteristics. Using high-energy X-rays
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Climate change is making lakes turn green-brown
If global warming persists, blue lakes worldwide are at risk of turning green-brown, according to a new study which presents the a global inventory of lake color. Shifts in lake water color can indicate a loss of ecosystem health. While substances such as algae and sediments can affect the color of lakes, the new study finds air temperature, precipitation, lake depth and elevation also play import
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A new understanding of the neurobiology of impulsivity
While not all impulsive behavior speaks of mental illness, a wide range of mental health disorders which often emerge in adolescence, including depression and substance abuse, have been linked to impulsivity. So, finding a way to identify and treat those who may be particularly vulnerable to impulsivity early in life is especially important. Researchers have developed a genetically based score whi
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Deepest scientific ocean drilling sheds light on Japan's next great earthquake
Scientists who drilled deeper into an undersea earthquake fault than ever before have found that the tectonic stress in Japan's Nankai subduction zone is less than expected. The findings are a puzzle but will help scientists home in on the link between tectonic forces and the earthquake cycle and potentially lead to better earthquake forecasts, both at Nankai and other megathrust faults such as Ca
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AI-based screening method could boost speed of new drug discovery
Developing life-saving medicines can take billions of dollars and decades of time, but researchers are aiming to speed up this process with a new artificial intelligence-based drug screening process they've developed. Using a method that models drug and target protein interactions using natural language processing techniques, the researchers achieved up to 97% accuracy in identifying promising dru
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DNA nets capture COVID-19 virus in low-cost rapid-testing platform
Tiny nets woven from DNA strands can ensnare the spike protein of the virus that causes COVID-19, lighting up the virus for a fast-yet-sensitive diagnostic test—and also impeding the virus from infecting cells, opening a new possible route to antiviral treatment, according to a new study.
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An AI message decoder based on bacterial growth patterns
From a box of Cracker Jack to The Da Vinci Code, everybody enjoys deciphering secret messages. But biomedical engineers at Duke University have taken the decoder ring to place it's never been before—the patterns created by bacterial colonies.
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This Week in Space: NASA Finally Completed an Artemis Fueling Test
NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) rocket with the Orion spacecraft aboard is seen atop the mobile launcher as it moves up the ramp at Launch Pad 39B, Wednesday, Aug. 17, 2022, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA's Artemis I mission is the first integrated test of the agency's deep space exploration systems: the Orion spacecraft, SLS rocket, and supporting ground systems. Launch of the
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Tesla Updating Vehicles to Not Crush Passengers' Hands in Window
Keep Clear Tesla is issuing software updates for a more than a staggering million of its vehicles, due to an eyebrow-raising bug: that the cars' powered windows fail to detect obstacles — like your hand — in their way while closing. In the National Highway Traffic Safety Adminstration's (NHTSA) own words , "the window automatic reversal system may not react correctly after detecting an obstructio
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A New Island Just Appeared in the Pacific Ocean
Double Take Hey, was that there before? A new island has popped up in the southwest Pacific Ocean, according to the NASA Earth Observatory. This fledgling patch of land spawned out of a seafloor ridge teeming with highest density of underwater volcanoes on the planet. Known as the Home Reef seamount, the underwater mountain stretches between New Zealand and Tonga. Starting this month, one of thos
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Woman Horrified To Discover Her Private Medical Photos Were Being Used To Train AI
Doctor Botto An AI artist going by the name Lapine says she discovered that private medical photos from nearly ten years ago were being used in an image set that trains AI, called LAION-5B. Lapine made this unnerving discovery by using Have I Been Trained , a site that lets artists to check if their work has been used in the image set. When Lapine performed a reverse image search of her face, two
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Intestinal fortitude: Gut coils hold secrets of organ formation
A new study finds that gut rotation during development is orchestrated by two waves of expression of a transcription factor called Pitx2. The second wave, it turns out, is triggered by mechanical cues within an elastic tissue that anchors the gut tube, and later becomes a conduit for blood and lymphatic vessels that supply the gut tube.
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Exposing the evolutionary weak spots of the human genome
Mutations can drastically help or hurt the odds of an organism surviving and reproducing. Researchers have created a computer program called ExtRaINSIGHT that tracks the history of harmful mutations throughout human evolution. They've discovered several regions of the genome are especially vulnerable to mutations, meaning any mutations there could lead to severe or lethal consequences.
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Detailed insight into friction: How objects start to slide
Chemists and physicists shed light on a crucial aspect of friction: how things begin to slide. Using fluorescence microscopy and dedicated fluorescent molecules, they are able to pinpoint how and when the friction at the contact between two objects is overcome and sliding starts to occur. They report on the details of this important transition from static to dynamic friction.
