Search Posts

Nyheder27april2022

A global reptile assessment highlights shared conservation needs of tetrapods
Nature, Published online: 27 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04664-7 An extinction-risk assessment of reptiles shows that at least 21.1% of species are threatened by factors such as agriculture, logging, urban development and invasive species, and that efforts to protect birds, mammals and amphibians probably also benefit many reptiles.
4h
New cocoa processing method produces fruitier, more 'flowery' dark chocolate
Producing chocolate, one of the world's most beloved sweets, is a multistep process beginning with freshly harvested cocoa beans. People have been experimenting with chocolate-making for millennia, and even today, new methods are still being introduced. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have found that an alternative processing step called "moist incubat
1h

LATEST

Just Call Trump a Loser
Let's assume Donald Trump runs again for president in 2024. Yes, I know, caveats, caveats. Republicans say it's too early to discuss '24. A lot can change between now and then . Maybe Trump won't actually run. Maybe he's just teasing the possibility to milk the attention. Apparently, he likes attention. But if Trump does decide to inflict himself on another race, he will enter as the clear Republ
10h
Sunak launches £25m 'fraud squad' to recover lost Covid support billions
Public Sector Fraud Authority will tackle criminal gangs who rip off taxpayers after criticism from MPs A £25m "fraud squad" is to be launched after MPs criticised the government's failure to crack down on criminals who stole billions of pounds of taxpayers' cash through Covid support schemes. Announcing the creation of the Public Sector Fraud Authority (PFSA) on Wednesday, the Treasury said it w
8h
Girls shun physics A-level as they dislike 'hard maths', says social mobility head
Female physicists question 'terrifying' claims made by government commissioner Katharine Birbalsingh to MPs Girls do not choose physics A-level because they dislike "hard maths", the government's social mobility commissioner has claimed, prompting anger from leading scientists. Addressing a science and technology committee inquiry on diversity and inclusion in Stem subjects (science, technology,
7h
Terms of Twitter Deal Say Elon Musk Isn't Allowed to Insult Twitter
Sounds like Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk might experience a little turbulence on the ride to adding another company to his Musk-iverse. Twitter's lawyers negotiated the company's sale to Musk for around $44 billion , and said there are a few things he's not allowed to do — including, notably, fully enjoy his regular pasttime of posting regrettable stuff on Twitter . After Musk entered a deal to
26min
Japanese Railroad Builds Giant Gundam-Style Robot to Fix Power Lines
Based Bot A Japanese company is taking service robotics to a whole new level with a giant, humanoid maintenance robot. As New Atlas and other blogs reported , the West Japan Rail Company, also known as JR West, is now using a humongous Gundam -style robot to fix remote railway power lines — and to make it even cooler, the robot is piloted by an actual human wearing a VR setup. With a giant barrel
1h
The problems with Elon Musk's plan to open-source the Twitter algorithm
Just hours after Twitter announced it was accepting Elon Musk's buyout offer, the SpaceX CEO made his plans for the social network clear. In a press release , Musk outlined the sweeping changes he intended to make, including opening up the algorithms that determine what users see in their feed. Musk's ambition to open-source Twitter's algorithms is driven by his long-standing concern about potent
8h
Discovery of the one-way superconductor, thought to be impossible
Associate professor Mazhar Ali and his research group at TU Delft have discovered one-way superconductivity without magnetic fields, something that was thought to be impossible ever since its discovery in 1911—up until now. The discovery, published in Nature, makes use of 2D quantum materials and paves the way toward superconducting computing. Superconductors can make electronics hundreds of times
5h
Heat flow shown to be more efficient when temperature is oscillating than when static
A team of researchers from the Institute of Scientific Instruments working with a colleague from Charles University, both in the Czech Republic, has shown that heat flows more efficiently when the temperature of the material through which it is flowing oscillates, as opposed to remaining steady. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group describes experiments they c
7h
Supernova reveals its secrets to team of astronomers
An international group of astronomers led by Benjamin Thomas of The University of Texas at Austin has used observations from the Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) at the university's McDonald Observatory to unlock a puzzling mystery about a stellar explosion discovered several years ago and evolving even now. The results, published in today's issue of The Astrophysical Journal, will help astronomers be
1h
It Turns Out People Who Don't Believe in Evolution Are Racist Jerks
People who think evolution is a bunch of hogwash are, per a new study, much more likely to be bigoted. In a new interview with PsyPost , University of Massachusetts at Amherst researcher Stylianos Syropoulos discusses the implications of a new study his team published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology . Syropoulos and his colleagues found that in the United States — as well as i
2h
Scientists Find DNA Building Blocks in Asteroids
Meteorite Life Scientists have discovered the building blocks of DNA in meteorites that landed in North America and Australia, Reuters reports , suggesting that the basic ingredients for life may have originated in outer space. Until now, scientists had detected three of the five basic chemicals that make up DNA and RNA. But in a new study published in the journal Nature Communications , a team o
3h
'Bossware is coming for almost every worker': the software you might not realize is watching you
Computer monitoring software is helping companies spy on their employees to measure their productivity – often without their consent When the job of a young east coast-based analyst – we'll call him James – went remote with the pandemic, he didn't envisage any problems. The company, a large US retailer for which he has been a salaried employee for more than half a decade, provided him with a lapt
9h
School Boards Are No Match for America's Political Dysfunction
I t should have been an unremarkable community gathering. At first, it looked as though it might be. On October 25, a cold wind whipped against the cars filing into the East Middle School parking lot in Grand Blanc, Michigan, for a school-board meeting. The audience piled into the six-feet-apart, gray folding chairs in the cafetorium. A group of unmasked community members slid their chairs closer
9h
Elon Musk Already Showed Us How He'll Run Twitter