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Motherhood at work: Exploring maternal mental health
Up to 1 in 5 women in the postpartum period will experience a mental health disorder like postpartum depression or generalized anxiety disorder. How an organization handles a mother's return to work can have a significant impact on her mental health, according to new research.
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The carp virus that taught researchers about immunology
One of the fascinating aspects of scientific research is certainly the serendipity that comes with it, which is something the team of Prof. Alain Vanderplasschen, virologist and immunologist at the FARAH (Faculty of Veterinary Medicine) of the University of Liège can only agree with. His team has just published in Nucleic Acids Research the results of ten years of research on the study of an origi
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Scientists use modified silk proteins to create new nonstick surfaces
Researchers at Tufts University have developed a method to make silk-based materials that refuse to stick to water, or almost anything else containing water for that matter. In fact, the modified silk, which can be molded into forms like plastic, or coated onto surfaces as a film, has non-stick properties that surpass those of nonstick surfaces typically used on cookware, and it could see applicat
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Indoor air quality experiments show exposure risks while cooking, cleaning
When you're cooking or cleaning inside your home, what chemicals are you breathing, and are they potentially harmful? Chemists have given us a solid start on the answer. A large, collaborative research experiment recently attempted to map the airborne chemistry of a typical home. Researchers performed typical home activities like cooking and cleaning and used sophisticated instrumentation to docum
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Coral genome reveals cysteine surprise
Model animals, such as mice and fruit flies, have provided scientists with powerful insights into how cellular biology works. However, model animals are really just a guide, and it can be risky to generalize findings across animals from studying a selection of model organisms.
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Neoliberals are most receptive to political tricks, study finds
Do we fall for political tricks—when politicians tell us things that seem completely meaningless? Social psychologists of the University of Amsterdam tested how people respond to vague and meaningless statements like "To politically lead the people means to always fight for them" and "For better and stronger Gonfel!" (a fictitious country). They find that right-wing people, and especially neoliber
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First single-crystal organometallic perovskite optical fibers
Due to their very high efficiency in transporting electric charges from light, perovskites are known as the next generation material for solar panels and LED displays. A team led by Dr. Lei Su at Queen Mary University of London now have invented a brand-new application of perovskites as optical fibers. The results are published in Science Advances.
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Project counts down Ariel exoplanet targets
Details of the orbits of 450 candidate exoplanet targets of the European Space Agency's Ariel space mission have been presented this week at the Europlanet Science Congress (EPSC) 2022, and submitted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series. The study, coordinated by the ExoClock project, has been co-authored by 217 professional and amateur astronomers, as well as university
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Mutation in key molecules could stop gonorrhea infection
Creating a mutation that inhibits how the bacterial pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae causes gonorrhea, a common sexually transmitted infection, could offer a new way to prevent and treat the disease, according to researchers in the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University.
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Tracking the origin of southern California's latest invasive pest
In 2012, a crop of California's most prized ornamental trees was overrun by an invisible invader. The growing shoots of coral beans—the official city tree of Los Angeles—began wilting and falling away, revealing stems that had been hollowed out from the inside by the caterpillars of Erythrina stem borer moths.
3h
The carp virus that taught researchers about immunology
One of the fascinating aspects of scientific research is certainly the serendipity that comes with it, which is something the team of Prof. Alain Vanderplasschen, virologist and immunologist at the FARAH (Faculty of Veterinary Medicine) of the University of Liège can only agree with. His team has just published in Nucleic Acids Research the results of ten years of research on the study of an origi
3h
Scientists use modified silk proteins to create new nonstick surfaces
Researchers at Tufts University have developed a method to make silk-based materials that refuse to stick to water, or almost anything else containing water for that matter. In fact, the modified silk, which can be molded into forms like plastic, or coated onto surfaces as a film, has non-stick properties that surpass those of nonstick surfaces typically used on cookware, and it could see applicat
3h
Higher temperatures make it difficult for fig tree pollinators
Researchers from Uppsala University and elsewhere have been studying the effect of rising temperatures on the lifespan of pollinating fig wasps. The findings show that the wasps lived much shorter lives at high temperatures, which would make it difficult for them to travel the long distances between the trees they pollinate.
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Developing conductive and electrocatalytic mediators in Li-S batteries
Lithium sulfide (Li-S) batteries are considered a promising and efficient energy storage system because of their high energy density (2600 Wh kg-1) and low sulfur material cost. However, numerous obstacles to the practical implementation of Li–S batteries remain, including low sulfur conductivity, the shuttle effect, and the requirement for an adequate volume change (80%) of sulfur during charging
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An AI message decoder based on bacterial growth patterns
Depending on the initial conditions used, such as nutrient levels and space constraints, bacteria tend to grow in specific ways. Researchers have created a new type of encryption scheme based on how a virtual bacterial colony grows with specific initial conditions.