Last night, after Twitter accepted his $44 billion bid to buy the company, Elon Musk traveled to South Texas, where SpaceX is building prototypes for a rocket system designed to take people to Mars someday. Earlier, he had shared some of his to-do list for the social-media company he could soon own outright: "enhancing the product with new features," "defeating the spam bots," and making the plat
22h
Former NASA Astronaut Says Russian Cosmonauts Are Being "Brainwashed"
Sound Off One firebrand ex-astronaut is again assailing Russia amid the country's invasion of neighboring Ukraine — and this time, he's targeted the cosmonauts. In a new interview with Newsweek , former NASA astronaut Scott Kelly went off, berating Russia for the way he says its government has "brainwashed" the cosmonauts who used to be his colleagues aboard the International Space Station. Kelly
4h
Elon Musk's Twitter Stunt Is Wreaking Havoc on Tesla
Spree Twitter Tesla CEO Elon Musk is in final talks to take over Twitter , a shopping spree that came with a massive price tag of $44 billion. And while he could soon add the social media network to his already lengthy portfolio of companies, his other major ventures are feeling the squeeze. To come up with the money, even the richest man in the world had to dig deep into his pockets, offering up
5h
AI Generates Painting of Actual "Burger King" and There's a Terrifying Hunger in His Eye
Bow Down OpenAI's powerful new neural network has "painted" a freaky-looking "burger king" that could give the bloodthirsty Henry VIII a run for his money. DALL-E 2, the latest artificial intelligence system from the company co-founded by Elon Musk , can turn simple text prompts into incredibly beautiful and realistic-looking works of art. For this "painting," OpenAI market manager Adam Goldberg
5h
How a Purple State Got a Bright Red Sheen
States, as Louis Brandeis said , have long been the laboratories of democracy. Today, they can also serve as the laboratories of authoritarianism —the places where a radicalized Republican Party tries to enact its agenda after a disappointing legislative record during Donald Trump's presidency. If one had to guess where the vanguard of MAGA policy making might be, the natural guess would be some
9h
Where Foreign Correspondents Capitulated to Autocracy
When Allan Au didn't post his Wordle score on Facebook one morning this month, his friends began to worry. For Au, a longtime journalist and media trainer in Hong Kong, the ritual was less about flexing his vocabulary skills than a deliberate way to indicate that he was still free. His friends, it turned out, had cause for concern: Au had been arrested on suspicion of committing sedition. The nex
11h
More than half of Americans have had Covid, including three of four children
A CDC report showed a striking increase in those with coronavirus antibodies between December and February More than half of Americans show signs of a previous Covid-19 infection, including three out of every four children, according to a new report released on Tuesday. The findings from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) come after researchers examined blood samples from more t
21h
Oops! Hacker Steals $1 Million in Crypto and Then Destroys It
Cleaned Out Despite the old saying, not everything lives forever on the internet — including stolen crypto. This week, crypto security firm BlockSec announced that a hacker figured out how to exploit lending agreements and triple their crypto reward on the ZEED DeFi protocol, which runs on the Binance Smart Chain and trades with a currency called YEED. " Our system detected an attack transaction
2h
Huge Wave Injures a Deck Hand on the Patricia Lee | Deadliest Catch
Stream Deadliest Catch on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/deadliest-catch #DeadliestCatch #Discovery #DiscoveryPlus Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Disco
6h
1,500-year-old shoe resembling Roman sandal found in Norwegian alpine pass
A team of researchers working on what has been named the "Secrets of the Ice" project has come into possession of a 1,500-year-old shoe that was found in a Norwegian alpine pass—one that resembles an ancient Roman sandal. The group has not yet published their paper describing their work analyzing the shoe but has posted updates on Facebook and Twitter.
5h
That a Day Begins, Leave It to the Small
genius of planets & stars, rotations & spinning, meteorological time maybe, geologic maybe. & what we call ordinary, call human, has little to do with the fact that morning arrives after night. If there is anything to be found these months, let the clouds say so, point the way. Today someone said museum, said gallery, said offstage in the wings, said in the stacks of the local library, said a bri
8h
Researchers have a formula for getting in the flow
The immersive and often exhilarating experience of "flow" while playing sports, making art, or working is a much sought-after state of mind associated with peak creativity and productivity, which is why artificial intelligence programmers and human resource departments alike are eager to find ways to cultivate it.
22h
Fault-tolerant quantum computer memory in diamond
Quantum computing holds the potential to be a game-changing future technology in fields ranging from chemistry to cryptography to finance to pharmaceuticals. Compared to conventional computers, scientists suggest that quantum computers could operate many thousand times faster. To harness this power, scientists today are looking at ways to construct quantum computer networks. Fault-tolerant quantum
5h
Facebook Admits It Doesn't Know What It Does With Your Private Data
According to a leaked internal document obtained by Motherboard , Facebook is surprisingly hazy on what it does with the data it collects on its users — or what it's even doing with it. And that's a big problem. The company, which has earned a reputation for its careless safekeeping of the wealth of data it's been hoarding for years, has to abide by a "tsunami" of new privacy rules being implemen
26min
Workers think less creatively in Zoom meetings, study finds
Face-to-face gatherings produce more ideas – and more inventive ones – than videoconferencing, say researchers As if the endless muting and freezing, the need for shelves lined with high literature, and the constant fear of a colleague wandering on screen unclothed were not enough to worry about, researchers have found that Zoom stifles creativity. Meeting face to face produced more ideas, and id
5h
Turning the nation's capital into the next Kendall Square
Washington, DC, is dominated by the federal government and tourism, but Jeff Jamawat, MCP '19, SM '19, thinks that's no longer enough. "We want people to also recognize DC as a tech hub," says Jamawat, associate director of economic development and innovation at the Golden Triangle Business Improvement District. The nonprofit is launching an innovation district centered along Pennsylvania Avenue
9h
A glimpse inside a graphene sandwich
Since the first successful fabrication of a two-dimensional structure of carbon atoms about 20 years ago, graphene has fascinated scientists. A few years ago, researchers discovered that two layers of graphene, slightly twisted against each other, can conduct electric current without loss. In recent years, this discovery has prompted scientists to explore such layered materials in greater detail.
5h
The MIT researcher who helps senators understand digital currencies
Last summer, a special subcommittee of the US Senate met remotely to weigh the benefits of launching a central-bank digital currency, or CBDC—something that could, if optimally designed, transform the US financial system, making it more accessible to more citizens. For senators staring intently at their laptops, this was basically the first day of digital-currency school. And to introduce them to
11h
The breakthrough science of mRNA medicine | Melissa J. Moore
The secret behind medicines that use messenger RNA (or mRNA) is that they "teach" our bodies how to fight diseases on their own, leading to groundbreaking treatments for COVID-19 and, potentially one day, cancer, the flu and other ailments that have haunted humanity for millennia. RNA researcher Melissa J. Moore — Moderna's chief scientific officer and one of the many people responsible for the r
5h
Massive underwater avalanches deliver pollutants to deep sea
Research shows largest 'turbidity currents' can carry more sediment than the annual output of all the world's rivers combined over time On 18 November 1929, a magnitude 7.2 earthquake shook the ocean floor off the coast of Newfoundland, Canada. Within minutes transatlantic telephone cables started sequentially snapping, with the furthest cable – 600km from the quake – breaking 13 hours and 17 min
15h
He created an indigenous digital currency. The dream is still alive.
Payu Harris wanted to create a cryptocurrency for his grandma. For all grandmas, he would say, or uncis in Lakota—especially the impoverished ones living on the outskirts of Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota, with little access to electricity or the internet. He'd argue that MazaCoin could be called a success if she used it every day. If that seems an unlikely prospect, it is—and Maza
11h
Photos: Two Months of War in Ukraine
Last weekend marked two months since the start of Russia's invasion of Ukraine. For the moment, Russian military efforts seem to be focused on seizing control of the country's eastern and southern areas. After Russia's withdrawal from areas around Kyiv, some Ukrainians have been slowly returning to claim their dead, assess the damage, and salvage what they can. Gathered here, recent images of the
2h
What Happens When We Give Animals Our Diseases?
When scientists think about the movement of microbes between animal species, we generally focus on "spillover" events: when pathogens move from animals to humans. But pathogen transmission isn't a one-way street. Humans appear to have introduced SARS-CoV-2 — the virus that causes COVID-19 —into populations of wild deer, mink, captive gorillas, pet dogs and cats, and a variety of other species. So
5h
Money changes everything
April 1969 From "Computer-Based Services in Personal Transactions": The challenge thrown down by the computer for the future is to transmit information without the paper. This challenge leads to speculation about a "checkless society," a phrase that has captured the imagination of journalists to the point of popularizing a concept long before economic, social, and legal aspects have been resolved
11h
Ocean warrior
When Manuel Moreu, SM '78, was a child, his father was an officer in the Spanish navy, and Moreu wanted nothing more than to be an officer himself. At age five, however, side effects of antibiotics left him deaf in one ear, which meant that the navy would never take him. "Rather than operate the warships, I [decided to] build them," he says. Now Moreu runs Seaplace, Spain's top marine design firm
9h
Neuroimmune cardiovascular interfaces control atherosclerosis
Nature, Published online: 27 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04673-6 The peripheral nervous system uses neuroimmune cardiovascular interfaces to assemble a structural artery–brain circuit, and therapeutic intervention in the artery–brain circuit attenuates atherosclerosis.
4h
Europe Has Traded Away Its Online Porn Law
The landmark Digital Services Act has a glaring omission: It ditches plans to tighten rules that could have protected survivors of revenge porn and other forms of sexual abuse.
9h
A refined microbiome 'fingerprint' method tracks sub-strain variants of a single gut microbe strain
A previously developed a microbiome 'fingerprint' method that identifies single strains of particular gut bacteria through analysis of metagenomics data from fecal samples, has been refined to include looking for single-nucleotide variants in the KEGG metabolic pathways of a particular strain. This magnified analysis shows a short-term difference in sub-strain dynamics of two Bacteroides species b
now
Machine learning, harnessed to extreme computing, aids fusion energy development
MIT research scientists Pablo Rodriguez-Fernandez and Nathan Howard have just completed one of the most demanding calculations in fusion science—predicting the temperature and density profiles of a magnetically confined plasma via first-principles simulation of plasma turbulence. Solving this problem by brute force is beyond the capabilities of even the most advanced supercomputers. Instead, the r
15min
The instability at the beginning of the solar system
Michigan State University's Seth Jacobson and colleagues in China and France have unveiled a new theory that could help solve a galactic mystery of how our solar system evolved. Specifically, how did the gas giants — Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune — end up where they are, orbiting the sun like they do? The research also has implications for how terrestrial planets such as Earth were formed
35min
What Should Twitter Forbid? Be Specific.
This is an edition of Up for Debate, a newsletter by Conor Friedersdorf. On Wednesdays, he rounds up timely conversations and solicits reader responses to one thought-provoking question. Every Friday, he publishes some thoughtful replies. Sign up for the newsletter here. Question of the Week Elon Musk bought Twitter. Anticipating that the deal will go through, many are advising him on how to impr
44min
Best Cameras for Kids in 2022
Something magical happens when you look through a camera lens, and the best cameras for kids put that magic in the hands of burgeoning photographers. Kids' cameras are made to withstand a few stumbles and falls but can still capture the moment. Most kids' cameras are lightweight and simple, with just a few settings. Tweens and teens can usually handle a little more complexity and a model designed
1h
What the Fitness Industry Doesn't Understand
If you tried to imagine the perfect gym teacher, you'd probably come up with someone a lot like Hampton Liu. He's a gentle, friendly guy who spends most of his time trying to figure out how to make the basics of exercise more approachable, and he talks frequently about how he never wants anyone to feel shame for their ability or skill level. In other words—and with apologies to good gym teachers,
1h
A watershed moment: Key findings about potential drinking water contamination
Every day, people across the United States turn on their faucets for a glass of drinking water, but few ever think about where their water originates. For the millions who dwell in urban areas, that water often comes from far away watersheds, land areas that channel rainfall and snowmelt to creeks, streams, and rivers. However, the way humans use land in these watersheds may affect the quality of
1h
Coachella Defeated My Cynicism About Music Festivals
I n an ill-fated attempt to hype myself up for the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival, I went on YouTube to look at an inflatable blue gorilla—a stage prop for the hip-hop act Brockhampton, who had announced that Coachella would be the group's last booking ever. The festival unfolds in two identical three-day lineups over consecutive weekends; I was attending the second weekend, and I wante
1h
7 things you should know about sleep apnea and CPAP
Using a continuous positive air pressure machine is a common way to treat obstructive sleep apnea. But there is growing confusion among many people about whether or not they should use one. High on the list of sounds no one wants to hear is the snoring of a bed partner. But sometimes that harsh, rasping sound is more than just annoying; it can be life-threatening. About half of the 90 million Ame
1h
Study shows creativity assessments progressing slowly, including racialized, gendered approaches
Creativity has been designated a critical 21st Century Skill by the National Research Council, yet there is not one ideal, accepted way to identify creative young people and encourage the strength as part of their education. A new study from the University of Kansas found that while creativity's value has long been recognized, there are three primary methods of assessing it in young people. Those
1h
Water wash cleanses barns between broiler chicken flocks, without need for disinfection
In Canadian broiler chicken production, removal of litter, washing, and disinfection have typically taken place to prepare barns for new flocks. More recently, new regulations have allowed for water washing between flocks, without disinfection. University of Alberta researchers have found that water wash by itself reduced the numbers of the pathogen, Campylobacter jejuni, in birds and in the barn
1h
Tangle no more, nanotubes
Scientists have developed an acid-based solvent that simplifies carbon nanotube processing in a way that's less toxic and easy to scale up for industrial applications.