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More older adults should be checking blood pressure at home, study suggests
Only 48 percent of people age 50 to 80 who take blood pressure medications or have a health condition that's affected by hypertension regularly check their blood pressure at home or other places, a new study finds. A somewhat higher number — but still only 62 percent — say a health care provider encouraged them to perform such checks.
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SARS-CoV-2 infects fat tissue, creates inflammatory storm cloud, study finds
A study shows that SARS-CoV-2 can infect human fat tissue. This phenomenon was seen in laboratory experiments conducted on fat tissue excised from patients undergoing bariatric and cardiac surgeries, and later infected in a laboratory dish with SARS-CoV-2. It was further confirmed in autopsy samples from deceased COVID-19 patients.
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Indoor air quality experiments show exposure risks while cooking, cleaning
When you're cooking or cleaning inside your home, what chemicals are you breathing, and are they potentially harmful? Chemists have given us a solid start on the answer. A large, collaborative research experiment recently attempted to map the airborne chemistry of a typical home. Researchers performed typical home activities like cooking and cleaning and used sophisticated instrumentation to docum
3h
Will climate-change-driven temporal variation in precipitation affect crop yields and reactive nitrogen losses?
Climate change (e.g., global warming) is intensifying the global water cycle and the temporal variation of precipitation has increased significantly. The distribution of precipitation is more uneven over time, and drought and flood events occurred more frequently. This unstable variability in precipitation is particularly negative for crop growth.
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The rise to royalty: How worker wasps balance specialization and plasticity
An international team of biologists and theoretical physicists from Dresden (Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems), Cambridge, UK (Babraham Institute) and Athens (B.S.R.C. "Alexander Fleming") has tackled this paradox using experiments on paper wasps. Paper wasps are social insects that display societal division of labor, with some insects specializing in foraging and other task
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Little evidence screaming helps mental health, say psychologists
Experts question long-term benefits of therapy for mental and psychological disorders Popping into a room on your lunch break to have a good scream may seem like a helpful way to let off steam, but experts say there is little evidence the approach offers long-term benefits for mental health. Primal scream therapy (PST) was created by psychologist Arthur Janov in the late 1960s . It is based on th
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A quadruple increase in carbon dioxide over East Asia causes changes in both fast and slow cloud responses
Extreme climate warming has been shown to change how cloud cover behaves throughout East Asia (EA). Recent research suggests that in a warmer climate with greater amounts of CO2 in the atmosphere, slow cloud responses to meteorological mechanisms can cause a cooling effect over certain regions of EA. However, in some areas within Asia, fast cloud responses may have the opposite effect. This new dy
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When monkeys use the forest as a pharmacy
Have you ever seen your cat or dog eating grass? They do so because it can help their digestion, and many wild species use natural substances to prevent and control diseases or to repel parasites. This is called "zoopharmacognosy" or, more commonly, animal self-medication.
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The expansion of capitalism led to a deterioration in human welfare, according to new study
Far from reducing extreme poverty, the expansion of capitalism from the 16th century onward was associated with a dramatic deterioration in human welfare. This is according to a study carried out by the Institute of Environmental Science and Technology of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (ICTA-UAB) in collaboration with Macquarie University, Australia, which shows that this new economic syste
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To reach net zero the world still needs mining. After 26 years, here's what I've learned about this 'evil' industry
On the wooded hill above the Stan Terg lead and zinc mine in Kosovo, there is an old concrete diving platform looming over what was once an open-air swimming pool. Before the break-up of Yugoslavia, people who worked at the mine would bring their families here to swim, sunbathe on the wide terrace with its view across the valley, and picnic among the trees. Now the pool is slowly disappearing into
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Planetary-scale 'heat wave' discovered in Jupiter's atmosphere
An unexpected "heat wave" of 700 degrees Celsius, extending 130,000 kilometers (10 Earth diameters) in Jupiter's atmosphere, has been discovered. James O'Donoghue, of the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), has presented the results this week at the Europlanet Science Congress (EPSC) 2022 in Granada.
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The rise to royalty: How worker wasps balance specialization and plasticity
An international team of biologists and theoretical physicists from Dresden (Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems), Cambridge, UK (Babraham Institute) and Athens (B.S.R.C. "Alexander Fleming") has tackled this paradox using experiments on paper wasps. Paper wasps are social insects that display societal division of labor, with some insects specializing in foraging and other task
3h
Fighting fungal infections with metals
Each year, more than 1 billion people contract a fungal infection. Although they are harmless to most people, over 1.5 million patients die each year as a result of infections of this kind.
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Are sanitary pads a panacea for impoverished women?
In an era when the Indian government has prioritized women's menstrual health and movies like Netflix's "Period. End of Sentence" are garnering worldwide attention, the distribution of disposable sanitary pads to women in India's rural areas has been widely celebrated.