2h
The Download: The Money Issue, and the problems with open sourcing Twitter's algorithms
This is today's edition of The Download , our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology. Introducing: The Money Issue Money is weird now. Whether it's a biometric-based universal cryptocurrency meant to underpin Web3, cities built by Bitcoin, digital currencies that are replacing cash, or the way iBuying is transforming the housing market, technol
2h
Calming excited neurons may improve stroke recovery
A new study has prompted scientists to reconsider a once-popular yet controversial idea in stroke research. The researchers believed that, in the aftermath of a stroke, calming overexcited neurons might prevent them from releasing a toxic molecule that can kill neurons already damaged by lack of oxygen. This idea was supported by studies in cells and animals, but it lost favor in the early 2000s
2h
Wildfires in US, Canadian boreal forests could release sizable amount of remaining global carbon budget
A paper by U.S. scientists published in the peer-reviewed journal Science Advances today finds that fires occurring in U.S. and Canadian boreal forests between now and 2050 could release about 3% of the remaining global carbon budget unless greater investments are made to limit fire size in these carbon-rich forests. The first-of-its-kind study was led by Dr. Carly Phillips, a fellow with the West
2h
Nanoplastic particles love company: Researchers analyze polyethylene degradation in environment
Polyethylene accounts for nearly one-third of the world's plastic waste. An interdisciplinary team has now investigated the progressive degradation of polyethylene in the environment for the first time. Although the degradation process leads to fragmentation into ever smaller particles, isolated nanoplastic particles are rarely found in the environment. The reason is that such decay products do no
2h
How one inflammatory disorder exacerbates another
People with severe gum disease are at a higher risk of other inflammatory conditions, such as heart disease and arthritis, and the reverse is true as well. New research unpacks the mechanism underlying this association, demonstrating in mice that a susceptibility to arthritis can be transmitted by a bone marrow transplant if the donor has gum inflammation.
2h
Plug-and-play organ-on-a-chip can be customized to the patient
Researchers have developed a model of human physiology in the form of a multi-organ chip consisting of engineered human heart, bone, liver, and skin that are linked by vascular flow with circulating immune cells, to allow recapitulation of interdependent organ functions. The researchers have essentially created a plug-and-play multi-organ chip, which is the size of a microscope slide, that can be
2h
Study points to physical principles that underlie quantum Darwinism
At the atomic and subatomic scales, objects behave in ways that challenge the classical worldview based on day-to-day interactions with macroscopic reality. A familiar example is the discovery that electrons can behave as both particles and waves, depending on the experimental context in which they are observed. To explain this and other phenomena, which appear contrary to the laws of physics inhe
2h
Climate resilient microalgae could help restore coral reefs
Coral species exhibit different temperature tolerances. This is in part due to the composition of their microalgae symbionts. With a new method, researchers from Uppsala University were able to predict how individual microalgae might behave under future temperature stress and identify more tolerant coral symbionts. In combination with forthcoming single cell selection and growth experiments, the i
3h
Over 21% of reptile species at risk of extinction
At least one in five reptile species are threatened with extinction, including more than half of turtles and crocodiles, according to the first major global assessment of the world's so-called cold-blooded creatures.
3h
In China, opinion of the US tanked during Trump presidency
The perceptions of people in China concerning the United States plummeted during Donald Trump's presidency, a survey of public opinion in the country shows. Researchers based their study on data collected before and after the 2020 presidential election. Songying Fang, an associate professor of political science at Rice University, and one of the paper's authors, says the study is rare in addressi
3h
Do zoom meetings kill creativity?
Zoom meetings became the lifeblood of many workplaces during pandemic, but a new study points to a downside: They may limit employees' capacity for creative thinking.
3h
Scientists find a genetic cause of lupus
An international team of researchers has identified DNA mutations in a gene that senses viral RNA, as a cause of the autoimmune disease lupus, with the finding paving the way for the development of new treatments.
3h
Supernova reveals secrets to astronomers
An international group of astronomers has used observations to unlock a puzzling mystery about a stellar explosion discovered several years ago and evolving even now. The results will help astronomers better understand the process of how massive stars live and die.
3h
Research unveils evolution and seed micromorphology in Impatiens
The species Impatiens linnaeus is notoriously difficult to classify morphologically, and the semi-succulent stems, fleshy leaves, and extremely fragile flowers make it challenging to prepare good herbarium specimens. Compared with flowers, seeds of Impatiens are more stable and conserved, and the importance of seed micromorphology for classification has been recognized. However, the micromorpholog
3h
Single-molecule techniques illuminate mechanisms of GPCR activation
Scientists at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital and Columbia University/New York State Psychiatric Institute are studying G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), membrane proteins that are the target of one-third of approved drugs. Using single-molecule imaging techniques, researchers gained fresh insight into the process by which cellular signals are relayed by GPCRs. The work may aid the develo
3h
Disposable masks could be used to improve concrete
With the pervasive single-use masks during the pandemic now presenting an environmental problem, researchers have demonstrated the idea of incorporating old masks into a cement mixture to create stronger, more durable concrete.
3h
Developing the world's smallest gear wheel
Ever smaller and more intricate—without miniaturization, we wouldn't have the components today that are required for high-performance laptops, compact smartphones or high-resolution endoscopes. Research is now being carried out in the nanoscale on switches, rotors or motors that consist of only a few atoms in order to build what are known as molecular machines. A research team at FAU has successfu
3h
Byte-Sized Review: REDMAGIC 7 Pro Packs Serious Mobile Gaming Potential
Love it or hate it, mobile gaming is here to stay, especially with phones like the REDMAGIC 7 Pro , which is built specifically for gaming. It's only natural, considering just how much horsepower Android phones pack into a small, handheld space. Lightning-fast processing and next-gen graphics are more or less a mainstay of newer phones, and REDMAGIC 7 Pro is no outlier in this regard. Here's our
4h
Glimpse inside a graphene sandwich
In the search for novel types of superconductors — phases of matter that that conduct electric current without loss — scientists are investigating materials that consist of multiple layers. A team has studied in detail the properties of a system of three twisted graphene layers and gained important insights into its properties.
4h
Catalytic synthesis of phenols with nitrous oxide
Nature, Published online: 27 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04516-4 A study demonstrates that nitrous oxide can act as the source of O in a catalytic conversion of aryl halides to phenols, releasing N2 as by-product.
4h
Computer-designed repurposing of chemical wastes into drugs
Nature, Published online: 27 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04503-9 A forward-synthesis platform, Allchemy, computationally determines how to 'close the circle', or use waste chemicals to make valuable pharmaceutical or agrochemical products, ranking possible routes by environmental, geospatial, and other factors.
4h
FAIR data enabling new horizons for materials research
Nature, Published online: 27 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04501-x A findable, accessible, interoperable and reusable (FAIR) data infrastructure is discussed to turn the large amount of research data generated by the field of materials science into knowledge and value.
4h
Virtual communication curbs creative idea generation
Nature, Published online: 27 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04643-y Videoconferencing inhibits the production of creative ideas, but videoconferencing groups are as effective as (or perhaps even more effective than) in-person groups at deciding which ideas to pursue.
4h
Early Solar System instability triggered by dispersal of the gaseous disk
Nature, Published online: 27 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04535-1 Dynamical simulations of the early Solar System show that the giant planets' instability was triggered by the dispersal of the Sun's gaseous disk, constrained by astronomical observations to be a few to ten million years after the birth of the Solar System.
4h
The field-free Josephson diode in a van der Waals heterostructure
Nature, Published online: 27 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04504-8 A Josephson diode is made by fabricating an inversion symmetry breaking van der Waals heterostructure of NbSe2/Nb3Br8/NbSe2, demonstrating that even without a magnetic field, the junction can be superconducting with a positive current but resistive with a negative current.
4h
Expanding ocean food production under climate change
Nature, Published online: 27 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04674-5 Sustainable mariculture could increase seafood production under almost all climate-change scenarios analysed, but this would require substantial fisheries reforms, continued advances in feed technology and the establishment of effective mariculture governance and best practices.
4h
Machine learning-aided engineering of hydrolases for PET depolymerization
Nature, Published online: 27 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04599-z Untreated, postconsumer-PET from 51 different thermoformed products can all be almost completely degraded by FAST-PETase in 1 week and PET can be resynthesized from the recovered monomers, demonstrating recycling at the industrial scale.
4h
Engineered jumpers overcome biological limits via work multiplication
Nature, Published online: 27 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04606-3 A comparison of the energetics of jumping between biological and engineered systems shows that engineered systems can greatly increase energy limits using the process of work multiplication, and this analysis leads to the demonstration of a 30-centimetre device jumping over 30 metres.
4h
β-Hydroxybutyrate suppresses colorectal cancer
Nature, Published online: 27 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41586-022-04649-6 The growth of colorectal cancer is reduced by ketogenic diet consumption, the properties of which are mediated by the ketone body β-hydroxybutyrate.
4h
Tailor-made enzymes poised to propel plastic recycling into a new era
Nature, Published online: 27 April 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01075-6 Waste streams of the plastic poly(ethylene terephthalate) that can be recycled into material suitable for food packaging are limited, creating a shortfall of feedstocks. An enzyme has been discovered that widens the feedstock options.
4h
Phosphorylation found inside RNA
Nature, Published online: 27 April 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01021-6 In an impressively thorough study, phosphorylation in the core of a transfer RNA molecule has been described for the first time, and the enzymes that add and remove the phosphate group have been characterized.
4h
Control of human protein-degradation machinery revealed
Nature, Published online: 27 April 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01144-w A long-standing puzzle in molecular biology is how the enzyme USP14 is activated by the proteasome and regulates protein degradation. Time-resolved cryo-electron microscopy combined with deep learning reveals this mechanism in unprecedented detail.
4h
Stretched skin cells divide without DNA replication
Nature, Published online: 27 April 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-00790-4 Analysis of zebrafish larvae reveals that epithelial cells in their skin undergo tension-driven division without DNA replication. This allows rapid expansion, enabling the cells to cover the fast-growing organism.
4h
Virtual collaboration hinders a key component of creativity
Nature, Published online: 27 April 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-00126-2 Experiments and fieldwork show that teams working together online produce fewer ideas than those collaborating in person — a first step towards answering the question of which modes of communication are generally best for creativity.
4h
Addressing social, psychological and economic barriers helps people out of extreme poverty
Nature, Published online: 27 April 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01027-0 Policies that aim to reduce poverty often prioritize economic interventions. We show that a programme that addresses not only financial but also psychological and social barriers is effective at helping extremely poor households in Niger. Our results point to a cost-effective approach for alleviating extreme poverty that can
4h
Crosstalk between nerves, immune cells and plaques drives atherosclerosis
Nature, Published online: 27 April 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-00508-6 Fatty structures called plaques can form in arteries, and are separated from nerves by the artery walls. But this is no barrier to communication — it seems that nerves interact with plaques and immune cells to drive cardiovascular disease.