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Study findings suggest association between exposure to air pollution — particularly in the first 5 years of life — and alterations in brain structure
A study has found an association, in children aged 9-12, between exposure to air pollutants in the womb and during the first 8.5 years of life and alterations in white matter structural connectivity in the brain. The greater the child's exposure before age 5, the greater the brain structure alteration observed in preadolescence.
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Warming oceans are changing Australian reef fish populations
Shallow reefs and the creatures that inhabit them are changing due to rising ocean temperatures, but these impacts have been obscured by a lack of comprehensive local data. A team of researchers has been tracking changes in the country's reefs for over a decade, and they now describe how they used fine-scale data to illustrate how warming waters impact tropical and temperate reef fish communities
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Asthma, anxiety, and more linked to medical debt
Asthma, heart disease, lung disease, anxiety, and other mood disorders are all associated with elevated rates of medical debt, research finds. Expensive ongoing treatment for cancer and diabetes are the best-known drivers of the medical debt that contributes to two-thirds of personal bankruptcies, but the study indicates other chronic conditions also contribute significantly. The researchers anal
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Saudi Arabia Just Bought Two SpaceX Tickets to the International Space Station
Sounds Expensive Don't have a rocket, but want to get some astronauts to the ISS? Don't stress. As long as you've got some serious millions in the bank, you can apparently buy your space explorers two seats onboard an ISS-bound SpaceX Crew Dragon. That's what Saudi Arabia reportedly just did, at least. Per Reuters , Saudi Arabia inked a deal with private spaceflight company Axiom Space earlier th
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Can We Learn from the Mistakes of Futurism?
In their new book, brothers Steven, Jay, and Bob Novella try to improve on the futurism of yesteryear by identifying 10 "futurism fallacies" that have bedeviled earlier predictions.
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It may already be too late to meet UN genetic diversity target, but new findings could guide conservation efforts
Climate change and habitat destruction may have already caused the loss of more than one-tenth of the world's terrestrial genetic diversity, according to new research. This means that it may already be too late to meet the United Nations' proposed target, announced last year, of protecting 90 percent of genetic diversity for every species by 2030, and that we have to act fast to prevent further lo
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Newly discovered COVID-like virus could infect humans, resist vaccines
A recently discovered virus in a Russian bat that is similar to SARS-CoV-2, the virus behind COVID-19, is likely capable of infecting humans and, if it were to spillover, is resistant to current vaccines. Researchers found spike proteins from the bat virus, named Khosta-2, can infect human cells and is resistant to both the monoclonal antibodies and serum from individuals vaccinated for SARS-CoV-2
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Analysis of particles of the asteroid Ryugu delivers surprising results
In December 2020, a small landing capsule brought rock particles from the asteroid Ryugu to Earth — material from the beginnings of our solar system. The Japanese space probe Hayabusa 2 had collected the samples. Geoscientists have now discovered areas with a massive accumulation of rare earths and unexpected structures.
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Want noisy miners to be less despotic? Think twice before filling your garden with nectar-rich flowers
Noisy miners are complicated creatures. These Australian native honeyeaters live in large cooperative groups, use alarm calls to target specific predators, and sometimes help raise the young of other miners. But they're perhaps best known for their aggressive and coordinated attacks on other birds—a behavior known as "mobbing."
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He's Fishing in Our Water! | Deadliest Catch
Stream Deadliest Catch on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/deadliest-catch #DeadliestCatch #Discovery #DiscoveryPlus Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Disco
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How we'll transplant tiny organ-like blobs of cells into people
To the naked eye, organoids aren't much to look at. They're basically tiny blobs. Closer inspection reveals their true complexity: these lab-grown balls of cells can resemble miniature organs. So far, organoids have mostly been used for research. But teams have started transplanting them into animals with the hope of curing disease. Humans are next—albeit some way off. Let's say in 10 years … may
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Is there a link between cancer and heart disease? | Nicholas Leeper
Does the key to stopping cancer lie in the heart? Cardiologist Nicholas Leeper digs into emerging scientific research on the link between the world's two leading causes of death, heart disease and cancer, sharing how their biological origins may be connected — and treatable with the same therapeutics. A call to challenge dogma and break down traditional silos in science, with the hope of saving l
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Calibrating the luminosity of nearby stars to refine calculations of universe age and expansion
A picture may be worth a thousand words, but for astronomers, simply recording images of stars and galaxies isn't enough. To measure the true size and absolute brightness (luminosity) of heavenly bodies, astronomers need to accurately gauge the distance to these objects. To do so, the researchers rely on "standard candles"—stars whose luminosities are so well known that they act like light bulbs o
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New banana disease is spreading and poses threat to Africa's food security
A new banana fungus is rapidly spreading across the globe. It hit Africa a decade ago, and the advance of the disease poses a threat to Africa's food security, a genetic study conducted by Wageningen University & Research (WUR) and Utrecht University reveals. Plant Pathology Professor Gert Kema and his colleagues sound the alarm.