4h
Tension hones body segmentation around the clock
Nature, Published online: 27 April 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-00840-x The formation of body segments in vertebrate embryos has long been attributed to the spatio-temporal patterning of molecular signals. But segment length in zebrafish is now found to be adjusted by tissue mechanics.
4h
Jumping robot bests biology by enhancing stored energy
Nature, Published online: 27 April 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01077-4 A robotic jumper combines inspiration from biology with clever engineering to reach new heights. Crucial to the design is the combination of a rotary motor with a hybrid spring that maximizes stored energy density.
4h
Students identify Chicago neighborhoods most at risk of urban flooding
Growing up in Brooklyn and spending her undergraduate and now graduate student years in Chicago, Chaillé Biddle has grown increasingly alarmed by the problem of urban flooding. When rainwater and stormwater overflow in developed areas, and the local sewer system cannot handle heavy downpours, that water fills streets and homes.
4h
From conventional to strange metal behavior in magic-angle twisted bilayer graphene
Magic-angle twisted bilayer graphene (MATBG) is a graphene-based material with a unique structure, consisting of two graphene sheets layered on top of each other with a misalignment of approximately 1.1°. This unique structure has been found to host various interesting states, including correlated insulating states and unconventional superconductivity.
4h
Wildfire smoke accelerates glacier melt, affects mountain runoff
As global temperatures rise, wildfires are becoming more common. A new study by University of Saskatchewan (USask) hydrology researchers found that exposure to wildfire smoke can cause glaciers to melt faster, affecting mountain runoff that provides major freshwater resources for life downstream.
5h
Extreme heat waves threaten honeybee fertility and trigger sudden death
Temperatures soared above 42 C for days in Western Canada in June 2021, with Lytton, B.C., registering 49.6 C, the hottest temperature ever recorded in Canada. Wildfires scorched the province, sparking a 56-day state of emergency and nearly 600 additional sudden deaths compared to the same time in 2020.
5h
Solar beats nuclear at many potential settlement sites on Mars
While most missions to the moon and other planets rely upon solar power, scientists have assumed that any extended surface mission involving humans would require a more reliable source of energy: nuclear power. Improvements in photovoltaics are upending this calculus. A new study concludes that a solar power system would weigh less than a nuclear system, and would be sufficient to power a colony a
5h
Green technology breakthrough: Hematite photocatalyst using sunlight energy simultaneously produces hydrogen and hydrogen peroxide
Hydrogen production using sunlight energy (solar-water splitting) has gained much attention in the quest to move towards carbon-neutral technologies. If chemical products with applications in the health and food industries could be produced at the same time as hydrogen, this would help reduce the cost of solar-water splitting, as well as increasing the technology's range of applications.
5h
Threatened South American coati found roaming in a large city
The South American coati is a medium-sized mammal with a wide distribution in South America. Despite this, it is endangered in southern Brazil, primarily because of the loss of forest habitats. Researchers recorded an individual at the Canoas Airbase, one of the last remaining green spaces in a densely urbanized area of a large city in southern Brazil.
5h
New study finds childhood abuse linked to higher risk for high cholesterol as an adult
The likelihood of developing high cholesterol — a risk factor for heart disease and stroke — was higher among white men and white women who experienced abuse during childhood, according to a study of more than 5,000 Black and white adults in the U.S. In contrast, growing up in a well-managed household with family members who were involved and engaged in the child's life offset the higher risk of
5h
Best Drawing Tablets of 2022
The best drawing tablets give you a level of control over your digital art that is stunning. Learning computers as a child in the mid '90s, the digital art tools that were commonly available were Microsoft Paint and a mouse — sure, some folks had fancy Macintosh computers and Wacom tablets, but for most of us, all that was achievable was the most rudimentary MS Paint pixel art. Today the best dra
5h
Advancing materials science for superconducting quantum circuits
NPL scientists, in collaboration with experts in physical chemistry, have unleashed state-of-the-art electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques to understand materials relevant for superconducting quantum circuits, with results published in a recent paper in Science Advances.
5h
Finding additional ways that proteins rotate
Biological materials like bones, teeth, and seashells are impressively tough. This strength comes from their composition: a combination of hard rock-like minerals and resilient carbon-based molecules like proteins. Materials scientists are taking inspiration from these biological materials to create a new generation of advanced materials made from proteins and minerals. But accomplishing this requ
5h
Surgeon on trial in Sweden over experimental windpipe transplants
Paolo Macchiarini, who made headlines for pioneering surgery, charged with aggravated assault over procedure An Italian doctor who made headlines for pioneering windpipe surgery has gone on trial in Sweden, charged with aggravated assault for performing the experimental procedure. Paolo Macchiarini won praise in 2011 after claiming to have performed the world's first synthetic trachea transplants
5h
News from the climate history of the Dead Sea
The lake level of the Dead Sea is currently dropping by more than one meter every year — mainly because of the heavy water consumption in the catchment area. However, very strong lake level drops due to climate changes are also known from earlier times. At the end of the last ice age, for example, the water level dropped by almost 250 meters within a few millennia.