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New research backs improved translations of weather forecasts for US Spanish speakers
New social science research published online today in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society shows that the Spanish words currently used by NOAA's National Weather Service and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) for tornado warnings do not carry the same level of urgency needed to spur protective action as the English words used for these warnings. Though the research focus
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The 20 Most-Anticipated Films of the Season
The Toronto International Film Festival has long marked the start of the fall movie season, the time when new releases finally start to transition from mass-appeal blockbusters to something a little more grown-up and suited for the Oscars. After two years limited by the pandemic, TIFF returned in 2022 to its robust, splashy self, loaded with gala premieres and more than 200 new features . Below a
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What Book Bans Take From Kids
This year, the American Library Association's annual Banned Books Week arrived in the midst of a renewed push to limit the literature children can access. Schools and libraries around the country have dealt with attempts to ban and remove hundreds of titles, many of which grapple with issues of sex, race, and gender, in the name of protecting young people from supposedly sensitive subject matter.
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ESA selects Harmony as tenth Earth Explorer mission
Following preparatory activities and a stringent process ESA Member States today formally selected Harmony for implementation as the tenth Earth Explorer mission within the FutureEO program. This unique satellite mission concept is, therefore, now set to become a reality to provide a wealth of new information about our oceans, ice, earthquakes and volcanoes—which will make significant contribution
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Climate-prepared countries are losing ground, recent index shows
The most climate-prepared countries in the world are losing ground, according to the latest update of the University of Notre Dame's Global Adaptation Initiative (ND-GAIN) Country Index. Updated annually, ND-GAIN's Country Index quantifies the climate vulnerability and readiness of more than 180 countries by aggregating 45 core indicators over 20 years.
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Cyclones circling Jupiter's poles still baffling space scientists
A team of space scientists affiliated with multiple institutions in the U.S., working with a colleague from Italy and another from France has used modeling to partially explain the resilience of cyclones circling Jupiter's poles. In their paper published in the journal Nature Astronomy, the group describes how they analyzed images captured by the Juno space probe and used what they learned to crea
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The plate boundary between Africa and the Iberian Peninsula could cause large tsunamis
A new study led by the Institut de Ciències del Mar (ICM-CSIC) in Barcelona and the Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA) has revealed the exact location of the boundary between the European and African tectonic plates, located in the Alboran Sea region. The work also evaluates its potential capacity to produce large earthquakes that, in turn, could trigger devastating tsunamis
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Mysterious ripples in the Milky Way were caused by a passing dwarf galaxy
Using data from the Gaia space telescope, a team led by researchers at Lund University in Sweden has shown that large parts of the Milky Way's outer disk vibrate. The ripples are caused by a dwarf galaxy, now seen in the constellation Sagittarius, that shook our galaxy as it passed by hundreds of millions of years ago.
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Unchecked ocean warming threatens many Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean corals
The coral reefs of the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean are richly diverse ecosystems of global importance. These regions contain more than 10% of the world's reefs and host hundreds of fish species, and they provide more than $6 billion in economic benefits courtesy of fisheries, tourism, and other ecosystem services. But over the past four decades, climate change and local stressors like overfis
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This Vertical Farm Grows Carbon-Neutral Algae Next to a Geothermal Power Plant
Vertical farms are popping up everywhere from Pennsylvania to Dubai , most of them growing some sort of leafy green (and one growing mushroom fungus !). A farm in Iceland has taken a different direction, both in terms of what it grows and how it's growing it. Vaxa Technologies is cultivating spirulina algae indoors, and a new study found that its process is carbon-neutral and emissions-free. Mayb
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Termites could have 'huge' impact on warming world
Termites could soon be moving toward the North and South poles as global temperatures warm from climate change, research finds. Most people think termites are a nuisance that consume wood in homes and businesses. But those termites represent less than 4% of all termite species worldwide. Termites are critical in natural ecosystems—especially in the tropics—because they help recycle dead wood from
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Biosphere drought reveals scent of troubled ecosystem