5h
Preventing infection with an improved silver coating for medical devices
According to folklore, silver bullets kill werewolves, but in the real world, researchers want to harness this metal to fight another deadly foe: bacteria. Recently, scientists have tried to develop a silver coating for implantable medical devices to protect against infection, but they've had limited success. Scientists now describe a new, long-acting silver-ion releasing coating that, in rats, pr
5h
Microplastics give land pathogens a free ride to the ocean
Microplastics are a pathway for pathogens on land to reach the ocean, with likely consequences for human and wildlife health, according to a new study. The study is the first to connect microplastics in the ocean with land-based pathogens. It shows that microplastics can make it easier for disease-causing pathogens to concentrate in plastic-contaminated areas of the ocean. The pathogens in the st
6h
Race skews experimental Alzheimer's blood test results
Three experimental blood tests used to identify people in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease perform differently in Black people, according to a new study. A fourth blood test, the PrecivityAD test, is equally effective at detecting early Alzheimer's disease regardless of the race of the person being tested, the researchers say. Since cutoffs between normal and abnormal test scores usually a
6h
Could Future Skyscrapers Be Made of Wood? Two New Timber Towers Are Going Up
Construction is a major carbon dioxide emitter, with eight percent of global emissions traceable to the cement industry and another eight percent coming from steel production . Engineers and entrepreneurs are testing out new ways of building things—in terms of both methodology and materials—to make construction more eco-friendly, not to mention cut its costs and provide better spaces for people t
6h
What is aphasia? Researchers explain
The diagnosis of aphasia for actor Bruce Willis has put the condition in the spotlight. Here, researchers dispel some common myths. Until recently, many Americans were unfamiliar with aphasia. Roughly 2 million people in the United States have aphasia, in various forms. The language disorder , whether mild or severe, can be debilitating. Willis' recent diagnosis prompted his retirement from a dec
6h
The use of magnetic nanoparticles for cancer therapy
A joint research paper from Chemnitz University of Technology and Shivaji University (India) titled "APTES monolayer coverage on self-assembled magnetic nanospheres for controlled release of anticancer drug Nintedanib" was downloaded 4,458 times last year. This puts the paper among the top most accessed papers in the peer-reviewed journal Scientific Reports.
7h
Newer treatment for domestic abusers shows promise
New research compares two treatment programs for men convicted of domestic violence. The study finds that men convicted of domestic violence were charged with significantly fewer violent and nonviolent charges one year after completing a treatment program developed in Iowa compared to a model used in most other states. Survey data from victims still in contact with the men provided preliminary ev
8h
Mammans ursprung påverkar barnets födelsevikt
Det är stora skillnader i födelsevikt mellan de med svensk bakgrund och de med rötter från icke-västliga länder och skillnaderna ökar kraftigt för den tredje generationen. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
8h
Teori stärks: Jorden bildades av kosmiskt damm och grus
Förra året lanserade forskare i Lund en banbrytande teori om att jorden bildades av småstenar som under miljontals år sögs ihop till en himlakropp. Förklaringsmodellen stärks nu genom en ny studie, som visar att även kosmiskt damm spelade en avgörande roll för vår planets tillblivelse. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
8h
Samtal i hemmet viktigt stöd för äldre
Allt fler äldre lever med långvariga hälsoproblem och känner sig ensamma. Ny forskning visar att samtalsstöd kan bli ett startskott för att må bättre och hitta glädje i tillvaron. Inlägget dök först upp på forskning.se .
8h
Asteroid whisperer
Andrew Rivkin '91 has spent his career unpacking the mysteries of asteroids. "One of the things I really like about studying asteroids is how little we know about them," he says. "We can still get very basic and important information from telescopes—part of what drew me to the field was the prospect of spending time taking data under starry skies, and undergraduate research I did at the MIT Walla
9h
Uncovering the unexpected link between opioid use and memory loss
Memory contextualizes our emotions and deepens our identities. But illnesses such as dementia can wipe out decades of experiences without a trace. In her debut book, The Memory Thief , science journalist Lauren Aguirre '86 explores how opioids can contribute to this loss. The book chronicles an unusual form of amnesia initially identified in a group of fentanyl overdose survivors—and explores how
9h
Sounding the alarm on noise and health
It's a familiar suburban problem: landscapers with gas-powered tools generate a terrible din. For Jamie Banks, SM '79, who was running a business out of her house in 2010, the problem was no minor disruption: "I was surrounded by multifamily homes and commercial properties and subjected to loud landscape maintenance noise hours a day, several days a week." An environmentalist and health-care scie
9h
Lost and found
Grad students Tara Boroushaki (left) and Laura Dodds of the Media Lab's Signal Kinetics group calibrate a robotic system called RFusion that can find and retrieve objects, even if the items are hidden under a pile.
9h
What's next for MIT?
At MIT, momentum is a phenomenon we understand. It also defines us as a community. Earlier in the year, when I announced I would step down as president, one crucial responsibility was especially clear to me: sustaining the Institute's momentum through the transition to its next president. Fortunately, a group of more than 200 MIT students, staff, and faculty have given us a blueprint for doing ju
9h
Molecular monitor
Oncologists often turn to chemo​therapy, an aggressive treatment that often relies on trial and error. It can be difficult to tell how many cancer cells chemotherapy has destroyed—let alone why different tumors may respond to the same treatment in different ways. Hadley Sikes, the Esther and Harold E. Edgerton Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering at MIT and a principal investigator of the
9h
Topographies that talk
Dense, lush rainforests in the Amazon. Rivers and streams running through Appalachia's green hills and mountains. Rocky coasts of the Hawaiian islands battered by seas. Each of these landscapes poses mysteries that inspire Taylor Perron's research. What he sees as "whodunits" about the Earth itself require investigations into how past climate, erosion, and plate tectonics can explain the present
9h
These fast, cheap tests could help us coexist with covid
Early in the covid pandemic, testing for the virus was tied to central, certified laboratories that quickly became overwhelmed. During peak viral surges, results often arrived too late to give meaningful information about whether someone should quarantine or return to work. And in parts of the world without access to high-tech labs, people had no way to tell if their cough or fatigue was caused b
9h
Nanotech group up to nine retractions
A group of nanotechnology researchers in Iran is up to nine retractions after losing four papers in a go for problematic figures. The work was led by Abolfazl Akbarzadeh, a medicinal chemist at Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, who has spent time as a visiting professor at Boston University and UCLA. Commenters on PubPeer including … Continue reading
9h
Base edit your way to better crops
Nature, Published online: 27 April 2022; doi:10.1038/d41586-022-01117-z Plant scientists are turning to genome-editing techniques to precisely tailor the productivity and consumer appeal of important crops.