Findings from an unprecedented drought experiment in a biosphere underscore the importance of molecular compounds often associated with fragrance in identifying when an ecosystem is in distress. Ever wonder what gives a forest its signature pine-fresh scent? The answer is the molecular compound pinene, a type of monoterpene naturally released by plants. Each year, plants pump roughly 100 million
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COVID hit health care worker well-being super hard
COVID exacted a huge toll on the well-being of health care workers, a new survey shows. Already struggling with high levels of emotional exhaustion going into the pandemic, the problem grew even worse after two years of managing the crisis. Nurses have been especially hard hit. Researchers conducted surveys over three years with more than 30,000 health care workers—including doctors, nurses, clin
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Will we ever see pictures of the big bang? We ask an expert
Dr Matthew Bothwell, public astronomer at the University of Cambridge, on whether humans will one day be able to observe the origin of the universe The pictures from the James Webb telescope – described by Nasa as a "time machine" because the light has taken billions of years to reach us – raise the question: will it be possible to someday see the big bang itself? I asked Dr Matthew Bothwell, pub
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Can't remember words
I'm 24 and had pretty bad insomnia for a few years now, I've noticed that I'm having a lot of trouble remembering very simple words and phrases where I end up replacing/using them in the wrong places of a sentence. It's really hurting my conversation abilities because if someone is talking to me, I'll literally end my sentences early because I can't remember a word and as they're talking to me al
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Liteboxer Go: Punch Up Your Workout Virtually — Wherever You Travel
Getting a workout in while you're traveling is a challenge. But the Liteboxer Go can help you squeeze in sweat sessions from wherever you are. Or as the company describes the portable boxing workout system: "fitness anywhere, anytime." The Liteboxer Go is part video game (think old-school Dance Dance Revolution ), part workout app (throwing in some strength training and meditation), with a big do
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Genmodifiering av lignin kan göra växter torktåliga
Genom att genetiskt modifiera lignin, som finns i växters cellväggar, kan vi skapa växter som tål torka bättre. Resultaten skulle kunna användas inom både jord- och skogsbruk för att hantera framtida klimatutmaningar. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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Surr på nätet ger vink om spelsuccé
Snacket på nätet kan förutspå om ett dataspel kommer att sälja bra eller inte. Och det här kan företag baka in i sina försäljningsprognoser, enligt forskare. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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Chefen avgörande för att sjuksköterskor ska stanna
Vårdenhetschefer har en central roll för att sjuksköterskor ska trivas på arbetsplatsen. Cheferna behöver i sin tur ha kontor på plats, vara synliga i verksamheten och en rimlig administrativ arbetsbörda. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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Östrogen hos män skyddar spermierna
Intag av testosteron kan bromsa eller helt blockera spermiebildningen hos män. Kroppseget östrogen har däremot en skyddande effekt på spermiebildningen. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
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Dozens starstruck at Northumberland dark skies mass trespass
Participants view Milky Way and Andromeda galaxy as campaigners bemoan restrictions on right to roam "Welcome to the night," beamed a right to roam campaigner welcoming a coach load of city dwellers to the pitch dark stillness of remote Northumberland countryside on a chilly September evening. The passengers had been attracted by a secretive offer spread on Instagram and by old-school posters pin
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Scientists unlock the code to breeding better peas
Peas are a crucial crop for Australian farmers due to their versatility and reliable yields across a range of environments and soil types. A source of protein, starch, fiber and minerals, peas are also a valuable rotation crop due to their ability to improve the soil that they grow in without using industrial fertilizers.
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Cornell Scientists Create Microscopic Robots With Electronic 'Brains'
We've seen tiny robots before, but never like this. Researchers from Cornell have created the first microscopic robots that operate without any form of external control. These nanomachines have all the hardware they need on board, including a basic electronic brain. They just need a little solar energy, and off they go. They're currently very limited devices, but the designers envision almost unl
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Team links malaria spike with mass amphibian die-off
Researchers have linked an amphibian die-off in Costa Rica and Panama with a spike in malaria cases in the region. At the spike's peak, up to 1 person per 1,000 annually contracted malaria that normally would not have had the amphibian die-off not occurred, researchers report. Dozens of species of frogs, salamanders, and other amphibians quietly disappeared from parts of Latin America in the 1980
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Lil Nas X Is the Anti-Troll
The one-time Barb deals with hecklers and homophobes with the cunning of a true internet native. This week, he bought them pizza.
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Gut bacteria let bears eat differently but reach the same size
The microbial life in bears' guts allows them to achieve comparable size and fat stores while eating widely different diets, according to a new study. The work sheds light on the role of the gut microbiome in supporting health in wild omnivores. "We think of bears as having simple digestive tracts, so it's easy to slip into thinking that they therefore have simple gut microbiomes," says Erin McKe
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Giant magnon spin wave conductance in ultrathin insulators surprises researchers
When you make conducting wires thinner, their electrical resistance goes up. This is Ohm's law, and it is generally right. An important exception is at very low temperatures, where the mobility of electrons increases when wires become so thin that they are effectively two-dimensional. Now, University of Groningen physicists, together with colleagues at Brest University have observed that something
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Secondary ion mass spectrometry reveals atoms that make up MXenes and their precursor materials
Since the initial discovery of what has become a rapidly growing family of two-dimensional layered materials—called MXenes—in 2011, Drexel University researchers have made steady progress in understanding the complex chemical composition and structure, as well as the physical and electrochemical properties, of these exceptionally versatile materials. More than a decade later, advanced instruments
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Atomic-scale imaging reveals a facile route to crystal formation
What do clouds, televisions, pharmaceuticals, and even the dirt under our feet have in common? They all have or use crystals in some way. Crystals are more than just fancy gemstones. Clouds form when water vapor condenses into ice crystals in the atmosphere. Liquid crystal displays are used in a variety of electronics, from televisions to instrument panels. Crystallization is an important step for
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The evolutionary advantage of an aromatic clamp in plant family 3 glycoside exo-hydrolases
Nature Communications, Published online: 23 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-33180-5 Barley β-d-glucan glucohydrolase is a glycoside hydrolase family 3 (GH3) enzyme critical for growth and development. Here the authors carryout mutagenesis, structural analyses and multi-scale molecular dynamics to examine the binding and conformational behaviour of several β-d-glucosides during the substrat
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The Download: YouTube's deadly crafts, and DeepMind's new chatbot
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. The YouTube baker fighting back against deadly "craft hacks" Ann Reardon is probably the last person whose content you'd expect to be banned from YouTube. A former Australian youth worker and a mother of three, she's been teaching millions of loyal subscribers
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Internationale udpluk fra dag tre på EASD
Tredjedagen på årets store diabeteskongres bød blandt andet på ny forskning i, hvad det har af betydning for risikoen for udvikling af diabetes, hvis en kvinde får fjernet livmoderen. Et andet studie viste, at kulde kan bekæmpe type 2-diabetes, specielt hvis det fremprovokerer rystelser.
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AMD Zen 4 Breaks Overclocking Records on 280mm AIO, Can Hit 5.8GHz All-Core With Exotic Cooling
AMD's highly anticipated Zen 4 "Raphael" CPUs are launching next week, and now we have some overclocking numbers direct from the company. The big caveat here is the Ryzen 9 7950X does appear to run hot, as we reported previously . So there will be no free lunches this time around. The days of a high-end, AMD CPU running cool and quiet seem to be long gone. If you want to do some serious overclock
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SETI Researchers Have Begun Scanning the Backgrounds of Images for Alien Signals
Credit: NASA/STScI/CEERS/TACC/S. Finkelstein/M. Bagley/Z. Levay The Breakthrough Listen Initiative , funded by billionaire Yuri Milner, is currently working to scan a million stars in our galaxy for evidence of intelligent life. There are no hits yet, but a new study proposes another way Breakthrough Listen could aid in the search for extraterrestrial life. Radio telescopes are not only sensitive
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Tool predicts drug combos that weaken birth control
Researchers have developed a computer model that flags drug combinations that could reduce the effectiveness of contraception. Many contraceptive users may not realize taking additional medications can reduce the effectiveness of birth control, leading to unintended pregnancies. In the journal Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics , researchers describe how they developed a computer model and vali
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Can a rare bird's enzyme improve human health?
An enzyme from the rare crested ibis could someday help our bodies make better drugs. The species of bird is the only one known to naturally produce an enzyme able to generate a noncanonical amino acid; that is, one not among the 20 necessary to encode most proteins. That it exists—a discovery made through computational comparison of genome databases—proves it's possible for that enzyme to work w
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'An Army of Zombies Is Leading Us to Hell'
After President Vladimir Putin announced this week that Russia was conscripting some 300,000 reservists and military veterans to reinforce its war effort in Ukraine, international flights out of Russian cities quickly sold out . This latest wave of Russia's exodus included Anton Shalaev, a 38-year-old senior manager at an IT company, and 15 colleagues. On less than a day's notice, these men of mi
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America's False Idols
M y first job out of UCLA was in the analyst program at Morgan Stanley, in the 1980s. Like most of my analyst class, I had no idea what investment banking was—only that we were at the helm of the capitalist bobsled and could make a lot of money. We paid scant consideration to the wider role finance played in society. We were charged with birthing the apex predator of the capitalist species, the p
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11 COVID Questions People Still Have, Answered
F or almost two years , answering readers' COVID-19 questions was part of my job as the writer of this magazine's daily newsletter. We discussed what activities were safe in the early days of the pandemic , when and where to slap on a mask , what to make of new coronavirus variants , and more. So when my partner came down with a fever one night this summer, I thought it was my time to shine. Thin
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The Return of Fascism in Italy
"T he election of the first woman prime minister in a country always represents a break with the past, and that is certainly a good thing," Hillary Clinton said to an Italian journalist at the Venice International Film Festival earlier this month. She was speaking of Giorgia Meloni, a member of the Chamber of Deputies, who could make history if the Brothers of Italy party does as well as expected
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Soft shape-programmable surfaces by fast electromagnetic actuation of liquid metal networks
Nature Communications, Published online: 23 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-31092-y Low modulus materials that can change shape in response to external stimuli are promising for a wide range of applications. The authors here introduce a shape-reprogrammable construct, based on liquid metal microfluidic networks and electromagnetic actuation, that supports a unique collection of capabilitie
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Household transmission of the SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variant in Denmark
Nature Communications, Published online: 23 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-33328-3 In this study, the authors compare the transmission dynamics of the Delta and Omicron SARS-CoV-2 variants using household data from Denmark. They find that Omicron has a higher secondary attack rate, and that the odds of infection with Omicron was higher than with Delta, particularly for vaccinated individu
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Arctic sea ice loss leads to more frequent strong El Niño events
Over the last 40 years, a rapid shrinking of Arctic sea ice has been one of the most significant indicators of climate change. The amount of sea ice that survives the Arctic summer has declined 13% per decade since the late 1970s and projections show the region could experience its first ice-free summer by 2040.