10h
Risk Aversion Is Ruining Science
An incrementalist approach to science may pay off in the short run, but big advances require daring acts of inquisitiveness. To give young researchers the confidence and support they need to make new discoveries, universities and grant institutions must do a better job of rewarding failure.
10h
Three-dimensional structure determination of protein complexes using matrix-landing mass spectrometry
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-29964-4 Mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful tool for the structural characterization of protein complexes. Here the authors offer a path for direct integration of MS and electron microscopy with a MS approach that enables grid deposition and structural preservation of gaseous protein complex ions.
11h
Keeping sight of copper in single-atom catalysts for electrochemical carbon dioxide reduction
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30027-x Cu-based single atom catalysts can convert CO2 into multi-carbon products, however, the assignment of active sites needs great caution. In this comment, the authors discuss the transient Cu cluster formation as active sites and emphasise the need for operando characterisation in mechanistic study.
11h
No general stability conditions for marine ice-sheet grounding lines in the presence of feedbacks
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-29892-3 Using theoretical, numerical and data analyses, this study finds that there are no general stability conditions for marine ice sheets if feedbacks caused by interactions of ice sheets with atmosphere, ocean and lithosphere are taken into account.
11h
L-tyrosine-bound ThiH structure reveals C–C bond break differences within radical SAM aromatic amino acid lyases
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-29980-4 ThiH is a radical SAM L-tyrosine lyase involved in the biosynthesis of the thiazole ring of vitamin B1. Here, the authors report the crystal structure of ThiH in complex with its L-tyrosine substrate, revealing an unexpected protonation state and tunneling effect that lowers the reaction energy barrier.
11h
A synergistic strategy to develop photostable and bright dyes with long Stokes shift for nanoscopy
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-29547-3 Super-resolution microscopy is a powerful tool for cellular studies but requires bright and stable fluorescent probes. Here, the authors report on a strategy to introduce quinoxaline motifs to conventional probes to make them brighter, more photostable, larger Stokes shift, and demonstrate the probes for biosen
11h
Superstretchable, yet stiff, fatigue-resistant ligament-like elastomers
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30021-3 Stiffness, toughness, and fatigue resistance are seemingly incompatible in materials design. Here the authors demonstrate a hierarchical crosslinking strategy using lithium ion oxygen interactions and PMMA nanoaggregates to enable energy dissipation in the network, leading to stiff yet tough polymer materials.
11h
The initial charge separation step in oxygenic photosynthesis
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-29983-1 The photosystem II reaction center (PSII-RC) is a model system to understand the initial steps of photosynthesis, but its excited state dynamics is difficult to disentangle with most spectroscopic methods. Here the authors perform a two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopic study of PSII-RC, providin
11h
Data-driven capacity estimation of commercial lithium-ion batteries from voltage relaxation
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-29837-w Accurate capacity estimation is crucial for lithium-ion batteries' reliable and safe operation. Here, the authors propose an approach exploiting features from the relaxation voltage curve for battery capacity estimation without requiring other previous cycling information.
11h
Russia Announces It Will Suspend Gas Shipments to Poland, Bulgaria
The Russian utility Gazprom has announced it will suspend natural gas shipments to Poland and Bulgaria beginning on April 27. On March 31, Putin signed a decree that required "unfriendly" EU nations to pay for natural gas in rubles rather than in euros or dollars. The response from the EU initially has been that member states should continue to pay for gas with euros or dollars as stipulated in e
11h
Climate action, as patriotism
This is a re-post from Yale Climate Connections by Dennis Laich, Larry Wilkerson, and Erik Edstrom The US military is about to find itself committed to yet another unwinnable mission costing trillions of dollars. No, we are not referring to the possibility of American escalation in Russia's brutal war against Ukraine: We are referring to the grim prospect of the American military's having to atte
15h
Investigating the upper bound of high-frequency electromagnetic waves on unshielded twisted copper pairs
Nature Communications, Published online: 26 April 2022; doi:10.1038/s41467-022-29631-8 This paper establishes a physical limit on the ability of the ubiquitous twisted pairs to support high speed internet. This limit due to radiation from the wire is theoretically explained as well as numerically simulated and experimentally measured.
20h
My prediction of the future
Me: "Hi I would like to apply for the hostess position." Applebees: "Great, you're gonna need a four year degree and six years of experience." Me: "Great why don't I just go kill myself." submitted by /u/Positive_Pangolin969 [link] [comments]
21h
Gastrointestinal issues linked with anxiety, social withdrawal for kids with autism
A new study found a 'bi-directional' relationship between gastrointestinal issues and internalized symptoms in children and adolescents with autism — meaning the symptoms seem to be impacting each other simultaneously. The findings could influence future precision medicine research aimed at developing personalized treatments to ease pain for individuals with autism experiencing gastrointestinal i
22h
When it comes to preventing Alzheimer's, women respond better than men
A study is the first to examine if sex significantly affects cognitive outcomes in people who follow individually-tailored, multi-domain clinical interventions. The study also determined whether change in risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD), along with blood markers of AD risk, also were affected by sex. Results showed that while care in an Alzheimer's Prev
22h
Death in darkness: A new type of cell death discovered in fly guts
A research group has discovered a completely unknown type of cell death that takes place in the guts of the common fruit fly. The new process, coined 'erebosis' by the researchers is thought to play a role in gut metabolism. The findings necessitate a revision of the conventional concept of cell death, and at the same time, overturn the previously established theory of tissue homeostasis in the gu
22h
Parental type 1 diabetes can affect children's cognitive development
Cognitive development in children could be affected regardless of which biological parent has type 1 diabetes, according to a new study. The research shows for the first time that having a parent with a chronic disease like type 1 diabetes may be associated with lower school performance rather than maternal high blood sugar during fetal development.
22h
'Shielding' strategies instead of lockdowns would have led to tens of thousands more deaths, new modelling shows
Shielding vulnerable people while allowing Covid-19 to run through the rest of the population had been proposed as an alternative strategy to lockdowns. Modelling by University of Bath scientists shows it would ultimately have failed as infections 'leak through' to the most vulnerable. Even in the most optimistic shielding scenario, critical care capacity in hospitals would have been massively exc
22h
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Leave a Reply