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PODCAST Sådan kan vi indfange og lagre Danmarks CO2-udledning
Det er ikke nok at begrænse vores udslip af CO2, vi er også nødt til at indfange den, lagre den eller bruge den. Hør hvordan i denne uges Transformator, som også handler om, hvorfor Novo Nordisk fonden netop har smidt 1,5 milliarder kroner i udviklingen af en dansk kvantecomputer.
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Noise-resilient and high-speed deep learning with coherent silicon photonics
Nature Communications, Published online: 23 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-33259-z The challenge of high-speed and high-accuracy coherent photonic neurons for deep learning applications lies to solve noise related issues. Here, Mourgias-Alexandris et al. address this problem by introducing a noise-resilient hardware architectural and a deep learning training platform.
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Payload distribution and capacity of mRNA lipid nanoparticles
Nature Communications, Published online: 23 September 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-33157-4 Lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) are effective vehicles to deliver mRNA vaccines and therapeutics but assessing the mRNA packaging characteristics in LNPs is challenging. Here, the authors report that mRNA and lipid contents in LNP formulations can be quantitatively examined by multi-laser cylindrical illuminatio
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What Does the Philadelphia D.A. Do Now?
Larry Krasner has been at the forefront of the progressive-prosecutor movement since becoming Philadelphia's district attorney in 2017. Which means that he has also been at the center of an unending storm. Krasner has faced relentless battles with the police union, other local elected officials, and Republicans who control the Pennsylvania state legislature and are now making an unprecedented eff
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The YouTube baker fighting back against deadly "craft hacks"
Ann Reardon is probably the last person whose content you'd expect to be banned from YouTube. A former Australian youth worker and a mother of three, she has her own cookbook, has baked for the BBC, and once made a coin-size apple pie for two baby chicks. Since 2011 she's been using her YouTube channel to show millions of loyal subscribers how to bake and decorate elaborate cakes. But on July 1,
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Allan Flyvbjerg: »Nu tager jeg et nyt modigt valg«
For seks år siden tog Allan Flyvbjerg springet fra dekan på Det sundhedsvidenskabelige fakultet på Aarhus Universitet til jobbet som direktør for Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen. I en alder af 63 har han overraskende for mange meddelt, at han stopper med udgangen af september for at blive pensionist.
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Fortified Bermuda braces for powerful Hurricane Fiona
The beach chairs and umbrellas were put away, storefronts were covered and a lighthouse illuminated racing clouds overhead as Bermuda braced Thursday for Hurricane Fiona, a powerful Category 4 storm that has left a trail of destruction in the Caribbean.
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Ancient Maya cities were dangerously contaminated with mercury
The cities of the ancient Maya in Mesoamerica never fail to impress. But beneath the soil surface, an unexpected danger lurks there: mercury pollution. In a review article in Frontiers in Environmental Science, researchers conclude that this pollution isn't modern: it's due to the frequent use of mercury and mercury-containing products by the Maya of the Classic Period, between 250 and 1100 CE. Th
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Book Review: How We Make Sense of Mental Illness
A t 6 years old , Rachel Aviv entered the hospital because she refused to eat. Six weeks later, her doctors discharged her, and she went on to have a mostly normal childhood. But decades on, her sojourn through the mental health treatment universe continued to haunt her. Her doctors had given her illness a label, anorexia, and doubted that she would ever recover. "We are extremely guarded regardi
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Minimizing COVID Via Pseudo-Profound Bullshit
Some COVID-minimizers use "seemingly impressive assertions that are presented as true and meaningful but are actually vacuous" to fool people into thinking they are receiving profound, secret knowledge. It's actually just bullshit. The post first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .
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Schneider Shorts 23.09.2022 – Elsevier apologises
Schneider Shorts 23.09.2022 – the triumphant return of irisin, Elsevier apologises for a misunderstanding, great men of science celebrated, Italian dermatologists learning a lesson, with a Persian plant papermill, russian homeopathy, tea and vitamins, and why Israeli Scientists are smarter than the rest.
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